jerryking + value_propositions   46

Be a Potentiator - Mike Lipkin
April 25, 2019 | @ #CAIF2019 | Presentation and speech By Mike Lipkin.

1. Be Self-Savvy: Define your principles. Discern your impact. Play your role. Know what drives you. Know how you’re occurring to others. Know their expectations of you. Know thyself and thy relationship with others.
2. Develop Situational Sensibility: Get out there. Know the trends. Connect the dots. Context is decisive. Whoever understands their environment best wins. So expand your footprint. Study the data until it tells the truth. Anticipate the future by getting there first. Become your peers’ scout. Discover the new world for yourself and other will want to join you.
3. Make a Powerful Promise: Declare your purpose. Express your value proposition. Focus your execution. Know your personal mission. Know the unique benefit you give to others. Act accordingly. So my mission is to turn people into potentiators. My unique benefit is to excite people into remarkable action. I’m executing my promise through motivational messages like this one in any way I can. What are you doing?
4. Become Sublimely Skilled: Practice for real. Become the authority. Make it a pleasure. Whatever your level, be the best at that level. Learn from every experience. Communicate your knowledge with conviction. Light others up with your joie de vivre.
5. Build Robust Resilience: Interpret to win. Be prolific. Train like an athlete. We’re only as good as the stories that we tell ourselves. Make whatever happens meaningful. Do more things. Put the odds on your side. And train, train, train. Stamina is the rocket fuel of champions.
6. Grow Courageous Creativity: Unleash your imagination. Experiment like Edison. Talk, listen, learn. Dare to dream then declare your dream. Turn it into reality by trying something new. Fail fast until you fly high. Get in front of people and give them great conversation. Enrich their perspective while you expand yours.
7. Be Fanatically Faithworthy: Commit to your commitments. Come through in the crunch. Be the best you can be, every day. If you say it, do it. Make your word the one thing that others can always depend on. Become the go-to-person in a crisis. And, whatever happens, bring your A-Game every time. You can’t always be the best, but you can always be the best you can be that day.
8. Create Close Connections: Give First. Open yourself up. Become an insider. Generosity pays big dividends. Show what you can give them and others will show you the money. Get up, close and personal. Become integral to others’ wellbeing. If you build their trust, they will pay it forward all the way back to you.
9. Communicate Like a Champion: Say it like you mean it. Talk their language. Connect them to their purpose. How you say what you say is as important as what you say. Let your authenticity shine through but inject it with your passion. Be the reason why other people rediscover why they make a difference.
10. Cause Bold Breakthroughs: Own it. Celebrate the struggle. Finish like a professional. It’s not about the title. It’s about your skin in the game. It’s about taking on the responsibility for everyone else’s success, no matter what. You can’t always win, but you can always play to win. It’s meant to be hard. The pain is the price you pay to be a potentiator. Close strong and the force will be with you.
breakthroughs  CAIF  commitments  Communicating_&_Connecting  connecting_the_dots  execution  inspiration  It's_up_to_me  motivations  purpose  self-made  serving_others  skin_in_the_game  torchbearers  value_propositions  Mike_Lipkin  code_switching 
april 2019 by jerryking
Strategy or Culture: Which Is More Important?
“Culture eats strategy for breakfast.” These words, often attributed to Peter Drucker, are frequently quoted by people who see culture at the heart of all great companies. Those same folks like to cite the likes of Southwest Airlines, Nordstrom, and Zappos, whose leaders point to their companies’ cultures as the secret of their success.

The argument goes something like this: “Strategy is on paper whereas culture determines how things get done. Anyone can come up with a fancy strategy, but it’s much harder to build a winning culture. Moreover, a brilliant strategy without a great culture is ‘all hat and no cattle,’ while a company with a winning culture can succeed even if its strategy is mediocre. Plus, it’s much easier to change strategy than culture.” The argument’s inevitable conclusion is that strategy is mere ham and eggs for culture.

But this misses a big opportunity to enhance the power of both culture and strategy. As I see it, the two most fundamental strategy questions are:

1. For the company, what businesses should you be in?

2. And for each of those businesses, what value proposition should you go to market with?

A company’s specific cultural strengths must be central to answering that first question. For example, high-margin, premium-product companies that serve wealthy customers do not belong in businesses where penny-pinching is a source of great pride and celebrated behavior. Southwest has chosen not to enter a NetJets-like business, and that’s a sound decision.

Likewise, companies whose identity and worth are based on discovery and innovation do not belong in low-margin, price-competitive businesses. For example, pharmaceutical companies that traditionally compete by discovering novel, patentable drugs and therapies will struggle to add value to businesses competing in generics. The cultural requirements are just too different. This is why universal banks struggle to win in both commercial and investment banking. Whatever synergies they might enjoy (for instance, from common customers and complementary capital needs) are more than offset by the cultural chasm between these two businesses: the value commercial bankers put on containing risk and knowing the customer, versus the value investment bankers have for taking risk and selling innovative financial products.

Maintaining cultural coherence across a company’s portfolio should be an essential factor when determining a corporate strategy. No culture, however strong, can overcome poor choices when it comes to corporate strategy. For example, GE has one of the most productive cultures in the world, and its former leader, Jack Welch, concedes that his acquisition of Kidder Peabody was a failure because its cultural needs did not fit GE’s cultural strengths. The impact of culture on a company’s success is only as good as its strategy is sound.

No culture, however strong, can overcome poor choices when it comes to corporate strategy.

Culture also looms large in answering the second question above. In most businesses, customers consider more than concrete features and benefits when choosing between alternative providers; they also consider “the intangibles.” In fact, these often become the tiebreaker when tangible differences are difficult to discern. For example, most wealthy individuals choose financial advisors more for their personal chemistry or connections than their particular range of mutual funds. Virgin Airlines tries to attract passengers who like its offbeat, non-establishment attitude in how it operates. Culture experts are right to point out Southwest, Nordstrom, and Zappos because these companies have instilled norms of behavior that are essential features of their winning value propositions: from offering consistently low-price, high-quality service in Southwest’s case, to consistently delivering surprising staff service at Nordstrom and leading customer satisfaction at Zappos. What these companies really demonstrate is how culture is an essential variable—much like your product offering, pricing policy, and distribution channels—that should be considered when choosing strategies for your individual businesses. This is especially so when the behavior of your people, and particularly your frontline staff, can give you an edge with your customers.

Strategy must be rooted in the cultural strengths you have and the cultural needs of your businesses. If culture is hard to change, which it is, then strategy is too. Both take years to build; both take years to change. This is one of the many reasons that established companies struggle with big disruptions in their markets. For example, all the major credit card companies are seeking to transition from traditional payments to digital commerce. This shift in strategy will be difficult to pull off. It not only requires a cultural change, but also a change in companies’ target customer, value propositions, and essential capabilities—the three most fundamental choices a business strategy comprises!

