4801
Quad9
Quad9 is a free, recursive, anycast DNS platform that provides end users robust security protections, high-performance, and privacy. 

Security: Quad9 blocks against known malicious domains, preventing your computers and IoT devices from connecting malware or phishing sites. Whenever a Quad9 user clicks on a website link or types in an address into a web browser, Quad9 will check the site against the IBM X-Force threat intelligence database of over 40 billion analyzed web pages and images. Quad9 also taps feeds from 18 additional threat intelligence partners to block a large portion of the threats that present risk to end users and businesses alike. 

Performance: Quad9 systems are distributed worldwide in more than 70 locations at launch, with more than 160 locations in total on schedule for 2018. These servers are located primarily at Internet Exchange points, meaning that the distance and time required to get answers is lower than almost any other solution. These systems are distributed worldwide, not just in high-population areas, meaning users in less well-served areas can see significant improvements in speed on DNS lookups. The systems are “anycast” meaning that queries will automatically be routed to the closest operational system. 

Privacy: No personally-identifiable information is collected by the system. IP addresses of end users are not stored to disk or distributed outside of the equipment answering the query in the local data center. Quad9 is a nonprofit organization dedicated only to the operation of DNS services. There are no other secondary revenue streams for personally-identifiable data, and the core charter of the organization is to provide secure, fast, private DNS


Awesome!
quad9  resolvers  dns  anycast  ip  networking  privacy  security 
2 days ago
Why is this company tracking where you are on Thanksgiving?
Creepy:
To do this, they tapped a company called SafeGraph that provided them with 17 trillion location markers for 10 million smartphones.
The data wasn’t just staggering in sheer quantity. It also appears to be extremely granular. Researchers “used this data to identify individuals' home locations, which they defined as the places people were most often located between the hours of 1 and 4 a.m.,” wrote The Washington Post. [....]
This means SafeGraph is looking at an individual device and tracking where its owner is going throughout their day. A common defense from companies that creepily collect massive amounts of data is that the data is only analyzed in aggregate; for example, Google’s database BigQuery, which allows organizations to upload big data sets and then query them quickly, promises that all its public data sets are “fully anonymized” and “contain no personally-identifying information.” In multiple press releases from SafeGraph’s partners, the company’s location data is referred to as “anonymized,” but in this case they seem to be interpreting the concept of anonymity quite liberally given the specificity of the data.
Most people probably don’t realize that their Thanksgiving habits could end up being scrutinized by strangers.
It’s unclear if users realize that their data is being used this way, but all signs point to no. (SafeGraph and the researchers did not immediately respond to questions.) SafeGraph gets location data from “from numerous smartphone apps,” according to the researchers.
safegraph  apps  mobile  location  tracking  surveillance  android  iphone  ios  smartphones  big-data 
2 days ago
'STELLA Report from the SNAFUcatchers Workshop on Coping With Complexity', March 14-16 2017
'A consortium workshop of high end techs reviewed postmortems to better understand how engineers cope with the complexity of anomalies (SNAFU and SNAFU catching episodes) and how to support them. These cases reveal common themes regarding factors that produce resilient performances. The themes that emerge also highlight opportunities to move forward.'

The 'Dark debt' concept is interesting here.
complexity  postmortems  dark-debt  technical-debt  resilience  reliability  systems  snafu  reports  toread  stella  john-allspaw 
5 days ago
The naked truth about Facebook’s revenge porn tool
This is absolutely spot on.

If Facebook wanted to implement a truly trusted system for revenge porn victims, they could put the photo hashing on the user side of things -- so only the hash is transferred to Facebook. To verify the claim that the image is truly a revenge porn issue, the victim could have the images verified through a trusted revenge porn advocacy organization. Theoretically, the victim then would have a verified, privacy-safe version of the photo, and a hash that could be also sent to Google and other sites.
facebook  privacy  hashing  pictures  images  revenge-porn  abuse  via:jwz 
7 days ago
Driverless shuttle in Las Vegas gets in fender bender within an hour
Like any functioning autonomous vehicle, the shuttle can avoid obstacles and stop in a hurry if needed. What it apparently can’t do is move a couple feet out of the way when it looks like a 20-ton truck is going to back into it.

A passenger interviewed by KSNV shared her frustration:

The shuttle just stayed still and we were like, ‘oh my gosh, it’s gonna hit us, it’s gonna hit us!’ and then.. it hit us! And the shuttle didn’t have the ability to move back, either. Like, the shuttle just stayed still.
ai  driverless-cars  driving  cars  las-vegas  aaa  navya  keolis 
8 days ago
20 Benefits that speed up hiring and 5 that slow it down
But that isn’t to say work-life balance isn’t important. It’s just job seekers are looking for balance outside of work. Three of the five benefits that sped up time to hire were related to giving more opportunities to leave work:

Caregiver leave
Adoption leave
On site gym
Performance based incentives
Family leave
hiring  benefits  text-analysis  pto  holidays  vacation  leave  gyms  work  family-leave 
9 days ago
A Clash of Cultures
In short, I am in support of Naomi Wu. Rather than let the Internet speculate on why, I am sharing my perspectives on the situation preemptively.

