jerryking + thinking_big   41

Grand follies and the art of thinking big
February 22, 2019 |Financial Times| by Janan Ganesh.

Who would rather that Airbus had never made the bet at all? Who would live in a world that never risks over-reach?

A defender of grand follies is spoilt for examples that turned out well........Today’s vainglorious travesty is tomorrow’s untouchable fixture of the landscape. We are lousy judges of future tastes, including our own....Even if an audacious project fails, and fails lastingly, it can still trigger success stories of other kinds. Some of this happens through the sheer technical example set: the A380, like Concorde before it, forced engineers to innovate in ways that will cascade down the decades in unpredictable ways. Some of the most banal givens of daily life — dust busters, wireless headsets — can be traced back to that messianic project we know as the space programme.

Then there is the inspiring spectacle of just trying to do something big. Progress through tinkering counts no less than progress through great leaps, but only the second kind is likely to electrify people into venturing their own efforts. Without the grand gesture — and the risk of humiliation — any field of endeavour is liable to stagnate.....Perhaps an exhausted west now prefers to tinker all the same. Big ideas are often paid for out of idle wealth (think of Elon Musk’s fortune, or Alphabet’s cash pile) and the existence of this can seem almost distasteful in a culture that is newly sensitive to inequality. As for largeness of vision, there was plenty of the stuff in the forever wars and pre-crash banking. It would be strange if people who lived through those events did not now flinch at the sight of excitable visionaries brandishing schemes.
Airbus  audacity  big_bets  breakthroughs  Elon_Musk  fallacies_follies  game_changers  humiliation  incrementalism  inspiration  Janan_Ganesh  Jeff_Bezos  marginal_improvements  moonshots  overreach  risks  thinking_big  tinkerers  visionaries 
february 2019 by jerryking
Thinking BIG: Danish architects have a radical vision to build a distinct condo community in Toronto - The Globe and Mail
ALEX BOZIKOVIC ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
COPENHAGEN
PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 12, 2018

The new condo will be hard to miss. It could be the strangest residential building ever constructed in Canada. Certainly, it will set an interesting example for new housing. While new condos and apartments are often faulted for being soulless, this promises to be a carefully detailed building, a distinctive place, and a village that contributes to the larger city.......the King Street project, by Westbank in partnership with Toronto office developers Allied Properties REIT. It was inspired by Moshe Safdie’s Habitat 67, the legendary assemblage of prefab boxes on Montreal’s harbour.......Like Habitat, the King Street building is configured as a series of “mountains,” irregular stacks of boxes that each contain a home or a piece of one. The residences rise up, over and around four century-old brick buildings, which will all be retained entirely or in large part......They are eminently livable. This is typical of BIG’s work, which tends to juxtapose fantastic ambition with business savvy and technical expertise.......BIG, and their clients, were ready to do something more thoughtful, but had no interest in blending in. After much back-and-forth, they’ve settled on glass block as the building’s main cladding material.....The King Street project is also an ambitious experiment with urban design. There are basically two species of tower in Toronto: a mid-rise slab of six to 10 storeys, which steps back at the top; and a “tower-and-podium,” a model borrowed from Vancouver that combines a fat, squared-off base (or “podium”) with a tall, skinny residential tower.
architecture  Danish  heritage  King_Street  livability  property_development  thinking_big  Toronto  condominiums  soul-enriching  housing 
september 2018 by jerryking
Ten Ways Ridiculously Successful People Think Differently
December 4, 2017 | LinkedIn | Dr. Travis Bradberry Influencer.

Obstacles do not block the path; they are the path. This perspective helps successful people to think differently to everyone else, which is important, because if you think like everyone else, no matter how smart or experienced you are, you’ll hit the same ceiling. By thinking outside the box and going against the grain, successful people rise above their limitations.

They’re confident.
They’re composed. They know that no matter how good or bad things get, everything changes with time. All they can do is to adapt and adjust to stay happy and in control.

They’re honest.

They seek out small victories.

They’re always learning.

They expose themselves to a variety of people. There’s no easier way to learn to think differently than spending time with someone whose strengths are your weaknesses or whose ideas are radically different from your own. This exposure sparks new ideas and makes you well rounded. This is why we see so many great companies with co-founders who stand in stark contrast to each other. Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak from Apple were a prime example. Neither could have succeeded without the other.

They keep an open mind.

They’re fearless.

They turn tedious tasks into games.

They dream big but remain grounded.
affirmations  thinking_big  gamification  self-confidence  fearlessness  self-control  honesty  Steve_Jobs  heterogeneity  incrementalism  negative_space  open_mind  think_differently  small_wins 
may 2018 by jerryking
Stanley Hartt, 80, was ‘an articulate advocate for Canada’ - The Globe and Mail
DAVE GORDON
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED 1 HOUR AGO

What prompted Mr. Mulroney to choose Mr. Hartt over other candidates for the chief-of-staff job was that he "was the most brilliant young man of our generation. He had a remarkable mind, with a great capacity to look at complex issues and crunch them into coherent options for anyone with whom he was associated."