Consigning strategy to just a morning meal for culture does injustice to both. Confining culture to the narrow role of “enabling” strategy prevents it from strengthening strategy by being part of it. It also weakens the power of strategy to turn your company’s cultural strengths into a source of enduring advantage.

Don’t let culture eat strategy for breakfast. Have them feed each other.
cultural_clash  cultural_change  intangibles  management  organizational_culture  Peter_Drucker  questions  quotes  strategy  synergies  value_propositions  via:enochko  unscalability 
march 2019 by jerryking
How Small Companies Can Get Big, Fast
Apr 10, 2014, 07:00am
How Small Companies Can Get Big, Fast

Michael Skok

What’s in it For Them?

One mistake small companies make when they get the chance to approach a larger company is that they make the conversation about them, the little guy. They begin by asking how the large company can help them sell their product or service when it should be the other way around. The best way to make a partnership pitch is by approaching a company and telling them what you’re going to do for them.

So flip all the points above and ask yourself how you’ll pitch to your potential partner to ensure this is a must-have partnership for them.

Usually, one of the key benefits a large company will want to realize is competitive advantage from faster time-to-market and more nimble development. Start there and figure out how you can build out things like opportunities to increase average revenue per user or ARPU for them. But be prepared to prove it and don’t rush it. Like any relationship it needs to be two way.
Gulliver_strategies  large_companies  minimum_viable_products  partnerships  product-market_fit  serving_others  small_business  value_propositions 
december 2018 by jerryking
How to approach your own career like an entrepreneur - Fortune
1. Choose growth over profitability. Rather than focus on short-term gains, think long-term goals and what you need to get there.
2. Bet on who you want to work with, not on where. Job seekers should invest in people, not ideas. That means pick the place you’re going to work for the people you’re going to work with. They’re the ones who will train you and lead you to other opportunities when the time comes.
3. Find your special sauce. Fetishize your product-market fit. This may be one of the hardest challenges in the new economy.
4. Celebrate uncertainty. Iterate. Seek feedback and adapt. Pivot where necessary.
5. Be public. Be on Linkedin. Give away hard-won information and knowledge, you’ll get something back. Be more transparent.

Nitin Julka was 31 and working like a dog in Cleveland when he got the itch. For six years he’d been a VP of his family’s business, a $20 million company that sold IT to schools. He had moved home after getting an MBA, excited to grow the company and make a difference in educational technology. It had been a “wild ride,” but he was ready for change. “I had no idea what I wanted to do,” he says. “I just knew I wanted to do something different.”

The jobs that interested him most were in tech. He started calling friends, friends of friends, business school classmates, and even distant contacts to talk about Bay Area companies and about what professional roles he might actually qualify for. After 30 or so conversations, he made up his mind: He wanted to be a product manager at a fast-growing Silicon Valley–based startup.

This struck few as a logical or even feasible next step for Julka: “I was changing job functions, industries, and geographies. People told me you can do one of those things—not all three at once.”

But Julka is more self-aware than most. On a quarterly basis, he conducts a life assessment and reviews what he considers to be his professional competitive advantage. Among his “most unique” attributes he lists his receptiveness to feedback. Indeed, in his quest for continual improvement, he has recorded personal and professional feedback in a single, running Google doc since 2010. He reads it once a week, when prompted by a recurring calendar invite.

And so began what Julka considers the “abnormal part” of his job search: He drew up a spreadsheet of 60 target companies, a few of which he researched for 60 to 80 hours (he admits he “overinvested”). He read 10-Ks and 10-Qs and a hundred CrunchBase articles; he mined his personal and virtual connections; he enlisted a friend, a former Google programmer, to tutor him in code; and he found free online videos from which he learned UX/UI design. With his wife’s support, he gave himself five weeks in Silicon Valley—no mean feat given that he had an 18-month-old baby at home. He met with three or more people a day, prepared a 48-page set of interview notes, and rode the highs and lows of pitching himself for a job that many thought he was an odd fit for.

It ended on a high. In September 2013 he got several job offers—including one, through a contact of his business school professor, at Bizo, a startup that has since been acquired by LinkedIn LNKD .

Julka may sound like a case study in craziness, a modern-day Ben Franklin whose entrepreneurial energy and efforts cannot be easily matched. But while he exists at one extreme, he’s the prototype for what it takes to navigate one’s career these days.

The truth is, wherever you are on the corporate ladder, whatever you do for a living, you’ve got to think like you’re launching a business from the ground up.

As LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman and Ben Casnocha wrote in their zeitgeist-tapping book from 2012, The Start-Up of You, “All humans are entrepreneurs.” To accelerate your career in today’s economy, you’ve got to embrace that spirit and apply the Silicon Valley formula—“adapt to the future” and “invest in yourself”—no matter how comfortable in your job you might be.

Imagine you’re a founder. You’ve been working for days—years, really. (You can’t remember the last time you took a day off.) You’ve networked like crazy. And now, at last, you’ve landed one of those much-coveted meetings with a high-profile venture capital firm on Sand Hill Road.

the start up of you bookIt feels as though you’ve been waiting your whole life for this: You’ve prepared your slide deck, rehearsed your pitch, and honed your talking points. You’re ready to be grilled about even the finest details of your marketing and monetization strategies. You’ve gone so far as to research your VC’s hobbies. But the product you’re selling isn’t some whiz-bang app or the latest and greatest cloud-computing platform; the product is you.

Here’s where your potential backer steps in: What’s your competitive advantage, she asks? The questions come rapid-fire: What’s your addressable market? The opportunities for growth? Your five-year plan? Your 10-year plan?

You may not be used to thinking about your career in such calculating terms, but old standards like “follow your passion” get you only so far. You won’t get Series A funding, but the analogy is apt: If you are the startup, you’d better start answering to your inner VC.

“You’ve got to have a sense of purpose, authenticity, self-awareness, intellectual honesty, and the ability to navigate ambiguity,” says Hemant Taneja, managing director at General Catalyst Partners, a venture capital firm. That’s what he looks for in companies—and people—he invests in. Alan Braverman, an entrepreneur and angel investor who co-heads the Giant Pixel, a tech startup studio, speaks more bluntly: “What most people consider a safe career path, I consider falling behind.”