As with most Internet controversies, it’s messy and emotional. I will try my best to outline the biases and issues I have observed. Of course, everyone has their perspective; you don’t have to agree with mine. And I suspect many of my core audience will dislike and disagree with this post. However, the beginning of healing starts with sharing and listening. I will share, and I respectfully request that readers read the entire content of this post before attacking any individual point out of context.

The key forces I see at play are:

Prototype Bias – how assumptions based on stereotypes influence the way we think and feel
Idol Effect – the tendency to assign exaggerated capabilities and inflated expectations upon celebrities
Power Asymmetry – those with more power have more influence, and should be held to a higher standard of accountability
Guanxi Bias – the tendency to give foreign faces more credibility than local faces in China

All these forces came together in a perfect storm this past week.
culture  engineering  maker  naomi-wu  women  stereotypes  bias  idols  power  china  bunnie 
9 days ago
How Facebook Figures Out Everyone You've Ever Met
Oh god this is so creepy.
Facebook’s machinery operates on a scale far beyond normal human interactions. And the results of its People You May Know algorithm are anything but obvious. In the months I’ve been writing about PYMK, as Facebook calls it, I’ve heard more than a hundred bewildering anecdotes:

A man who years ago donated sperm to a couple, secretly, so they could have a child—only to have Facebook recommend the child as a person he should know. He still knows the couple but is not friends with them on Facebook.
A social worker whose client called her by her nickname on their second visit, because she’d shown up in his People You May Know, despite their not having exchanged contact information.
A woman whose father left her family when she was six years old—and saw his then-mistress suggested to her as a Facebook friend 40 years later.
An attorney who wrote: “I deleted Facebook after it recommended as PYMK a man who was defense counsel on one of my cases. We had only communicated through my work email, which is not connected to my Facebook, which convinced me Facebook was scanning my work email.”
facebook  privacy  surveillance  security  creepy  phones  contacts  pymk 
10 days ago
The $280M Ethereum bug

The newly deployed contract, 0x863df6bfa4469f3ead0be8f9f2aae51c91a907b4, contains a vulnerability where its owner was uninitialized. Although, the contract is a library it was possible for devops199 to turn it into a regular multi-sig wallet since for Ethereum there is no real distinction between accounts, libraries, and contracts.
The event occurred in two transactions, a first one to take over the library and a second one to kill the library — which was used by all multi-sig wallets created after the 20th of July.

Since by design smart-contracts themselves can’t be patched easily, this make dependancies on third party libraries very lethal if a mistake happens. The fact that libraries are global is also arguable, this would be shocking if it was how our daily use Operating Systems would work.
security  bitcoin  ethereum  lol  fail  smart-contracts 
10 days ago
Facebook asks users for nude photos in project to combat revenge porn
The photos are hashed, server-side, using the PhotoDNA hashing algorithm. This would have been way way better if it ran locally, on user's phones, instead though. Interesting to note that PhotoDNA claims to have a "1 in 10 billion" false positive rate according to https://www.itu.int/en/cop/case-studies/Documents/ICMEC_PhotoDNA.PDF
photodna  hashing  images  facebook  revenge-porn  messenger  nudes  photos 
10 days ago
'Lambda and serverless is one of the worst forms of proprietary lock-in we've ever seen in the history of humanity' • The Register
That doesn't mean Polvi is a fan. "Lambda and serverless is one of the worst forms of proprietary lock-in that we've ever seen in the history of humanity," said Polvi, only partly in jest, referring to the most widely used serverless offering, AWS Lambda. "It's seriously as bad as it gets."

He elaborated: "It's code that tied not just to hardware – which we've seen before – but to a data center, you can't even get the hardware yourself. And that hardware is now custom fabbed for the cloud providers with dark fiber that runs all around the world, just for them. So literally the application you write will never get the performance or responsiveness or the ability to be ported somewhere else without having the deployment footprint of Amazon."


Absolutely agreed...
lambda  amazon  aws  containers  coreos  deployment  lockin  proprietary  serverless  alex-polvi  kubernetes 
11 days ago
Something is wrong on the internet – James Bridle – Medium
'an essay on YouTube, children's videos, automation, abuse, and violence, which crystallises a lot of my current feelings about the internet through a particularly unpleasant example from it. [...]

