5121
The BARR-C:2018 Embedded C Coding Standard
'Barr Group's Embedded C Coding Standard was developed to minimize bugs in firmware by focusing on practical rules that keep bugs out--while also improving the maintainability and portability of embedded software. The coding standard details a set of guiding principles as well as specific naming conventions and other rules for the use of data types, functions, preprocessor macros, variables and much more. Individual rules that have been demonstrated to reduce or eliminate certain types of bugs are highlighted. In this latest version, BARR-C:2018, the stylistic coding rules have been fully harmonized with MISRA C: 2012, while helping embedded system designers reduce defects in firmware written in C and C++.'
embedded  c  coding  standards  style-guides  misra  c++ 
yesterday
Nosferatu is only viewable today due to piracy
'In 1922 a German court ordered all prints and negatives of Nosferatu destroyed following a copyright dispute with the widow of Bram Stoker. The film only exists today because of piracy. One copy survived and somehow found it's way to America, where Dracula was already in the public domain. That's it. That's the only reason you've ever seen the granddaddy of all horror movies.'
dracula  bram-stoker  nosferatu  piracy  licensing  movies  history 
2 days ago
Hacker Finds Hidden 'God Mode' on Old VIA C3 x86 CPUs
Domas discovered the backdoor, which exists on VIA C3 Nehemiah chips made in 2003, by combing through filed patents. He found one — US8341419 — that mentioned jumping from ring 3 to ring 0 and protecting the machine from exploits of model-specific registers (MSRs), manufacturer-created commands that are often limited to certain chipsets.

Domas followed the "trail of breadcrumbs," as he put it, from one patent to another and figured out that certain VIA chipsets were covered by the patents. Then he collected many old VIA C3 machines and spent weeks fuzzing code.

He even built a testing rig consisting of seven Nehemiah-based thin clients hooked up to a power relay that would power-cycle the machines every couple of minutes, because his fuzzing attempts would usually crash the systems. After three weeks, he had 15 GB of log data — and the instructions to flip on the backdoor in the hidden RISC chip.

(via Nelson)
cpu  via  x86  fuzzing  security  nehemiah  via:nelson 
5 days ago
Anatomy of a tabloid Fortnite front page story
Interesting writeup of how the UK tabloids concoct their scare stories, rustling up "victims" and paying them and their agents fees of thousands of pounds
fortnite  pokemon-go  gaming  tabloids  uk  newspapers  truth  the-sun  games 
6 days ago
People Think This Whole QAnon Conspiracy Theory Is A Prank On Trump Supporters
This, if true, is the most gloriously Discordian thing ever.
"Let us take for granted, for a while, that QAnon started as a prank in order to trigger right-wing weirdos and have a laugh at them. There's no doubt it has long become something very different. At a certain level it still sounds like a prank. But who's pulling it on whom?" they [Roberto Bui, Giovanni Cattabriga, and Federico Guglielmi] said.
q  conspiracy  politics  trump  qanon  luther-blissett  discordianism  wu-ming  funny  crazy 
7 days ago
ncw/rclone
"rsync for cloud storage" - Google Drive, Amazon Drive, S3, Dropbox, Backblaze B2, One Drive, Swift, Hubic, Cloudfiles, Google Cloud Storage, Yandex Files
backup  github  sync  cloud  s3  storage  rsync  rclone  google  aws  dropbox  backblaze  yandex  onedrive 
7 days ago
Fonez - Pre-owned Phones
Galway-based refurb phone retailer, recommended by co-worker Ciaran where he picked up his Pixel
phones  ireland  shopping  mobile 
7 days ago
How I gained commit access to Homebrew in 30 minutes
If I were a malicious actor, I could have made a small, likely unnoticed change to the openssl formulae, placing a backdoor on any machine that installed it.

If I can gain access to commit in 30 minutes, what could a nation state with dedicated resources achieve against a team of 17 volunteers? How many private company networks could be accessed? How many of these could be used to escalate to large scale data breaches? What other package management systems have similar weaknesses?

This is my growing concern, and it’s been proven time and time again that package managers, and credential leaks, are a weak point in the security of the internet, and that supply chain attacks are a real and persistent threat. This is not a weakness in Homebrew, but rather a systemic problem in the industry, and one where we need more security research.
homebrew  github  security  jenkins  credentials  scary 
7 days ago
Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team | Fast, Powerful, and Practical: New Technology for Aerial Imagery in Disaster Response
Aerial imagery can play an important role in disaster response operations, enabling response teams to identify and prioritize hardest-hit areas, conduct damage assessments, and plan response activities. Existing tools make this relatively easy in connected environments; users can browse high-resolution satellite imagery catalogs and download the relevant imagery, and can process drone imagery using online tools. Current solutions don’t work well in disconnected environments, however. Even offline tools lack the storage space and processing power to be effective for addressing large areas.