As deputy minister of finance, Mr. Hartt was so respected by Mr. Mulroney that he was the only public servant to sit with cabinet at all times, Mr. Mulroney said.

Mr. Hartt played a major role in some vital areas of economic policy, Mr. Mulroney said, including the privatizations of Petro Canada and Air Canada, "along with 29 other Crown corporations," according to the former prime minister....Air Canada CEO Calin Rovinescu became acquainted with Mr. Hartt in 1979, when Mr. Rovinescu was articling at Stikeman Elliott in Montreal.

"[Mr. Hartt] encouraged us to think on our feet, in front of the most difficult situations," he said. "Typically, you were expected to deliver your work with excellence, and your bonus would be the hope of getting a more interesting and complicated assignment afterward."

As senior counsel, Mr. Hartt would engage with junior colleagues as though they were family, regularly inviting them for meals at his home and allowing them to babysit his children, Mr. Rovinescu said.

Mr. Hartt, as a mentor, taught Mr. Rovinescu such life lessons as "Embrace curiosity. Think big. Think on your feet," as well as "Don't be afraid of crazy ideas; the crazier the better. Throw stuff against the wall and see what sticks."
chief_of_staff  Brian_Mulroney  obituaries  '90s  lawyers  radical_ideas  curiosity  thinking_big  Calin_Rovinescu 
january 2018 by jerryking
7 Closing Strategies to Double Your Average Sale Size
August 11 | Entrepreneur Magazine | Marc Wayshak - GUEST WRITER
Your success depends on closing bigger, better deals. Put your time and energy into prospects with the power to make large investments and introduce you to others who can do the same.

1. Get over your fear.
Many salespeople are simply too scared to sell to huge companies...... large companies face the same problems as your small customers do, just on a bigger scale. This means they need a bigger version of your solution -- and they have the budget to match. Get over your fear.

2. Stand apart from the crowd.
High-level prospects hear from an average of 10 salespeople every day. If you do what everyone else is doing, you’ll never get through to them or earn their trust. To double your average sales size, you must be intentional about standing apart from the crowd in your industry. While others pitch, you should ask questions. While others are enthusiastic, you should be low-key and genuine. While your competitors focus on their products, you should focus on your prospect’s deepest frustrations and show how you can solve them.

3. Stop selling to low-level prospects.
Selling low-level prospects harms your close rate and decreasing your average sale size. Low-level prospects simply don’t have the power or budget to tell you “yes." They’re not the decision-makers. If you want to increase the size of your sales, stop selling to prospects who lack the budget to invest in your solution.

4. Sell to decision-makers.
It’s a best practice to head straight to the top of the food chain and sell to directors, vice presidents, and C-level executives. They have the power and budget to say “yes” to your offer. If someone refers you back down the chain, you’re still landing an introduction to the right person -- by his or her boss, no less.

5. Stop cold-calling.
Cold calls are miserable. Try implementing a sales-prospecting campaign. Plan your calls, letters and emails as follow-ups to a valuable letter or package you send via FedEx. This could be a special report, unique sample or company analysis. These intentional, repeated touches over a series of months will set you up as a familiar name by the time you actually get your prospect on the phone. When a huge sale is on the line, you can afford to invest time and money to catch a single prospect’s attention.

6. Know the decision-making process.
If you’ve closed only small deals at small companies in the past, you might be accustomed to working with just one or two decision-makers at a time. In large corporations, the decision-making process can be much more complicated. One of the biggest mistakes salespeople make is failing to understand the decision-making process. Get a grasp of this early on, and you can stay in front of the right people, build value for them and close your sales at higher prices.

7. Leverage sales for introductions.
When you close one large sale at a big organization, don’t stop there. Ask new customers for introductions to others in their company or network who could benefit from your offering. You have nothing to lose by asking for introductions, but failure to do so will cost you massive opportunity and revenue.
Gulliver_strategies  sales  fear  large_companies  differentiation  sales_cycle  buyer_choice_rejection  cold_calling  referrals  prospects  JCK  executive_management  campaigns  Aimia  LBMA  strategic_thinking  close_rate  questions  thinking_big  enterprise_clients  C-suite  low-key  authenticity  doubling  the_right_people 
august 2017 by jerryking
Reza Satchu: What I learned after selling my first startup for nearly $1 billion
JUN. 30, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | INTERVIEW BY DAWN CALLEJA

The major disadvantage I had coming out of McGill was that I had more modest expectations. Whereas kids at Harvard, Yale, Stanford—through their interactions with CEOs, they get to see what’s possible. The reason I created Economics for Entrepreneurs at the University of Toronto, and then Next 36, was to provide that bridge.
The class is purposely stressful, because guess what? Being an entrepreneur is stressful.

There’s an increasing prosperity gap between Canada and the U.S. Not because we don’t work as hard, but because we don’t have any Facebooks, any Googles, any Ubers here.
If someone asked me if I wanted to teach entrepreneurship in high school or to 30-year-olds, I’d go for high school. Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Uber—they were all started by people in their 20s.