What we’re talking about is very young children [..] being deliberately targeted with content which will traumatise and disturb them, via networks which are extremely vulnerable to exactly this form of abuse. It’s not about trolls, but about a kind of violence inherent in the combination of digital systems and capitalist incentives. It’s down to that level of the metal.'
internet  youtube  children  web  automation  violence  horror  4chan  james-bridle 
11 days ago
The 10 Top Recommendations for the AI Field in 2017 from the AI Now Institute
I am 100% behind this. There's so much potential for hidden bias and unethical discrimination in careless AI/ML deployment.
While AI holds significant promise, we’re seeing significant challenges in the rapid push to integrate these systems into high stakes domains. In criminal justice, a team at Propublica, and multiple academics since, have investigated how an algorithm used by courts and law enforcement to predict recidivism in criminal defendants may be introducing significant bias against African Americans. In a healthcare setting, a study at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center observed that an AI system used to triage pneumonia patients was missing a major risk factor for severe complications. In the education field, teachers in Texas successfully sued their school district for evaluating them based on a ‘black box’ algorithm, which was exposed to be deeply flawed.

This handful of examples is just the start — there’s much more we do not yet know. Part of the challenge is that the industry currently lacks standardized methods for testing and auditing AI systems to ensure they are safe and not amplifying bias. Yet early-stage AI systems are being introduced simultaneously across multiple areas, including healthcare, finance, law, education, and the workplace. These systems are increasingly being used to predict everything from our taste in music, to our likelihood of experiencing mental illness, to our fitness for a job or a loan.
ai  algorithms  machine-learning  ai-now  ethics  bias  racism  discrimination 
12 days ago
How to effectively complain to an Irish broadcaster about a public affairs show
Simon McGarr: "If you think that a public affairs show has failed to address a matter with proper balance, you can (Tweet) say it to the breeze or complain.
There is a process to follow to make an effective complaint
1) complain to broadcaster
2) complain to BAI if unhappy with response."

Thread with more details, and yet more at https://twitter.com/IrishTV_films/status/927172642544783360
complaining  complaints  rte  bai  ireland  current-affairs 
12 days ago
newrelic/sidecar: Gossip-based service discovery. Docker native, but supports static discovery, too.
An AP gossip-based service-discovery sidecar process.
Services communicate to each other through an HAproxy instance on each host that is itself managed and configured by Sidecar. It is inspired by Airbnb's SmartStack. But, we believe it has a few advantages over SmartStack:

Native support for Docker (works without Docker, too!);
No dependence on Zookeeper or other centralized services;
Peer-to-peer, so it works on your laptop or on a large cluster;
Static binary means it's easy to deploy, and there is no interpreter needed;
Tiny memory usage (under 20MB) and few execution threads means its very light weight
clustering  docker  go  service-discovery  ap  sidecar  haproxy  discovery  architecture 
15 days ago
Inside The Great Poop Emoji Feud
PILE_OF_POO in the news!
The debate appears to be between some of Unicode’s most prolific contributors and typographers (Unicode was initially established to develop standards for translating alphabets into code that can be read across all computers and operating systems), and those in the consortium who focus primarily on the evolution of emojis. The two chief critics — Michael Everson and Andrew West, both typographers — say that the emoji proposal process has become too commercial and frivolous, thereby cheapening the Unicode Consortium’s long body of work.

Their argument centers around “Frowning Pile Of Poo,” one of the emojis under consideration for the June 2018 class. In an Oct. 22 memo to the Unicode Technical Committee, Everson tore into the committee over the submission calling it “damaging ... to the Unicode standard.”
pile-of-poo  emoji  funny  michael-everson  unicode  frowning-poo  poo  shit 
15 days ago
How the Guardian found 800,000 paying readers
The strategy to rescue the Guardian from financial oblivion has attained a landmark position by increasing its revenue from readers to a point where it now outweighs the paper’s income from advertising.
This significant shift in the Guardian’s business model, making it less dependent on a highly challenging advertising market for media companies, results largely from a quadrupling in the number of readers making monthly payments under the title’s membership scheme, which has grown from 75,000 to 300,000 members in the past year.


Wow. Good job Guardian!
guardian  journalism  subscriptions  newspapers  future  membership  donations 
16 days ago
AWS Service Terms
57.10 Acceptable Use; Safety-Critical Systems. Your use of the Lumberyard Materials must comply with the AWS Acceptable Use Policy. The Lumberyard Materials are not intended for use with life-critical or safety-critical systems, such as use in operation of medical equipment, automated transportation systems, autonomous vehicles, aircraft or air traffic control, nuclear facilities, manned spacecraft, or military use in connection with live combat. However, this restriction will not apply in the event of the occurrence (certified by the United States Centers for Disease Control or successor body) of a widespread viral infection transmitted via bites or contact with bodily fluids that causes human corpses to reanimate and seek to consume living human flesh, blood, brain or nerve tissue and is likely to result in the fall of organized civilization.


Seems fair enough.
aws  zombies  funny  t-and-cs  legal  civilization  just-in-case 
16 days ago
aws-vault
'A vault for securely storing and accessing AWS credentials in development environments'.

