jm + addiction   4

Health-Records Company Pushed Opioids to Doctors in Secret Deal - Bloomberg
This is APPALLING. holy crap.
To doctors opening patients’ electronic records across the U.S., the alert would have looked innocuous enough.

A pop-up would appear, asking about a patient’s level of pain. Then, a drop-down menu would list treatments ranging from a referral to a pain specialist to a prescription for an opioid painkiller.

Click a button, and the program would create a treatment plan. From 2016 to spring 2019, the alert went off about 230 million times.

The tool existed thanks to a secret deal. Its maker, a software company called Practice Fusion, was paid by a major opioid manufacturer to design it in an effort to boost prescriptions for addictive pain pills -- even though overdose deaths had almost tripled during the prior 15 years, creating a public-health disaster. The software was used by tens of thousands of doctors’ offices.
healthcare  capitalism  opioids  health-records  pain  painkillers  addiction  practice-fusion 
9 weeks ago by jm
Expert reaction to World Health Organisation Q&A on e-cigarettes
It does seem that scaremongering about vaping is hurting efforts to get people off cigarettes:
“Practically all the factual statements in it are wrong. There is no evidence that vaping is ‘highly addictive’ – less than 1% of non-smokers become regular vapers.  Vaping does not lead young people to smoking – smoking among young people is at all time low.  There is no evidence that vaping increases risk of heart disease or that could have any effect at all on bystanders’ health. The US outbreak of lung injuries is due to contaminants in illegal marijuana cartridges and has nothing to do with nicotine vaping. There is clear evidence that e-cigarettes help smokers quit.

“The authors of this document should take responsibility for using blatant misinformation to prevent smokers from switching to a much less risky alternative.”
cigarettes  smoking  vaping  addiction  health  medicine  scaremongering  who  cancer 
10 weeks ago by jm
Bad data PR: how the NSPCC sunk to a new low in data churnalism
when the NSPCC sent out a press release saying that one in ten 12-13 year olds [in the UK] are worried that they are addicted to porn and 12% have participated in sexually explicit videos, dozens of journalists appear to have simply played along – despite there being no report and little explanation of where the figures came from. [....]

"It turns out the study was conducted by a “creative market research” [ie. pay-per-survey] group calledOnePoll. "Generate content and news angles with a OnePoll PR survey, and secure exposure for your brand,” reads the company’s blurb. "Our PR survey team can help draft questions, find news angles, design infographics, write and distribute your story." "The OnePoll survey included just 11 multiple-choice questions, which could be filled in online. Children were recruited via their parents, who were already signed up to OnePoll."


The NSPCC spends 25 million UKP per year on "child protection advice and awareness", so they have the money to do this right. Disappointing.
nspcc  bad-science  bad-data  methodology  surveys  porn  uk  kids  addiction  onepoll  pr  market-research 
april 2015 by jm
The Rational Choices of Crack Addicts - NYTimes.com
“The key factor is the environment, whether you’re talking about humans or rats,” Dr. Hart said. “The rats that keep pressing the lever for cocaine are the ones who are stressed out because they’ve been raised in solitary conditions and have no other options. But when you enrich their environment, and give them access to sweets and let them play with other rats, they stop pressing the lever.”
crack  drugs  policy  science  addiction  society 
september 2013 by jm

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