This blog post shows how rugged, portable Amazon Web Services (AWS) servers can be turned into a kit that’s mega-powerful, deployable, and purpose-built for post-disaster imagery operations. This can help humanitarians and government agencies to more accurately and efficiently conduct damage assessments and identify hardest-hit areas, potentially making a real difference in the aftermath of a natural disaster.
snowball  aws  humanitarian  emergency-response  osm  openstreetmap  mapping  aid  disasters 
4 weeks ago
"Haskell is very simple"
niftierideology on twitter:
Haskell is very simple. Everything is composed of Functads which are themselves a Tormund of Gurmoids, usually defined over the Devons. All you have to do is stick one Devon inside a Tormund and it yields Reverse Functads (Actually Functoids) you use to generate Unbound Gurmoids.
haskell  functors  functads  tormund-of-gurmoids  jargon  funny  satire  coding  languages 
4 weeks ago
15 Key Takeaways from the Serverless Talk at AWS Startup Day
Best current practices for AWS Lambda usage. (still pretty messy/hacky/Rube-Goldberg-y from the looks of it tbh)
aws  lambda  serverless  ops  hacks  amazon 
4 weeks ago
Labour HQ used Facebook ads to deceive Jeremy Corbyn during election campaign | News | The Times
Campaign chiefs at Labour HQ hoodwinked their own leader because they disapproved of some of Corbyn’s left-wing messages. They convinced him they were following his campaign plans by spending just £5,000 on adverts solely designed to be seen by Corbyn, his aides and their favourite journalists, while pouring far more money into adverts with a different message for ordinary voters.
advertising  politics  crazy  facebook  jeremy-corbyn  microtargeting  ads  uk  labour-party 
4 weeks ago
Second Wind CPAP
Second-hand CPAP machines -- decent prices here, recommended by @Searcher on FP
cpap  second-hand  appliances 
4 weeks ago
How my research on DNA ancestry tests became "fake news"
I was not surprised to see our research twisted by fake news and satire websites. Conspiracy theories are meant to be just as entertaining as they are convincing. They also provide a way out of confronting reality and reckoning with facts that don’t confirm preexisting worldviews. For white nationalists and racists, if test results showed traces of African American or Jewish ancestry, either the tests did not work, or the results were planted by some ideologically motivated scientists, or the tests were part of a global war against whites. With conspiracy theories, debunking is rarely useful because the individual is often searching for an interpretation that confirms their prior beliefs.

As such, DNA conspiracy theories allow white supremacists to plan new escape routes for the traps they laid for themselves long ago. With DNA testing, the one-drop rule—a belief made law in the 1900s that one drop of African blood makes one Black—becomes transmuted genealogically into the one-percent rule, according to which to remain racially white, an individual’s results must show no sign of African or Jewish origin. Through the genealogical lens, American white nationalists consider “one hundred percent European” as good results, which in turn substantiates their “birth right” to the United States as a marker of heredity and conquest.
racism  science  fake-news  conspiracy  genealogy  dna  dna-testing 
4 weeks ago
Facebook's new rules for moderators on dealing with far-right pages are awful
This is a total shitshow. Facebook needs to sort this out, it is not remotely desirable.
Facebook: "We allow to call for the creation of white ethno-states."
In other words, Facebook is officially ok with people calling for ethnic cleansing and genocide.

The time for Facebook to hire/consult with experts re: the far-right was about three or four years ago. That they now *agree* with the rationale of Alt-Reich rebranding in 2018 shows that this company is simply not fit for purpose.

[...] t's quite something that Facebook's advice to their moderators literally mirrors Nazi propaganda: "Being interested in and caring for one’s kind is not to disparage foreign peoples and races"- Nazi party pamphlet "Why the Aryan Law?" (1934)
facebook  awful  moderation  far-right  nazis  fascism  ethnic-cleansing  genocide  social-media  fail 
4 weeks ago
Evolution of Application Data Caching : From RAM to SSD
Memcached provides an external storage shim called extstore, that supports storing of data on SSD (I2) and NVMe (I3). extstore is efficient in terms of cost & storage device utilization without compromising the speed and throughput. All the metadata (key & other metadata) is stored in RAM whereas the actual data is stored on flash.
memcached  netflix  services  storage  memory  ssd  nvme  extstore  caching 
4 weeks ago
Summer Fruit Shrub Recipe - NYT Cooking
as recommended by Nelson -- I've been meaning to make one
shrubs  drinks  vinegar  recipes  to-make  fruit 
4 weeks ago
The problems with DynamoDB Auto Scaling and how it might be improved
'Based on these observations, we hypothesize that you can make two modifications to the system to improve its effectiveness:

trigger scaling up after 1 threshold breach instead of 5, which is in-line with the mantra of “scale up early, scale down slowly”;
trigger scaling activity based on actual request count instead of consumed capacity units, and calculate the new provisioned capacity units using actual request count as well.

As part of this experiment, we also prototyped these changes (by hijacking the CloudWatch alarms) to demonstrate their improvement.'
dynamodb  autoscaling  ops  scalability  aws  scaling  capacity 
5 weeks ago
open source ham radio hardware in the Thai cave rescue
the Heyphone, a voice radio designed by UK radio ham, John Hey
ham-radio  heyphone  voice  radios  cave  rescue  thailand 
5 weeks ago
Flight Rights
'This website has been designed to help you, the passenger, understand your rights and entitlements in the event that your air travel plans are disrupted.' from the Commission for Aviation Regulation. See also thread from Sinead Ryan at https://twitter.com/sinead_ryan/status/1016628694427885568
consumer  aviation  flights  ryanair  aer-lingus  ireland  rights  flying 
5 weeks ago
Centrifuge: a reliable system for delivering billions of events per day
Nice scale-up service to solve the multi-tenant, multi-target queueing problem with good customer isolation from Segment
queueing  architecture  dead-letter-queue  kafka  segment  multi-tenant  isolation 
5 weeks ago
Goodbye Microservices: From 100s of problem children to 1 superstar · Segment Blog
Super-happy we resisted many of the microservices gospels and dodged this bullet
architecture  microservices  monolith  git  monorepo 
5 weeks ago
Google Cloud Platform Blog: Introducing Jib
'build Java Docker images better':
Jib takes advantage of layering in Docker images and integrates with your build system to optimize Java container image builds in the following ways:

Simple - Jib is implemented in Java and runs as part of your Maven or Gradle build. You do not need to maintain a Dockerfile, run a Docker daemon, or even worry about creating a fat JAR with all its dependencies. Since Jib tightly integrates with your Java build, it has access to all the necessary information to package your application. Any variations in your Java build are automatically picked up during subsequent container builds.

Fast - Jib takes advantage of image layering and registry caching to achieve fast, incremental builds. It reads your build config, organizes your application into distinct layers (dependencies, resources, classes) and only rebuilds and pushes the layers that have changed. When iterating quickly on a project, Jib can save valuable time on each build by only pushing your changed layers to the registry instead of your whole application.