Scott Piper says: 'You should not use the AWS CLI with MFA without aws-vault, and probably should not use the CLI at all without aws-vault, because of it's benefit of storing your keys outside of ~/.aws/credentials (since every once in a while a developer will decide to upload all their dot-files in their home directory to github so they can use the same .vimrc and .bashrc aliases everywhere, and will end up uploading their AWS creds).'
aws  vault  security  cli  development  coding  dotfiles  credentials  mfa 
16 days ago
Rich "Lowtax" Kyanka on Twitter's abuse/troll problem
how did you solve this problem at Something Awful? You said you wrote a bunch of rules but internet pedants will always find ways to get around them.

The last rule says we can ban you for any reason. It's like the catch-all. We can ban you if it's too hot in the room, we can ban you if we had a bad day, we can ban you if our finger slips and hits the ban button. And that way people know that if they're doing something and it's not technically breaking any rules but they're obviously trying to push shit as far as they can, we can still ban them. But, unlike Twitter, we actually have what's called the Leper's Colony, which says what they did and has their track record. Twitter just says, “You're gone.”
twitter  communication  discussion  history  somethingawful  lowtax 
16 days ago
Fooling Neural Networks in the Physical World with 3D Adversarial Objects · labsix
This is amazingly weird stuff. Fooling NNs with adversarial objects:
Here is a 3D-printed turtle that is classified at every viewpoint as a “rifle” by Google’s InceptionV3 image classifier, whereas the unperturbed turtle is consistently classified as “turtle”.

We do this using a new algorithm for reliably producing adversarial examples that cause targeted misclassification under transformations like blur, rotation, zoom, or translation, and we use it to generate both 2D printouts and 3D models that fool a standard neural network at any angle. Our process works for arbitrary 3D models - not just turtles! We also made a baseball that classifies as an espresso at every angle! The examples still fool the neural network when we put them in front of semantically relevant backgrounds; for example, you’d never see a rifle underwater, or an espresso in a baseball mitt.
ai  deep-learning  3d-printing  objects  security  hacking  rifles  models  turtles  adversarial-classification  classification  google  inceptionv3  images  image-classification 
16 days ago
Yonatan Zunger's twitter thread on Twitter's problem with policy issues
'I worked on policy issues at G+ and YT for years. It was *painfully* obvious that Twitter never took them seriously.'

This thread is full of good information on "free speech", nazis, Trump, Gamergate and Twitter's harrassment problem.

(Via Peter Bourgon)
via:peterbourgon  harrassment  twitter  gamergate  threads  youtube  google-plus  policy  abuse  bullying  free-speech  engagement 
24 days ago
MaxMind DB File Format Specification
An interesting data structure format -- 'the MaxMind DB file format is a database format that maps IPv4 and IPv6 addresses to data records using an efficient binary search tree.'
maxmind  databases  storage  ipv4  ipv6  addresses  bst  binary-search-trees  trees  data-structures 
25 days ago
What To Do When Your Daughter Is the Mean Girl | Psychology Today
Bookmarking -- just in case. hopefully it won't be necessary... good site for parenting advice along these lines.
I knew this day would come. I was, of course, hoping it never would-hoping that my daughter would never be mean to someone else's daughter-but as they say, I wrote the book on girl bullying in elementary school, so I knew that there was a pretty good chance that despite all of my best efforts, one of these days, my girl was gonna act like the mean one. This morning, she told me about it.
psychology  kids  parenting  bullies  children  girls 
25 days ago
Cronic
'A cure for Cron's chronic email problem'
cron  linux  unix  ops  sysadmin  mail 
26 days ago
IBM broke its cloud by letting three domain names expire - The Register
“multiple domain names were mistakenly allowed to expire and were in hold status.”
outages  fail  ibm  the-register  ops  dns  domains  cloud 
29 days ago
Solera - Wikipedia
Fascinating stuff -- from Felix Cohen's excellent twitter thread.
Solera is a process for aging liquids such as wine, beer, vinegar, and brandy, by fractional blending in such a way that the finished product is a mixture of ages, with the average age gradually increasing as the process continues over many years. The purpose of this labor-intensive process is the maintenance of a reliable style and quality of the beverage over time. Solera means literally "on the ground" in Spanish, and it refers to the lower level of the set of barrels or other containers used in the process; the liquid (traditionally transferred from barrel to barrel, top to bottom, the oldest mixtures being in the barrel right "on the ground"), although the containers in today's process are not necessarily stacked physically in the way that this implies, but merely carefully labeled. Products which are often solera aged include Sherry, Madeira, Lillet, Port wine, Marsala, Mavrodafni, Muscat, and Muscadelle wines; Balsamic, Commandaria, some Vins doux naturels, and Sherry vinegars; Brandy de Jerez; beer; rums; and whiskies. Since the origin of this process is undoubtedly out of the Iberian peninsula, most of the traditional terminology was in Spanish, Portuguese, or Catalan.
wine  aging  solera  sherry  muscat  vinegar  brandy  beer  rum  whiskey  whisky  brewing  spain 
29 days ago
Open-sourcing RacerD: Fast static race detection at scale | Engineering Blog | Facebook Code
At Facebook we have been working on automated reasoning about concurrency in our work with the Infer static analyzer. RacerD, our new open source race detector, searches for data races — unsynchronized memory accesses, where one is a write — in Java programs, and it does this without running the program it is analyzing. RacerD employs symbolic reasoning to cover many paths through an app, quickly.