In Silicon Valley, failure is almost a badge. In Canada, getting young adults thinking about failing and taking risk early in their careers is a good thing.....Never underestimate the stupidity of large companies. If they did everything right, there’d never be new companies.
Part of being an entrepreneur is suspending disbelief and just going with your gut. So take the imperfect information you have and make a judgment. If it’s wrong, who cares? Just keep going.
chutzpah  audacity  entrepreneur  Alignvest  large_companies  brands  Fortune_500  McGill  thinking_big 
july 2017 by jerryking
Six Steps to Ditching Your Fear and Starting That Big Thing - The New York Times
Sketch Guy
By CARL RICHARDS APRIL 24, 2017
Continue reading the main storyShare This Page
Share
Tweet
Email
More
fear  inspiration  thinking_big 
april 2017 by jerryking
Dancing with Disruption - Mike Lipkin
Post navigation
PREVIOUS POST
By Mike Lipkin
#1. Become someone who knows.....a secret is a formula or knowledge that is only known to a few. If you own a secret, you have the power to share it so you can turn the few into the many. Secrets are everywhere – hiding in plain sight. The difference between someone who knows and someone who doesn’t is the willingness to do the work, find the information, talk to the people and formulate one’s strategy. Be a source of joy and not a source of stress!! Disruption begins long before.....Mastering other people's emotions....Add in a way that thrills and delights others!! Prospective of Personal Mastery....industry connection + internal influence.
# 2. Have an audacious ambition. If you want to be a disruptor, you can be humble, but you can’t be modest. You have to dream big....dream bigger than anything that gets in its way.
#3. Be simultaneously analytical and creative. There may be a gap in the market, but is there a market in the gap? ...Disruption demands left and right brain firing together. Your intuition may alert you to the opportunity but it’s your intellect that builds your business case. That’s why you need wingmen or women to complement your capacity. Fly social not solo.
#4. Be prolific. The more you lose, the more you win. 1.0 is always imperfect. You will hear the word “no” hundreds of times more than the word “yes.” The best way to get ready is to do things before you’re ready. The best you can do is get it as right as you can the first time [i.e. "good enough"] and then get better, stronger, smarter. Disruptors try a lot more things than disruptees. They fail fast and they fail forward. [Practice: repeated performance or systematic exercise for the purpose of acquiring skill or proficiency.
#5. Communicate like magic. If you want to be a disruptor, you must be a great communicator. ... the right words generate oxytocin – the love hormone, whereas the wrong words generate cortisol, the stress hormone. .... tell your story in a way that opens people’s hearts, minds and wallets to you. Create a vocabulary.
#6. Be a talent magnet. Disruption demands the boldest and brightest partners....The best talent goes where it earns the highest return. Reputation is everything. [What would Mandela do?]
#7. Play like a champion today. Disruptors may not always play at their best but they play their best every day. They bring their A-Game no matter who they’re playing....you feel their intensity and passion. How hard are you hustling on any given day? Everything matters. There is no such thing as small. They’re all in, all the time.
disruption  personal_branding  uncertainty  hard_work  Pablo_Picasso  creativity  intuition  intensity  passions  talent  failure  partnerships  reputation  Communicating_&_Connecting  storytelling  thinking_big  expertise  inequality_of_information  knowledge_intensive  imperfections  audacity  special_sauce  prolificacy  affirmations  unshared_information  good_enough  pairs  Mike_Lipkin  CAIF 
april 2017 by jerryking
Marginal gains matter but gamechangers transform
25 March/26 March 2017 | FT | by Tim Harford.

In the hunt for productivity, the revolutionary long shot is worth the cost and risk.

.............................As Olympic athletes have shown, marginal improvements accumulated over time can deliver world-beating performance,” said Andrew Haldane in a speech on Monday, which is quite true. Mr Haldane, the Bank of England’s chief economist
........The marginal gains philosophy tries to turn innovation into a predictable process: tweak your activities, gather data, embrace what works and repeat.......As Mr Haldane says, marginal improvements can add up.

But can they add up to productivity gains for the economy as a whole? The question matters. There is no economic topic more important than productivity, which in the long run determines whether living standards surge or stagnate.
........
The idea that developed economies can A/B test their way back to brisk productivity growth is a seductive one.

