4992
Debugging Stuck Ruby Processes — What to do Before You Kill -9
good tips on using gdb to gather backtraces (via Louise)
debugging  gdb  ruby  linux  unix  threads  ops 
14 hours ago
Use the GDPR to find who has advertised to you on Facebook, and get them to delete your details
Sometimes you get ads on Facebook and you are just not interested in what they’re selling. This is a way to find out who has uploaded your email address into facebook to target ads at you, and then- if you’re in the EU- how to use the new General Data Protection Regulation to get those advertisers to delete you from their system.


Totally going to do this. roll on May 25
gdpr  facebook  privacy  ads  data-privacy  eu 
15 hours ago
Palantir Knows Everything About You
This is so fucking dystopian:
Operation Laser has made L.A. cops more surgical — and, according to community activists, unrelenting. Once targets are enmeshed in a [Palantir] spidergram, they’re stuck.

Manuel Rios, 22, lives in the back of his grandmother’s house at the top of a hill in East L.A., in the heart of the city’s gang area. [...] He grew up surrounded by friends who joined Eastside 18, the local affiliate of the 18th Street gang, one of the largest criminal syndicates in Southern California. Rios says he was never “jumped in”—initiated into 18. He spent years addicted to crystal meth and was once arrested for possession of a handgun and sentenced to probation. But except for a stint in county jail for a burglary arrest inside a city rec center, he’s avoided further trouble and says he kicked his meth habit last year.

In 2016, Rios was sitting in a parked car with an Eastside 18 friend when a police car pulled up. His buddy ran, pursued by the cops, but Rios stayed put. “Why should I run? I’m not a gang member,” he says over steak and eggs at the IHOP near his home. The police returned and handcuffed him. One of them took his picture with a cellphone. “Welcome to the gang database!” the officer said.

Since then he’s been stopped more than a dozen times, he says, and told that if he doesn’t like it he should move. He has nowhere to go. His girlfriend just had a baby girl, and he wants to be around for them. “They say you’re in the system, you can’t lie to us,” he says. “I tell them, ‘How can I be in the hood if I haven’t got jumped in? Can’t you guys tell people who bang and who don’t?’ They go by their facts, not the real facts.”

The police, on autopilot with Palantir, are driving Rios toward his gang friends, not away from them, worries Mariella Saba, a neighbor and community organizer who helped him get off meth. When whole communities like East L.A. are algorithmically scraped for pre-crime suspects, data is destiny, says Saba. “These are systemic processes. When people are constantly harassed in a gang context, it pushes them to join. They internalize being told they’re bad.”
palantir  surveillance  privacy  precrime  spidergrams  future  la  gangs  justice  algorithms  data-protection  data-privacy  policing  harrassment 
3 days ago
_Building a Bw-Tree Takes More Than Just Buzz Words_, SIGMOD 2018
'An account of our disappointing journey to build a open-source lock-free Bw-Tree for the Peloton DBMS.'

'In 2013, Microsoft Research proposed the Bw-Tree (humorously
termed the “Buzz Word Tree”), a lock-free index that provides high
throughput for transactional database workloads in SQL Server’s
Hekaton engine. The Bw-Tree avoids locks by appending delta
record to tree nodes and using an indirection layer that allows it to
atomically update physical pointers using compare-and-swap (CaS).
Correctly implementing this techniques requires careful attention
to detail. Unfortunately, the Bw-Tree papers from Microsoft are
missing important details and the source code has not been released.

This paper has two contributions: First, it is the missing guide
for how to build a lock-free Bw-Tree. We clarify missing points in
Microsoft’s original design documents and then present techniques
to improve the index’s performance. Although our focus here is on
the Bw-Tree, many of our methods apply more broadly to designing
and implementing future lock-free in-memory data structures. Our
experimental evaluation shows that our optimized variant achieves
1.1–2.5× better performance than the original Microsoft proposal
for highly concurrent workloads. Second, our evaluation shows
that despite our improvements, the Bw-Tree still does not perform
as well as other concurrent data structures that use locks.'

Finally: https://twitter.com/andy_pavlo/status/986647389820747776 :

'Our results show that @ViktorLeis's ART index and @xexd's MassTree and a non-fancy B+Tree are currently the best for in-memory workloads. Skip Lists are always terrible.'
skip-lists  algorithms  data-structures  storage  bw-trees  mass-trees  benchmarks  performance  multithreading  lock-free  locking  trees 
4 days ago
A flaw-by-flaw guide to Facebook’s new GDPR privacy changes | TechCrunch
Overall, it seems like Facebook is complying with the letter of GDPR law, but with questionable spirit. Sure, privacy is boring to a lot of people. Too little info and they feel confused and scared. Too many choices and screens and they feel overwhelmed and annoyed. Facebook struck the right balance in some places here. But the subtly pushy designs seem intended to steer people away from changing their defaults in ways that could hamper Facebook’s mission and business.
gdpr  design  facebook  privacy  data-protection  data-privacy  social-networking  eu  law 
5 days ago
Securing wireless neurostimulators
The latest generation of such devices come with remote monitoring and reprogramming capabilities, via an external device programmer. The manufacturers seem to have relied on security through obscurity (when will we ever learn!) with the very predictable result that the interface turns out not be secure at all. So we end up with a hackable device connected directly to someone’s brain.
security  brain  health  medical  devices  iot  exploits  neurostimulators 
5 days ago
"Facebook will implement a part of their transparency plan"
The Transparent Referendum Initiative writes:
Big News - Facebook will implement a part of their transparency plan - the ability to see the ads that a page has paid for- IN IRELAND FROM 25th. A positive first step. This will help us build out our database, as we wait for a platform fed offline list to be implemented. #8thRef
facebook  ads  transparency  ireland  repealthe8th  referenda  voting 
6 days ago
Scientists accidentally create mutant enzyme that eats plastic bottles
Scientists have created a mutant enzyme that breaks down plastic drinks bottles – by accident. The breakthrough could help solve the global plastic pollution crisis by enabling for the first time the full recycling of bottles.