You don’t have to be a TaskRabbit (or a VC) to know that the world of work has changed. Technology, globalization, and one long recession—in which nearly one in six Americans reported losing a job, according to Princeton economist Henry Farber—have all disrupted old-fashioned employment. Corporations have downsized, outsourced, and rightsized. They slashed training budgets during the recession, and though that spending is coming back—up 15% in 2013, according to a Deloitte survey—corporate talent development is thought to be a dying art. “As companies see it, the incentives are just so perverse,” says Peter Cappelli, a professor of management at Wharton Business School. “Typically you train someone, and once they become useful, they’re hired away from you.” Meanwhile, the slow march of automation continues: Robots now fly planes, perform surgeries, and in some cases write news. That leaves you, dear worker, in a tight spot—whether or not you’ve got your dream job now, you’ve got to stay relevant and evolve.

That’s not as easy as it once was. The half-life of desirable skills has shortened with the hastening pace of technological change. (A Python programmer now eats the once-hot Java programmer for lunch.) Fabio Rosati, CEO of the online freelancing platform Elance-oDesk, says these dynamics are moving us from the era of employment to one of newfangled “employability.” Professionals, like the 9.3 million who find work on his site, are now being viewed as mobile, independent bundles of skills. In this universe the most adaptable talent rules the day. Increasingly, learning agility is an attribute sought in corporate leadership, says Vicki Swisher, a senior director at Korn Ferry, an executive search firm. What’s more, she says, it’s what employers are looking for in all new hires.

That agility is also mission critical for your personal enterprise (formerly known as your career path). Rather than climb a single corporate ladder like the company man of yore, you’re more likely to spend your career scaling a professional jungle gym, maneuvering between projects, jobs, companies, industries, and locales. By the reckoning of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ latest job-tenure survey, you’ll pivot every 4.6 years (make that three if you’re a millennial, a demographic that will dominate the workforce in 2015). To do this well requires imagination, initiative, and some guts. Much like a startup, you’re forging your way ahead in a dynamic world where there is no conventional path.

“Get comfortable with being uncomfortable,” advises Mike Abbott, a general partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, who knows as an entrepreneur and as someone whose career zigged to Microsoft, Palm, and Twitter before it zagged to venture capital. In his case, he sought discomfort. “That’s how you learn the most.”

While the ideas of a free-agent nation and personal brand building have been with us for a couple of decades, DIY-career building has gotten a big push from the digital (and old-fashioned sharing) infrastructure that fosters this independence. There’s the rise in communal workspaces like WeWork and educational alternatives like Coursera, which offers college courses online, and General Assembly, which trains workers in the most in-demand tech skills. (As Julka’s case shows, YouTube and Google can also be empowering resources.)

A slew of online platforms has made it simpler to drum up employment, from one-off gigs to full-time jobs. Professionals can peddle their services, whether it be supply-chain management or legal advice, more easily and independently too, through sites like Elance-oDesk and TrustedPeer, which sometimes cater to big companies.

The data are messy on the size and shape of this new, more independent workforce. The BLS, whose classification system dates back to 1948, counted 14.4 million self-employed Americans in April 2014. That’s a far cry from the results of a study commissioned this year by the Freelancers Union and Elance-oDesk, which put the number of freelancers—a broader category that includes temps, part-timers, and moonlighters—at 53 million, or one in three American workers. (A report on freelancers … [more]
value_propositions  personal_branding  via:enochko  it's_up_to_me  pitches  self-assessment  self-awareness  Silicon_Valley  gig_economy  start_ups  Managing_Your_Career  Reid_Hoffman  Ben_Casnocha  slight_edge  job_search  discomforts  uncertainty  learning_agility  transparency  customer_growth  self-employment  Elance-oDesk  TrustedPeer  large_companies  non-routine  skills  special_sauce  free-agents  WeWork  product-market_fit  preparation  readiness  torchbearers 
july 2016 by jerryking
Do you know the value of what you’re selling? Many sales reps don’t - The Globe and Mail
TIBOR SHANTO
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Mar. 25, 2016

There are two questions I ask of sales people that confirm this. The first is “Why do people buy from you and your company?” The answers I get are not only underwhelming, but often indistinguishable from other companies in their sectors. The answers are generic and usually communicate the vendors’ own view of themselves, rather than that of the market. In most instances, if I took out the name of the company I am with, and put in the name of their least worthy competitor, the effect and accuracy of the statement changes little, if any. Which means that unworthy competitor can compete with you and deliver the same underwhelming experience at a lower cost.

This is even more pronounced when I ask: “Give me three specific value or positive business impacts you have delivered to your clients.” Instead of talking about how they were able to reduce delivery time by X, leading to a gain in revenue of Y, and reducing the cash sitting in inventory by Z, I hear a stream of beige, empty-calorie words.
value_propositions  sales  personal_branding  specificity  jargon  think_threes  salesmanship 
march 2016 by jerryking
What a Year of Job Rejections Taught Me About Pitching Myself
SEPTEMBER 09, 2015 | HBR | Nina Mufleh.
[send to Nick Patel]
After sending out hundreds of copies of my résumé to dozens of companies over the last year, I realized that I was getting nowhere because my approach was wrong....How could a career that ranged from working with royalty to Fortune 500 brands and startups not pique the curiosity of any hiring managers?

As a marketer, I decided to re-frame the challenge. Instead of thinking as a job applicant, I had to think of myself as a product and identify ways to create demand around hiring me. I applied everything I knew about marketing and storytelling to build a campaign that would show Silicon Valley companies the kind of value I would bring to their teams.

The experiment was a report that I created for Airbnb that highlighted the promise and potential of expanding to the Middle East, a market that I am extremely familiar with and until recently they had not focused on. I spent a couple of days gathering data about the tourism industry and the company’s current footprint in the market, and identified strategic opportunities for them there.

I released the report on Twitter and copied Airbnb’s founders and leadership team. Behind the scenes, I also shared it by email with many personal and professional contacts and encouraged them to share it if they thought it was interesting — most did, as did some of the top VCs, entrepreneurs and many peers around the world....What I realize in hindsight is probably one of the most important lessons of my career so far. The project highlighted the qualities I wanted to show to recruiters; more importantly, it also addressed one of the main weaknesses they saw in me....What the report helped me do was show, not tell, my value beyond their doubts. It refocused my perceived weakness into a strength: an international perspective with the promise of understanding and entering new markets. And though none of the roles that I interviewed for in the last two months focused on expansion, by addressing and challenging the weakness, I was able to re-frame the conversation around my strengths....asking yourself a different version of that question is going to make you better prepared for any conversation with a recruiter, a potential client, or even a potential investor....not “What is my weakness?” but rather “What do they perceive as a weakness in my background?”
Airbnb  campaigns  career_paths  creating_demand  Fortune_500  founders  HBR  hindsight  inbound_marketing  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  Middle_East  networking  personal_branding  pitches  problem_framing  reframing  rejections  self-promotion  social_media  strengths  value_propositions  via:enochko  weaknesses 
september 2015 by jerryking
Membership Experience Not Membership Math
Posted by Amanda Kaiser on Sep 5, 2014

How do you move members away from doing that mental math? How do you make joining less transactional and focus more on experience?