Reproducible - Jib supports building container images declaratively from your Maven and Gradle build metadata, and as such can be configured to create reproducible build images as long as your inputs remain the same.
build  google  java  docker  maven  gradle  coding  builds  jars  fat-jars  packaging 
5 weeks ago
Dublin Cargo Bike Rental
EUR40 per day from the Dutch Bike Shop in Belfield
dutch-bikes  bakfiets  cargo-bikes  cycling  bikes  rental  dublin 
5 weeks ago
Hospitality boom: What’s happening with Dublin’s bars and restaurants?
Good article with an insider look at what's going on with venues, bars and restaurants in Dublin:
They call it “meanwhile use” in property developer shorthand. It’s the market or cafe that slots itself temporarily into a building earmarked for redevelopment. Rent is low and terms are flexible. Cheap space is hewn out of a lull. Cool creative things happen. You don’t need the backing of a private equity fund or a multinational developer to set up a cafe or restaurant. No one is asking for a six-figure sum just to hand you the keys. [...]

That era has gone. Landlords are back in the driving seat. Between the canals the key money, a once-off upfront payment just to get the keys, is mind-boggling. The pace of new openings seems relentless and “not particularly sustainable”, as one industry insider puts it: how many burritos do you have to sell when you’ve paid €500,000 upfront, before the costs of fitting it out, staffing it and paying the rent?
dublin  hospitality  bars  restaurants  pubs  nightlife  landlords  property  boom  key-money 
5 weeks ago
Scarr
S3 + Cloudfront + ACM + Route53, automated.
There are a bunch of free/cheap options for hosting static sites (just html/css/js) out there: github pages, netlify, firebase hosting - but when I want to build a bulletproof static site "for real", my go-to toolset is S3 for hosting with Cloudfront caching in front of it. I figured that after a few times doing this, I'd automate it. There are a few pre-existing tools for parts of this, but none I could find that did the whole thing from registration through uploading and Cloudfront invalidation.
cli  acm  aws  s3  cloudfront  route53  static-sites  web  html  hosting 
5 weeks ago
Basho investor to pay up $20m in damages for campaign that put biz on 'greased slide to failure' • The Register
This is disappointing. Basho was very promising.

An investment fund and its manager have been ordered to pay up $20.3m after "misinformation, threats and combative behaviour" helped put NoSQL database biz Basho on a "greased slide to failure".

As reported by The Register, the once-promising biz, which developed the Riak distributed database, faded away last year amid severe criticisms of the way its major investor, Georgetown Capital Partners, operated.

These centred around the control the investment firm and boss Chester Davenport gained over Basho, and how that power was used to block other funders and push out dissenting voices, with the hope of selling the company off fast.
basho  distcomp  riak  vc  software  silicon-valley 
5 weeks ago
What I’ve learned from nearly three years of enterprise Wi-Fi at home
I am happy to note that I've grown out of this kind of pain (I think)....
Do you just want better Wi-Fi in every room? Consider buying a Plume or Amplifi or other similar plug-n-go mesh system. On the other hand, are you a technically proficient network kind of person who wants to build an enterprise-lite configuration at home? Do you dream of VLANs and port profiles and lovingly tweaked firewall rules? Does the idea of crawling around in your attic to ceiling-mount some access points sound like a fun way to kill a weekend? Is your office just too quiet for your liking? Buy some Ubiquiti Unifi gear and enter network nerd nirvana.
networking  wifi  wireless  ubiquiti  sdn  vlans  home  ops 
5 weeks ago
Wifi Design Tips
PDF with a few good tips on wifi layout, AP placement etc. Also recommended: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Adep0SeOjAE&feature=youtu.be&t=17m22s (via irldexter)
via:irldexter  wifi  802.11  wireless  ops  networking 
5 weeks ago
Nginx tuning tips: TLS/SSL HTTPS – Improved TTFB/latency
Must do these soon on jmason.org / taint.org et al.
nginx  http  https  http2  ops  tls  security  linux 
6 weeks ago
Sundial Generator
Glowforge laser-cut a sundial, customised for your very own corner of planet Earth
sundial  sun  laser-cutting  cool  making  makers  time 
6 weeks ago
Dublin Cycling Campaign traffic survey finds twice as many cyclists as car passengers during rush hour
There are twice as many people cycling as there are people in cars on the quays in Dublin at the morning rush hour, a video survey by the Dublin Cycling Campaign has found.


This doesn't surprise me at all -- I would be in that number too, except I now avoid the quays as they are too dangerous to cycle on due to the heavy traffic! A segregated cycle route is greatly needed.
cycling  dublin  safety  cars  driving  dublin-cycling-campaign  liffey-cycle-route 
6 weeks ago
"Stylish" browser extension steals all your internet history | Robert Heaton
'Stylish, the popular CSS userstyle browser extension [collects] complete browser history, including sites scraped from Google results. Instant uninstall.' (via Andy Baio)
privacy  browser  extensions  stylish  css  history  data-protection 
6 weeks ago
airlift/jvmkill
a simple JVMTI agent that forcibly terminates the JVM when it is unable to allocate memory or create a thread. This is important for reliability purposes: an OutOfMemoryError will often leave the JVM in an inconsistent state. Terminating the JVM will allow it to be restarted by an external process manager.


This is apparently still useful despite the existence of '-XX:ExitOnOutOfMemoryError' as of java 8, since that may somehow still fail occasionally.
oom  java  reliability  uptime  memory  ops 
6 weeks ago
Large breweries ‘pay publicans not to stock smaller companies’ beer, cider’
Good on Alan Kelly TD for raising the issue -- it is clearly happening and is clearly anti-competitive market manipulation by the big brewers.
He said a pub in Cork he was in recently had 21 taps of which 19 were from one brewing company and that smaller breweries tried to get some of that business. Mr Kelly claimed similar practices were occurring in pubs across all counties and that the statutory body that deals with anti-competitive practices, the Competition and Consumer Protection Commission (CCPC), had received a number of complaints but did not have the resources to deal with the issue.