An alternative view is that what’s really lacking is a different kind of innovation: the long shot. Unlike marginal gains, long shots usually fail, but can pay off spectacularly enough to overlook 100 failures.
.....
These two types of innovation complement each other. Long shot innovations open up new territories; marginal improvements colonise them. The 1870s saw revolutionary breakthroughs in electricity generation and distribution but the dynamo didn’t make much impact on productivity until the 1920s. To take advantage of electric motors, manufacturers needed to rework production lines, redesign factories and retrain workers. Without these marginal improvements the technological breakthrough was of little use.
....Yet two questions remain. One is why so many businesses lag far behind the frontier. .......The culprit may be a lack of competition: vigorous competition tends to raise management quality by spurring improvements and by punishing incompetents with bankruptcy. ....
But the second question is why productivity growth has been so disappointing. A/B testing has never been easier or more fashionable, after all. The obvious answer is that the long shots matter, too.
.....In a data-driven world, it’s easy to fall back on a strategy of looking for marginal gains alone, avoiding the risky, unquantifiable research (jk: leaps of faith). Over time, the marginal gains will surely materialise. I’m not so sure that the long shots will take care of themselves.
adaptability  breakthroughs  compounded  economics  game_changers  incrementalism  innovation  leaps_of_faith  marginal_improvements  moonshots  nudge  organizational_change  organizational_improvements  organizational_structure  productivity  productivity_payoffs  slight_edge  taxonomy  thinking_big  Tim_Harford 
march 2017 by jerryking
CPPIB chief urges Canada to diversify, aim investments at emerging markets - The Globe and Mail
JANET MCFARLAND
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jan. 26 2015

Canadian companies need to “think bigger” and aim investments at Asia and other fast-growing regions of the world to improve the country’s international business success....Canadians have to think more about “the scale of the world in which we live” and realize how “puny” the country is in terms of the global population and global markets, Mr. Wiseman said in an interview prior to his remarks. More people are entering the middle class in China and India each year than live in Canada, he noted, but many Canadian businesses still do not aspire to tap those markets.

He pointed to the example of Chinese smart-phone manufacturer Xiaomi Inc., which has become one of the world’s largest handset makers within just five years. The company designs phones, but contracts out all its manufacturing, and has aggressively taken on giants such as Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd.

“There’s no reason why a company like that couldn’t exist here in Canada, selling handsets into China and India,” Mr. Wiseman said. “But we don’t think that way. We think about our own market, and we think about defining success within a much smaller realm than the world that is around us."... all companies need to understand their competitive advantages and exploit them, and Canada’s multicultural and multilingual population is one of the country’s most under-tapped competitive advantages.
diversification  private_equity  CPPIB  CEOs  Xiaomi  Asia  emerging_markets  multilingual  multicultural  competitive_advantage  internationally_minded  beyondtheU.S.  thinking_big  Mark_Wiseman 
january 2015 by jerryking
If you want to be big in 2015, think big - The Globe and Mail
DAVID CICCARELLI
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jan. 01 2015

Thought leadership builds your brand and raises your profile in arenas you may not be able to enter otherwise. Write about what you know and make yourself available to speak about your topic.

Add value by sharing your knowledge and empowering others to succeed. Contributing to the greater discussion will gain more impressions for your brand. To paraphrase the late motivational speaker Zig Ziglar, helping others get what they want will help you to get what you want.
preparation  growth  small_business  thought_leadership  serving_others  organizational_culture  chutzpah  large_companies  individual_initiative  thinking_big 
january 2015 by jerryking
What kind of jobs do the software engineers who earn $500k per year do? - Quora
If you're a worker in a village who supplies said village with water, you are valuable to its people. There are two types of workers:

Type 1 worker: Grabs an empty bucket or two, goes to the sweet water lake, fills them up, comes back and makes twenty people happy. He gets to drink some of that water along the way, and once he gets back, takes some of the water home.

Type 2 worker: Disregards how much of a "fair share" of water he's getting. Instead of grabbing a bucket, grabs a shovel and a little cup, and disappears for a while. He's digging a stream from the lake towards the village. Often he disappoints people for having returned from weeks of work with an empty cup. But the elders in the village for some reason believe in him and want to keep him (and throw him a bone so that he doesn't starve for a little while). Some day, suddenly he shows up with a constantly flowing stream of water behind his back. He puts the Type 1 workers out of water delivery business. They'll have to go find a different activity and "team" to work with. Type 2 worker, depending on how much control they retained on that stream, get to own a good chunk of it. Because the village wants to acquire and integrate that stream, they compensate the ownership of Type 2 worker in that stream with on par ownership in the village itself, typically land or such.

News media observes the Type 2 worker and his unwillingness to part with his accumulated wealth in return for his added value for the village (often vesting on a schedule, also known as golden handcuffs); and spins it such that it looks as if another village tried to woo that worker but was met with unexpected resistance.

The resulting media impression, in the mind of Type 1 workers, feels like pay inequity (see the video at the bottom). This is because Type 1 workers expect equal rewards for equal time spent being loyal to the same village.
productivity  software  Quora  mindsets  value_creation  entrepreneurship  creating_valuable_content  uncharted_problems  unconventional_thinking  solutions  wealth_creation  variations  productivity_payoffs  scaling  thinking_big 
may 2014 by jerryking
The pivot point
September 27, 2013 | RoB Magazine | Gordon Pitts.
Kevin Lynch's big ideas on reviving the East Coast economy don't include big government
economic_development  Gordon_Pitts  Atlantic_Canada  immigration  immigrants  Kevin_Lynch  thinking_big 
september 2013 by jerryking
If BlackBerry is sold, Canada faces an innovation vacuum - The Globe and Mail
Aug. 17 2013 | The Globe and Mail | KONRAD YAKABUSKI.

