jerryking + trends   181

Family offices are diving into new markets
August 1, 2019 | Financial Times | by Gillian Tett.

Once, property advisers mainly sold malls to developers, retail groups or banks. Now, however, there is rising demand from family offices. The new owner of Water Tower Place was said to have experience acquiring and managing other “trophy quality, grocery-anchored shopping centers” in the US.

As the Fed and other central banks loosen monetary policy, private pools of capital are searching for ever-more innovative ways to earn returns. ....It is not easy to monitor such financial flows with precision, since the family office sector — which is estimated to control almost $6tn in assets — is highly secretive. However, financiers say that a shift is under way. A few decades ago, the sector (like most asset managers) put most of its money in public bond and equity markets, with a smaller allocation to real estate.

Then investing in hedge funds became all the rage. But a survey conducted late last year by UBS bank and Campden Wealth suggests just 5.7 per cent of family office assets now sit in hedge funds, sharply down from recent years. Meanwhile, the allocation to public markets is also falling, with just 28 per cent in equities and 16 per cent in bonds.

At the same time, investments in private equity and real estate have risen to account for 22 per cent and 17 per cent respectively. This trend seems set to intensify.....“Family offices continue to re-evaluate traditional approaches to investing [with] accelerating interest in making direct investments in real estate and operating businesses.”

This means that family offices are no longer just investing in private equity funds (which are already bloated with cash), but increasingly cutting direct deals. ...The more that elite private pools of capital find juicy returns outside public markets, the more this risks fuelling wealth gaps. After all, most non-elite investors remain stuck in public markets and bank deposits, exposed to the vagaries of low interest rates.

This return gap may be going largely unnoticed now, because private markets are so opaque. However, the difference is likely to grow.
family_office  Gillian_Tett  trends  opacity 
11 weeks ago by jerryking
Spy tactics can spot consumer trends
MARCH 22, 2016 | Financial Times | John Reed.
Israel’s military spies are skilled at sifting through large amounts of information — emails, phone calls, location data — to find the proverbial needle in a haystack: a suspicious event or anomalous pattern that could be the warning of a security threat.....So it is no surprise that many companies ask Israeli start-ups for help in data analysis. The start-ups, often founded by former military intelligence officers, are using the methods of crunching data deployed in spycraft to help commercial clients. These might range from businesses tracking customer behaviour to financial institutions trying to root out online fraud......Mamram is the Israel Defense Forces’ elite computing unit.
analytics  consumer_behavior  cyber_security  data  e-mail  haystacks  hedge_funds  IDF  insights  intelligence_analysts  Israel  Israeli  Mamram  maritime  massive_data_sets  security_&_intelligence  shipping  spycraft  start_ups  tracking  traffic_analysis  trends 
april 2019 by jerryking
Five trends affecting Canada’s frozen dessert industry - Restobiz
Five trends affecting Canada’s frozen dessert industry
By Camille Bedu
July 24, 2014
desserts  frozen_foods  trends  Canada 
october 2018 by jerryking
The incredible shrinking grocery store
NOVEMBER 8, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | RASHA MOURTADA.

Today's urban shoppers – whether they're 35 or 65 – are generally looking for two things in a grocery store: prepared food that tastes homemade and household staples such as paper towels and dishwashing detergent. They want a shopping experience that's more contained but still meets all their needs....Grocery store guru Paco Underhill on three trends he expects to see in North American supermarkets:

Hybrid stores: Think part traditional shopping, part Internet shopping. He expects customers to shorten trips by submitting shopping lists in advance to stores and selecting only certain items – produce and meat, for instance – themselves when they pick up their order.

Refillable containers: He expects a bulk shopping model – widespread today for dry goods – to take off for household supplies such as laundry soap, where shoppers will bring back large containers for refills.

Private label 'stores': Imagine all of Loblaws' President's Choice products in one spot within the store. "Rather than shelving these products throughout the store, they're concentrated in one area, so the shopper looking for the best price sees it all together," says Mr. Underhill.
big-box  boutiques  grocery  Highland_Farms  retailers  small_spaces  supermarkets  Wal-Mart  Paco_Underhill  trends  downsizing  prepared_meals 
october 2018 by jerryking
Craft-Beer Company Taps Streaming Service for Growth - WSJ
By Benjamin Mullin
Aug. 27, 2018

BrewDog, a Scottish beer company, is offering a streaming service featuring more than 100 hours of video centered on drinking culture, the latest effort by a brand to launch its own media venture.

“The BrewDog Network,” available on smartphone apps and online, costs $4.99 a month. Breaking through in a crowded subscription-video market won’t be easy.......The BrewDog Network will carry a mix of licensed and original content where drinking is an element, from food shows to travel series such as “Four Sheets,” hosted by bon vivant Zane Lamprey. “The BrewDog Show,” featuring the company’s founders, will also be available at launch.
liquor  trends  breweries  beers  craftsmanship  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  product_launches  streaming  digital_media  subscriptions 
august 2018 by jerryking
Welcome to the New Convenience Store - WSJ
By Jane Black
April 25, 2018

“People will come in and say this isn’t a convenience store,” said Lisa Sedlar, the founder of Green Zebra Grocery. “And I say, ‘Of course it is.’ We are redefining what it means to be a convenience store in America.”