However, Minister of State Pat Breen said “after a robust examination” the CCPC found it did not have grounds to suspect a breach of the law.

Mr Kelly said that “the dogs in the street know what is happening here” and that the Minister’s response was insulting to the industry. He said the CCPC would need large resources to investigate the issue and “large amounts of cash and resources are being used, and these practices are happening in large pubs in all cities and towns in Ireland”.
ireland  brewing  beer  pubs  ccpc  anti-competitive  business  alan-kelly  dail 
6 weeks ago
Cory Doctorow: Zuck’s Empire of Oily Rags
the sophisticated targeting systems available through Facebook, Google, Twitter, and other Big Tech ad platforms made it easy to find the racist, xenophobic, fearful, angry people who wanted to believe that foreigners were destroying their country while being bankrolled by George Soros.

Remember that elections are generally knife-edge affairs, even for politicians who’ve held their seats for decades with slim margins: 60% of the vote is an excellent win. Remember, too, that the winner in most races is “none of the above,” with huge numbers of voters sitting out the election. If even a small number of these non-voters can be motivated to show up at the polls, safe seats can be made contestable. In a tight race, having a cheap way to reach all the latent Klansmen in a district and quietly inform them that Donald J. Trump is their man is a game-changer.

Cambridge Analytica are like stage mentalists: they’re doing something labor-intensive and pretending that it’s something supernatural. A stage mentalist will train for years to learn to quickly memorize a deck of cards and then claim that they can name your card thanks to their psychic powers. You never see the unglamorous, unimpressive memorization practice. Cambridge Analytica uses Facebook to find racist jerks and tell them to vote for Trump and then they claim that they’ve discovered a mystical way to get otherwise sensible people to vote for maniacs.
facebook  politics  surveillance  cory-doctorow  google  twitter  advertising  elections  cambridge-analytica  racism  nazis 
6 weeks ago
The iconic _Fountain_ (1917) was not created by Marcel Duchamp
In 1982 a letter written by Duchamp came to light. Dated 11 April 1917, it was written just a few days after that fateful exhibit. It contains one sentence that should have sent shockwaves through the world of modern art: it reveals the true creator behind Fountain – but it was not Duchamp. Instead he wrote that a female friend using a male alias had sent it in for the New York exhibition. Suddenly a few other things began to make sense. Over time Duchamp had told two different stories of how he had created Fountain, but both turned out to be untrue. An art historian who knew Duchamp admitted that he had never asked him about Fountain, he had published a standard-work on Fountain nevertheless. The place from where Fountain was sent raised more questions. That place was Philadelphia, but Duchamp had been living in New York.

Who was living in Philadelphia? Who was this ‘female friend’ that had sent the urinal using a pseudonym that Duchamp mentions? That woman was, as Duchamp wrote, the future. Art history knows her as Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. She was a brilliant pioneering New York dada artist, and Duchamp knew her well. This glaring truth has been known for some time in the art world, but each time it has to be acknowledged, it is met with indifference and silence.

This article addresses the true authorship of Fountain from the perspective of the latest evidence, collected by several experts. The opinions they voice offer their latest insights.  Their accumulation of evidence strengthens the case to its final conclusion. To attribute Fountain to a woman and not a man has obvious, far-reaching consequences: the history of modern art has to be rewritten. Modern art did not start with a patriarch, but with a matriarch. What power structure in the world of modern art prohibits this truth to become more widely known and generally accepted? Ultimately this is one of the larger questions looming behind the authorship of Fountain. It sheds light on the place and role of the female artist in the world of modern art.
elsa-von-freytag-loringhoven  marcel-duchamp  modern-art  history  art-history  scandals  credit  art  fountain  women 
6 weeks ago
‘Nothing to worry about. The water is fine’: how Flint poisoned its people | News | The Guardian
The anxiety reverberated all the way to the state capital, Lansing, where Governor Rick Snyder was weeks away from winning reelection. His chief legal counsel, Michael Gadola, wrote in an email: “To anyone who grew up in Flint as I did, the notion that I would be getting my drinking water from the Flint River is downright scary. Too bad the [emergency manager] didn’t ask me what I thought, though I’m sure he heard it from plenty of others. My mom is a city resident. Nice to know she’s drinking water with elevated chlorine levels and fecal coliform … They should try to get back on the Detroit system as a stopgap ASAP before this thing gets too far out of control.”
flint  michigan  bureaucracy  water  poisoning  corrosion  poison  us-politics  environment  taxes 
6 weeks ago
Dormio: Interfacing with Dreams to Augment Human Creativity — MIT Media Lab
Using Dormio you fall asleep as you normally would, but the transition into stage 2 sleep is tracked and interrupted. This suspends you in a semi-lucid state where microdreams are inceptable, allowing direction of your dreams. 
dreaming  dreams  science  neuroscience  brain  sleep  lucid-dreaming  via:fp  dormio 
6 weeks ago
Template GDPR video request for CCTV images
in this case, to the ICBR anti-abortion protesters wearing bodycams outside Dublin maternity hospitals
hospitals  bodycams  icbr  abortion  gdpr  privacy  sar  cctv 
7 weeks ago
Antonio Regalado Twitter thread on genetic genealogy, DNA privacy, and total DNA de-anonymity
I used to know some technicians in the NYC Medical Examiner's lab. They had all been DNA typed (to detect accidental contamination). So, their little society was a picture of what is to come, of total DNA transparency.

They would do stuff like find out who stuck gum under the table. Also, who was peeing on the toilet seat in the bathroom.

So There’s a second technology at play: environmental DNA sampling. Once police get a name they tail the suspect and try to get some DNA he leaves behind. To make the match to crime scene sample. Police have gotten DNA from:
- a car door handle
- a straw
- a paper napkin

Imagine storm troopers of a repressive regime descending on a meeting place of the resistance. Just swab the whole place and find out who was there from DNA left behind.
Technically, total DNA de-anonymity is possible. Far as I know there’s no law, no protection, against identifying you from your DNA.