Help members solve more important problems

Our visits to the zoo solve many problems for me. Superficially, we are active and outside – but I can get this at a playground. More importantly, we are having fun and learning something. Most important, I believe that experiences like this can help teach my son those life skills that will help him be well rounded, fulfilled and giving person.

The zoo markets fun and learning but stories from higher up the list of mom’s needs would resonate far more. You see this play out successfully with the big brands. Harley Davidson means freedom not transportation. Coke means youth and fun not sugar water.

You can provide the most value when you help solve your member’s most important problems.

Provide special member experiences

Many member benefits lists read like a math equation: 10% off for members, a $50 savings, and 1 free guest. This is hardly compelling reading and it is not so compelling in the decision making process either. The logic is there but the emotion is missing.

How to help LBMA members package the emotional benefits of joining so that they can be shared back at their companies?
memberships  LBMA  associations  branding  transactional_relationships  brands  value_propositions  experience  emotions  OPMA 
july 2015 by jerryking
Media Asset Management – "Topping off" our Digital World
Even more than in 1932, when R.B. Bennett’s Government first articulated the need for a public broadcaster, CBC/Radio-Canada is interconnected with Canada’s democratic, social and cultural needs. Public broadcasting offers a unique value proposition as an effective instrument of Canadian public policy in a mixed public and private broadcasting system.
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“I look forward to joining the CBC team and getting started. CBC Sports is among the best-known and most-respected brands in the history of Canadian broadcasting,” Orridge says. “We are anticipating an exciting NHL Stanley Cup Playoff schedule, with women’s FIFA World Cup Soccer soon to follow. Our sports schedule overall represents an extraordinary opportunity and value proposition for both our audiences and our advertising partners.”
CBC  digital_media  value_propositions  public_broadcasting 
april 2015 by jerryking
Riders on the economic storm: Practical thinking for small business Riders on the economic storm: Practical thinking for small business | None | Nu U Consulting
24/06/09

Jonathan Weber writes in Slate’s The Big Money: Making Payroll feature in a piece titled, “Know When to Fold”: “Failure is not something an entrepreneur can give in to very readily. A certain level of blind optimism—even in the face of long odds—is often necessary to build a successful product or company. If you, as the business owner, don't believe, you can be pretty sure your employees, customers, and shareholders won't, either… don't give in easily if you feel the passion… Sometimes you have to take the view that failure simply isn't an option.”
tips  economic_downturn  small_business  strategies  networking  value_propositions 
march 2015 by jerryking
Want to land a big client? Here are four important tips - The Globe and Mail
MATTHIJS KEIJ
Young Entrepreneur Council
Published Tuesday, Aug. 12 2014

Study them

Landing a big client isn’t about you. Let me say that again: It is not about you.... remember that to succeed, you must help your client succeed. How do you do that? Study everything you can about the client until you fully understand the business, strategies and objectives.

Next, clearly define how your product or service will help the company achieve its goals. If you can identify a problem or isolate areas for improvement, then you can clearly illustrate your ability to provide a unique solution.

Make the connection. to land that enterprise client, try to identify your Norgay or Hillary. Talking to the wrong people wastes valuable time. However, if you can create a relationship with a strategic partner, that person can help get you in front of the right people and into the necessary meetings – all the more quickly than you could do on your own. Your target client is Mount Everest. Start climbing.
Gain influence

“An enterprise client needs to be convinced that working with your company is the best decision they could ever make,” says Karthik Manimozh, president and COO of 1-Page. “One of the most effective ways to help them arrive at this conclusion is to let your reputation precede you.”

The leadership, prestige and visibility that your company wields in the marketplace are all key factors that influence buying decisions. The answers your potential enterprise client seeks rest on your ability to shape your story. Good PR and marketing is the foundation. Strategic networking and social proof are pillars.

Remember, influence is something that comes with hard work...Be everywhere; talk with everyone (but ensure your conversations are informative and upbeat, never desperate).

Persevere through tough times

It can take months or even more than a year to land an enterprise client. Nothing worth having comes easy.

During that time, you’re bound to find yourself in countless meetings, possibly caught up in the middle of office politics, or jumping through hoops as the legal and procurement departments vet your company. Don’t dismay. This is par for the course when trying to land an enterprise client.
solutions  solution-finders  marketing  business_development  tips  indispensable  influence  networking  JCK  due_diligence  large_companies  perseverance  Communicating_&_Connecting  value_propositions  serving_others  strategic_thinking  client_development  hard_work  enterprise_clients  hard_times  office_politics  Michael_McDerment  the_right_people 
august 2014 by jerryking
Three Mistakes to Avoid When Networking
February 18, 2014 | HBR | by Dorie Clark |

Misunderstanding the pecking order.
Asking to receive before you give.
Failing to specifically state your value proposition.
networking  serving_others  HBR  value_propositions  misunderstandings 
february 2014 by jerryking
Noel's Pitch Letter
steal elements of his note for your own purposes. Look at the way he helps you to recognize a 'Noel-solvable' problem. Look at the succinct way he conveys the unique 'Noel-selling-proposition'. He ma...
Noel_Desautels  Managing_Your_Career  networking  JCK  pitches  feedback  templates  value_propositions  from notes
december 2013 by jerryking
Art Makes You Smart - NYTimes.com
November 23, 2013 | NYT | By BRIAN KISIDA, JAY P. GREENE and DANIEL H. BOWEN.

FOR many education advocates, the arts are a panacea: They supposedly increase test scores, generate social responsibility and turn around failing schools. Most of the supporting evidence, though, does little more than establish correlations between exposure to the arts and certain outcomes. Research that demonstrates a causal relationship has been virtually nonexistent.... we can conclude that visiting an art museum exposes students to a diversity of ideas that challenge them with different perspectives on the human condition. Expanding access to art, whether through programs in schools or through visits to area museums and galleries, should be a central part of any school’s curriculum.
art  correlations  museums  students  education  evidence  cognitive_skills  creative_renewal  value_propositions  the_human_condition 
november 2013 by jerryking
Delivering the message: How premium hotel brands struggle to communicate their value proposition
2006 | International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management Vol. 18 Iss: 3, pp.246 - 252 | by Winfried Daun, Raffaela Klinger.

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to review the ways in which premium hotel brands address the challenge of building and sustaining their value proposition and communicating the essence of this value to their customers.

Design/methodology/approach – The article draws on commercial market research, published information sources and industry experience to identify the key issues that impact on the effectiveness of marketing communications.