Several trends are driving change, according to research firm the Hartman Group. In the era of fast-casual restaurants, customers of all ages aren’t willing to sacrifice good taste or a pleasant experience for fast and easy. And despite claims of being time-starved, they don’t seem interested in a one-stop shop. Primary shoppers report making more frequent trips to buy food at a range of outlets, from traditional grocery stores to specialty shops: The average number of grocery trips made per purchaser, per month jumped nearly 30% between 2014 and 2017. Finally, snacks—the raison d’être of convenience stores—are supplanting meals. Of all “eating occasions,” 50% are now snacks.
convenience_stores  fast-casual  grocery  one-stop_shop  retailers  small_spaces  snacks  time-strapped  trends  upstarts  urban 
april 2018 by jerryking
Japanese convenience stores limber up in effort to spur growth
April 15, 2018 | FT | Leo Lewis and Robin Harding in Tokyo YESTERDAY.

Over the next five years, FamilyMart — Japan’s second-biggest convenience store chain with revenues of ¥3.1tn ($29.5bn) — plans to open 300 Fit & Go gyms in a challenge to its two largest competitors, Seven & i Holdings and Lawson.

FamilyMart’s move into fitness highlights powerful trends that are transforming Japanese retail. They are creating fresh opportunities, say analysts, for the mighty konbini (a transliteration of “convenience”) to seize an ever greater share of consumer spend.

“Current social patterns — the rise of working women, the ageing population — are a strong following wind for the convenience store industry,” said Sadanobu Takemasu, chief executive of Lawson, the third-largest operator with ¥2.6tn sales and 14,000 stores. Rural depopulation is also on their side, with a konbini often the last shop standing in many communities.

“There are people who think Japan can manage with nothing but ecommerce and convenience stores. The big dry goods like toilet paper would come online,” he added. “All the day-to-day goods would come from the convenience store.”

But, say analysts, even the konbini face the challenge of population decline. Footfall at stores open for more than a year has fallen for 24 months in a row, the longest period since the Japan Franchise Association began compiling the statistics in 2004.

The answer to lower footfall is more revenue per customer. Having achieved dominance of their own industry through consolidation, the konbini are moving into other sectors, taking on supermarkets, coffee shops, drug stores and fast-food chains......“The convenience stores’ biggest challenge is the absence of a new category big enough to give the whole industry a lift,” said Mr Kawano, who added that even the ready-to-eat likes of the Famichiki had yet to prove their power to transform. “Each group is investing more in its fast-food offering — but there has been nothing revolutionary, no game changer.”
convenience_stores  retailers  Japanese  prepared_meals  Japan  foot_traffic  gyms  fast-food  trends  new_categories 
april 2018 by jerryking
Risk Management Reports
This site can’t be reached
http://www.riskinfo.com/rmr/rmrdec97.html is unreachable.
Search Google for risk info rmr amrdec 97

December 1997 Volume 24, No. 12. The trick in risk management,
perhaps, is in recognizing that normal is not a (default) state of nature but a
state of transition, and trend is not destiny. . . ." (Sept. 1, 1997). Peter Bernstein
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
John Adams, author of Risk University College London Press, London, 1995
Peter_Bernstein  risk-management  risks  book_reviews  base_rates  ephemerality  transient  impermanence  trends  transitions  normality  quotes  from notes
april 2018 by jerryking
Ten Years Out
December 5 2017 | FT | By Gideon Rachman, James Kynge, Vanessa Houlder and Richard Waters.

From massive migration to prying governments, businesses will have to weather startling changes over the next decade.....It can be difficult, when assailed daily by news of populism, terrorism and cyber hacking, to look to anything beyond the next crisis. Yet business leaders need to focus on the future. What, for example, does it mean for employers that by 2027, Africa’s population will have grown by a third and Europe’s will have flatlined? How will companies cope when governments expect them to gather more staff data and play ever larger roles in enforcing tax laws?

In Ten Years Out, four senior FT journalists outline what they see as the biggest challenges that no chief executive will be able to ignore. They also provide some tips on how companies can best prepare themselves for the changes that are coming.
forecasting  trends  CEOs  challenges  migration  tax  artificial_intelligence  China  Richard_Waters 
december 2017 by jerryking
The Not-So-Glossy Future of Magazines -
SEPT. 23, 2017 | The New York Times | By SYDNEY EMBER and MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM.

Suddenly, it seemed, longstanding predictions about the collapse of magazines had come to pass.

Magazines have sputtered for years, their monopoly on readers and advertising erased by Facebook, Google and more nimble online competitors. But editors and executives said the abrupt churn in the senior leadership ranks signaled that the romance of the business was now yielding to financial realities.

As publishers grasp for new revenue streams, a ‘‘try-anything’’ approach has taken hold. Time Inc. has a new streaming TV show, “Paws & Claws,” that features viral videos of animals. Hearst started a magazine with the online rental service Airbnb. Increasingly, the longtime core of the business — the print product — is an afterthought, overshadowed by investments in live events, podcasts, video, and partnerships with outside brands.

The changes represent one of the most fundamental shifts in decades for a business that long relied on a simple formula: glossy volumes thick with high-priced ads.

“Sentimentality is probably the biggest enemy for the magazine business,” David Carey, the president of Hearst Magazines, said in an interview. “You have to embrace the future.”.......experiments are part of an industrywide race to find some way — any way — to make up for the hemorrhaging of revenue.

Hearst recently introduced The Pioneer Woman Magazine, a partnership with the Food Network host Ree Drummond that was initially sold only at Walmart. Its new travel publication, Airbnbmag, is geared toward customers of the do-it-yourself online rental site, with distribution at newsstands, airports and supermarkets. Meredith has started a magazine called The Magnolia Journal with the HGTV stars Chip and Joanna Gaines.