The new research was spurred by the discovery in 2016 of the first bacterium that had naturally evolved to eat plastic, at a waste dump in Japan. Scientists have now revealed the detailed structure of the crucial enzyme produced by the bug. The international team then tweaked the enzyme to see how it had evolved, but tests showed they had inadvertently made the molecule even better at breaking down the PET (polyethylene terephthalate) plastic used for soft drink bottles. “What actually turned out was we improved the enzyme, which was a bit of a shock,” said Prof John McGeehan, at the University of Portsmouth, UK, who led the research. “It’s great and a real finding.”
plastic  recycling  enzymes  science  mutants  pet  bottles  green 
6 days ago
"Tweeps! What’s the craziest infra incident you worked on at Twitter"
great thread of Twitter outages and production incidents. I would love to hear more details about these, I love hearing about other people's outages ;) Even reading "over a month of cleanup and some permanent data loss" has me sweating....
infrastructure  engineering  twitter  ops  outages  production 
6 days ago
Best Practices for DynamoDB
Amazon have updated this architectural tips doc for DynamoDB users -- good reference
dynamodb  nosql  aws  storage  databases  design  coding 
6 days ago
Thomas Mayne (politician) - Wikipedia
An illustrious ancestor, apparently!

'Thomas Mayne (1832–1915) was an Irish Parliamentary Party politician. He was elected as Member of Parliament (MP) for Tipperary at a by-election in 1883,[1] and held the seat until the constituency was divided at the 1885 general election. He was then elected for the new Mid division of Tipperary,[2] and held that seat until he resigned in 1890 by becoming Steward of the Manor of Northstead.[3]'

He was known for helping Charles Stewart Parnell in a sticky situation -- from http://www.online-literature.com/elbert-hubbard/journeys-vol-thirteen/6/ :

'About six months after this, London was convulsed with laughter at a joke too good to keep: One Captain O'Shea [Kitty O'Shea's husband] had challenged Charles Parnell, the Irish Leader, to a duel. Parnell accepted the challenge, but the fight was off, because Thomas Mayne had gone to O'Shea and told him he "would kick him the length of Rotten Row if he tried to harm or even opened his Galway yawp about Parnell."'
parnell  thomas-mayne  ancestors  history  ireland  nationalism  mps  1800s  19th-century  kitty-oshea 
9 days ago
How to report graphic abortion imagery to the gardai under Irish law
I tried to report ICBR graphic abortion imagery to the Gardai today and met a lot of resistance. The following thread gives an account of what happened and how someone can effectively report this imagery. 1/x
At 2pm on Friday the 13th of April I noticed the presence of ICBR graphic abortion imagery being displayed outside the Nassau street entrance of Trinity. I called Kevin Street Garda Station in order to make a complaint under Section 7 of the Public Order Act 1994 2/x
I was told that the Gardai had been instructed by their superiors to not intervene with such imagery and that this direction had come from the Refendum Commission itself. I then called the Refendum Commission in order to query this, as they'd never been involved previously. 3/x
A representative from the commission informed me that no such direction had been given to the Gardai as it is not in the commission's remit to influence such imagery. The representative told me that they would contact with Kevin Street Station about this miscommunication. 4/x
I then rang Kevin Street Station again to inform them of what I had been told by the Refendum Commission. I was then told that a complaint had to be made in person to either a Garda on the scene or to a local station (Trinity would be Pearse Street), which is understandable. 5/x
I informed the Gardai of a similar experience in Dundrum in which the local station had dispatched officers to move along those displaying the imagery to prevent a breach of the peace without a complaint being made in person. 6/x
I was finally told that Pearse Street Station would be contacted to have an available car dispatched to Trinity. 8/x
TLDR: If you see this imagery, report it under Section 7. If you are told that the Gardai cannot intervene, let them know that other stations have before. If they say they have been directed by the Referendum Commission, let them know there is no such directive on record. 9/x
I hope this miscommunication can be cleared up and that both @gardainfo and @RefCom_ie end up on the same page, so that Gardai can continue to do their jobs effectively and respond to public complaints of breach of the peace. 10/10