This sounds extremely interesting...
racerd  race-conditions  data-races  thread-safety  static-code-analysis  coding  testing  facebook  open-source  infer 
4 weeks ago
Alarm systems alarmingly insecure. Oh the irony | Pen Test Partners
Some absolutely abysmal security practices used in off-the-shelf self-installed wireless home alarm systems -- specifically the Yale HSA6400. Simple replay attacks of the unlock PIN message, for instance
security  home  wireless  alarms  yale  fail 
4 weeks ago
"1 like = 1 delicious cocktail recipe or booze fact."
Great cocktail factoid thread from Manhattans Project/Every Cloud's Felix Cohen
felix-cohen  cocktails  booze  factoids  history  drinks 
4 weeks ago
Cyclists: Let's Talk About Shoaling
You're stopped at a red light with a bunch of folks on bikes, when someone who's just arrived sails past everyone, right to the head of the class. It's a lot like seeing somebody in the Whole Foods express lane with too many things. In other words, it's the kind of behavior that triggers toothy-toddler rages in otherwise emotionally competent adults.


Oh god. This drives me nuts. (via Mark)
shoaling  cycling  commuting  bikes  red-lights  commute  rage 
4 weeks ago
What Parents Can Do When Bullying is Downplayed at School | Psychology Today
Despite the "Bully-Free Zone" posters that line the school cafeteria walls and the Zero-Tolerance policy that was boasted about during last September's Back-to-School night, your experience is that the school would rather not address the problem at all. The responses you get from your child's teacher include bland lip service [...]


Good advice for this nasty situation -- I'm thankfully not facing it myself, but bookmarking just in case...
bullying  kids  school  education  psychology  children  parenting 
4 weeks ago
Falling through the KRACKs
I want to talk about why this vulnerability continues to exist so many years after WPA was standardized. And separately, to answer a question: how did this attack slip through, despite the fact that the 802.11i handshake was formally proven secure?
krack  security  wpa  wifi  ieee  crypto  vulnerabilities 
4 weeks ago
A history of the neural net/tank legend in AI, and other examples of reward hacking
@gwern: "A history of the neural net/tank legend in AI: https://t.co/2s4AOGMS3a (Feel free to suggest more sightings or examples of reward hacking!)"
gwern  history  ai  machine-learning  ml  genetic-algorithms  neural-networks  perceptron  learning  training  data  reward-hacking 
4 weeks ago
One person’s history of Twitter, from beginning to end – Mike Monteiro
Twitter, which was conceived and built by a room of privileged white boys (some of them my friends!), never considered the possibility that they were building a bomb. To this day, Jack Dorsey doesn’t realize the size of the bomb he’s sitting on. Or if he does, he believes it’s metaphorical. It’s not. He is utterly unprepared for the burden he’s found himself responsible for.
The power of Oppenheimer-wide destruction is in the hands of entitled men-children, cuddled runts, who aim not to enhance human communication, but to build themselves a digital substitute for physical contact with members of the species who were unlike them. And it should scare you.
politics  twitter  mike-monteiro  history  silicon-valley  trump 
4 weeks ago
Turtle Bunbury - THE NIGHT OF THE BIG WIND, 1839 (Reprise)

The Night of the Big Wind was the most devastating storm ever recorded in Irish history. Known in As Gaeilge as ‘Oiche na Gaoithe Moire’, the hurricane of 6th and 7th January 1839 made more people homeless in a single night than all the sorry decades of eviction that followed it.
1839  1830s  19th-century  ireland  turtle-bunbury  history  storms  weather  hurricanes 
4 weeks ago
srcecde/aws-lambda-cheatsheet
'AWS Lambda cheatsheet' -- a quick ref card for Lambda users
aws  lambda  ops  serverless  reference  quick-references 
4 weeks ago
Over The Air - Vol. 2, Pt. 3: Exploiting The Wi-Fi Stack on Apple Devices
This is the most amazing hack.