The sale and breakup of a flagship technology company is a reoccurring theme in Canadian business. But this time is different. If BlackBerry Ltd. goes, there is no ready replacement. That’s a telling switch from the situation Canada faced with the sale of Newbridge Networks in 2000 and the demise of Nortel Networks in 2009....Canada has an innovation bottleneck. An abundance of science is generated in university labs and start-up firms but most of it never finds its way into commercial applications. Risk-averse banks and too many businesses of the bird-in-the-hand variety remain the weak links in Canada’s innovation system.

“We punch above our weight in idea generation,” observes Michael Bloom, who leads the Conference Board of Canada’s Centre for Business Innovation. “But the further you move towards commercialization, the weaker we get as a country.”....Innovation can be driven by any sector, even the old-economy resource extraction business of the oil sands. But tech firms remain by far the most R&D-intensive players in any economy.

Hence, the tech sector is a key barometer of a country’s innovation strength. And innovation matters because it has a profound influence on our living standards – it is “the key long-run driver of productivity and income growth,” ...Canadian businesses remain oddly complacent.

“We tend in this county not to look at the true market opportunity of innovation,” Mr. Bloom adds. “If you only see a market of 35 million people, you’re going to see more risk than if you see the market as Europe, the U.S. and Asia. Americans see risk, but also great opportunity.”

It’s no coincidence that many of Canada’s greatest entrepreneurs and innovators have been immigrants. Unlike his American counterpart, the average Canadian business graduate does not dream of becoming the next Sergey Brin, Steve Jobs or, for that matter, Peter Munk.

Mr. Lazaridis and ex-BlackBerry co-CEO Jim Balsillie notwithstanding, how many Canadian entrepreneurs and innovators have truly changed the world, or aspire? By all accounts, not that many. A Conference Board study released last month found that only 10 per cent of Canadian firms (almost all of them small ones) pursue “radical or revolutionary” innovations. Large firms focus at best on “incremental” innovations.
Blackberry  bottlenecks  commercialization  competitiveness_of_nations  complacency  hollowing_out  Konrad_Yakabuski  Newbridge  Nortel  innovation  idea_generation  ecosystems  breakthroughs  incrementalism  large_companies  sellout_culture  Jim_Balsillie  moonshots  immigrants  Canada  Peter_Munk  market_opportunities  weak_links  thinking_big  oil_sands  resource_extraction  marginal_improvements  innovation_vacuum  punch-above-its-weight  This_Time_is_Different 
august 2013 by jerryking
How to Think Big,
April 11, 2013 | Businessweek | by 'Titanic' Replica Builder Clive Palmer.

There are no barriers to having great ideas and thinking big. Whether rich or poor, privileged or disadvantaged, everybody is capable of changing their lives and the lives of others by thinking big. It takes imagination, courage, and the will to work hard. Don’t listen to the knockers and the critics, the naysayers and the negativity. To my knowledge, nobody ever built a monument to a critic. They come and go, but big ideas last forever. The great John F. Kennedy said words to this effect: “A man may die, nations may rise and fall, but an idea lives on.”

I’ve had my share of failures along the way, but they’ve only made me stronger and smarter and the successes all the more sweet. The secret to thinking big is capturing the imagination of the people. That’s where the power lies. It’s like harnessing the tide. If you can cultivate the right idea that resonates on an individual level, it will surge through the population like a wave. The best ideas are highly contagious. They can cross borders and cultures.
ideas  thinking  howto  storytelling  persuasion  virality  idea_generation  chutzpah  failure  individual_initiative  ideaviruses  moonshots  negativity_bias  imagination  courage  hard_work  thinking_big  JFK 
july 2013 by jerryking
First on your to-do list? The unpleasant tasks
Jun. 09 2013 | - The Globe and Mail | by HARVEY SCHACHTER.

increasing the overall demand for what you sell – making the pie bigger, rather than figuring out on how to divide it with competitors – is an important part of success....Stop focusing on the quality of your work, because people care more about the quality of their own work, advises blogger Ben Drake. Help others improve by asking them what they need from you to help them soar.
Harvey_Schachter  serving_others  talent_management  thinking_big 
june 2013 by jerryking
The Internship - Not the Movie - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: June 8, 2013

Internships are increasingly important today, they explained, because skills are increasingly important in the new economy and because colleges increasingly don’t teach the ones employers are looking for. Experience, rather than a degree, has become an important proxy for skill, they note, and internships give you that experience. So grab one wherever you can, they add, because, even if you’re just serving coffee, it is a way to see how businesses actually work and which skills are prized by employers.... Since so many internships are unpaid these days, added Sedlet, there is a real danger that only “rich kids” can afford them, which will only widen our income gaps. The key, if you get one, he added, is to remember “that companies don’t want generalists to help them think big; they want people who can help them execute” and “add value.”