Very illuminating.
twitter  threads  abortion  propaganda  gardai  law  ireland  public-order-act 
9 days ago
How to talk to your children about abortion care in the run-up to the referendum
She pointed out one of the “baby” posters the other day when we were in the car and passed one. I said “Actually that’s a baby seed but the people who paid a lot of money for those posters made it look like a baby on purpose, because they think everyone who has a baby seed should have to grow it into a baby whether they wanted to or not. And that I think that’s telling lies and shouldn’t be allowed."
abortion  pro-choice  kids  children  education  childbirth  savita  propaganda  repealthe8th  parenting 
11 days ago
A Taxonomy of Tech Debt | Riot Games Engineering
Very sensible way to group/classify tech debt work -- we did something similar in Swrve internally at one point, but this is much more evolved
engineering  software  coding 
11 days ago
#Repealthe8th | Are the Irish Media Up To The Job?
For years we were subject to speculation and debate about the emergence of new party in Irish politics. Endless coverage for Lucinda Creighton, Michael McDowell and whoever else. All the while, the most incredibly vibrant social movement touching every county in Ireland has emerged and the majority of journalists are unable to write about it.

Media comment has concerned itself not so much with the issues but with grave concern that this is happening outside perceived boundaries of respectable politics. This is ordinary people getting together and putting a most unspeakable issue on the agenda and soon to vote – in spite of the Normal Rules.

It is not just that regime journalists live in a bubble or don’t care to inform themselves. They genuinely do not understand how this campaign has played out. It is beyond their entire conception. This is what happens when your idea of politics only extends to the ritual of posters on lamp posts.
media  ireland  politics  political-correspondents  oireachtas-retort  analysis  society  marref  repealthe8th 
12 days ago
Uses This / Leonard Lin
lhl describes the stuff he uses, day to day. Lots of travel gear, drones, Linux and a surprising lack of Macs
travel  shopping  hardware  gear  uses-this  lhl  drones  vr  linux  vive  chromebook  tips 
12 days ago
The American Chopper meme, explained - Vox
"Maybe we should have been blogging in dialectics all along"
memes  american-chopper  dialectics  academia  discussion  plato  dialogue 
13 days ago
Gravis McElroy on Twitter: "The thing that really kills me about the silicon valley hypercapitalist hell spiral...."
Epic shouty thread about modern Silicon Valley software products.
We know that no company, regardless of size, can be trusted with this information. We KNOW it will not stay private, our photos of our partners genitals and tax documents will become public either deliberately or accidentally.

We know that any company that tries to buck this trend can't be trusted, and even if they are completely, absolutely transparent, it doesn't matter because we will wake up one day to discover they were purchased at 2 AM and the data transfer /already started/

We represent billions in revenue but they hold our info in escrow and that means we don't have enough money to buy their loyalty, because a business considers business money more real than person money.
money  funding  capitalism  silicon-valley  internet  web  google  facebook  banks  banking 
13 days ago
Mythology about security…
A valuable history lesson from Jim Gettys:
Government export controls crippled Internet security and the design of Internet protocols from the very beginning: we continue to pay the price to this day.  Getting security right is really, really hard, and current efforts towards “back doors”, or other access is misguided. We haven’t even recovered from the previous rounds of government regulations, which has caused excessive complexity in an already difficult problem and many serious security problems. Let us not repeat this mistake…


I remember the complexity of navigating crypto export controls. As noted here, it was generally easier just not to incorporate security features.
security  crypto  export-control  jim-gettys  x11  history  x-windows  mit  athena  kerberos 
14 days ago
Austerity is an Algorithm
Fucking hell, things sound grim Down Under:
Things changed in December 2016, when the government announced that the system had undergone full automation. Humans would no longer investigate anomalies in earnings. Instead, debt notices would be automatically generated when inconsistencies were detected. The government’s rationale for automating the process was telling. “Our aim is to ensure that people get what they are entitled to—no more and no less,” read the press release. “And to crack down hard when people deliberately defraud the system.”

The result was a disaster. I’ve had friends who’ve received an innocuous email urging them to check their MyGov account—an online portal available to Australian citizens with an internet connection to access a variety of government services—only to log in and find they’re hundreds or thousands of dollars in arrears, supposedly because they didn’t accurately report their income. Some received threats from private debt collectors, who told them their wages would be seized if they didn’t submit to a payment plan.

Those who wanted to contest their debts had to lodge a formal complaint, and were subjected to hours of Mozart’s Divertimento in F Major before they could talk to a case worker. Others tried taking their concerns directly to the Centrelink agency on Twitter, where they were directed to calling Lifeline, a 24-hour hotline for crisis support and suicide prevention.

At the end of 2015, my friend Chloe received a notice claiming she owed $20,000 to the government. She was told that she had reported her income incorrectly while on Youth Allowance, which provides financial assistance to certain categories of young people.

The figure was shocking and, like others in her position, she grew suspicious. She decided to contest the debt: she contacted all of her previous employers so she could gather pay slips, and scanned them into the MyGov app. “I gave them all of my information to prove that there was no way I owed them $20,000,” she says.