Upon successful execution, the exploit exposes APIs to read and write the host’s physical memory directly over-the-air, by mapping in any requested address to the controlled DART L2 translation table, and issuing DMA accesses to the corresponding mapped IO-Space addresses.
hacks  exploits  security  ios  wifi  apple  iphone  kernel 
4 weeks ago
Spotify’s Discover Weekly: How machine learning finds your new music
Not sure how accurate this is (it's not written by a Spotify employee), but seems pretty well researched -- according to this Discover Weekly is a mix of 3 different algorithms
discover-weekly  spotify  nlp  music  ai  ml  machine-learning 
5 weeks ago
Amazon Shipping Filter - Chrome Web Store
a user script to determine when Amazon.{com,co.uk,fr,de,it,etc} will not deliver to your chosen delivery address, which is a common risk for Irish users
ireland  shipping  amazon  buying  extensions  chrome  userscripts  shopping 
5 weeks ago
How to operate reliable AWS Lambda applications in production
running a reliable Lambda application in production requires you to still follow operational best practices. In this article I am including some recommendations, based on my experience with operations in general as well as working with AWS Lambda.
aws  cloud  lambda  ops  amazon 
5 weeks ago
Study: wearing hi-viz clothing does not reduce risk of collision for cyclists
Journal of Transport & Health, 22 March 2017:
This study found no evidence that cyclists using conspicuity aids were at reduced risk of a collision crash compared to non-users after adjustment for confounding, but there was some evidence of an increase in risk. Bias and residual confounding from differing route selection and cycling behaviours in users of conspicuity aids are possible explanations for these findings. Conspicuity aids may not be effective in reducing collision crash risk for cyclists in highly-motorised environments when used in the absence of other bicycle crash prevention measures such as increased segregation or lower motor vehicle speeds.
health  safety  hi-viz  clothing  cycling  commute  visibility  collision  crashes  papers 
5 weeks ago
House Six, the Heartbeat of Student Life – The University Times
Dilapidated but beloved, House Six shapes student life in Trinity and has for decades been the backdrop to changes in Irish society.


Ah, memories -- in my case mostly of all-night Civ games in Publications
history  tcd  trinity  house-six  csc  tcdsu  dublin  buildings  landmarks 
5 weeks ago
Jepsen: Hazelcast 3.8.3
Not a very good review of Hazelcast's CAP behaviour from Aphyr. see also https://twitter.com/MarcJBrooker/status/917437286639329280 for more musings from Marc Brooker on the topic ("PA/EC is a confusing and dangerous behaviour for many cases")
jepsen  aphyr  testing  hazelcast  cap-theorem  reliability  partitions  network  pacelc  marc-brooker 
5 weeks ago
A Decade of Dynamo: Powering the next wave of high-performance, internet-scale applications - All Things Distributed
A deep dive on how we were using our existing databases revealed that they were frequently not used for their relational capabilities. About 70 percent of operations were of the key-value kind, where only a primary key was used and a single row would be returned. About 20 percent would return a set of rows, but still operate on only a single table.

With these requirements in mind, and a willingness to question the status quo, a small group of distributed systems experts came together and designed a horizontally scalable distributed database that would scale out for both reads and writes to meet the long-term needs of our business. This was the genesis of the Amazon Dynamo database.

The success of our early results with the Dynamo database encouraged us to write Amazon's Dynamo whitepaper and share it at the 2007 ACM Symposium on Operating Systems Principles (SOSP conference), so that others in the industry could benefit. The Dynamo paper was well-received and served as a catalyst to create the category of distributed database technologies commonly known today as "NoSQL."


That's not an exaggeration. Nice one Werner et al!
dynamo  history  nosql  storage  databases  distcomp  amazon  papers  acm  data-stores 
5 weeks ago
"Why We Built Our Own Distributed Column Store" (video)
"Why We Built Our Own Distributed Column Store" by Sam Stokes of Honeycomb.io -- Retriever, inspired by Facebook's Scuba
scuba  retriever  storage  data-stores  columnar-storage  honeycomb.io  databases  via:charitymajors 
5 weeks ago
A Branchless UTF-8 Decoder
This week I took a crack at writing a branchless UTF-8 decoder: a function that decodes a single UTF-8 code point from a byte stream without any if statements, loops, short-circuit operators, or other sorts of conditional jumps. [...] Why branchless? Because high performance CPUs are pipelined. That is, a single instruction is executed over a series of stages, and many instructions are executed in overlapping time intervals, each at a different stage.


Neat hack (via Tony Finch)
algorithms  optimization  unicode  utf8  branchless  coding  c  via:fanf 
5 weeks ago
Kremlin info-ops measured to have a total reach of 340 million with dark, divisive ads
when the virality and resharing is measured, it's far higher than previously estimated, according to this Washington Post article
virality  news  fake-news  facebook  politics  russia 
5 weeks ago
London's Hidden Tunnels Revealed In Amazing Cutaways | Londonist
these really are remarkable. I love the Renzo Picassos in particular
design  history  london  3d  cutaways  diagrams  comics  mid-century 
5 weeks ago
poor man's profiler
'Sampling tools like oprofile or dtrace's profile provider don't really provide methods to see what [multithreaded] programs are blocking on - only where they spend CPU time. Though there exist advanced techniques (such as systemtap and dtrace call level probes), it is overkill to build upon that. Poor man doesn't have time. Poor man needs food.'