In crime cases, [this is] being done by “amateur” using a database (GEDmatch) that itself is highly informal.
privacy  dna  genetics  genetic-genealogy  gedmatch  law  transparency 
7 weeks ago
ICE's Risk Classification Assessment turned into a digital rubber stamp
If this report is correct, this "statistics-based" risk classification tool is just a cruel joke:
To conform to Trump’s policies, Reuters has learned, ICE modified a tool officers have been using since 2013 when deciding whether an immigrant should be detained or released on bond. The computer-based Risk Classification Assessment uses statistics to determine an immigrant’s flight risk and danger to society.
Previously, the tool automatically recommended either “detain” or “release.” Last year, ICE spokesman Bourke said, the agency removed the “release” recommendation.

More: https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/evk3kw/ice-modified-its-risk-assessment-software-so-it-automatically-recommends-detention
immigration  statistics  machine-learning  rubber-stamping  fake-algorithms  whitewashing  ice  us-politics 
7 weeks ago
Yelp, The Red Hen, And How All Tech Platforms Are Now Pawns In The Culture War
Though the brigading of review sites and doxxing behavior isn’t exactly new, the speed and coordination is; one consequence of a never-ending information war is that everyone is already well versed in their specific roles. And across the internet, it appears that technology platforms, both big and small, must grapple with the reality that they are now powerful instruments in an increasingly toxic political and cultural battle. After years attempting to dodge notions of bias at all costs, Silicon Valley’s tech platforms are up against a painful reality: They need to expect and prepare for the armies of the culture war and all the uncomfortable policing that inevitably follows.

Policing and intervening isn’t just politically tricky for the platforms, it’s also a tacit admission that Big Tech’s utopian ideologies are deeply flawed in practice. Connecting everyone and everything in an instantly accessible way can have terrible consequences that the tech industry still doesn’t seem to be on top of. Silicon Valley frequently demos a future of seamless integration. It’s a future where cross-referencing your calendar with Yelp, Waze, and Uber creates a service that’s greater than the sum of its parts. It’s an appealing vision, but it is increasingly co-opted by its darker counterpart, in which major technology platforms are daisy-chained together to manipulate, abuse, and harass.
culture-war  technology  silicon-valley  yelp  reviews  red-hen  dystopia  spam  doxxing  brigading  politics 
7 weeks ago
Facial recognition software is not ready for use by law enforcement | TechCrunch
This is a pretty amazing op-ed from the CEO of a facial recognition software development company:

Facial recognition technologies, used in the identification of suspects, negatively affects people of color. To deny this fact would be a lie. And clearly, facial recognition-powered government surveillance is an extraordinary invasion of the privacy of all citizens — and a slippery slope to losing control of our identities altogether. There’s really no “nice” way to acknowledge these things.

I’ve been pretty clear about the potential dangers associated with current racial biases in face recognition, and open in my opposition to the use of the technology in law enforcement. As the black chief executive of a software company developing facial recognition services, I have a personal connection to the technology, both culturally and socially.

Having the privilege of a comprehensive understanding of how the software works gives me a unique perspective that has shaped my positions about its uses. As a result, I (and my company) have come to believe that the use of commercial facial recognition in law enforcement or in government surveillance of any kind is wrong — and that it opens the door for gross misconduct by the morally corrupt.
techcrunch  facial-recognition  computer-vision  machine-learning  racism  algorithms  america 
7 weeks ago
Here’s a list of organizations that are mobilizing to help separated immigrant children | The Texas Tribune
We’ve compiled a list of organizations that are mobilizing to try and help children that have been separated from their parents at the Texas-Mexico border.
texas  children  immigration  family-separations  us-politics  usa  charity 
8 weeks ago
10-hour Microsoft Azure outage in Europe
Service availability issue in North Europe

Summary of impact: From 17:44 on 19 Jun 2018 to 04:30 UTC on 20 Jun 2018 customers using Azure services in North Europe may have experienced connection failures when attempting to access resources hosted in the region. Customers leveraging a subset of Azure services may have experienced residual impact for a sustained period post-mitigation of the underlying issue. We are communicating with these customers directly in their Management Portal.

Preliminary root cause: Engineers identified that an underlying temperature issue in one of the datacenters in the region triggered an infrastructure alert, which in turn caused a structured shutdown of a subset of Storage and Network devices in this location to ensure hardware and data integrity.

Mitigation: Engineers addressed the temperature issue, and performed a structured recovery of the affected devices and the affected downstream services.


The specific services were: 'Virtual Machines, Storage, SQL Database, Key Vault, App Service, Site Recovery, Automation, Service Bus, Event Hubs, Data Factory, Backup, API management, Log Analytics, Application Insight, Azure Batch Azure Search, Redis Cache, Media Services, IoT Hub, Stream Analytics, Power BI, Azure Monitor, Azure Cosmo DB or Logic Apps in North Europe'. Holy cow
microsoft  outages  fail  azure  post-mortems  cooling-systems  datacenters 
8 weeks ago
Visa admits 5m payments failed over a broken switch
“We operate two redundant data centres in the UK, meaning that either one can independently handle 100% of the transactions for Visa in Europe. In normal circumstances, the systems are synchronised and either centre can take over from the other immediately … in this instance, a component with a switch in our primary data centre suffered a very rare partial failure which prevented the backup switch from activating.”
visa  outages  post-mortems  fail  europe  dcs 
8 weeks ago
In America, Naturalized Citizens No Longer Have an Assumption of Permanence | The New Yorker
Michael Bars, the U.S.C.I.S. spokesman, told the Washington Examiner that the agency is hiring dozens of lawyers for the new task force. The mandate, according to both Cissna and Bars, is to find people who deliberately lied on their citizenship applications, not those who made innocent mistakes. The distinction is fuzzier than one might assume.

Back in 1989, I had to make a decision about whether to lie on my citizenship application. At the time, immigration law banned “aliens afflicted with sexual deviation,” among others suffering from “psychopathic personality,” from entry to the United States. I had come to this country as a fourteen-year-old, in 1981, but I had been aware of my “sexual deviation” at the time, and this technically meant that I should not have entered the country. [....]