The bean counters were unmoved. They maintained that Chloe had reported her after-tax income instead of her before-tax income. As a result, they increased the amount she owed to $30,000. She agreed to a payment plan, which will see her pay off the debt in fortnightly installments of $50 over the course of two decades. “I even looked into bankruptcy because I was so stressed by it,” she says. “All I could think about was the Centrelink debt, and once they upped it to 30k, I was so ashamed and sad and miserable,” she says.
austerity  algorithms  automation  dystopia  australia  government  debt-collectors  robo-debt  dole  benefit  grim-meathook-future 
14 days ago
lemire/JavaFastPFOR: A simple integer compression library in Java

a library to compress and uncompress arrays of integers very fast. The assumption is that most (but not all) values in your array use much less than 32 bits, or that the gaps between the integers use much less than 32 bits. These sort of arrays often come up when using differential coding in databases and information retrieval (e.g., in inverted indexes or column stores).

Please note that random integers are not compressible, by this library or by any other means. If you ever had the means of systematically compressing random integers, you could compress any data source to nothing, by recursive application of your technique.

This library can decompress integers at a rate of over 1.2 billions per second (4.5 GB/s). It is significantly faster than generic codecs (such as Snappy, LZ4 and so on) when compressing arrays of integers.

The library is used in LinkedIn Pinot, a realtime distributed OLAP datastore. Part of this library has been integrated in Parquet (http://parquet.io/). A modified version of the library is included in the search engine Terrier (http://terrier.org/). This libary is used by ClueWeb Tools (https://github.com/lintool/clueweb). It is also used by Apache NiFi.
compression  java  pfor  encoding  integers  algorithms  storage 
14 days ago
A Closer Look at Experian Big Data and Artificial Intelligence in Durham Police
'UK police bought profiling data for their artificial intelligence (AI) system, deciding whether to hold suspects in custody, from ... Experian.'

'The AI tool uses 34 data categories including the offender’s criminal history, combined with their age, gender and two types of residential postcode. The use of postcode data is problematic in predictive software of this kind as it carries a risk of perpetuating bias towards areas marked by community deprivation.'
experian  marketing  credit-score  data  policing  uk  durham  ai  statistics  crime  hart 
14 days ago
If iPads were meant for kids
A long list of the misfeatures that IOS/Android devices have regarding child use. 100% agreed with this
ios  ipad  iphone  parenting  devices  kids  android  youtube 
14 days ago
Another reason why your Docker containers may be slow
TL;DR: fadvise() is a bottleneck on Linux machines running many containers
linux  fadvise  filesystems  performance  docker  containers  ops 
17 days ago
plugin EVs outsell ICE-driven cars in Norway
56% of cars registered in March 2018 in Norway were plugin EVs rather than fossil-fuel burning ICE vehicles, with Nissan Leafs well in first place
evs  pevs  nissan  cars  driving  norway  green  ev 
17 days ago
What worries me about AI – François Chollet – Medium
One path leads to a place that really scares me. The other leads to a more humane future. There’s still time to take the better one. If you work on these technologies, keep this in mind. You may not have evil intentions. You may simply not care. You may simply value your RSUs more than our shared future. But whether or not you care, because you have a hand in shaping the infrastructure of the digital world, your choices affect us all. And you may eventually be held responsible for them.
ai  facebook  newsfeed  technology  future  silicon-valley  google 
19 days ago
tomnomnom/gron
'Make JSON greppable!'
json  gron  grep  cli  tools  data  hacking  golang 
19 days ago
Online mattress-in-a-box brands: Why are there so many? - Curbed
“People ask me what it takes to get into this space,” said Bryan Murphy, founder and president of Tomorrow Sleep. “If you have a [Google] AdWords account [to buy digital ads] and you know a subcontractor, you can sell a mattress online.”
mattresses  business  economics  retail  adwords  online 
19 days ago
rr: lightweight recording & deterministic debugging
aspires to be your primary C/C++ debugging tool for Linux, replacing — well, enhancing — gdb. You record a failure once, then debug the recording, deterministically, as many times as you want. The same execution is replayed every time. rr also provides efficient reverse execution under gdb. Set breakpoints and data watchpoints and quickly reverse-execute to where they were hit.


(via Kevin Lyda and b0rk)
debug  gdb  mozilla  debugging  coding  cli  c++  c 
24 days ago
Dalzells of Markethill
an Armagh-based home appliance retail shop, apparently doing good deals and with free delivery to Dublin. recommended by Karlin Lillington: "Superb prices, will do multi-purchase deals, FREE delivery to Meath/Louth/Dublin & bend over backwards to offer service & advice"
via:karlin  armagh  shopping  appliances  kitchen  home  import  tips 
24 days ago
Europe dumps 300,000 UK-owned .EU domains into the Brexit bin - The Register

"As a result of the withdrawal of the United Kingdom, a holder of a domain name does no longer fulfil the general eligibility criteria... the Registry for .eu will be entitled to revoke such domain name on its own initiative and without submitting the dispute to any extrajudicial settlement of conflicts."