Even Condé Nast, the glitzy purveyor of luxury titles, has recognized the advantages of outside partnerships....debuting a quarterly print title for Goop, Gwyneth Paltrow’s lifestyle brand, with a cover featuring a topless Ms. Paltrow submerged in mud from France.
magazines  generational_change  brands  Vanity_Fair  print_journalism  churn  events  partnerships  sentimentality  digital_media  journalism  Hearst  Meredith  publishing  advertising  decline  experimentation  trends  Condé_Nast  resignations  exits  popular_culture 
september 2017 by jerryking
As Black-Owned Banks Withdraw, Community Sounds Alarm - WSJ
By Sharon Nunn
Aug. 6, 2017

The number of black-owned banks operating in the U.S. has been dropping steadily for the past 15 years and fell to 23 this year, the lowest level in recent history, according to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. That has left many African-American communities short of access to capital and traditional financial services, according to some banking experts....The 2008 recession hit the black banking sector especially hard, and if the current rate of closures of about two a year, as well as the industry-wide reluctance or inability to start banks, continues, black-owned banks could disappear entirely within the next eight to 12 years. The trend is worrisome to some analysts who argue fewer banks serving low-income, minority groups could expand “financial deserts”—communities with few or no banking institutions—and increase the likelihood that black and Hispanic communities could become susceptible to redlining, a discriminatory practice that excludes poorer minority areas from financial services....... [black-owned community banks were] the first bank some African-Americans had access to, making it a symbol of black enterprise and economic development, .......A survey of entrepreneurs by the U.S. Census Bureau in 2014 found that 47% of black business owners had gotten got the full amount of funding requested from banks, credit unions or other financial institutions, compared with 76% of whites.

That survey also showed fear of rejection was the top reason cited by black business owners who chose not to seek needed capital at all.
black-owned  banks  African-Americans  trends  decline  FDIC  financial_services  redlining  low-income  community_banks 
august 2017 by jerryking
The Mall of the Future Will Have No Stores - WSJ
By Esther Fung
June 12, 2017

As retailers close bricks-and-mortar stores at an accelerating pace, shopping-center landlords like Starwood Capital are facing a vexing question: What to do with all this empty space?

Their solutions are varied but all have a common element: reducing, or even eliminating, retail from the equation.

Some landlords plug empty spaces with churches, for-profit schools and random enterprises while they figure out a long-term plan. Others see a future in mixed-use real estate, converting malls into streetscapes with restaurants, offices and housing. And some are razing properties altogether and turning them into entertainment or industrial parks......A construction binge in the 1980s and ’90s left the U.S. oversaturated with malls. Growth in online sales and declining demand for full-priced goods are causing retailers to shrink their store fleets and divert resources to e-commerce platforms.....Many mall owners are trying to liven up the experience, bringing more dining and entertainment tenants and eschewing the traditional mix of middling food courts, fashion retailers and department stores.

“The appetite for experimentation is there,...but Sometimes developers conclude that the only way to save a dying mall is to level it and start over.
shopping_malls  landlords  retailers  trends  future  randomness  experiential_marketing  e-commerce  store_closings  experimentation  property_development  physical_space  oversaturation 
june 2017 by jerryking
Snap Makes a Bet on the Cultural Supremacy of the Camera - The New York Times
Farhad Manjoo
STATE OF THE ART MARCH 8, 2017

The rising dependence on cameras & picture-based communications system is changing the way we communicate and could alter society in big ways. ...Snap’s success or failure isn’t going to be determined this week or even this year. This is a company that’s betting on a long-term trend: the rise and eventual global dominance of visual culture.Snap calls itself a camera company. That’s a bit cute, considering that it only just released an actual camera, the Spectacles sunglasses, late last year. Snap will probably build other kinds of cameras, including potentially a drone.

But it’s best to take Snap’s camera company claim seriously, not literally. Snap does not necessarily mean that its primary business will be selling a bunch of camera hardware. It’s not going to turn into Nikon, Polaroid or GoPro. Instead it’s hit on something deeper and more important. Through both its hardware and software, Snap wants to enable the cultural supremacy of the camera, to make it at least as important to our daily lives as the keyboard.....the rising dependence on cameras is changing our language. Other than in face-to-face communication, we used to talk primarily in words. Now, more and more, from GIFs to emoji, selfies to image-macro memes and live video, we talk in pictures.
Farhad_Manjoo  Snap  Snapchat  visual_culture  cameras  big_bets  Communicating_&_Connecting  IPOs  Ikea  trends  Instagram  imagery  Polaroid 
march 2017 by jerryking
Little Brother
Sep 11th 2014 | The Economist | Alexandra Suich.