But what, they were often asked, does “add value” mean? It means, they said, show that you have some creative flair — particularly in design, innovation, entrepreneurship, sales or marketing, skills that can’t be easily replaced by a piece of software, a machine or a cheaper worker in India.
job_search  tips  internships  HireArt  Managing_Your_Career  value_creation  new_graduates  experience  thinking_big  value_added  creativity  imagination  execution  Tom_Friedman  non-routine  in-person  special_sauce 
june 2013 by jerryking
Britain: Priorities for a pivotal year | The Economist
Nov 21st 2012 | | The Economist from The World In 2013 print edition | Nick Clegg

At a time of great change, Britain must think big and long-term, says Nick Clegg, deputy prime minister and leader of the Liberal Democrats
Nick_Clegg  United_Kingdom  priorities  long-term  chutzpah  thinking_big 
january 2013 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: Changing the game
Posted by Seth Godin on November 01, 2007

Google announced an open interchange that allows users to take their social graph with them from one site to another. MySpace just joined in. This changes the rules for FaceBook, because now users have a choice of picking from dozens, soon to be hundreds of open sites... or just one closed one.

How can you change your game?

Consider the plight of Mike Huckabee and John Edwards. Both are making strong runs for the nominations of their parties, but both suffer because they're not seen as front runners. So why not change the game? Instead of waiting for a TV network to invite them to a debate, why not make your own TV show? Debate each other, in public, in Iowa. Broadcast the whole thing on YouTube. When you're done, challenge others in the opposite party to debate you, one on one. On your channel. What are they, chicken?

Consider the sandwich/burger shop/deli on a street crowded with choices. What to do? Why not get rid of all the meat and become a vegetarian/kosher sandwich/burger shop/deli? Now, it's five competitors and you. Anyone with a friend who eats carefully will bring her to your shop, the one and only one of its kind.

Usually, when you destroy the barriers in an existing industry, everyone loses... except you.
game_changers  entrepreneurship  risk-taking  barriers_to_entry  Seth_Godin  change_agents  thinking_big  scaling  constraints  vegetarian 
september 2012 by jerryking
What the Silence Said - WSJ.com
December 12, 2003 | WSJ | By DANIEL HENNINGER. A tribute to Bob Bartley.

In a December 2000 column about the Bush cabinet (titled, "Think Big"), Bob said this about the attorney-general slot: "The Occam's Razor answer is Jim Baker, just displaying legal generalship in Florida."

If you understand Occam's Razor, you understand the entire Bartley persona. I think Bob put this phrase in print about five times in his career, never of course bothering to explain its origins with the 14th-century English philosopher William of Occam, who posited the principle that the best and sturdiest solution to a problem is often the least complicated. Bob believed mightily in this idea. He thrilled, for instance, at James Carville's summation of the 1992 election: "It's the economy, stupid." Pure Occam's Razor.

Thus: To incentivize an economy you can either rejigger the entire tax code -- or reduce marginal tax rates. To keep prices stable, you can either swim through swamps of economic indicators -- or use a price rule, such as the gold standard. To find out what a nation wants, "hold an election." I think Bob saw Ronald Reagan, more than anything, as an Occam's Razor President ("Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall"). The day Bob heard that Jimmy Carter was scheduling the White House tennis court, he knew it was hopeless.

At the Journal editorial page, if you watched Bob Bartley work through the day's events -- in the news, in ideas, in life -- you learned to focus on the core of an issue, the fulcrum. The taciturnity wasn't an eccentric quirk; it was Bob's adamant, lifelong refusal to allow an issue or idea to be defeated by secondary or irrelevant detail. He defeated the irrelevancies by refusing to legitimize them with talk. Bob Bartley was in the game to move events, to move history. He knew how to do that, and in the 36 years he ran this page's editorials, he taught the rest of us how to do it: Think big. We did, and we will.
Daniel_Henninger  taciturn  tributes  wsj  Occam's_Razor  game_changers  James_A._Baker_III  thinking_big  problem_solving  incisiveness  high-impact  tax_codes 
august 2012 by jerryking
Why Modern Innovation Traffics in Trifles
July 6, 2012| WSJ | By NICHOLAS CARR.
Why Our Innovators Traffic in Trifles
An app for making vintage photos isn't exactly a moonshot. Are we too obsessed with 'tools of the self'?

What's behind innovation's turn toward the trifling? Declinists point to several possible culprits: America's schools are broken, investors and executives have become shortsighted, taxes are too high (sapping the entrepreneurial spirit), taxes are too low (preventing the government from funding basic research). Or maybe America has just lost its mojo.