Findings – The conclusion is that luxury hotel chains have worked hard to improve the effectiveness of brand management but that several key factors (such as market insight, differentiation, relative uniqueness) influence the long-term effectiveness of the brand management approach.

Research limitations/implications – Practical measures for improving brand management practices are identified and explained.

Practical implications – The key success factors are explained, with suggestions for implementation.

Originality/value – The paper draws on consulting experience and contains analysis and practical suggestions that are especially relevant to practitioners.
value_propositions  Communicating_&_Connecting  hotels  brands  branding  information_sources 
august 2013 by jerryking
The economic imperative for investing in arts and culture
Mar. 27 2013 | The Globe and Mail | TODD HIRSCH.

A better reason why the economy needs a strong cultural scene is that it helps to attract and retain labour. This is especially important for cities trying to draw smart professionals from around the world. The best and brightest workers are global citizens, and if they (or their families) are not pleased with the cultural amenities, they won’t come. Calgary, where I live, is a perfect example: world-class fly fishing and a great rodeo will attract some people, but without fantastic arts and sports amenities, the pool of willing migrants would be shallow....The third reason, however, is the most important. To become the creative, innovative and imaginative citizens that our companies and governments want us to be, Canadians need to willingly expose themselves to new ideas. A vibrant arts and culture community is the easiest way to make this possible.

American neuroscientist Gregory Berns, in the introduction to his 2008 book Iconoclast, wrote: “To see things differently than other people, the most effective solution is to bombard the brain with things it has never encountered before.” Living and travelling abroad is a great way to do this, but for most of us that isn’t a practical reality. Arts and culture on our home turf offer us the chance to “bombard” our brain with new stimulus without leaving town.

The important part, as Dr. Berns puts it, is to concentrate on things your brain has never encountered before. If you’re an opera fan, going to see opera season after season will be enjoyable, but you won’t reap the creative benefits that come from exposure to other things. Maybe you need to skip the next performance of Don Giovanni and take in some indie rock. Or if you’re a hockey nut, turn off the game one night and take in an exhibit of contemporary visual art. You’re not required to enjoy an unfamiliar art or sport (although if you go with an open mind, you’ll be surprised). The point is to purposely take it in, absorb what’s going on, and let your mind be bombarded. It gets the brain’s neurons firing in different ways...We have to stop thinking about arts and culture as simply nice-to-haves. They are just as important as well-maintained roads and bridges. By giving us the chance to stimulate our minds with new ideas and experiences, they give us the opportunity to become more creative. Arts and culture are infrastructure for the mind.
cultural_institutions  art  artists  Calgary  creativity  prosperity  creative_class  funding  fine_arts  value_propositions  mental_dexterity  creative_renewal  Todd_Hirsch  imagination  idea_generation  ideas  iconoclasts  contemporary_art  open_mind  economic_imperatives  the_best_and_brightest 
march 2013 by jerryking
The art of leadership
November 17-18, 2012 | Financial Times pg. 22--Culture | by Peter Aspden.

The arts have the power to build social integration and point to a higher purpose for humanity.

1. Boldness
2. Suppleness
3. Democracy
4. A sense of mission
5. Imagination.
leadership  culture  United_Kingdom  museums  leaders  cultural_institutions  talent  arts  value_propositions  mission-driven  social_integration 
february 2013 by jerryking
How branding should boost your bottom line
December 5, 2012 |Toronto Caribbean | JG Francoeur.

“The single most important decision in evaluating a business is pricing power. If you’ve got the power to raise prices without losing business to a competitor, you’ve got a very good business. And if you have to have a prayer session before raising the price by 10 percent. then you’ve got a terrible business.” says Warren Buffet. If you employ solid branding techniques you can do the same with your business. raise your prices and boost your income!
To build a good brand you must focus on the 5 P5 of branding. Start by answering this questions and building your branding plan.
* First is purpose: When someone hears your name. what do you want them to think?
* Second is proposition: Your proposition is your core competency. You've got to know yourself to grow yourself!
* Third is packaging: 55 percent of how people perceive you is visual and most small business owners look small, unprofessional and unreliable. You must convey an image that will inspire confidence for your prospects.
* Fourth are people: It’s simple but powerful, your net worth is equal to your network of people. Big brands are surrounded by other big brands and you can do the same if you employ a partnership model.
* Fifth is perseverance: Many business owners think clients will fall from the sky. They try one venture or one marketing initiative and because it’s not successful they quit. You must never quit because your dream is important not only to you but to others who you will inspire along the way.
branding  howto  brands  brand_purpose  packaging  perseverance  purpose  value_propositions  human_capital  the_single_most_important  pricing  Warren_Buffett  price_hikes 
december 2012 by jerryking
Why Should We Care?
January 10, 2008 | WSJ.com | By PHILIPPE DE MONTEBELLO.

We all know art and art museums are important. But when it comes to articulating our reasons for this belief, we find it very difficult. We'd love to simply say, like our children, "Just because." When we try to be more specific, we end up with something rather abstract, such as: They are the repositories of precious objects and relics, the places where they are preserved, studied and displayed, which means that museums can be defined quite literally and succinctly, as the memory of mankind...The fact is, in the rooms of our museums are preserved things that are far more than just pretty pictures. These works of art, embodying and expressing with graphic force the deepest aspirations of a time and place, are direct, primary evidence for the study and understanding of mankind.... if we find our identity through works of art, then we have to identify them correctly, and works of art are not easy to decipher. They don't come with installation kits, lists of ingredients, and certificates of origin. In order to determine the time and place of their genesis, we have to ask of them: Who made them, where, when and why?

The answers to these questions are anything but obvious, because very few artistic traditions are pure -- that is, uninflected by outside influences. So, confronted with a work of art, we must be sure of its origin....The art museum then plays a key and beneficial role in teaching us humility, in making us recognize that other, very different yet totally valid civilizations have existed and do exist right alongside our own..in attempting to answer the question "why should we care?" I'd like to suggest a final, more broadly significant lesson. It is mankind's awe-inspiring ability, time and again, to surpass itself. What this means is that no matter how bleak the times we may live in, we cannot wholly despair of the human condition.
museums  art  value_propositions  provenance  artifacts  sublime  sense_of_proportion  galleries  art_galleries  humility  inspiration  interpretation  sense-making  Philippe_de_Montebello  the_human_condition 
august 2012 by jerryking
What is JCK's Value Proposition2
October 18, 2002 | Owen Gordon