In 1963 David Ogilvy, the father of Madison Avenue and author of a classic business book, “Confessions of an Advertising Man”, wrote: “An advertisement is like a radar sweep, constantly hunting new prospects as they come into the market. Get a good radar, and keep it sweeping.”.....Behavioural profiling has gone viral across the internet, enabling firms to reach users with specific messages based on their location, interests, browsing history and demographic group......Extreme personalisation in advertising has been slow to come... online advertising space is unlimited and prices are low, so making money is not as easy as it was in the offline world,.....Digital advertising is being buoyed by three important trends. The first is the rise of mobile devices, such as smartphones....The second, related trend is the rise of social networks such as Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest, which have become an important navigation system for people looking for content across the web. ......The third big development has been the rise of real-time bidding, or “programmatic buying”, a new system for targeting consumers precisely and swiftly with online adverts. Publishers, advertisers and intermediaries can now bid for digital ads electronically and direct them to specific consumers at lightning speed.....The lines between established media businesses are becoming blurred. Richard Edelman, the boss of Edelman, a public-relations firm, describes the media and advertising business as a “mosh pit”. .... clients’ biggest question is whether people will even notice their ads. ...This special report will show that technology is profoundly changing the dynamics of advertising. Building on the vast amount of data produced by consumers’ digital lives, it is giving more power to media companies that have a direct relationship with their customers and can track them across different devices. ....Consumers may gain from advertising tailored to their particular needs, and so far most of them seem content to accept the ensuing loss of privacy. But companies are sensitive to the potential costs of overstepping the mark. As the head of one British advertising firm puts it: “Once people realise what’s happening, I can’t imagine there won’t be pushback.”
Facebook  Twitter  Pinterest  Ogilvy_&_Mather  David_Ogilvy  behavioural_targeting  pushback  books  effectiveness  haystacks  privacy  native_advertising  ad-tech  Conversant  Kraft  personalization  trends  mobile_phones  smartphones  social_media  real-time  auctions  programmatic  advertising  online_advertising  Omnicom 
february 2017 by jerryking
The Fitness Shift That Should Worry Every Gym Owner - WSJ
By RACHEL BACHMAN
Jan. 21, 2017

Streaming fitness is surging. So are services that let people sample nearby fitness studios for a monthly fee, according to new data from Atlanta-based firm Cardlytics. Many subscribers to these on-demand fitness options are siphoning spending from traditional gyms, the data shows.

Payments to on-demand fitness services jumped to 7.7% of total spending on workouts last year, up from 4.8% two years earlier, according to Cardlytics. Spending for on-demand fitness now exceeds spending at yoga and Pilates studios, according to the data.

Traditional gyms still command the overwhelming majority of workout spending, but that share fell to about 73% in 2016 from nearly 78% in 2014.
fitness  trends  on-demand  gyms  streaming 
january 2017 by jerryking
Center for the Future of Museums: technology trends
Thursday, October 6, 2016
The Future of Ownership

Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums (GLAMs) are already grappling with the migration of content (records, correspondence) from paper to digital, including challenges of scale and readability. Now we face an additional complication: increasingly people don’t even own their digital collections of music, books or video content—they rent, borrow or pay to play.

Content that used to be contained in physical objects (books, records, photos, DVDs) is increasing being leased to us via digital devices. What does that mean for the legacy people can (or can’t) leave to document their life and work? Instead of an historic figures’ beloved book collection, will we be able to preserve her Kindle library? Would that collection even be stable over time? Will it contain (digital) marginalia? Photo collections increasingly live on the cloud, and if a service unexpectedly disappears, years of documentation can simply disappear. The podcast Reply All recently devoted a sobering episode to one such story, about a mom named Rachel who panicked when PictureLife folded, erasing her visual record of her daughters’ childhoods. What if one of those girls grows up to be president?
trends  ownership  sharing_economy  minimalism  end_of_ownership  decluttering  galleries  libraries  archives  museums  content  legacies  preservation  streaming  on-demand  physical_assets  artifacts  digitalization 
december 2016 by jerryking
Leaving for the city | The Economist
Sep 3rd 2016 |

Bill Bishop: The Big Sort

The best book to read if you want to understand corporate America’s migration patterns is not Mr Florida’s but a more recent study, Bill Bishop’s “The Big Sort”. It argues that Americans are increasingly clustering in distinct areas on the basis of their jobs and social values. The headquarters revolution is yet another iteration of the sorting process that the book describes, as companies allocate elite jobs to the cities and routine jobs to the provinces. Corporate disaggregation is no doubt a sensible use of resources. But it will also add to the tensions that are tearing America apart as many bosses choose to work in very different worlds from the vast majority of Americans, including their own employees.
workplaces  Flybits  urban  cities  creative_class  trends  books  geographic_sorting  geographic_mobility 
november 2016 by jerryking
The Next Hot Trends in Food - WSJ
By JULIE JARGON and ANNIE GASPARRO
Oct. 16, 2016
food  trends  fresh_produce  fruits  vegetables 
october 2016 by jerryking
MA in GWR and Silicon Valley - Public Release
Merger and Acquisition Trends in Silicon Valley and the
Greater Washington Region:
2006 – 2011
Silicon_Valley  trends  M&A  mergers_&_acquisitions 
october 2016 by jerryking
Five U.S. sectors expected to outperform in 2016 - The Globe and Mail
PAUL BRENT
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jan. 07, 201
forecasting  trends  outperformance 
february 2016 by jerryking
The United States shouldn’t take sides in the Sunni-Shiite struggle - The Washington Post
By Fareed Zakaria Opinion writer

...the most significant trend shaping the region today is something different: Sunnis vs. Shiites. That sectarian struggle now infects almost every aspect of the region’s politics....Though there always was tension, Sunnis and Shiites did live in peace, for the most part, until recently.....The pivotal shift took place in 1979. The Islamic Revolution in Iran brought to power an aggressively religious ruling class, determined to export its ideas and support Shiites in the region.....Saudi Arabia is facing a series of challenges, from the Islamic State to domestic extremists. The country’s large and active social media are dominated by radical Islamists. And as oil prices plunge, government revenue has collapsed, and the nation’s generous subsidies to its people will be hard to sustain. The regime needs greater legitimacy.
Fareed_Zakaria  Sunni  Shiite  schisms  Middle_East  U.S.foreign_policy  Yemen  frameworks  sectarian  religion  Shia  trends  Iran  Wahhabism  extremism  geopolitics  Saudi_Arabia 
january 2016 by jerryking
The making of the next big food trend - The Globe and Mail
ANN HUI
National Food Reporter The Globe and Mail Last updated: Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2016
pulses  trends  food  grains 
january 2016 by jerryking
What Scented Candles Say to an Economist - The New York Times
By DIANE COYLE NOV. 7, 2015