Basically periodically grabbing stack traces from running processes using gdb.
gdb  profiling  linux  unix  mark-callaghan  stack-traces  performance 
6 weeks ago
This Future Looks Familiar: Watching Blade Runner in 2017
I told a lot of people that I was going to watch Blade Runner for the first time, because I know that people have opinions about Blade Runner. All of them gave me a few watery opinions to keep in mind going in—nothing that would spoil me, but things that would help me understand what they assured me would be a Very Strange Film.
None of them told me the right things, though.
culture  movies  film  blade-runner  politics  slavery  replicants 
6 weeks ago
Slack 103: Communication and culture
Interesting note on some emergent Slack communications systems using emoji: "redirect raccoon", voting, and "I'm taking a look at this"
slack  communications  emojis  emoji  online  talk  chat 
6 weeks ago
The world's first cyber-attack, on the Chappe telegraph system, in Bordeaux in 1834

The Blanc brothers traded government bonds at the exchange in the city of Bordeaux, where information about market movements took several days to arrive from Paris by mail coach. Accordingly, traders who could get the information more quickly could make money by anticipating these movements. Some tried using messengers and carrier pigeons, but the Blanc brothers found a way to use the telegraph line instead. They bribed the telegraph operator in the city of Tours to introduce deliberate errors into routine government messages being sent over the network.
The telegraph’s encoding system included a “backspace” symbol that instructed the transcriber to ignore the previous character. The addition of a spurious character indicating the direction of the previous day’s market movement, followed by a backspace, meant the text of the message being sent was unaffected when it was written out for delivery at the end of the line. But this extra character could be seen by another accomplice: a former telegraph operator who observed the telegraph tower outside Bordeaux with a telescope, and then passed on the news to the Blancs. The scam was only uncovered in 1836, when the crooked operator in Tours fell ill and revealed all to a friend, who he hoped would take his place. The Blanc brothers were put on trial, though they could not be convicted because there was no law against misuse of data networks. But the Blancs’ pioneering misuse of the French network qualifies as the world’s first cyber-attack.
bordeaux  hacking  history  security  technology  cyber-attacks  telegraph  telegraphes-chappe 
6 weeks ago
Report an Issue Online | Dublin City Council
handy self-service issue report portal, more direct possibly than FixMyStreet.ie
dcc  dublin  city  council  reporting  civic  traffic-lights  roads  paths 
6 weeks ago
Google and Facebook Have Failed Us - The Atlantic
There’s no hiding behind algorithms anymore. The problems cannot be minimized. The machines have shown they are not up to the task of dealing with rare, breaking news events, and it is unlikely that they will be in the near future. More humans must be added to the decision-making process, and the sooner the better.
algorithms  facebook  google  las-vegas  news  filtering  hoaxes  4chan  abuse  breaking-news  responsibility  silicon-valley 
6 weeks ago
Intel pcj library for persistent memory-oriented data structures
This is a "pilot" project to develop a library for Java objects stored in persistent memory. Persistent collections are being emphasized because many applications for persistent memory seem to map well to the use of collections. One of this project's goals is to make programming with persistent objects feel natural to a Java developer, for example, by using familiar Java constructs when incorporating persistence elements such as data consistency and object lifetime.

The breadth of persistent types is currently limited and the code is not performance-optimized. We are making the code available because we believe it can be useful in experiments to retrofit existing Java code to use persistent memory and to explore persistent Java programming in general.


(via Mario Fusco)
persistent-memory  data-structures  storage  persistence  java  coding  future 
6 weeks ago
EV Purchase and Import Guide
Importing an EV from the UK into Ireland (specifically the Nissan Leaf). A little dated (2013) but possibly useful all the same
ev  cars  driving  uk  import  nissan-leaf 
6 weeks ago
S3 Point In Time Restore
restore a versioned S3 bucket to the state it was at at a specific point in time
ops  s3  restore  backups  versioning  history  tools  scripts  unix 
6 weeks ago
In 1973, I invented a ‘girly drink’ called Baileys
The creation of the iconic booze:
'We bought a small bottle of Jamesons Irish Whiskey and a tub of single cream and hurried back. It was a lovely May morning. 1973. Underdogs Sunderland had just won the FA Cup. We mixed the two ingredients in our kitchen, tasted the result and it was certainly intriguing, but in reality bloody awful. Undaunted, we threw in some sugar and it got better, but it still missed something. We went back to the store, searching the shelves for something else, found our salvation in Cadbury’s Powdered Drinking Chocolate and added it to our formula. Hugh and I were taken by surprise. It tasted really good. Not only this, but the cream seemed to have the effect of making the drink taste stronger, like full-strength spirit. It was extraordinary.'
whiskey  cream  booze  drinks  baileys  1970s  history  1973  chocolate  cocktails 
6 weeks ago
Share scripts that have dependencies with Nix
Nice approach to one-liner packaging invocations using nix-shell
nix  packaging  unix  linux  ops  shebang  #! 
6 weeks ago
The copyright implications of a publicly curated online archive of Oireachtas debates
"a publicly curated online archive of Oireachtas debates is so obviously in the public interest that copyright law should not prevent it." (via Aileen)
via:aileen  copyright  oireachtas  debates  ireland  parliament  archival  history 
6 weeks ago
Cashing in on ATM Malware - A Comprehensive Look at Various Attack Types
rather unnerving report from Trend Micro / Europol.