Over the years, the applications for both citizenship and permanent residence have grown ever longer, filling with questions that seem to be designed to be used against the applicant. Question 26 on the green-card application, for example, reads, “Have you EVER committed a crime of any kind (even if you were not arrested, cited, charged with, or tried for that crime)?” ... The question does not specify whether it refers to a crime under current U.S. law or the laws of the country in which the crime might have been committed. In the Soviet Union of my youth, it was illegal to possess foreign currency or to spend the night anywhere where you were not registered to live. In more than seventy countries, same-sex sexual activity is still illegal. On closer inspection, just about every naturalized citizen might look like an outlaw, or a liar.
law  immigration  us-politics  america  citizenship  naturalization  history 
8 weeks ago
Is America Ready for a Global Pandemic? - The Atlantic
The egg-based [vaccine manufacture] system depends on chickens, which are themselves vulnerable to flu. And since viruses can mutate within the eggs, the resulting vaccines don’t always match the strains that are circulating. But vaccine makers have few incentives to use anything else. Switching to a different process would cost billions, and why bother? Flu vaccines are low-margin products, which only about 45 percent of Americans get in a normal year. So when demand soars during a pandemic, the supply is not set to cope.

American hospitals, which often operate unnervingly close to full capacity, likewise struggled with the surge of patients. Pediatric units were hit especially hard by H1N1, and staff became exhausted from continuously caring for sick children. Hospitals almost ran out of the life-support units that sustain people whose lungs and hearts start to fail. The health-care system didn’t break, but it came too close for comfort—especially for what turned out to be a training-wheels pandemic. The 2009 H1N1 strain killed merely 0.03 percent of those it infected; by contrast, the 1918 strain had killed 1 to 3 percent, and the H7N9 strain currently circulating in China has a fatality rate of 40 percent.

That the U.S. could be so ill-prepared for flu, of all things, should be deeply concerning. The country has a dedicated surveillance web, antiviral drugs, and an infrastructure for making and deploying flu vaccines. None of that exists for the majority of other emerging infectious diseases.
vaccines  health  diseases  h1n1  flu  pandemics  future  scary 
8 weeks ago
Save on your AWS bill with Kubernetes Ingress
decent into to Kubernetes Ingress and the Ambassador microservices API gateway built on Envoy Proxy
envoy  proxying  kubernetes  aws  elb  load-balancing  ingress  ambassador  ops 
8 weeks ago
Halton sequence
In statistics, Halton sequences are sequences used to generate points in space for numerical methods such as Monte Carlo simulations. Although these sequences are deterministic, they are of low discrepancy, that is, appear to be random for many purposes. They were first introduced in 1960 and are an example of a quasi-random number sequence.
algorithms  graphics  random  randomness  coding  monte-carlo-simulation  number-sequences 
8 weeks ago
Fibonacci Hashing: The Optimization that the World Forgot (or: a Better Alternative to Integer Modulo)
Turns out I was wrong. This is a big one. And everyone should be using it. Hash tables should not be prime number sized and they should not use an integer modulo to map hashes into slots. Fibonacci hashing is just better. Yet somehow nobody is using it and lots of big hash tables (including all the big implementations of std::unordered_map) are much slower than they should be because they don’t use Fibonacci Hashing.


Apparently this is binary multiplicative hashing, and Google's brotli, webp, and Snappy libs all use a constant derived heuristically from a compression test corpus along the same lines (see comments).

(Via Michael Fogleman)
algorithms  hashing  hash  fibonacci  golden-ratio  coding  hacks  brotli  webp  snappy  hash-tables  hashmaps  load-distribution 
8 weeks ago
A few observations on the bikesharing systems in China
Mindblowing Twitter thread. The variety of systems, most of which are barely impinging on our systems over here in Ireland!
china  bikesharing  cycling  bikes  transit  public-transit  commuting 
8 weeks ago
Paradox of tolerance
The paradox of tolerance was described by Karl Popper in 1945. The paradox states that if a society is tolerant without limit, their ability to be tolerant will eventually be seized or destroyed by the intolerant. Popper came to the seemingly paradoxical conclusion that in order to maintain a tolerant society, the society must be intolerant of intolerance.
psychology  diversity  paradoxes  karl-popper  tolerance  intolerance  racism 
8 weeks ago
Crazy maths makes nonsense of Irish climate change policy
'John FitzGerald on madness of Ireland burning peat for electricity:

'the current subsidy per job involved is at least €100,000 a year. The Bord na Móna annual report indicates that, in the year 2016/2017, its workers’ average pay was €50,000. In other words, the subsidy per job is around twice what the workers involved actually earn.

If the peat-fired power stations were closed tomorrow, and the workers involved continued to be employed on their current wages, subsidising these jobs would only cost €50 million, not €100 million. Electricity consumers would pay less to subsidise these jobs, and Ireland’s greenhouse gas emissions would fall substantially as a result of discontinuing this polluting fuel use.'

We should plan for closure by 2020 of peat-fired electricity generation:

–greatly benefit environment;
–save electricity consumers money;
–protect livelihoods.
environment  peat  ireland  electricity  fossil-fuels  policy  climate-change 
8 weeks ago
The best Mario Kart character according to data science
Unless you’re going all-in on acceleration, it looks like a heavy character is the way to go; the two heaviest character classes (Wario and Donkey Kong) account for 11/15 of the Pareto-optimal configurations.


Wario/Sports Bike/Slick or Wario/Gold Standard/Slick get the top billing!
wario  nintendo  mario-kart  games  wii  switch 
8 weeks ago
Twitter thread regarding GDPR-compliance for append-only logs/event sourcing systems
Martin Kleppmann: "What’s current best practice for GDPR compliance (in particular, right to deletion) in systems with append-only logs/event sourcing/blockchains, which are supposed to keep history forever?"