We need a wider variety of indicators to help us take a more accurate reading of the economy. Some of these might seem frivolous, but paying close attention to worldly detail could make forecasting more reliable.
(1) height of hemlines
(2) the number of cranes visible on the skyline
(3) Spending on luxury items is another example. During a boom, sales of fast cars, expensive paintings, prime real estate and diamond necklaces all soar, as do their prices.

Less obvious are trends in retailing. When the good times roll, people decide that their great idea for a specialty store is viable. Thus booms bring all those boutiques selling just one type of good: socks or scented candles or freshly squeezed juices. But like flowers that display the behavior known as nyctinasty — opening to the sun’s light and warmth — they close as soon as the skies darken and things start to cool.

(4) how easy, or otherwise, it is to get restaurant reservations or tickets for shows.
(5) how many “help wanted” signs appear in the windows of stores and restaurants.

....G.D.P. almost certainly fails to capture newer areas of economic activity, such as today’s digital innovation — so other sources of information are needed to fill the gap....economic policy makers usually scrutinize tens, or even hundreds, of indicators, covering different industries and assets, different parts of the country, different groups of people. They monitor jobs reports, advertising rates, wage settlements, the cost of shipping freight, asset prices, sales of consumer durables and much, much more.
economics  economists  forecasting  non-obvious  GDP  indicators  trends  retailers  boutiques  detail_oriented  economic_data  information_sources  policymakers  policymaking 
november 2015 by jerryking
A Seismic Shift in How People Eat - The New York Times
By HANS TAPARIA and PAMELA KOCHNOV. 6, 2015

....Consumers are walking away from America’s most iconic food brands. Big food manufacturers are reacting by cleaning up their ingredient labels, acquiring healthier brands and coming out with a prodigious array of new products. ....Food companies can’t merely tinker. Nor will acquisition-driven strategies prove sufficient, because most acquisitions are too small to shift fortunes quickly. ....For legacy food companies to have any hope of survival, they will have to make bold changes in their core product offerings. Companies will have to drastically cut sugar; process less; go local and organic; use more fruits, vegetables and other whole foods; and develop fresh offerings. General Mills needs to do more than just drop the artificial ingredients from Trix. It needs to drop the sugar substantially, move to 100 percent whole grains, and increase ingredient diversity by expanding to other grains besides corn....a complete overhaul of their supply chains, major organizational restructuring and billions of dollars of investment, but these corporations have the resources.
food  foodservice  brands  supply_chains  innovation  shifting_tastes  Nestlé  Perdue  Tyson  antibiotics  trends  Kraft  supermarkets  fresh_produce  OPMA  consumer_behavior  General_Mills  iconic  consumers  McDonald's  ingredient_diversity  seismic_shifts  new_products  Big_Food 
november 2015 by jerryking
How Can Big Food Compete Against Fresher Rivals? - WSJ
By ANNIE GASPARRO
Updated July 12, 2015 1

it is a two-part problem. No. 1, the consumer and competitive marketplace is definitely shifting. For example, quality has evolved beyond just good ingredients, preparation and packaging. Basic quality is a given now; many consumers are looking for something extra: less mass-produced, natural, local.

No. 2, iconic food companies and their mature brands are not responding effectively. Large, established food companies and their brands are being managed as portfolios of revenue and profit streams with a short-term financial orientation, and not as companies that produce food products. Small companies, on the other hand, are being created and managed by people with a food orientation and passion.
CPG  Kraft  emotional_connections  Nestlé  Coca-Cola  food  Pepsi  Big_Food  trends  Kellogg  passions  gourmet  foodies  decreasing_returns_to_scale  shifting_tastes  small_business  SMB 
july 2015 by jerryking
What Hollywood Can Teach Us About the Future of Work - NYTimes.com
MAY 5, 2015 | NYT |By ADAM DAVIDSON.