It ain't sexy, Jerry. But I suspect that most successful consultants out there simply start out as a business-head for hire. then after getting some assignments continually in a particular area, claim to have expertise in that particular core competency, THEN think about where's the best place they could apply "this' to get the biggest bang for the buck. So first you have to define what the "this" is. then hone it‘ then market it. Examples would be "I write business plans for emerging high technology start-ups soup to nuts"; "I do primary market research using Statscan. IMS, etc. in order to estimate sizes of markets for initial product launches- primarily consumer-oriented products"; set up or broker distributorship partnerships for international businesses looking to have representation in Canada‘; I advise companies on how to re-invent their brand through my knowledge of various media vehicles. ad campaigns plus in~store promotions?
Do you see the kind of specificity you're going to have to hone in on and hang your hat on in order to drive business? I'm not saying you're doing it but terms like "Strategic Consulting" are almost meaningless in this day and age unless: a) You're McKinsey or someone, or; b) You're dealing with very unsaavy people. i.e. you're helping a saw mill in the Eastern Townships of Quebec because no one there knows the first thing about business or has even graduated high school. For any kind of Toronto-based business with any degree of sophistication. you're going to have to be more focused and "on message” in terms of what it is that you provide.
JCK  value_propositions  Owen_Gordon  management_consulting  specificity 
july 2012 by jerryking
Ten Laws Of The Modern World
04.19.05 | Forbes | Rich Karlgaard.

• Gilder's Law: Winner's Waste. The futurist George Gilder wrote about this a few years ago in a Forbes publication. The best business models, he said, waste the era's cheapest resources in order to conserve the era's most expensive resources. When steam became cheaper than horses, the smartest businesses used steam and spared horses. Today the cheapest resources are computer power and bandwidth. Both are getting cheaper by the year (at the pace of Moore's Law). Google (nasdaq: GOOG - news - people ) is a successful business because it wastes computer power--it has some 120,000 servers powering its search engine--while it conserves its dearest resource, people. Google has fewer than 3,500 employees, yet it generates $5 billion in (current run rate) sales.

• Ricardo's Law. The more transparent an economy becomes, the more David Ricardo's 19th-century law of comparative advantage rules the day. Then came the commercial Internet, the greatest window into comparative advantage ever invented. Which means if your firm's price-value proposition is lousy, too bad. The world knows.

• Wriston's Law. This is named after the late Walter Wriston, a giant of banking and finance. In his 1992 book, The Twilight of Sovereignty, Wriston predicted the rise of electronic networks and their chief effect. He said capital (meaning both money and ideas), when freed to travel at the speed of light, "will go where it is wanted, stay where it is well-treated...." By applying Wriston's Law of capital and talent flow, you can predict the fortunes of countries and companies.

• The Laffer Curve. In the 1970s the young economist Arthur Laffer proposed a wild idea. Cut taxes at the margin, on income and capital, and you'll get more tax revenue, not less. Laffer reasoned that lower taxes would beckon risk capital out of hiding. Businesses and people would become more productive. The pie would grow. Application of the Laffer Curve is why the United States boomed in the 1980s and 1990s, why India is rocking now and why eastern Europe will outperform western Europe.

• Drucker's Law. Odd as it seems, you will achieve the greatest results in business and career if you drop the word "achievement" from your vocabulary. Replace it with "contribution," says the great management guru Peter Drucker. Contribution puts the focus where it should be--on your customers, employees and shareholders.

• Ogilvy's Law. David Ogilvy gets my vote as the greatest advertising mind of the 20th century. The founder of Ogilvy & Mather--now part of WPP (nasdaq: WPPGY - news - people )--left a rich legacy of ideas in his books, my favorite being Ogilvy on Advertising. Ogilvy wrote that whenever someone was appointed to head an office of O&M, he would give the manager a Russian nesting doll. These dolls open in the middle to reveal a smaller doll, which opens in the middle to reveal a yet smaller doll...and so on. Inside the smallest doll would be a note from Ogilvy. It read: "If each of us hires people who are smaller than we are, we shall become a company of dwarfs. But if each of us hires people who are bigger than we are, we shall become a company of giants." Ogilvy knew in the 1950s that people make or break businesses. It was true then; it's truer today.
Rich_Karlgaard  matryoshka_dolls  Moore's_Law  Metcalfe's_Law  Peter_Drucker  Ogilvy_&_Mather  Gilder's_Law  hiring  talent  advertising_agencies  transparency  value_propositions  capital_flows  talent_flows  David_Ogilvy  inexpensive  waste  abundance  scarcity  constraints  George_Gilder 
june 2012 by jerryking
What Customers Want
JULY 7, 2003 | Fortune | by Larry Seiden and Geoff Colvin
To increase overall profitability, smart companies retain and
grow their most profitable customers and acquire more of them.
They fix, close, or sell their least profitable customers. And they
organize in a nontraditional way, around customer segments...
A winning value proposition is the one that best meets the full
set of customer needs, including price. That is, certain critical
elements of the experience deliver on the customers’ most important
needs better than the competition. This creates differentiation
and the potential for superior customer profitability—a mutually beneficial value exchange. Your goal is to create mutually beneficial value exchanges with customer segments that offer the greatest economic profit potential. Creating, communicating, and executing competitively dominant value propositions that earn exceptional customer profitability involves a sixstep process we’ve identified at leading companies and dubbed value proposition management.

Step 1: Figure out the needs
of your most profitable customers
Step 2: Get creative
Step 3: Test and verify your hypotheses
Step 4: Tell customers how great
your value propositions are
Step 5: Apply the best value
propositions on a large scale
Step 6: Begin anew.
Geoff_Colvin  customers  Dell  RBC  value_propositions  customer_segmentation  customer_acquisition  mutually_beneficial  customer_experience  Michael_McDerment 
april 2012 by jerryking
Build Your Personal Value Proposition
Executives set value propositions for their products — the target market segments, the benefits they provide, and their prices. It's why a target customer should buy the product.

But value propositions go beyond just products. Your personal value proposition (PVP) is at the heart of your career strategy. It's the foundation for everything in a job search and career progression — targeting potential employers, attracting the help of others, and explaining why you're the one to pick. It's why to hire you, not someone else.

The question is this: How do you develop a powerful PVP?

Take a look at Steve (name has been changed). Steve is a tall, 54-year-old manufacturing executive. Steve's interest and skill at manufacturing operations is the cornerstone of his PVP.

It's hard to know what you're really good at. You need more than the ordinary, convenient categories. I seek the kinds of things where I fit naturally, what I enjoy. That's not consumer products, not hard science, not financial institutions, and not an enterprise that's pursuing something other than long-term financial objectives. I look for operations-intensive companies who can benefit from significant performance improvement. I take floundering institutions and go build things. It's not quite turnaround, not slash and burn; but it's a far way from peaceful stewardship of assets. I'm a go-build guy.

Steve targets companies from $150 million sales up to $1 billion. He doesn't want start-ups, where everything would need to be set up, or a company so large that he couldn't know people down the line. He prefers private companies. With no experience with the special duties of a public corporation's CEO, he feels it doesn't make sense to have to learn all that on the job at this point in his work life.