Apply usual Reg pinch of salt of course. The real announcement states 'this information is subject to any transitional arrangement that may be contained in a possible withdrawal agreement, which is an ongoing negotiation between the United Kingdom and European Commission.' So I guess the plan is to get an agreement in place to avoid this.
brexit  domains  dot-eu  eu  uk  dns  the-register 
24 days ago
Examine.com
Scientific review of nutritional supplements and vitamins, rounding up hundreds of papers and weighting them based on the level of evidence provided
health  food  nutrition  vitamins  supplements  science  medicine  review  vitamin 
26 days ago
'Stop hosting GDC in SF' twitter thread
Emre Deniz: 'My GDC feedback was simple:

Stop hosting it in SF.

I'll be going back for tourist stuff but for the conference it needs to go. SF is a dangerous city and America is not welcome to non western developers.

The city hates us being there, we are worried being there, move it.'


The twitter thread is replete with scary stories of robberies, TSA hassling attendees, etc.
san-francisco  us  safety  gdc  conferences  travel 
26 days ago
How Good Is Spotify's Audio Quality? · Baron Schwartz's Website
Various streaming services (Spotify) use lossy formats (Ogg Vorbis); various audio-casting devices (Chromecast) use other lossy formats (AAC). Crappy audio quality issues ensue.
chromecast  ogg-vorbis  aac  audio  lossy-encoding  compression  noise  fail  spotify 
26 days ago
Timeline behind the #CopOnComrades controversy
A very exhaustive timeline of the online defence of feminism against a few left-wing men in Ireland, courtesy of Andrew Flood.
coponcomrades  left-wing  politics  ireland  twitter  facebook  irish-times 
26 days ago
Colm MacCárthaigh on TLS 1.3 and the risks of 0-RTT
here's my advice: if you see a server supporting 0-RTT and that server doesn't give you an iron-clad guarantee that when the key is used, it's deleted, and that your EARLY CONVERSATION can't be repeated ... don't use it.
colmmacc  tls  security  ssl  0rtt  risks  networking  crypto 
27 days ago
What's in your migraine kit?
Good post on workarounds/pain relief/migraine-abortive treatments from the /r/migraine subreddit. Some of the things I've found helpful (ice-cold Coke, headache stick, and of course triptans), and I few I haven't tried yet, so may give them a try. God damn migraines :(
migraine  headaches  medicine  health  pain  reddit  tips 
4 weeks ago
Brad Templeton's commentary on the Uber robocar killing a pedestrian
At this point, it does seem as though a wrongful death lawsuit might emerge from the family of the victim. The fame for the lawyer will cause pro bono representation to appear, and the deep pockets of Uber will certainly be attractive. I recommend Uber immediately offer a settlement the courts would consider generous.

And tell us more information about what really happened. And, if it's as surmised, to get their act together. The hard truth is, that if Uber's vehicle is unable to detect a pedestrian like this in time to stop, Uber has no business testing at 40mph on a road like this. Certainly not with an inattentive solo safety driver.


It certainly sounds like they need to answer questions about LIDAR usage on that car.
4 weeks ago
Arena
Film by Páraic McGloughlin

A brief look at the earth from above, based on the shapes we make, the game of life, our playing ground - Arena. Created using Google Earth imagery.

Pearse McGloughlin and I collaborated on the audio resulting in something between music and a soundtrack.
Audio mastered by TJ LippleHear
4 weeks ago
HTTP/2 Test
'A simple HTTP/2.0 test tool'
4 weeks ago
The NSA Worked to “Track Down” Bitcoin Users, Snowden Documents Reveal
'Part of the NSA's Bitcoin access, codenamed MONKEYROCKET, involved essentially tricking targets into using privacy software (a VPN app?) that was actually feeding information directly to the agency.'
4 weeks ago
awslabs/awscli-aliases
The AWS CLI tool supports aliases, a la git, so you can do things like "aws whoami" aliased to "aws sts get-caller-identity".
4 weeks ago
SXSW 2018: A Look Back at the 1960s PLATO Computing System - IEEE Spectrum
Author Brian Dear on how these terminals were designed for coursework, but students preferred to chat and play games [...]

“Out of the top 10 programs on PLATO running any day, most were games,” Dear says. “They used more CPU time than anything else.” In one popular game called Empire, players blast each other’s spaceships with phasers and torpedoes in order to take over planets.


And PLATO had code review built into the OS:

Another helpful feature that no longer exists was called Term Comment. It allowed users to leave feedback for developers and programmers at any place within a program where they spotted a typo or had trouble completing a task.

To do this, the user would simply open a comment box and leave a note right there on the screen. Term Comment would append the comment to the user’s place in the program so that the recipient could easily navigate to it and clearly see the problem, instead of trying to recreate it from scratch on their own system.

