jm + advertising   18

Tim Berners-Lee calls for tighter regulation of online political advertising | Technology | The Guardian
“Targeted advertising allows a campaign to say completely different, possibly conflicting things to different groups. Is that democratic?” Berners-Lee said.
politics  trump  law  elections  polling  advertising  facebook  micro-advertising 
12 days ago by jm
Facebook, patient zero in fake news epidemic, proudly advertises ability to sway elections
The online social network is highlighting the Toomey campaign's ability to make ads that performed exceptionally well on Facebook even as it downplays the ability of the site to influence elections. In the days following the President Donald Trump's election, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg responded to the potential influence of fake news on the election as "a pretty crazy idea."

Taking Facebook at its word means holding two contradictory beliefs at once: that the site can sway an election on behalf of paying customers, but doesn't exert influence when it comes to the spread of misinformation by independent profiteers.
facebook  fake-news  elections  news  pat-toomey  republicans  advertising 
22 days ago by jm
What Vizio was doing behind the TV screen | Federal Trade Commission
This is awful:
Starting in 2014, Vizio made TVs that automatically tracked what consumers were watching and transmitted that data back to its servers. Vizio even retrofitted older models by installing its tracking software remotely. All of this, the FTC and AG allege, was done without clearly telling consumers or getting their consent.

What did Vizio know about what was going on in the privacy of consumers’ homes? On a second-by-second basis, Vizio collected a selection of pixels on the screen that it matched to a database of TV, movie, and commercial content. What’s more, Vizio identified viewing data from cable or broadband service providers, set-top boxes, streaming devices, DVD players, and over-the-air broadcasts. Add it all up and Vizio captured as many as 100 billion data points each day from millions of TVs.

Vizio then turned that mountain of data into cash by selling consumers’ viewing histories to advertisers and others. And let’s be clear: We’re not talking about summary information about national viewing trends. According to the complaint, Vizio got personal. The company provided consumers’ IP addresses to data aggregators, who then matched the address with an individual consumer or household. Vizio’s contracts with third parties prohibited the re-identification of consumers and households by name, but allowed a host of other personal details – for example, sex, age, income, marital status, household size, education, and home ownership.  And Vizio permitted these companies to track and target its consumers across devices.

That’s what Vizio was up to behind the screen, but what was the company telling consumers? Not much, according to the complaint.

Vizio put its tracking functionality behind a setting called “Smart Interactivity.”  But the FTC and New Jersey AG say that the generic way the company described that feature – for example, “enables program offers and suggestions” – didn’t give consumers the necessary heads-up to know that Vizio was tracking their TV’s every flicker. (Oh, and the “Smart Interactivity” feature didn’t even provide the promised “program offers and suggestions.”)
privacy  ftc  surveillance  tv  vizio  ads  advertising  smart-tvs 
6 weeks ago by jm
What Happens Next Will Amaze You
Maciej Ceglowski's latest talk, on ads, the web, Silicon Valley and government:
'I went to school with Bill. He's a nice guy. But making him immortal is not going to make life better for anyone in my city. It will just exacerbate the rent crisis.'
talks  slides  funny  ads  advertising  internet  web  privacy  surveillance  maciej  silicon-valley 
september 2015 by jm
Samsung's smart TVs are inserting unwanted ads into users' own movies
Amazingly shitty. Never buying a Samsung TV if this is what they think is acceptable
advertising  tv  samsung  smart-tvs  iot  horrible  ads 
february 2015 by jm
When data gets creepy: the secrets we don’t realise we’re giving away | Technology | The Guardian
Very good article around the privacy implications of derived and inferred aggregate metadata from Ben Goldacre.
We are entering an age – which we should welcome with open arms – when patients will finally have access to their own full medical records online. So suddenly we have a new problem. One day, you log in to your medical records, and there’s a new entry on your file: “Likely to die in the next year.” We spend a lot of time teaching medical students to be skilful around breaking bad news. A box ticked on your medical records is not empathic communication. Would we hide the box? Is that ethical? Or are “derived variables” such as these, on a medical record, something doctors should share like anything else?
advertising  ethics  privacy  security  law  data  aggregation  metadata  ben-goldacre 
december 2014 by jm
Vodafone UK, Verizon add mandatory device-tracking token on all web requests
'Verizon Wireless is monitoring users' mobile internet traffic, using a token slapped onto web requests, to facilitate targeted advertising even if a user has opted out.