But none of these explanations is particularly compelling. In all sorts of ways, the conditions for ingenuity and enterprise have never been better, and more patents were granted last year than ever before in American history. In the past few years, companies have decoded the human genome, shrunk multipurpose computers to the size of sardine tins and built cars that can drive themselves. The Internet itself, a global computer network of mind-blowing speed, size and utility, testifies to the ability of today's engineers to perform miracles....... What we are seeing is not a slowdown in the pace of innovation but a shift in its focus. Americans are as creative as ever, but today's buzz and big-money speculation are devoted to smaller-scale, less far-reaching, less conspicuous advances. We are getting precisely the kind of innovation that we desire—and deserve..........Knowing that the cause of our innovators' faltering ambitions lies in our own nature does not make it any less of a concern. But it does suggest that, if we want to see a resurgence in big thinking and grand invention, if we want to promote breakthroughs that will improve not only our own lives but those of our grandchildren, we need to enlarge our aspirations. We need to look outward again. If our own dreams are small and self-centered, we can hardly blame inventors for producing trifles.
America_in_Decline?  breakthroughs  Facebook  incrementalism  ingenuity  innovation  Instagram  Mark_Zuckerberg  moonshots  Nicholas_Carr  shortsightedness  thinking_big 
july 2012 by jerryking
The Rhino Principle
01.30.06 | Forbes.com | Paul Johnson
We can choose to lead quiet lives and get through them without achieving much. But if we want to do the big thing, if we hope to leave a record that will be admired and remembered, we must learn to distinguish between the peripheral and the essential. Then, having clearly established our central objective, we must charge at it again and again until the goal is achieved.

That is what the rhinoceros does. It may not be a model animal in most ways. But it does one thing very well. And that one thing we can learn: Charge!
historians  gtd  indispensable  worthiness  signals  noise  discernment  judgment  thinking_big 
june 2012 by jerryking
Boosting Emerging-Market Entrepreneurs
May 23, 2007 | Bloomberg BusinessWeek | by Jeffrey Gangemi.
A non-profit is offering small, high-growth companies know-how, connections, and encouragement to think big. Revenues are growing
thinking_big  Endeavor  emerging_markets  entrepreneur  nonprofit  high-growth 
june 2012 by jerryking
Who gets the money: 'aggressive, hungry and paranoid' - The Globe and Mail
MARK EVANS | Columnist profile
Special to Globe and Mail Update
Published Friday, Mar. 02, 2012

there is financing available for “aggressive, hungry and paranoid” entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The problem is that there aren’t enough of those kinds of entrepreneurs in Canada....“Venture capital is made for people who are very ambitious, people who want to make a dent in the world, eat someone’s lunch, and want to disrupt someone’s business. That attitude, we don’t have enough of in Canada.”
iNovia  venture_capital  vc  entrepreneur  change_agents  disruption  mindsets  paranoia  ambitions  Mark_Evans  aggressive  frugality  pitches  thinking_big  champions  competitiveness  self-confidence  overambitious  staying_hungry  torchbearers 
march 2012 by jerryking
The Door-To-Door Billionaire Daryl Harms knows how to turn dull businesses into big profits. But can he really do it with your garbage? - May 1, 2003
By Ed Welles
May 1, 2003

Harms spots trends sooner and bears down harder than most entrepreneurs--a combination that has made him wildly wealthy, if not exactly famous. But his next venture--more on that later-- just might transform him into a household name on the order of, say, Warren Buffett. Like Buffett, Daryl Harms, 51, patiently trolls for perfect businesses in which he can build long-term value via his Masada Resource Group, based in Birmingham. He hunts down overlooked opportunities that don't trade on trendy brand names or cutting-edge technologies...When selling cable service, Harms went block to block, zeroing in on houses with the tallest antennas. Other salesfolk reflexively bypassed such homes because they assumed that better reception wasn't an issue for them. Harms targeted those customers first. "I told them, 'I can see you stand tall. Of all the people on the street you understand the value of TV,' " he recalls saying. " 'If we put cable in, you can compare it with what you have now. If you don't like it, we'll come back and take it out.' " Such "influencers," in Harms's lingo, made it easier for him to convert whole blocks....Spurred by a poll that showed that 92% of Americans considered themselves "environmentalists," Harms and his employees spent a year studying the recycling market only to decide that the real money lay in garbage. From there they sought out the best ethanol conversion technology. Having found it--at the Tennessee Valley Authority--they worked for five years to tweak the science, an effort that has earned Masada 18 patents. "Today's risky business climate warrants thoroughness," Harms says..."The theme is that there is always a consumer need to be addressed," explains Wheeler. "People will always talk on the phone, watch television, and produce garbage."...Asking the right question, it seems, comes naturally to Harms. Entrepreneurs fail, he believes, because they "get too microscopic in their thinking. In business it's very easy to get the right answer to the wrong question." According to Wheeler, Harms failed to ask the right question when he set up a venture called Postron, which allowed cable TV subscribers to receive their bills via cable and print them out on a printer attached to their TVs. What Harms didn't ask, says Wheeler, was "whether consumers wanted another piece of hardware." They didn't...Harms finds customers where no one else thinks to look. When he started selling burglar alarms in 1985, he didn't target high-crime areas. Instead he identified places where the perception of vulnerability was greatest--which he determined by calculating how much space the local paper devoted to crime. The first cellphone license he sought was for a desolate stretch of highway between Lincoln and Omaha rather than in a major population center. Why? Because, as Page says, "what else were people going to do in their cars but talk on the phone?" Aside from overlooked customers, Harms seeks another component to every business: recurring revenue of roughly $25 a month per user. "That's a bite that most people can get used to paying," he reasons. For him it translates into healthy cash flow, which fosters predictability and enables a business to survive hard times. Besides, "the more reliable the cash flow, the higher a multiple of that cash flow you can get for your company," he notes.
entrepreneur  moguls  counterintuitive  overlooked_opportunities  unglamorous  latent  hidden  cash_flows  questions  missed_opportunities  wide-framing  hard_times  predictability  consumer_needs  subscriptions  thinking_big  asking_the_right_questions 
november 2011 by jerryking
What's The Big Idea?
Mar 12, 2011 | Financial Times. pg. 28 | by James Crabtree. Forward to R. Mayot re. IdeaCity