Steve also emphasizes his view of the right atmosphere: "I'm not at all into sleazy places, nor into industries like tobacco, alcohol, or casinos. Ethically-challenged places are no fun." We could debate whether those industries pose ethical issues, but that's not the point. They aren't right for him.

Steve's leaving out the great majority of corporations, but that doesn't limit him. He gets three or four calls a year asking him to consider a corporate CEO position. Those calls come both because he's a strong candidate for jobs where he fits and because the people who call know that. They don't call about everything. They call about positions that connect to Steve's PVP. It's easy to understand where he's strong and what he wants to do. His PVP is distinctive, unlike what similarly qualified executives might say about themselves.

Here are four steps to develop a strong PVP:
Set a clear target. The PVP begins with a target, one that needs what you have to offer. You'll prefer some directions, not others. Targeting will make you most effective.
Identify your strengths. It may sound obvious, but what you know and what you can do are the foundation of your PVP. Hone in on what those are.
Tie your strengths to your target position. Don't leave it up to the employer to figure out how your strengths relate to what she needs. Let your PVP tightly connect you to the position. Connect the dots for her. Consider her perspective and know why she should hire you or promote you.
Provide evidence and success stories. Your strengths may be what an employer is "buying," but your achievements are the evidence you have those strengths. They make your case convincing. Some people prepare a non-confidential portfolio to showcase that evidence in a vivid way. They collect reports they wrote that had impact. They pull together facts on measurable achievements such as sales growth or cost reduction.

Steve's target — mid-sized, privately-held industrial companies that need significant operations improvement to enable growth — is an excellent example of the first of these steps. He's setting himself up in his distinct target area, where his network knows him well. His past success demonstrates that he has the capability and emphasizes his strengths. In all of this, Steve's intrinsic quality is critical to his success, but it's not the whole story. It's through his PVP that Steve's making the most of his talents.

As you think about your own career strategy, think about Steve and his narrowly defined and distinctive PVP. What's your value proposition?
entrepreneurship  JCK  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  personal_accomplishments  personal_branding  via:jb19012  value_propositions  special_sauce 
april 2012 by jerryking
Average Is Over - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: January 24, 2012
the reason we have such stubbornly high unemployment and sagging middle-class incomes today is largely because of the big drop in demand because of the Great Recession, but it is also because of the quantum advances in both globalization and the information technology revolution, which are more rapidly than ever replacing labor with machines or foreign workers.

In the past, workers with average skills, doing an average job, could earn an average lifestyle. But, today, average is officially over. Being average just won’t earn you what it used to. It can’t when so many more employers have so much more access to so much more above average cheap foreign labor, cheap robotics, cheap software, cheap automation and cheap genius. Therefore, everyone needs to find their extra — their unique value contribution that makes them stand out in whatever is their field of employment. Average is over.
averages  Tom_Friedman  unemployment  middle_class  globalization  automation  value_propositions  economic_stagnation  Tyler_Cowen  the_Great_Decoupling  Pablo_Picasso  cheap_revolution 
january 2012 by jerryking
Reinventing business research | timetric.com
Great research deserves to be presented well

If you're in the business of publishing research — whether you're making
it available for free to as wide an audience as possible, selling
subscriptions, or selling reports and datasets on a one-off basis —
Timetric can help you do it faster, cheaper and more effectively.

Faster: Timetric's library of public data, gallery of visualizations
and API let you get going right away.

Cheaper: Timetric's software-as-a-service; that means low (often
zero) setup cost and very competitive ongoing pricing. We're so
confident that Timetric will make you more effective that we're happy to
work on a revenue-share basis.

More effectively: There's a reason we're one of the ten best places
to see 'sexy' data online; not only do services built on Timetric look
(and work) great, because the graphs are sharable and social they get
into the media, bringing you more (and more engaged) readers.
DaaS  visualization  infographics  statistics  data  tools  charts  analytics  web  analysis  Freshbooks  value_propositions  JCK 
july 2011 by jerryking
Social netting - the whats and whys (2) | Office Jotter
By: Roger Whitehead, Director, Office Futures
Published: 27th August 2009
social_media  value_propositions  case_studies  Igloo  frameworks 
march 2011 by jerryking
Writing a Credible Investment Thesis
11/15/2004 | HBS Working Knowledge | by David Harding and
Sam Rovit
Many companies are "terrifyingly unclear" to themselves and investors about why they are making an acquisition, according to the authors of a new book, Mastering the Merger. Support comes when you spell it out.