The unique identifier token header (UIDH) was launched two years ago, and has caused an uproar in tech circles after it was re-discovered Thursday by Electronic Frontier Foundation staffer Jacob Hoffman-Andrews.

The Relevant Mobile Advertising program, under which the UIDH was used, allowed a restaurant to advertised to locals only or for retail websites to promote to previous visitors, according to Verizon Wireless.'
uidh  verizon  vodafone  privacy  tracking  http  cookies  advertising 
october 2014 by jm
waxpancake on Ello
The Ello founders are positioning it as an alternative to other social networks — they won't sell your data or show you ads. "You are not the product."

If they were independently-funded and run as some sort of co-op, bootstrapped until profitable, maybe that's plausible. Hard, but possible. But VCs don't give money out of goodwill, and taking VC funding — even seed funding — creates outside pressures that shape the inevitable direction of a company.
advertising  money  vc  ello  waxy  funding  series-a 
september 2014 by jm
CausalImpact: A new open-source package for estimating causal effects in time series
How can we measure the number of additional clicks or sales that an AdWords campaign generated? How can we estimate the impact of a new feature on app downloads? How do we compare the effectiveness of publicity across countries?

In principle, all of these questions can be answered through causal inference.

In practice, estimating a causal effect accurately is hard, especially when a randomised experiment is not available. One approach we've been developing at Google is based on Bayesian structural time-series models. We use these models to construct a synthetic control — what would have happened to our outcome metric in the absence of the intervention. This approach makes it possible to estimate the causal effect that can be attributed to the intervention, as well as its evolution over time.

We've been testing and applying structural time-series models for some time at Google. For example, we've used them to better understand the effectiveness of advertising campaigns and work out their return on investment. We've also applied the models to settings where a randomised experiment was available, to check how similar our effect estimates would have been without an experimental control.

Today, we're excited to announce the release of CausalImpact, an open-source R package that makes causal analyses simple and fast. With its release, all of our advertisers and users will be able to use the same powerful methods for estimating causal effects that we've been using ourselves.

Our main motivation behind creating the package has been to find a better way of measuring the impact of ad campaigns on outcomes. However, the CausalImpact package could be used for many other applications involving causal inference. Examples include problems found in economics, epidemiology, or the political and social sciences.
causal-inference  r  google  time-series  models  bayes  adwords  advertising  statistics  estimation  metrics 
september 2014 by jm
The Internet's Original Sin - The Atlantic
Ethan Zuckerberg: 'It's not too late to ditch the ad-based business model and build a better web.'
advertising  business  internet  ads  business-models  the-atlantic  ethan-zuckerberg  via:anildash  web  privacy  surveillance  google 
august 2014 by jm
Ucas sells access to student data for phone and drinks firms' marketing | Technology | The Guardian
The UK government's failure to deal with spam law in a consumer-friendly way escalates further:

UCAS, the university admissions service, is operating as a mass-mailer of direct marketing on behalf of Vodafone, O2, Microsoft, Red Bull and others, without even a way to later opt out from that spam without missing important admissions-related mail as a side effect.

'Teenagers using Ucas Progress must explicitly opt in to mailings from the organisation and advertisers, though the organisation's privacy statement says: "We do encourage you to tick the box as it helps us to help you."'

Their website also carries advertising, and the details of parents are sold on to advertisers as well.

Needless to say, the toothless ICO say they 'did not appear to breach marketing rules under the privacy and electronic communications regulations', as usual. Typical ICO fail.
ucas  advertising  privacy  data-protection  opt-in  opt-out  spam  direct-marketing  vodafone  o2  microsoft  red-bull  uk  universities  grim-meathook-future  ico 
march 2014 by jm
Let Me Explain Why Miley Cyrus’ VMA Performance Was Our Top Story This Morning | The Onion - America's Finest News Source
Absolute genius from The Onion.
Those of us watching on Google Analytics saw the number of homepage visits skyrocket the second we put up that salacious image of Miley Cyrus dancing half nude on the VMA stage. But here’s where it gets great: We don’t just do a top story on the VMA performance and call it a day. No, no. We also throw in a slideshow called “Evolution of Miley,” which, for those of you who don’t know, is just a way for you to mindlessly click through 13 more photos of Miley Cyrus. And if we get 500,000 of you to do that, well, 500,000 multiplied by 13 means we can get 6.5 million page views on that slideshow alone. Throw in another slideshow titled “6 ‘don’t miss’ VMA moments,” and it’s starting to look like a pretty goddamned good Monday, numbers-wise. Also, there are two videos -- one of the event and then some bullshit two-minute clip featuring our “entertainment experts” talking about the performance. Side note: Advertisers, along with you idiots, love videos. Another side note: The Miley Cyrus story was in the same top spot we used for our 9/11 coverage.
humor  journalism  cnn  miley-cyrus  vma  news  funny  advertising  ads 
august 2013 by jm
Branded to death | Features | Times Higher Education
The most abominable monster now threatening the intellectual health and the integrity of pure enquiry as well as conscientious teaching is the language of advertising, or better, the machinery of propaganda. Any number of critics from within university walls have warned the people at large and academics in particular of the way the helots of advertising and the state police of propaganda bloat and distort the language of thoughtful description, peddle with a confident air generalisations without substance, and serenely circulate orotund lies while ignoring their juniors’ rebuttals and abuse.