“That was immensely useful for developers,” Dear says. “If you were doing QA on software, you could quickly comment, and it would track exactly where the user left this comment. We never really got this on the Web, and it’s such a shame that we didn’t.”
plato  computing  history  chat  empire  gaming  code-review  coding  brian-dear 
4 weeks ago
A quantitive analysis of the impact of arbitrary blockchain content on Bitcoin
'People put all sorts of things into the Bitcoin blockchain - some of it objectionable, some of it illegal. Now what?'
blockchain  bitcoin  ledger  immutability  internet  law  crime  papers 
5 weeks ago
Ten Reasons Why I Don't Like Golang
When I first started programming in Go, my summary of it was, “The good things are great and the bad things are weird and I can live with them.” After another three years and a few large projects in Go, I no longer like the language and wouldn’t use it for a new project. Here are 10 reasons why, in no particular order.
golang  go  coding  languages  programming  gripes 
5 weeks ago
Ken Foxe's Beginner’s Guide to FOI
This guide is designed to be read by members of the public or journalists looking to dip their toes into the world of Freedom of Information in Ireland. It is not designed to be an authoritative guide to FOI, a history book, or an academic text … it is simply a useful introduction to the first steps, the language, and the things you need to know before you start.
foia  foi  government  ireland  ken-foxe 
5 weeks ago
Cameras as Traffic Cops – Hacker Noon
Guy trains model on NYC traffic camera video to detect blocked bike lanes and bus stops. Estimates "the number of tickets being given represents less than .0001% of infractions". (via lemonodor)
via:lemonodor  future  tickets  traffic  nyc  cameras  surveillance  bike-lanes  bus-stops  traffic-law 
5 weeks ago
Who Targets Me
Microtargeting. Misinformation. Psychographic profiling.
Install Who Targets Me [a Chrome plugin] to find out who’s trying to win your vote – and how they’re doing it.
ads  advertising  chrome  extensions  microtargeting  politics  facebook 
5 weeks ago
Interesting Twitter thread on email UI design, vs Slack
"When redesigning Outlook, we found two basic groups of users: pilers and filers. Pilers kept a single, ever-expanding list of mail in their Inbox and then worked it down to "inbox zero." Filers wrote rules or manually filed mail into folders, creating an organizational system.

Filers rely on their bespoke, highly customized knowledge of where things go in their email system, much like you might organize your kitchen in a way that makes sense to you. You know where the strainer or little corn-cob-holders go, and no one else does (or needs to.)

Pilers rely on search to find things in their huge amassed pile. We moved Outlook from the fundamental organization unit of "message" to "conversation" (or "thread") so that when pilers found mail via search, messages would return with the context of the surrounding conversation.

Both pilers and filers have one key thing in common: their systems require an affirmative, discrete action to take a mail out of their list. Filers file to a folder when done with a message, and pilers archive/delete. This turned out to be essential for people to feel in control."

really, "pilers" are using the UI that GMail pioneered, where credit is due (as far as I know at least).
mail  ux  ui  pilers-and-filers  filepile  email  slack  outlook 
5 weeks ago
Iterating over hash sets quickly in Java
Interesting datum:
My numbers are clear: in my tests, it is three times faster to sum up the values in a LinkedHashSet [than a HashSet].
performance  java  locality  memory  cache-friendly  data-structures  hashsets  linkedhashsets  sets 
5 weeks ago
7% of Scott Kelly's Genes Changed After a Year in Space - Universe Today
The study took into account possible genomic and cognitive changes between the two [twin] brothers. These findings were recently clarified by NASA, which indicated that 93% of Scott Kelly’s genes returned to normal after he returned to Earth while the remaining 7% points were missing. These were attributed to “longer-term changes in genes related to his immune system, DNA repair, bone formation networks, hypoxia, and hypercapnia.”

In other words, in addition to the well-documented effects of microgravity – such as muscle atrophy, bone density loss and loss of eyesight – Scott Kelly also experienced health effect caused by a deficiency in the amount of oxygen that was able to make it to his tissues, an excess of CO2 in his tissues, and long-term effects in how his body is able to maintain and repair itself.
nasa  space  iss  spaceflight  scott-kelly  zero-gravity  future  microgravity  health  via:elliot 
5 weeks ago
Charging the LEAF | Speak EV - Electric Car Forums
Excellent reference on charge times and connection types for the Nissan Leaf EV
nissan  leaf  ev  cars  charging  nissan-leaf 
6 weeks ago
YouTube, the Great Radicalizer - The New York Times
It seems as if you are never “hard core” enough for YouTube’s recommendation algorithm. It promotes, recommends and disseminates videos in a manner that appears to constantly up the stakes. Given its billion or so users, YouTube may be one of the most powerful radicalizing instruments of the 21st century.
youtube  culture  politics  radicalization  crazy  machine-learning  google  zeynep-tufekci 
6 weeks ago
BAD TRAFFIC: Sandvine’s PacketLogic Devices Used to Deploy Government Spyware in Turkey and Redirect Egyptian Users to Affiliate Ads?
This report describes our investigation into the apparent use of Sandvine/Procera Networks Deep Packet Inspection (DPI) devices to deliver nation-state malware in Turkey and indirectly into Syria, and to covertly raise money through affiliate ads and cryptocurrency mining in Egypt. 


