jerryking + u.s.foreign_policy + anti-americanism   8

Victim, bully or both?
18 Sep 2001 | The Globe and Mail A.16. |Christopher Levenson.

Once the smoke has cleared from Manhattan, I hope ordinary Americans -- surely among the least politically sophisticated and most insular of major world populations -- will finally begin to ask themselves what is behind the rhetorical smokescreen about the U.S. being the "beacon of liberty" and the "leader of the free world" that could make millions of ordinary people around the world hate them so much. Nothing can ever justify the horrendous loss of innocent lives in last Tuesday's terrorist attacks, but this horror and anger must be accompanied by introspection.

Many, especially in the Third World, have every justification for hating America because of its economic imperialism. This is not just a matter of overt military intervention, as in Chile, Nicaragua or El Salvador. It is also a matter of inaction: failure to adequately fund UN agencies, failure to support the ABM treaty and the refusal to sign on to the Kyoto agreement.

Until Americans realize that, in virtually all eyes except their own, they are an imperialist power in a world that is crying out for co-operation and long-term people-to-people assistance, we can only expect the hatred, and with it the terrorism, to get even worse.
letters_to_the_editor  anti-Americanism  ProQuest  Margaret_Wente  9/11  U.S.foreign_policy  moral_equivalencies 
july 2012 by jerryking
Please don't blame the American victims -
19 Sep 2001| The Globe and Mail A.14 |editorial

"The towers of the World Trade Center had barely settled into the ground before Canadian critics began suggesting that the Americans may have brought this disaster on themselves. In letters to the editor, opinion columns and talk shows, these critics have leaped to explain why U.S. foreign policy laid the ground for last week's attacks. "..."Anti-American sentiment is hardly new in Canada. There has always been a camp that considers the United States to be the root of all evil. But to see it emerge now, when Americans are still in the depths of their grief, is disturbing. Have these people no sense of decency? What sort of person kicks a neighbour when he is down? How would we feel if Americans began lecturing us on the error of our ways so soon after a national tragedy? "..."Of course, the anti-Americans are always careful to hide their barbs in a cloak of sympathy. Terrorism, they intone, is wrong, and the attacks on New York and Washington were a tragedy. But remember, they go on, the Americans have done some nasty things too. What about My Lai and other U.S. atrocities in the Vietnam war? What about the U.S. bombing of Cambodia? What about CIA support for the Pinochet regime in Chile?

Funny, but that is just what the terrorists say. It is a staple of militant rhetoric to argue that the United States is the real terrorist on the world stage. In the terrorist view, the United States is so evil, so destructive, that any attack on Americans is justified -- even an attack that kills thousands of innocent civilians.

This should go without saying, but there is no parallel -- no moral equivalence -- between what the terrorists did last week and what the United States may have done in the past. Whatever mistakes, and even crimes, that Washington may have committed in its role as a global superpower, these do not begin to explain, much less excuse, what was done last week. Even a schoolboy knows that two wrongs don't make a right, and these wrongs were of entirely different orders. Yet the anti-Americans drone on, telling us that we must see Sept. 11 "in context" -- the context of U.S. hegemony, U.S. imperialism, U.S.-led globalization. "
ProQuest  editorials  anti-Americanism  9/11  U.S.foreign_policy  root_cause  moral_equivalencies  world_stage 
july 2012 by jerryking
Pop-Tarts Or Freedom? - Op-Ed - NYTimes.com
January 16, 2005 | NYT | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN;

In the wake of U.S. aid to help Muslim and other victims of the recent tsunami, Colin Powell suggested that maybe, now that the Muslim world had seen ''American generosity'' and ''American values in action,'' it wouldn't be so hostile to America.

Don't hold your breath waiting for a thank-you card. If the fact that American soldiers have risked their lives to save the Muslims of Bosnia, the Muslims of Kuwait, the Muslims of Somalia, the Muslims of Afghanistan and the Muslims of Iraq has earned the U.S. only the false accusation of being ''anti-Muslim,'' trust me, U.S. troops passing out bottled water and Pop-Tarts in Indonesia are not going to erase that lie. It is not an exaggeration to say that, if you throw in the Oslo peace process, U.S. foreign policy for the last 15 years has been dominated by an effort to save Muslims -- not from tsunamis, but from tyrannies, mostly their own theocratic or autocratic regimes.
U.S.foreign_policy  Arab-Muslim_world  Arab_Spring  autocrats  op-eds  Tom_Friedman  anti-Americanism  tyrants  tsunamis  Muslim  Colin_Powell 
january 2012 by jerryking
America vs. The Narrative
November 28, 2009 | - NYTimes.com | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN. It
seems that Major Hasan was just another angry jihadist spurred to
action by “The Narrative,.” which is the cocktail of half-truths,
propaganda and outright lies about America that have taken hold in the
Arab-Muslim world since 9/11. Propagated by jihadist Web sites, mosque
preachers, Arab intellectuals, satellite news stations and books — and
tacitly endorsed by some Arab regimes — this narrative posits that
America has declared war on Islam, as part of a grand
“American-Crusader-Zionist conspiracy” to keep Muslims down. Yes, after
two decades in which U.S. foreign policy has been largely dedicated to
rescuing Muslims or trying to help free them from tyranny — in Bosnia,
Darfur, Kuwait, Somalia, Lebanon, Kurdistan, post-earthquake Pakistan,
post-tsunami Indonesia, Iraq and Afghanistan — a narrative that says
America is dedicated to keeping Muslims down is thriving.
anti-Americanism  Tom_Friedman  U.S.foreign_policy  Arab-Muslim_world  counternarratives 
november 2009 by jerryking
Bret Stephens: The Carter Ricochet Effect - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 23, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by BRET STEPHENS.
Takeaway message? Even the purest of motives can lead to the most
disastrous results.
Bret_Stephens  Obama  U.S.foreign_policy  Islam  takeaways  Arab-Muslim_world  anti-Americanism  Saudis 
november 2009 by jerryking

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