the “Hollywood model.” A project is identified; a team is assembled; it works together for precisely as long as is needed to complete the task; then the team disbands. This short-­term, project-­based business structure is an alternative to the corporate model, in which capital is spent up front to build a business, which then hires workers for long-­term, open-­ended jobs that can last for years, even a lifetime. It’s also distinct from the Uber-­style “gig economy,” which is designed to take care of extremely short-­term tasks, manageable by one person, typically in less than a day....With the Hollywood model, ad hoc teams carry out projects that are large and complex, requiring many different people with complementary skills. The Hollywood model is now used to build bridges, design apps or start restaurants. Many cosmetics companies assemble a temporary team of aestheticians and technical experts to develop new products, then hand off the actual production to a factory, which does have long-­term employees...Our economy is in the midst of a grand shift toward the Hollywood model. More of us will see our working lives structured around short-­term, project-­based teams rather than long-­term, open­-ended jobs...the Hollywood model is a surprisingly good system for many workers too, in particular those with highly-sought-­after skills. Ask Hollywood producers, and they’ll confirm that there are only a limited number of proven, reliable craftspeople for any given task. Projects tend to come together quickly, with strict deadlines, so those important workers are in a relatively strong negotiating position. Wages among, say, makeup and hair professionals on shoots are much higher than among their counterparts at high-­end salons. Similarly, set builders make more than carpenters and electricians working on more traditional construction sites....It’s probably not coincidental that the Hollywood model is ascendant at a time when telling stories, broadly speaking, is at the heart of American business.The Hollywood system offers another advantage for workers: Every weekend’s box-­office results provide new information about which skills in their field are valuable. ....The Hollywood model isn’t good news for everybody. It clearly rewards education and cultural fluency, which are not distributed evenly throughout the population.
trends  Hollywood  storytelling  teams  project_management  market_intelligence  automation  Communicating_&_Connecting  Managing_Your_Career  gig_economy  ad_hoc  dissolutions  short-term  on-demand  short-lived 
may 2015 by jerryking
Five angel investing trends to watch in Canada - The Globe and Mail
MICHELLE SCARBOROUGH
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Mar. 12 2015,
angels  trends  homegrown 
march 2015 by jerryking
Why Small Businesses Are Starting to Win Again - The New Yorker
JANUARY 24, 2015
Small Is Bountiful
BY TIM WU

Farmers who sell, say, organic or free-range foods, cannot hope to compete based on price. Instead, they try to create consumers who won’t eat chicken produced by big companies for moral, health, or aesthetic reasons...The true-differentiation strategy seems to work best when scale, despite its efficiencies, also introduces blind spots in areas such as customer service, flavor, curation, or other intangibles not entirely consistent with mass production and standardization. Where getting big begins to hurt the product, small can be bountiful.

=====================================
it is a two-part problem. No. 1, the consumer and competitive marketplace is definitely shifting. For example, quality has evolved beyond just good ingredients, preparation and packaging. Basic quality is a given now; many consumers are looking for something extra: less mass-produced, natural, local.

No. 2, iconic food companies and their mature brands are not responding effectively. Large, established food companies and their brands are being managed as portfolios of revenue and profit streams with a short-term financial orientation, and not as companies that produce food products. Small companies, on the other hand, are being created and managed by people with a food orientation and passion.
small_business  size  scaling  Tim_Wu  Peter_Drucker  differentiation  trends  breweries  beers  craftsmanship  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  revenge_effects  blind_spots  personal_values  market_segmentation  mass_production  decreasing_returns_to_scale  aesthetics  eco-friendly  creating_demand 
january 2015 by jerryking
The Tech That Will Change Your Life in 2015 - WSJ
By GEOFFREY A. FOWLER and JOANNA STERN
Updated Dec. 30, 2014
life-changing  technology  trends  tools 
january 2015 by jerryking
Where to Look for Insight
Mohanbir Sawhney Sanjay Khosla
FROM THE NOVEMBER 2014
Innovation isn’t a department. It’s a mindset that should permeate your entire enterprise.

No matter the venue, the feedstock for innovation is insight—an imaginative understanding of an internal or external opportunity that can be tapped to improve efficiency, generate revenue, or boost engagement. Insights can be about stakeholder needs, market dynamics, or even how your company works.

Here are Seven Insight Channels
Anomalies

Examine deviations from the norm
Do you see unexpectedly high or low revenue or share in a market or segment? Surprise performance from a business process or a company unit?

Confluence

Find macro trend intersections

What key economic, behavioral, technological, or demographic trends do you see? How are they combining to create opportunities?

Frustrations

Pinpoint deficiencies in the system

Where are customer pain points for your products, services, or solutions? Which organizational processes or practices annoy you and your colleagues?

Orthodoxies

Question conventional beliefs
Are there assumptions or beliefs in your industry that go unexamined? Toxic behaviors or procedures at your company that go unchallenged?

Extremities

Exploit deviance
What can you learn from the behaviors and needs of your leading-edge or laggard customers, employees, or suppliers?

Voyages

Learn from immersion elsewhere
How are your stakeholders’ needs influenced by their sociocultural context?

Analogies

Borrow from other industries or organizations
What successful innovations do you see applied in other disciplines? Can you adapt them for your own?
customer_insights  HBR  analogies  anomalies  toxic_behaviors  trends  pain_points  assumptions  innovation  insights  conventional_wisdom  travel  laggards  copycats  dilemmas  extremes  orthodoxy  immersive  deviance  learning_journeys  leading-edge  unexpected  mindsets  frictions  opportunities  opportunistic  consumer_behavior  feedstock 
november 2014 by jerryking
Loblaw targets food-savvy Canadians in major marketing overhaul - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Sep. 17 2014

Loblaw has partnered with Google Inc. to build a “food pulse index,” which will track online conversations about food across Canada. It will publish the results on a regularly updated map on the corporate website, which will show food trends by region.

And the content on the site and on Loblaw’s social media channels will be determined by what people are talking about. If beets are a hot topic, for example, the retailer will serve up images, recipes, polls and information about the root vegetable. If people are wondering about gluten-free Thanksgiving meals, Loblaw will respond.

