jm + 3d-printing   8

3D-Print Your Own 20-Million-Year-Old Fossils
When I get my hands on a 3-D printer, this will be high up my list of things to fabricate: a replica of a 20-million year old hominid skull.
With over 40 digitized fossils in their collection, you can explore 3D renders of fossils representing prehistoric animals, human ancestors, and even ancient tools. Captured using Autodesk software, an SLR camera, and often the original specimen (rather than a cast replica), these renderings bring us closer than most will ever get to holding ancient artifacts. And if you've got an additive manufacturing device at your disposal, you can even download Sketchfab plans to generate your own.
3d-printing  fossils  africa  history  hominids  replication  fabrication  sketchfab 
november 2013 by jm
3D-Printer Manufacturer Creates Software Filter To Prevent Firearm Printing
'[Create It REAL], which sells 3D printer component parts and software, recently announced that it has come up with a firearm component detection algorithm that will give 3D printers the option to block any gun parts. The software compares each component a user is trying to print with a database of potential firearms parts, and shuts down the modeling software if it senses the user is trying to make a gun.'
blocklists  filtering  guns  weapons  3d-printing  future  firearms 
july 2013 by jm
3-D Printer Brings Dexterity To Children With No Fingers
'A South African man who lost part of his hand in a home carpentry accident and an American puppeteer he met via YouTube have teamed up to make 3D-printable hands for children who have no fingers. So far, over 100 children have been given "robohands" for free, and a simplified version released just yesterday snaps together like LEGO bricks and costs just $5 in materials.'

This is incredible. Check out the video of Liam and his robohand in action: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kB53-D_N8Uc
3d-printing  3d  makers  robohands  hands  prosthetics  future  youtube  via:gruverja 
june 2013 by jm
Inside the Mcor IRIS
'The results are startlingly good. This 3D printed skull [see pic] looks almost real. This is the print quality everyone will be able to access when Mcor’s deal with Staples enables 3D printing from copy centers.'
mcor  staples  irish  tech  3d-printing  paper 
december 2012 by jm
Back-up Tut and other decoy spatial antiquities
I like this idea -- a complete facsimile of King Tut's burial chamber. Bldgblog comments:
<p>
“On the 90th anniversary of the discovery of King Tut’s tomb, an “authorized facsimile of the burial chamber” has been created, complete “with sarcophagus, sarcophagus lid and the missing fragment from the south wall.” The resulting duplicate, created with the help of high-res cameras and lasers, is “an exact facsimile of the burial chamber,” one that is now “being sent to Cairo by The Ministry of Tourism of Egypt.” [...]
</p><p>
'Interestingly, we read that this was "done under a licence to the University of Basel," which implies the very real possibility that unlicensed duplicate rooms might also someday be produced—that is, pirate interiors ripped or printed from the original data set, like building-scale "physibles," a kind of infringed architecture of object torrents taking shape as inhabitable rooms.' [...]
</p><p>
'In their book Anachronic Renaissance, for instance, Alexander Nagel and Christopher Wood write of what they call a long "chain of effective substitutions" or "effective surrogates for lost originals" that nonetheless reached the value and status of an icon in medieval Europe. "[O]ne might know that [these objects] were fabricated in the present or in the recent past," Nagel and Wood write, "but at the same time value them and use them as if they were very old things." They call this seeing in "substitutional terms".'
</p>
via:new-aesthetic  bldgblog  archaeology  facsimiles  copying  king-tut  egypt  history  3d-printing  physibles 
december 2012 by jm
The world’s first 3D-printed gun
I wasn't expecting to see this for a few years. The future is ahead of schedule!

A .22-caliber pistol, formed from a 3D-printed AR-15 (M16) lower receiver, and a normal, commercial upper. In other words, the main body of the gun is plastic, while the chamber — where the bullets are actually struck — is solid metal. [...]

While this pistol obviously wasn’t created from scratch using a 3D printer, the interesting thing is that the lower receiver — in a legal sense at least — is what actually constitutes a firearm. Without a lower receiver, the gun would not work; thus, the receiver is the actual legally-controlled part. In short, this means that people without gun licenses — or people who have had their licenses revoked — could print their own lower receiver and build a complete, off-the-books gun. What a chilling thought.
via:peakscale  guns  scary  future  grim-meathook-future  3d-printing  thingiverse  weapons 
july 2012 by jm
The Free Universal Construction Kit | F.A.T.
'a set of adapters for complete interoperability between 10 popular construction toys.' this is like a patent-infringement lawsuit magnet, surely. Will make an interesting test case...
3d  design  open-source  freedom  free  toys  lego  3d-printing  patents 
march 2012 by jm
Flickr: gruntzooki's stuff tagged with femur
Cory Doctorow got an MRI of his femur in prep for a surgical procedure -- and his wife used it to make a 3D-printed titanium keyring! awesome. I want to do this with MY SKULL
3d-printing  gadgets  cool  keyrings  tchotchkes  nifty  toys  gifts  mri  medical  bones  from delicious
march 2011 by jm

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