Ben Kehoe: "Crypto delete. The immutable store keeps an encrypted copy, and the key is stored elsewhere. Forget me = throw away the key".

That seems to be the most practical suggestion in general in this thread.
twitter  threads  gdpr  compliance  law  eu  append-only  logs  blockchain  event-sourcing  architecture  storage  kafka  kinesis 
8 weeks ago
Val on Programming: Making a Datomic system GDPR-compliant
Proposed solution: complementing Datomic with an erasure-aware key/value store.
In cases where Excision is not a viable solution, the solution I've come up with is store to privacy-sensitive values in a complementary, mutable KV store, and referencing the corresponding keys from Datomic.


This seems to be turning into a common pattern for GDPR compliant storage.
gdpr  privacy  clojure  datomic  data-protection  storage  architecture 
8 weeks ago
Taming the Beast: How Scylla Leverages Control Theory to Keep Compactions Under Control - ScyllaDB
This is a really nice illustration of the use of control theory to set tunable thresholds automatically in a complex storage system. Nice work Scylla:

At any given moment, a database like ScyllaDB has to juggle the admission of foreground requests with background processes like compactions, making sure that the incoming workload is not severely disrupted by compactions, nor that the compaction backlog is so big that reads are later penalized.

In this article, we showed that isolation among incoming writes and compactions can be achieved by the Schedulers, yet the database is still left with the task of determining the amount of shares of the resources incoming writes and compactions will use.

Scylla steers away from user-defined tunables in this task, as they shift the burden of operation to the user, complicating operations and being fragile against changing workloads. By borrowing from the strong theoretical background of industrial controllers, we can provide an Autonomous Database that adapts to changing workloads without operator intervention.
scylladb  storage  settings  compaction  automation  thresholds  control-theory  ops  cassandra  feedback 
9 weeks ago
The Language of the Trump Administration Is the Language of Domestic Violence | The New Yorker
God this is so awful.
Gaslighting, it needs not be said, is Trump’s preferred mode of communication, and it is encoded in the family-separation policy itself: once their parents have been taken into custody, the children are reclassified as “unaccompanied minors,” their parents effectively disappeared. On Friday, NPR reported on three Guatemalan mothers who were on trial in Alpine, Texas, after D.H.S. flew their children—ages eight, eight, and nine—more than two thousand miles away, to a shelter in Manhattan. “There is no mention in the Border Patrol narrative,” an immigration lawyer told NPR, “that these women had children with them when they entered the United States.” Can you prove this child is yours? Do you even have children? Well, then, where are they?
children  donald-trump  new-yorker  dhs  asylum-seekers 
9 weeks ago
Trans kids & the people who hate them
Research (Mental Health of Transgender Children Who Are Supported in Their Identities, Olson et al. 2016) has shown that children whose preferred gender identity is accepted by family and friends have no worse mental health outcomes than other children. But those who are not accepted are much more likely to have mental health issues, self harm or take their own lives.
We can take from this that acceptance causes no harm, but non-acceptance causes harm — so why are so many people angry with parents for accepting their trans kids?
trans  children  kids  parenting  society  gender  identity 
9 weeks ago
Woman's Tongue Gets Inseminated By Squid After Eating Undercooked Seafood | IFLScience
As documented in a 2012 edition of the Journal of Parasitology, the foreign bodies were identified as squid spermatophores (sperm-containing capsules) belonging to a Japanese flying squid (Todarodes pacificus). Rather foolishly, the woman had not removed the internal organs of the squid and proceeded to only parboil it for a few seconds before eating it, meaning its spermatophores were still alive and well.

“As soon as she put a piece into her mouth, she felt like many 'bugs' were biting her oral mucosa,” the study reads. “She experienced severe sharp pain and spat out the entire portion without swallowing. Despite that, she could feel many small squirming white bug-like organisms penetrating her oral mucosa.”


NOOOOOPE
nope  argh  disgusting  gross  squid  sperm  parasitology  spermatophores  korea  tongue 
9 weeks ago
Software Development and GDPR
You could think, as a developer, that the lawyers worry about this kind of fine-grained issue. They don’t. This is one of those situations where they say, well, here’s the risk, you have to make a decision, document it, and be ready to back that up in front of a judge should the soup hit the fan.

In this particular case it’s straightforward enough. Are you in control of the presence of data in your database? Yes. It’s up to you to delete it when requested. Are you in control of the data on your harddrive? Yes. It’s up to you to delete it when requested. Are you in control of the operating system implementation or database implementation of deletion? No. Could you get the data back if you wanted to? Yes – but that’s not part of your usual run of business, so why would you explicitly do that? What if some bad dude steals your harddrive and then rummages through it? Ok we are getting a little far-fetched here for most businesses that are not keeping special category data, but if this does happen, then you have failed in your security controls.

I guess my overall point here is that GDPR Compliance is a continuum, not a tickbox. You want to be doing the best you can with it and document why you can go so far and not further. The companies that will be getting the big legislative fines are the guys that are willy-nilly exporting special category data out of the EEA en masse without the knowledge of the people associated with that data. The rest of us just need to muddle along as best we can.

gdpr  privacy  dev  tech  coding  data-protection  law  eu  storage 
9 weeks ago
8thref.ie
An archive of 489,506 Irish abortion tweets from the period around the 8th referendum in Ireland
ireland  history  analytics  archives  archival  repealthe8th 
9 weeks ago
NTSB: Autopilot steered Tesla car toward traffic barrier before deadly crash
This is the Tesla self-crashing car in action. Remember how it works. It visually recognizes rear ends of cars using a BW camera and Mobileye (at least in early models) vision software. It also recognizes lane lines and tries to center between them. It has a low resolution radar system which ranges moving metallic objects like cars but ignores stationary obstacles. And there are some side-mounted sonars for detecting vehicles a few meters away on the side, which are not relevant here.