Relevant to this argument -- http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2013/07/the-webs-longest-nightmare-ends-eolas-patents-are-dead-on-appeal/ notes that 'the role of the University of California [was] one of the most perplexing twists in the Eolas saga. The university kept a low profile during the lead-up to trial; but once in Texas, Eolas' lawyers constantly reminded the jury they were asserting "these University of California patents." A lawyer from UC's patent-licensing division described support for Eolas at trial by simply saying that the university "stands by its licensees."'
branding  advertising  newspeak  universities  third-level  eolas  higher-education  education  research  university-of-california  ucb  patents  ip  swpats 
july 2013 by jm
My email to Irish Times Editor, sent 25th June
Daragh O'Brien noting 3 stories on 3 consecutive days voicing dangerously skewed misinformation about data protection and privacy law in Ireland:
There is a worrying pattern in these stories. The first two decry the Data Protection legislation (current and future) as being dangerous to children and damaging to the genealogy trade. The third sets up an industry “self-regulation” straw man and heralds it as progress (when it is decidedly not, serving only to further confuse consumers about their rights).

If I was a cynical person I would find it hard not to draw the conclusion that the Irish Times, the “paper of record” has been stooged by organisations who are resistant to the defence of and validation of fundamental rights to privacy as enshrined in the Data Protection Acts and EU Treaties, and in the embryonic Data Protection Regulation. That these stories emerge hot on the heels of the pendulum swing towards privacy concerns that the NSA/Prism revelations have triggered is, I must assume, a co-incidence. It cannot be the case that the Irish Times blindly publishes press releases without conducting cursory fact checking on the stories contained therein?

Three stories over three days is insufficient data to plot a definitive trend, but the emphasis is disconcerting. Is it the Irish Times’ editorial position that Data Protection legislation and the protection of fundamental rights is a bad thing and that industry self-regulation that operates in ignorance of legislation is the appropriate model for the future? It surely cannot be that press releases are regurgitated as balanced fact and news by the Irish Times without fact checking and verification? If I was to predict a “Data Protection killed my Puppy” type headline for tomorrow’s edition or another later this week would I be proved correct?
daragh-obrien  irish-times  iab  bias  advertising  newspapers  press-releases  journalism  data-protection  privacy  ireland 
june 2013 by jm
Welcome to Life: the singularity, ruined by lawyers - YouTube
'some portions of the experience, such as the sky, may be replaced by personalised advertising.' Uploading your consciousness in the age of copyright maximalism, as Nelson Minar put it (via Nelson)
via:nelson  grim-meathook-future  future  singularity  funny  copyright  advertising 
may 2012 by jm
Network Advertising Initiative: Opt-Out of Behavioural Advertising
'developed for the express purpose of allowing consumers to "opt out" of the behavioral advertising delivered by our member companies' -- opt out of the top 50 or so ad programs with a couple of clicks, via Jordan Sissel. great stuff
ads  advertising  browser  cookies  via:jordansissel  google  marketing  opt-out  privacy  tracking  web  behavioral  from delicious
june 2010 by jm
User complaints about photos in Facebook ads
'The platform API remains fundamentally broken and gives users no way to prevent applications from accessing their photos. Facebook would be best served by fixing this instead of dismissing users’ concern for privacy as “misleading rumors.”'
security  privacy  facebook  advertising  facebook-api  apis  opt-out 
august 2009 by jm

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