Tough truths, on the other hand, are things like when and where you invest and under what circumstances.
HBS  HBR  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  private_equity  investment_research  writing  themes  thesis  value_creation  value_propositions  investment_thesis  Bain  tough-mindedness 
december 2010 by jerryking
Maintaining Employment Value Proposition
July 31, 2009 | BusinessWeek | Staff at the Corporate
Executive Board. `Employee disengagement continues to be a critical
issue across a wide variety of organizations as they work through the
economic downturn. One out of four employees was disengaged at the end
of the first half in 2009 according to a survey of over 61,000 employees
by the Corporate Leadership Council, a program of the Corporate
Executive Board. One of the main causes of this disengagement is
directly linked to the massive change employees have experienced when it
comes to their Employment Value Proposition (EVP)—or the value that
employees gain by working for a particular organization, 82% of
employees indicated that their EVP has trended downwards quite
dramatically in the past six months due to reasons such as layoffs,
organizational restructurings, and shifts in managers. `
employee_engagement  value_propositions 
september 2010 by jerryking
Provide true value or advisers are 'toast'
April 12, 2010 | G & M | DAN RICHARDS. "punctuated
equilibrium" is working its way through the fin. industry. The late
scientist, Stephen Jay Gould, identified this concept. His insight was
that while change is a constant, the pace of change isn't - for
millennia, species have gone through centuries of slow, almost
imperceptible change, interspersed with short periods of incredibly
rapid and intense shifts. In the last 30 yrs, most industries have had
to adapt to an entirely new set of rules. Change agents like Wal-Mart,
Costco, & Amazon.com have reshaped retailing. Mfg has been
transformed by globalization & China. The Web has decimated the
traditional biz model for newspapers. Svcs. have seen the effects of
off-shoring. The investment industry is going through that same epochal
transformation. Defining tomorrow's winners is their ability to
demonstrate clear, compelling, discernible value: not a plan itself, but
what a plan accomplishes, and the communication of what the plan achieves.
financial_advisors  Dan_Richards  indispensable  competitive_landscape  generating_strategic_options  adaptability  Charles_Darwin  evolution  value_creation  theory_of_evolution  financial_services  disequilibriums  change_agents  constant_change  value_propositions  Communicating_&_Connecting  accelerated_lifecycles 
august 2010 by jerryking
Delivering the message: How premium hotel brands struggle to communicate their value proposition
2006 | International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality
Management. Vol. 18, Iss. 3; p. 246 | by Winfried Daun, Senior
Consultant, BBDO Consulting, Zurich, Switzerland, and Raffaela Klinger,
Freelance Consultant, Dusseldorf, Germany
ProQuest  luxury  hotels  value_propositions  Communicating_&_Connecting  branding  challenges 
march 2010 by jerryking
Marketing Your Business for SUCCESS
Nov/Dec 2005 | International Journal of Pharmaceutical
Compounding | by Russell A Waddill.
(1) product/service, (2) target customer, (3) value proposition
(competitive advantage in the market), and (4) value chain (how you
deliver your product/service to the customer).
ProQuest  JCK  marketing  small_business  financial_advisors  value_chains  value_propositions 
february 2010 by jerryking
Too many pots
Sept. 2003 | Profit. | by Rick Spence. Abel and Cain fell
into a common trap: targeting the broadest market possible. By trying to
please too many people at once, they were unable to make deep
connections with customers and event sponsors. Sure, their potential
market was huge, but as Abel admits, "We weren't providing enough
value." Niche markets pay better than mass markets; it's a classic
entrepreneurial lesson, but one that many people learn the hard way. If
one were starting a beverage company today, find the niches Pepsi and
Coke don't own - as Cott Corp. did with bargain-priced house brands.
Unlike the markets Cain and Abel had previously wooed, the people who
attended these events had pressing information and self-development
needs, and were willing to pay for events that fulfilled those needs.
"Specializing opened up markets that we could never reach before," says
Abel. "There turns out to be no shortage of niche markets. The closer
you look, the more you see."
ProQuest  Rick_Spence  entrepreneur  market_segmentation  specialization  targeting  lessons_learned  partnerships  value_propositions  niches  Pepsi  Cott  Coca-Cola  customer_segmentation  mass_markets  emotional_connections  market_intelligence  private_information 
february 2010 by jerryking
Introduction: Customer Focus - HBR.org
May 2007 | HBR | Customers are the real employer—the people
who fund our paychecks, the only guarantors of our jobs. Because the
customer’s power is very real, the dynamics of business drive everything
toward commoditization. As surely as springtime melts snowbanks,
markets erode profits. A company can respond to melting margins in one
of four ways. It can surrender, giving up differentiation and competing
on efficiency and cost. It can consolidate power by buying its rivals,
figuring that the biggest snowbanks survive longest. It can innovate,
leaving behind the commoditized old and making money from that which is
still fresh and profitable. Or it can differentiate not just its
offerings but its approach to customers as well: It can cleverly define
segments of customers and sell only to those for whom it can create
especially valuable offerings or work with individual customers to
combine its products and services into unique packages, often described
as “solutions.”
HBR  customer_focus  commoditization  customer_centricity  consolidation  innovation  differentiation  bespoke  personalization  customer_segmentation  value_propositions  solutions  solution-finders  packagers 
october 2009 by jerryking
The Value Every Business Needs to Create Now
Friday July 31, 2009 | HarvardBusiness.org | by Umair Haque
who perceives at least two kinds of value. Thin value describes an
economic illusionary vision in which the profit sought is economically
meaningless, because it leaves others worse off, or, at best, no one
better off. The marginal profit doesn't reflect the creation of
authentic, meaningful value. Thick value is sustainable, meaningful
value — and a new generation of radical innovators is wielding it like a
strategic superweapon.
value_propositions  value_creation  umairhaque 
october 2009 by jerryking
Consumed - Work Study - How to Create a Million-Dollar Business Before Graduating From College - NYTimes.com
April 10, 2009 | New York Times | By ROB WALKER. Profiles, a
23-year-old Dominic Coryell, a senior at Northeastern University, who
runs Boston-based Garment Valet. in 2008, Garment Valet booked $950,000
in revenue with 14 full-time employees.
entrepreneur  logistics  operations  value_propositions  Colleges_&_Universities  college_moguls 
april 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com: The value of value is the new consumer angle
March 16, 2009 | The Globe and Mail pg. B6| ANDREA SOUTHCOTT
* Understand your competitive context.
* Offer consumers new ways to experience your product.
* Tap into the power of local stories.
* Tap into the best-kept secrets of local community.
* Shift from owning to using.
consumers  value_propositions  competitive_landscape  value  Andrea_Southcott  sharing_economy  locavore  storytelling  economic_downturn  end_of_ownership 
march 2009 by jerryking
An old dog learns some new tricks
October 18, 2006| Globe & Mail pg. C3| by SEAN O'DONOVAN as
part of his Diary of a Job Hunter series. His target -- chief
executive officers in the technology industry.
Epiphany No. 1: network with networkers. O'DONOVAN prefers 1-on-1
meetings with CEOs which allows for a meaningful and frank exchange of
ideas and information. CEOs themselves tend to be networking savvy.
Epiphany No. 2 : Work at articulating how I can add the greatest value,
rather than telling people what I've done and where I'm most
comfortable. Always translate my bio into an understanding of what I can
do for them.....translate my career achievements into "What I can do for you" statements, focused on their needs and my corresponding skills.

I've now started to explain how I can "reposition the way you market and sell your products to improve market penetration," or "build, grow or revitalize your sales channel and alliance activities," or "streamline the definition, delivery and launch of new products to minimize revenue ramp-up times."

And it's all supported by specific achievements from my experience. It's made a big difference to the way I present myself. I've changed my 30-second elevator pitch as well as my follow-up e-mails sent to potential networking contacts after my first voicemail. And it's given me a great angle for the mailing I'm preparing to send to tech CEOs.

I now have a solid list of "things I can do for you," split out into four key categories: product planning/delivery; lead generation; marketing communications; and channel/alliance development.
job_search  networking  value_propositions  elevator_pitch  ProQuest  CEOs  personal_branding  one-on-one  self-promotion  JCK  high-impact 
march 2009 by jerryking
The Arts Need Better Arguments - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 17, 2009, WSJ article by GREG SANDOW.

The arts are going to need a better strategy. And in the end it's going to have to come from art itself, from the benefits art brings, in a world where popular culture -- which has gotten smart and serious -- also helps bring depth and meaning to our lives.

That's the kicker: the popular culture part. Once we figure that out, we can leave our shaky arguments behind and really try to prove we matter.
strategy  funding  fine_arts  value_propositions  contemporary_art  art  artists  economic_stimulus  imagination  creativity  open_mind  ideas  popular_culture  cultural_institutions  prosperity  creative_class 
february 2009 by jerryking

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