The system performed as designed. The white lines of the gore (the painted wedge) leading to this very shallow off ramp become far enough apart that they look like a lane.[1] If the vehicle ever got into the gore area, it would track as if in a lane, right into the crash barrier. It won't stop for the crash barrier, because it doesn't detect stationary obstacles. Here, it sped up, because there was no longer a car ahead. Then it lane-followed right into the crash barrier.

That's the fundamental problem here. These vehicles will run into stationary obstacles at full speed with no warning or emergency braking at all. That is by design. This is not an implementation bug or sensor failure. It follows directly from the decision to ship "Autopilot" with that sensor suite and set of capabilities.
tesla  fail  safety  self-driving  autopilot  cars  driving  sonar  radar  sensors  ai 
9 weeks ago
How to change JVM arguments at runtime to avoid application restart
This is a super nifty feature of the JVM: turn on and off heap class histogram dumps at runtime, for instance.
java -XX:+PrintFlagsFinal -version|grep manageable
jvm  ops  switches  cli  java  heap-dumps  memory  debugging  memory-leaks 
10 weeks ago
AWS Region Table
what products are available where
amazon  aws  regions  azs  services  architecture  ops 
10 weeks ago
How Ireland’s Abortion Referendum Became a Test Case for Democracy in the Social Media Age
Exploring the "fake news" merchants attempting to subvert the Irish abortion referendum.
On 4chan, a number of users who identified as Irish attempted to infiltrate the online conversation and tarnish the pro-repeal campaign. Operation Zyklon encouraged users to spread awareness of a connection between Amnesty International Ireland and the philanthropist George Soros, who donated €137,000 to Amnesty’s My Body My Rights campaign in 2016. Operation Trojan Horse saw users sharing templates of fake pro-repeal posters with extreme captions such as, “There should be no limit on abortion up to birth”. Users were encouraged to print and spread these posters around college campuses and share them across social media. A particularly curious operation called Operation Drunken Monkey aimed to stifle student voter turnout by organizing club nights on May 24 in the hope that students would be too hungover to vote the following day.
4chan  repealthe8th  abortion  referenda  politics  fake-news  amnesty 
10 weeks ago
How Ireland Beat Dark Ads – Foreign Policy
In practice, while these recognizable attempts to disrupt the democratic debate with microtargeted ads, bot activity, and misinformation were active, they appear to have been relatively ineffective and may even have turned voters away from those employing them.

Given the battleground online discourse has become in democracies across the world, this small country’s resistance to it may offer some cause for hope. The resilience offered by the small size and close-knit nature of the Irish electorate may be difficult to reproduce in larger democracies. But the active measures taken by media, volunteer groups, and campaigners against potentially corrosive techniques can be a powerful inspiration.


+1 -- it's heartening that we were able to defeat these 21st century dirty tricks after the damage they did with Trump and Brexit.
brexit  elections  trump  fake-news  propaganda  bots  dark-ads  facebook  social-media  repealthe8th  referenda  abortion  ireland  repeal-shield  twitter 
10 weeks ago
‘Abroad For Yes' Helped Irish Voters Get Home for Abortion Referendum
This was one of the most amazing things I saw during the referendum campaign, alright! I had the pleasure of helping to fund several journeys home to vote:
Rebecca Wilson, one of the Abroad for Yes co-founders, said she and two other women, her sister Lauren Wilson and Hannah McNulty Madden, decided to launch the group when the referendum date was announced in late March. Wilson was visiting Helsinki, where Lauren and McNulty Madden are students.

After realizing Lauren and McNulty Madden weren’t eligible for a postal vote, they looked up the cost of flights and panicked. On Twitter, however, McNulty Madden noticed that people were expressing interest in helping people who wanted to go home to Ireland but couldn’t afford it. The women decided to set up the Abroad for Yes Facebook group as a community for supporters of repealing the eighth amendment to gather and find one another.

Wilson thought they’d help fund travel for maybe 10 people total, but in the first day of the group’s existence funded 5 trips, including for Lauren and McNulty Madden. After traveling back to Dublin, Wilson and the group continued to help others, enlisting three other group administrators. Wilson said they don’t have an exact figure, but she believes they’ve helped raise at least 30,000 euros.
ireland  repealthe8th  abortion  referenda  abroad-for-yes  t4y  facebook 
10 weeks ago
A first draft of history
For journalists it is always easier to point to the politician with the pearly-white smile and the pithy sound-byte as the harbinger of change – they attract the cameras and the microphones and make us turn our backs on the truth. It’s like we cannot – or will not – believe that change can be brought about by ordinary people doing extraordinary things, no matter how often we see it. It’s like we need the fallacy that our leaders are somehow better than us, somehow in control to sleep safely at night, when in fact much of our insomnia and worry is their creation.

My first draft of history is this:

“On Friday May 25 2018, the women of Ireland repealed the Eighth Amendment.”

And that’s it.

It may have taken them 35 years, and in that time they were scorned and laughed at and belittled and abused, right up until Saturday morning and in some cases beyond, and yet they did it. Nothing else is relevant.

Through the day I saw women, from teenagers who had just cast their first vote to political veterans who started out on this trail 35 years previously, gradually realising what they had done.

One by one, it dawned on them the immense power that they now wield.

They banded together, and over the weeks and months and years, they changed a country.

And they’re not done yet.


Amen to that. Resist the rewriting of history -- this was a revolutionary moment for Ireland, and in some ways, the world.
ireland  history  repealthe8th  abortion  referenda  journalism 
10 weeks ago
How to revoke all ad permissions from Oath GDPR pages
in summary:
document.querySelectorAll('input[type=checkbox]').forEach(val => val.checked = false)


(via stx)
via:stx  oath  gdpr  privacy  tracking  ads 
10 weeks ago
on the etymology of "ramen"
One day it hit her when she heard her Chinese chef using his call to let her know an order was done: "Hao-ra" (好了), meaning "it's ready."
She decided to start calling it Ra-men, and the name quickly took off.
ramen  food  japanese  noodles  words  etymology  history 
11 weeks ago
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