The Google trends will influence not just marketing, but also product development at the retail giant.
Susan_Krashinsky  Loblaws  marketing  branding  brands  Google  product_development  trends 
october 2014 by jerryking
Finding keys to business in China
Fall 2014 | Western Alumni | by Ron Johnson August 22, 2014
China  alumni  Ivey  trends  books 
september 2014 by jerryking
AGRI-TREND Blog: BOOK RELEASE: The Agriculture Manifesto By Robert Saik - AGRI-TREND®
THE AGRICULTURE MANIFESTO
Author: By Robert D. Saik, PAg, CAC - CEO, Agri-Trend Inc., Posted: 2014-05-20
books  agriculture  trends  farming 
august 2014 by jerryking
A Vision of the Future From Those Likely to Invent It - NYTimes.com
May 2, 2014 | NYT | By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER and CHI BIRMINGHAM. Claire Cain Miller writes about tech for The Upshot, a New York Times venture that presents news, analysis and graphics about politics and policy

“Start new businesses that create jobs and solve real problems. Also, someone could create a Khan Academy that focuses on professional and vocational skills.”
REID HOFFMAN

“There is a bow wave of uncounted billions of dollars of philanthropic contributions that will unfold over the next 10 to 20 years from Silicon Valley.”
MARC ANDREESSEN
bow_waves  Claire_Cain_Miller  technology  future  trends  Reid_Hoffman  Marc_Andreessen  Peter_Thiel  personalized_medicine  Silicon_Valley  disruption  drones  new_businesses  philanthropy 
may 2014 by jerryking
Market Trends and Retailers’ Strategies in Fresh Produce
26-27 April 2007 | Dr. Marian Garcia, Kent Business School, University of Kent.

Suppliers of fresh produce are less able to differentiate their products at the consumer level
==> They are in a weak bargaining position as price differentiation is almost the only available strategy.

Impact on Fresh Produce Suppliers
* Despite increasing rationalization of the supply base, retailers are still able to switch volumes between suppliers of fresh produce.
* As a result, suppliers of fresh produce are often forced to accept low prices in order to get volume growth, which does little to improve their immediate and long-term financial performance.
* In response to consumer trends and marketing demands, innovative growers of fresh produce have increased their cooperation and involvement with buyers and other members of the supply chain to ensure their produce meet consumer expectations.
* Closer relationships between the various members in the supply chain, ensure information is shared and can be used to improve the competitive position of all members in that supply chain.
fresh_produce  marketing  trends  consolidation  information_flows  grocery  supermarkets  OPMA  strategies  retailers  Tesco  Sainsbury's  ASDA  supply_chains  private_labels  relationships 
january 2014 by jerryking
Hungry yet? Five big ideas for food in 2014 - The Globe and Mail
Chris Nuttall-Smith

The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Jan. 07 2014
food  Chris_Nuttall-Smith  trends 
january 2014 by jerryking
‘Uncharted,’ by Erez Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel - NYTimes.com
‘Uncharted,’ by Erez Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel
By WILLIAM GRIMES
Published: December 24, 2013
massive_data_sets  books  trends  English 
december 2013 by jerryking
Snap Out of It: Kids Aren't Reliable Tech Predictors - WSJ.com
Nov. 17, 2013 | WSJ | By Farhad Manjoo.

First, Snapchat's main selling point is ephemerality. Users who send a photo and caption using the app can select how long the image is viewable. Second, and relatedly, Snapchat is used primarily by teens and people in college. This explains much of Silicon Valley's obsession with the company....tech execs, youngsters are the canaries in the gold mine.

That logic follows a widely shared cultural belief: We all tend to assume that young people are on the technological vanguard, that they somehow have got an inside scoop on what's next. If today's kids are Snapchatting instead of Facebooking, the thinking goes, tomorrow we'll all be Snapchatting, too, because tech habits, like hairstyles, flow only one way: young to old.

There is only one problem with elevating young people's tastes this way: Kids are often wrong....Incidentally, though 20-something tech founders like Mr. Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs and Bill Gates get a lot of ink, they are unusual.... "The twentysomething inexperienced founder is an outlier, not the norm," ...If you think about it for a second, the fact that young people aren't especially reliable predictors of tech trends shouldn't come as a surprise. Sure, youth is associated with cultural flexibility, a willingness to try new things that isn't necessarily present in older folk. But there are other, less salutary hallmarks of youth, including capriciousness, immaturity, and a deference to peer pressure even at the cost of common sense. This is why high school is such fertile ground for fads. And it's why, in other cultural areas, we don't put much stock in teens' choices. No one who's older than 18, for instance, believes One Direction is the future of music....Is the app just a youthful fad, just another boy band, or is it something more permanent; is it the Beatles?

To figure this out, we would need to know why kids are using it. Are they reaching for Snapchat for reasons that would resonate with older people—because, like the rest of us, they've grown wary of the public-sharing culture promoted by Facebook and Twitter? Or are they using it for less universal reasons, because they want to evade parental snooping, send risqué photos, or avoid feeling left out of a fad everyone else has adopted?

At this point no one knows, probably not even the people who make Snapchat. For now,That's reason enough to be wary of Snapchat's youthful vigor.
capriciousness  customer_risk  developmental_change  ephemerality  fads  Farhad_Manjoo  generational_change  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  immaturity  impermanence  invisibility  motivations  peer_pressure  predictors  Silicon_Valley  Snapchat  snooping  transient  trends  young_people  youth 
november 2013 by jerryking
Ideas Conferences as Brand Builders
11/19/2012 | Forbes | Marian Salzman, Contributor.