'As things stand, it looks like different criminal groups have already graduated from physical to virtual
skimming via malware, thanks to the lack of security measures implemented by commercial banks
worldwide. This is common in Latin America and Eastern Europe, but these criminals are exporting the
technique and have started to victimize other countries.'
atms  banking  security  trend-micro  banks  europol  exploits 
6 weeks ago
the execution of James Connolly in cake form
As depicted in the Decobake 1916 commemorative cake competition. Amazing scenes of edible history
odd  funny  decobake  1916  history  ireland  republican  nationalism  james-connolly  executions  omgwtf  cake 
6 weeks ago
The Israeli Digital Rights Movement's campaign for privacy | Internet Policy Review
This study explores the persuasion techniques used by the Israeli Digital Rights Movement in its campaign against Israel’s biometric database. The research was based on analysing the movement's official publications and announcements and the journalistic discourse that surrounded their campaign within the political, judicial, and public arenas in 2009-2017. The results demonstrate how the organisation navigated three persuasion frames to achieve its goals: the unnecessity of a biometric database in democracy; the database’s ineffectiveness; and governmental incompetence in securing it. I conclude by discussing how analysing civil society privacy campaigns can shed light over different regimes of privacy governance. [....]

1. Why the database should be abolished: because it's not necessary - As the organisation highlighted repeatedly throughout the campaign with the backing of cyber experts, there is a significant difference between issuing smart documents and creating a database. Issuing smart documents effectively solves the problem of stealing and forging official documents, but does it necessarily entail the creation of a database? The activists’ answer is no: they declared that while they do support the transition to smart documents (passports and ID cards) for Israeli citizens, they object to the creation of a database due to its violation of citizens' privacy.

2. Why the database should be abolished: because it's ineffective; [...]

3. Why the database should be abolished: because it will be breached - The final argument was that the database should be abolished because the government would not be able to guarantee protection against security breaches, and hence possible identity theft.
digital-rights  privacy  databases  id-cards  israel  psc  drm  identity-theft  security 
7 weeks ago
Anthony Levandowski has founded an AI religion
In September 2015, the multi-millionaire engineer at the heart of the patent and trade secrets lawsuit between Uber and Waymo, Google’s self-driving car company, founded a religious organization called Way of the Future. Its purpose, according to previously unreported state filings, is nothing less than to “develop and promote the realization of a Godhead based on Artificial Intelligence.”


this article is full of bananas.
google  crazy  uber  waymo  self-driving-cars  cars  religion  way-of-the-future  ai  god 
7 weeks ago
Abseil
a new common C++ library from Google, Apache-licensed.
c++  coding  abseil  google  commons  libraries  open-source  asl2  c++17 
7 weeks ago
@tttthreads
Unroll a long twitter thread with a single tweet. I like it
unroll  threads  twitter  reading  ux  bots 
7 weeks ago
Sickness absence associated with shared and open-plan offices--a national cross sectional questionnaire survey. - PubMed - NCBI
occupants in open-plan offices (>6 persons) had 62% more days of sickness absence (RR 1.62, 95% CI 1.30-2.02).
health  office  workplace  data  sickness  open-plan  work  offices 
7 weeks ago
Airtable
looks like a nice web-based database, FileMaker Pro-style
filemaker  collaboration  database  tools  web  sharing  teams 
7 weeks ago
We’re more likely to get cancer than to get married. This is a wake-up call | Ranjana Srivastava | Opinion | The Guardian
Later, in clinic, I see patients ranging from a stoical university student to a devastated father to the frail octogenarian who can’t remember the day, let alone that he has cancer – each patient an illustration of a recent Macmillan Cancer Support UK finding that it is more common for an individual to be diagnosed with cancer than to get married or have a first child. One in two people will encounter a cancer diagnosis in their lifetime, which is why the report says that, alongside marriage, parenthood, retirement and the death of a parent, cancer is now “a common life milestone”.
cancer  life  milestones  death  uk  health  medicine 
7 weeks ago
LambCI — a serverless build system
Run CI builds on Lambda:
LambCI is a tool I began building over a year ago to run tests on our pull requests and branches at Uniqlo Mobile. Inspired at the inaugural ServerlessConf a few weeks ago, I recently put some work into hammering it into shape for public consumption.
It was borne of a dissatisfaction with the two current choices for automated testing on private projects. You can either pay for it as a service (Travis, CircleCI, etc) — where 3 developers needing their own build containers might set you back a few hundred dollars a month. Or you can setup a system like Jenkins, Strider, etc and configure and manage a database, a web server and a cluster of build servers .
In both cases you’ll be under- or overutilized, waiting for servers to free up or paying for server power you’re not using. And this, for me, is where the advantage of a serverless architecture really comes to light: 100% utilization, coupled with instant invocations.
lambci  ci  builds  jenkins  testing  coding 
7 weeks ago
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