Shame on these vendors.
egypt  espionage  infrastructure  turkey  syria  procera  dpi  malware  hacking  sandvine 
6 weeks ago
The Myth of Authenticity Is Killing Tex-Mex
Overshadowed by barbecue in its home state, Tex-Mex is the most important, least understood regional cuisine in America


I, for one, welcome the revival of Tex-Mex
cuisine  food  tex-mex  mexican  texas  barbecue 
6 weeks ago
The Great Igloos of Storm Emma - YouTube
in a once-in-a-lifetime snowstorm, it appears the young Irish male's mind turns to (checks notes) building an igloo and having a party in it
igloos  funny  ireland  storm-emma  snow  wtf  humans-of-the-sesh 
6 weeks ago
Git, complicated? Of course not! Commits map to isomorphic contours in source-code phase space
The inspiration for the classic tweet.
it’s simplest to think of the state of your repository as a point in a high-dimensional ‘code-space’,  in which branches are represented as n-dimensional membranes, mapping the spatial loci of successive commits onto the projected manifold of each cloned repository
git  incomprehensible  funny  jargon  topology  dvcs 
7 weeks ago
how to deal with obnoxious political ads on Facebook
tl;dr: hide or report the ads. Both will drive up the cost for the advertiser and limit their reach
ads  facebook  social-media  reporting  antichoice  repeal-the-8th 
7 weeks ago
Yes, bacon really is killing us - The Guardian Long Read
Nooooo!
Since we eat with our eyes, the main way we judge the quality of cured meats is pinkness. Yet it is this very colour that we should be suspicious of, as the French journalist Guillaume Coudray explains in a book published in France last year called Cochonneries, a word that means both “piggeries” and “rubbish” or “junk food”. The subtitle is “How Charcuterie Became a Poison”. Cochonneries reads like a crime novel, in which the processed meat industry is the perpetrator and ordinary consumers are the victims.

The pinkness of bacon – or cooked ham, or salami – is a sign that it has been treated with chemicals, more specifically with nitrates and nitrites. It is the use of these chemicals that is widely believed to be the reason why “processed meat” is much more carcinogenic than unprocessed meat. Coudray argues that we should speak not of “processed meat” but “nitro-meat”.

[...] When nitrates interact with certain components in red meat (haem iron, amines and amides), they form N-nitroso compounds, which cause cancer. The best known of these compounds is nitrosamine. This, as Guillaume Coudray explained to me in an email, is known to be “carcinogenic even at a very low dose”. Any time someone eats bacon, ham or other processed meat, their gut receives a dose of nitrosamines, which damage the cells in the lining of the bowel, and can lead to cancer.

You would not know it from the way bacon is sold, but scientists have known nitrosamines are carcinogenic for a very long time. More than 60 years ago, in 1956, two British researchers called Peter Magee and John Barnes found that when rats were fed dimethyl nitrosamine, they developed malignant liver tumours. By the 1970s, animal studies showed that small, repeated doses of nitrosamines and nitrosamides – exactly the kind of regular dose a person might have when eating a daily breakfast of bacon – were found to cause tumours in many organs including the liver, stomach, oesophagus, intestines, bladder, brain, lungs and kidneys.


But there IS some good news for Parma ham and sausages:

In 1993, Parma ham producers in Italy made a collective decision to remove nitrates from their products and revert to using only salt, as in the old days. For the past 25 years, no nitrates or nitrites have been used in any Prosciutto di Parma. Even without nitrate or nitrite, the Parma ham stays a deep rosy-pink colour. We now know that the colour in Parma ham is totally harmless, a result of the enzyme reactions during the ham’s 18-month ageing process.

[...] the average British sausage – as opposed to a hard sausage like a French saucisson – is not cured, being made of nothing but fresh meat, breadcrumbs, herbs, salt and E223, a preservative that is non-carcinogenic. After much questioning, two expert spokespeople for the US National Cancer Institute confirmed to me that “one might consider” fresh sausages to be “red meat” and not processed meat, and thus only a “probable” carcinogen.
bacon  sausages  meat  parma-ham  ham  food  cancer  carcinogens  big-meat  nitrates  nitrites 
7 weeks ago
Huy Fong sriracha hot sauce label - Fonts In Use
The fonts of the iconic sriracha bottle, analysed. Interestingly, the Chinese serif text is typeset in a universally-reviled font, PMingLiu:
For East Asian designers, PMingLiu was probably as despicable as Papyrus. Many have publicly voiced their disdain for PMingLiu, and some even see the elimination of PMingLiu from public sight as a career goal. Julius Hui, then consultant for Commercial Type, exclaims:

PMingLiu inhibits the type business, maims the public’s aesthetic judgment, and puts a bad face on the Minchō genre. As long as the public have not harbored a deep hatred against PMingLiu, it is futile to completely eliminate it from the world.
typography  packaging  sriracha  pmingliu  mincho  fonts  type  food  labels 
7 weeks ago
Palantir has secretly been using New Orleans to test its predictive policing technology - The Verge
Predictive policing technology has proven highly controversial wherever it is implemented, but in New Orleans, the program escaped public notice, partly because Palantir established it as a philanthropic relationship with the city through Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s signature NOLA For Life program. Thanks to its philanthropic status, as well as New Orleans’ “strong mayor” model of government, the agreement never passed through a public procurement process.

In fact, key city council members and attorneys contacted by The Verge had no idea that the city had any sort of relationship with Palantir, nor were they aware that Palantir used its program in New Orleans to market its services to another law enforcement agency for a multimillion-dollar contract.

