jm + 1916   8

the execution of James Connolly in cake form
As depicted in the Decobake 1916 commemorative cake competition. Amazing scenes of edible history
odd  funny  decobake  1916  history  ireland  republican  nationalism  james-connolly  executions  omgwtf  cake 
11 weeks ago by jm
Rebel Without A Call.
Purpose-built in 1898, the telephone exchange in Temple Bar was Dublin’s first automatic telephone exchange. Much like its newer neighbor, Internet House, it stood as a technological beacon shining through the luddite fog.

With this in mind the Irish Citizen Army targeted the Telephone Exchange in 1916 as one of the communication hubs for the island. While many of us grew up learning of a history of ‘blood sacrifice’ and the futility of the Easter Rising, the truth is that the attack was meticulously planned both militarily and logistically.

Sixty communication points around Dublin were hit in an effort to cut off all contact between British military forces within Ireland and to the ‘mainland’. The hope being that reserves and reinforcements would be delayed or misinformed.[...] Unfortunately for the rebels they could not take the Temple Bar exchange. A failure that would prove disastrous.
temple-bar  history  dublin  telephones  communications  1916 
may 2016 by jm
Inside the GPO in 1916: Desmond FitzGerald’s eyewitness account
'First published 50 years ago, this first-hand account by the father of the future taoiseach Garrett FitzGerald created a storm by claiming that the rebel leaders sympathetically discussed the likelihood of the Germans putting a prince of their own on the Irish throne.'

This is amazing -- the dispair and confusion is palpable. This is the first realistic-sounding account of what went on inside the GPO during the Easter Rising I've read, and the "German prince" gambit is pretty astonishing too.
easter-rising  1916  history  gpo  germany  ireland  desmond-fitzgerald  royalty 
march 2016 by jm
A shot that rang round the world
The international impact of the Easter Rising has rarely been acknowledged. This rebellion did not only rattle British rule in Ireland — it inspired radical movements in Britain itself and across the globe, and it shook colonial rulers and states worldwide.
history  easter-rising  1916  ireland  revolution  colonialism 
march 2016 by jm
Before the Split
Good post on Dublin City Council's atrociously revisionist 1916-commemoration banner, celebrating
Henry Grattan, Daniel O'Connell, Charles Stewart Parnell and John Redmond:
The banner is not showing parliamentary nationalists who might be included in a history of 1916 (Redmond might have been joined by John Dillon and Tom Kettle, for instance), but displaying the parliamentarian tradition in Irish political history. The people chosen all worked for change via political means, whether obtaining an independent Irish parliament from 1782-1801 (Grattan), working for Catholic Emancipation (Grattan and O’Connell), land reform (Parnell), or trying to repeal the Act of Union and obtain Home Rule (O’Connell, Parnell, Redmond). All were MPs in Westminster at some point. None openly espoused physical force. None aimed at establishing an independent Irish Republic. Putting the history of parliamentarianism on a banner labelled 1916 suggests that 1916 was in the parliamentarian tradition. That suggestion is very far from the truth.
parliamentarianism  1916  history  revisionism  dcc  dublin  politics 
march 2016 by jm
David Malone planning a commemoration of Dublin Mean Time next year
Dublin had its own time zone, 25 minutes off what would become GMT, until 1916
1916  dublin  rising  time  dublin-mean-time  dmt  gmt  perfidious-albion  dunsink 
october 2014 by jm
"The cricket bat that died for Ireland"
The bat had the misfortune of being on display in the shop front of Elvery’s store on O’Connell Street, then Sackville Street, during the Easter Rising. J.W. Elvery & Co. was Ireland’s oldest sports store, specialising in sporting goods and waterproofed wear, with branches in Dublin, Cork (Patrick Street) and London (Conduit Street). [...] Its location, about one block from the GPO, meant it was in the middle of the cross-fire and general destruction of the main street.
ireland  cricket  1916  history  easter-rising  crossfire  sports  elverys 
september 2013 by jm
Is it any wonder the country is the way it is?
Auto-generated complaints about the dreadful state of Ireland, for the pessimistic begrudger on the go. 'We might as well face it - the cast of Fade Street, without any legal grounds, never gave a shit about people in the midlands.'
lol  funny  begrudgery  ireland  satire  via:broadsheet  was-is-for-this  1916 
march 2012 by jm

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