Smart talk is today’s hot commodity, whether you’re speaking, listening or, perhaps most important, hobnobbing after the formal sessions...But what do they say about your personal brand? Are Davos people different from TED people different from SXSW people? What about the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) and Renaissance Weekend? Is there a big half-dozen in conference-going that lets you borrow for your brand (today’s equivalent of name-dropping) and build it up? And if there is, do you have to attend all of them (who has time?), or do you need to decide what each stands for and how it helps make a person a brand? Does your choice of conference send a message about what generation you see yourself in?...I’d argue that some conferences are becoming so ubiquitous and trendy that their velvet ropes are being pulled back.
personal_branding  trends  trend_spotting  public_discourse  Clinton_Global_Initiative  Davos  SXSW  ideacity  TED  Renaissance_Weekend 
september 2013 by jerryking
Veggie juice: equal parts health trend and hype - The Globe and Mail
May. 28 2013 |COURTNEY SHEA, Special to The Globe and Mail

Published
Tuesday,
juices  Toronto  trends  diets  healthy_lifestyles  vegetables  fruits 
june 2013 by jerryking
Venture Firms Build Own Software to Gain an Edge - WSJ.com
May 22, 2013 | WSJ | By EVELYN M. RUSLI.

Sequoia is one of a growing number of Silicon Valley venture-capital firms now creating proprietary software to gain an edge in the increasingly competitive industry.

Some are creating apps to scout potential deals by aggregating data across the Web and their community of companies. Others are building software—like Grove, named after clusters of sequoia trees—to help grow companies they have already invested in.
venture_capital  vc  Sequoia  slight_edge  Silicon_Valley  mobile_applications  data_driven  trends  proprietary  software  internal_systems  investors 
may 2013 by jerryking
McCormick® Flavor Forecast® 2013 Reveals Flavor Trends Expected To Drive Global Innovation... -- SPARKS, Md., Dec. 6, 2012 /PRNewswire/ --
Dec. 6, 2012 | PRNewswire |

About Flavor Forecast
Since 2000, McCormick has been on the forefront of identifying emerging culinary trends through its signature Flavor Forecast, a delicious expression of our passion for flavor. This annual look at the future of flavor is highly anticipated, acting as a catalyst for innovation within the broader food industry. The Flavor Forecast makes a difference in the way people create and experience food around the world. Visit www.flavorforecast.com for more information.

About McCormick
McCormick & Company, Incorporated is a global leader in flavor. With more than $3.5 billion in annual sales, the company manufactures, markets and distributes spices, seasoning mixes, condiments and other flavorful products to the entire food industry—retail outlets, food manufacturers and foodservice businesses. Every day, no matter where or what you eat, you can enjoy food flavored by McCormick. McCormick brings passion to flavor.™ Visit mccormick.com, mccormickcorporation.com and Facebook.com/McCormickSpice for more information.
McCormick  spices  flavours  trends  agribusiness  innovation 
april 2013 by jerryking
Fresh Facts on Retail Whole and Fresh Cut Produce Trends: Q4 2008
Fresh Facts on Retail
Whole and Fresh Cut Produce Trends: Q4 2008
fresh_produce  trends 
april 2013 by jerryking
Craft Beer’s Larger Aspirations Cause a Stir - NYTimes.com
By CLAY RISEN
Published: March 4, 2013

Several new, high-profile breweries are putting their product only in so-called large-format bottles. Dogfish Head Brewery, one of the bigger, better-known craft breweries in the country, will soon dedicate one of its two bottle-filling lines just to the 750-milliliter format.

The trend toward large bottles is part of what is being called the “wine-ification” of beer, the push by many brewers to make their product as respectable to pair with braised short ribs as is a nice Chateauneuf-du-Pape, and at a price to match. Bottles sell for as much as $30 in stores and much more on restaurant menus.

But they are getting a chilly reception from many drinkers. Internet message boards dedicated to craft beer are replete with complaints that large bottlesare too expensive and, thanks to their typically higher alcohol content, a challenge to finish in one sitting. Unlike wine, a beer is nearly impossible to recork.
liquor  trends  breweries  beers  craftsmanship  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts 
march 2013 by jerryking
Manure and you!
December 2004 | | Jim Carroll- Futurist, Trends & Innovation Keynote Speaker
agriculture  innovation  trends  gardening  composting 
february 2013 by jerryking
10 Big Trends for Agriculture |
December 10, 2005 | Jim Carroll- Futurist, Trends & Innovation Keynote Speaker
trends  agriculture 
february 2013 by jerryking
A look into the future
| Greenhouse Canada | Written by Dave Harrison

Shalin Khosla, the greenhouse vegetable specialist with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, says most of the construction last year was in glass. Much of the new acreage was in peppers, followed by tomatoes and cucumbers.

“The sector is continuing to move forward,” he notes. “We will have about 2,200 acres in the province once the dust settles this year.”

The renewed interest in glass is due to the fact glass prices have dropped in recent years, while plastic prices has risen. “The price difference isn’t as large as it used to be.”
greenhouses  future  trends  Ontario  Canada  fresh_produce  OGVG 
february 2013 by jerryking
Dollar, Volume Sales Up for Value-Added Produce | Produce content from Supermarket News
Dollar, Volume Sales Up for Value-Added Produce
Sep. 26, 2011 Supermarket News

FreshFacts on Retail, a retail research report produced by the Perishables Group for the United Fresh Foundation.
fresh_produce  trends 
february 2013 by jerryking
Trends in the Marketing of Fresh Produce and Fresh-cut Products
September 2008 | | by DR. ROBERTA COOK,Dept. of Ag and Resource Economics, University of California Davis
fresh_produce  trends  private_labels  foodservice  statistics  Roberta_Cook  food  supermarkets  grocery  fruits  vegetables  U.S.  barriers_to_adoption  surveys  slides 
february 2013 by jerryking
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