Even James Carville, the political operative instrumental in bringing about Palantir’s collaboration with NOPD, said that the program was not public knowledge. “No one in New Orleans even knows about this, to my knowledge,” Carville said.
palantir  creepy  surveillance  crime  forecasting  precrime  new-orleans  us-politics  privacy 
7 weeks ago
30 kWh Leaf Nissan Connect Issues
seems there's some kind of firmware/importation issue with the Nissan Leaf app integration.... bit of a mess
nissan-leaf  nissan  leaf  apps  mobile  cars  driving 
7 weeks ago
Can I Extend and Renovate my “Fixer Upper” for €100,000? A First Time Buyer’s Renovation Budget Explained
In 2013, €100,000 was like a king’s ransom to most businesses in the Irish construction industry. Now clients approach us with budgets at this level and are shocked when we tell them how little can be achieved with such a large sum of money. We have decided to tackle this issue with a clear worked example.

In 2018, rates for some types of construction have increased 50% since the recession, client expectations have increased, there is a shortage of competent construction workers, and subcontractors are now more accountable for quality.

These pressures have inflated the many expenses which make up a typical renovation budget. Even the most seasoned commercial clients are struggling to achieve tenable construction prices, and first time buyers must understand the financial risk of buying a home in need of complete renovation.


whoa.
renovation  homes  architecture  houses  building 
8 weeks ago
The Codex - I Do Not Like Go
Some gripes about Go from this blog, specifically around developer ergonomics (syntax highlighting and language-inherent error detection), politics, packaging and distribution, GOPATH, and the tuple-oriented error handling idiom. As R. I. Pienaar noted, the Go community seems full of "at-Google-wes", which is an excellent way of putting it.
golang  go  criticism  blogs  syntax-highlighting  coding  languages  google  at-google-we 
8 weeks ago
Containers Patterns
"There are a thousand ways to use containers" -- broken down into Development, Distribution and Runtime Patterns (via Tony Finch)
docker  containers  design-patterns  coding  packaging  deployment  via:fanf 
9 weeks ago
Artificial intelligence is going to supercharge surveillance - The Verge
What happens when governments can track huge numbers of people using CCTV? When police can digitally tail you around a city just by uploading your mugshot into a database?


Or, indeed, when CCTV combined with AI and big data is routinely tracking everybody all the time?
ai  surveillance  privacy  cctv  big-data  government  big-brother  anpr 
9 weeks ago
First bit of Tubular Bells played three times with slight delays so it takes 40 mins to sync - YouTube
'The intro of Tubular Bells played three times with slight delays so it takes 40 minutes to sync AND... randomly generated visual loops from the Exorcist.

That's what I've made happen tonight. No video editor, no music editor - all code.

And it's a trip.'
tubular-bells  the-exorcist  video  art  delay  hacks  trippy 
9 weeks ago
[Changelog] Republic of Ireland Patch notes for version 2.0.4.0 : ireland
Hello and welcome, I’m Leo Varadkar, lead developer of the MMO “Republic of Ireland”, which currently has 4,700,000+ players, and today we’ll be discussing changes coming eventually with the new 2.0.4.0 patch.


-- genius
changelog  funny  mmo  gaming  ireland  patches  comedy 
9 weeks ago
New DNA nanorobots successfully target and kill off cancerous tumors
This is amazing.
“Using tumor-bearing mouse models, we demonstrate that intravenously injected DNA nanorobots deliver thrombin specifically to tumor-associated blood vessels and induce intravascular thrombosis, resulting in tumor necrosis and inhibition of tumor growth,” the paper explains.

DNA nanorobots are a somewhat new concept for drug delivery. They work by getting programmed DNA to fold into itself like origami and then deploying it like a tiny machine, ready for action.
dna  nanorobots  origami  cancer  cures  medicine 
9 weeks ago
He Predicted The 2016 Fake News Crisis. Now He's Worried About An Information Apocalypse.
“In the next two, three, four years we’re going to have to plan for hobbyist propagandists who can make a fortune by creating highly realistic, photo realistic simulations,” Justin Hendrix, the executive director of NYC Media Lab, told BuzzFeed News. “And should those attempts work, and people come to suspect that there's no underlying reality to media artifacts of any kind, then we're in a really difficult place. It'll only take a couple of big hoaxes to really convince the public that nothing’s real.”
fake-news  reality  news  ai  propaganda  future  black-mirror  media  hoaxes  dystopia 
9 weeks ago
Single Trapped Atom Captures Science Photography Competition's top prize - EPSRC website
An image of a single positively-charged strontium atom, held near motionless by electric fields, has won the overall prize in a national science photography competition, organised by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

‘Single Atom in an Ion Trap’, by David Nadlinger, from the University of Oxford, shows the atom held by the fields emanating from the metal electrodes surrounding it. The distance between the small needle tips is about two millimetres.

When illuminated by a laser of the right blue-violet colour the atom absorbs and re-emits light particles sufficiently quickly for an ordinary camera to capture it in a long exposure photograph. The winning picture was taken through a window of the ultra-high vacuum chamber that houses the ion trap.
atom  photography  science  strontium  ion-traps  light 
9 weeks ago
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