From Davos, to Long Beach, to north Wales, 'ideas conferences' are burgeoning. But, asks James Crabtree, are they really the new crucibles for creative thinking - or just exclusive talking shops?

Aficionados of cult television know Portmeirion simply as "the village". Here, in the 1960s show The Prisoner, Patrick McGoohan insists "I am not a number, I am a free man," and plots his escape from a mysterious captive community. But, last weekend, the town hosted a different sort of exclusive gathering - and one perhaps better known for those trying to get in, not out.

Against a backdrop of pastel-painted Italianate cliff-top villas, around 120 specially invited guests descended on the Welsh coastal village for what its organisers describe as a global "thought leadership symposium". Such self-selected elite groupings seem, at first glance, to be little more than a weekend break for an already-fortunate section of the chattering classes; what one Portmeirion participant dryly described as "a socially concerned Saga mini-break, dressed up as something more serious".

But such events are also part of a wider trend in the burgeoning market for "ideas conferences" - exclusive conflabs that bring together groups of leaders with the aim of sparking creative ideas, untethered from the niche subjects, academic specialisms or industry segments that have long dominated professional events.

Examples are not hard to find. The business summit in the secluded Swiss mountain resort of Davos is the most famous. But the first week of March also saw the latest TED conference, an exclusive annual USD7,500-a-ticket gathering in Long Beach, California, dedicated to "ideas worth spreading". Elsewhere Google runs an annual invite-only conference, known as Zeitgeist, while American internet evangelist Tim O'Reilly hosts excitable technology entrepreneurs at Foo Camp, which modestly stands for "Friends of O'Reilly".

Dozens of smaller meetings are popping up too, such as Portmeirion, now in its third year and with the FT as one of its sponsors. They represent a shift in the market for conferences, now forced to be more eye-catching to attract the attention of more demanding and distracted audiences. But their blossoming also illuminates a wider trend: the growing importance of unusual ideas and rich social networks, in an economy in which information is both increasingly valuable and confusingly abundant.

Those gathered at Portmeirion this year formed an eclectic group, ranging from polymathic finance expert Nassim Nicholas Taleb to actress Miriam Margolyes and rock concert promoter Harvey Goldsmith. Elsewhere the resort's narrow streets were thronged with a mixture of senior bankers, newspaper columnists, politicians, entrepreneurs, authors and think-tank boffins.

Portmeirion itself used to be something of a salon for London's recuperating elite, hosting guests such as Noel Coward and Bertrand Russell. The idea of hosting a contemporary event there stems from this: it is the brainchild of British public relations guru Julia Hobsbawm, whose father (the Marxist historian Eric Hobsbawm) brought their family to the town for summer holidays.

Top-level gatherings have long been a feature of politics and international affairs. Historian Simon Schama points to The Poker Club, a distinguished salon at the heart of the Scottish Enlightenment of the late 1700s, which counted David Hume and Adam Smith among its members.

Today's ideas conferences are less serious affairs than their antecedents, with agendas that go well beyond the straitjacketed worlds of politics, foreign affairs and business. Videos, jazzy graphics and blaring music between sessions all help keep participants engaged. Informal, unscripted agenda-less "unconferences", are also popular.

A defiantly cross-disciplinary ethic marks out this new class of events, whose programmes are seemingly incomplete without sculptors, comedians and bioethicists to balance out the economists and business gurus. Portmeirion's two most memorable sessions were its most eclectic: a plea to save the seas from oceanographer Sylvia Earle, and a moving film about Indian prostitution from filmmaker Beeban Kidron.

The flipside of this variety is a certain intellectual vagueness, as organisers try to hold together a programme full of clashing insights. The gnomic theme of the most recent TED, for instance, was "the rediscovery of wonder" - featuring a live talk from an astronaut in an orbiting space station, and a demonstration of a machine that "printed" human body parts. The theme of Portmeirion, meanwhile, was simply "community and values", into which one could read just about anything.

Certainly, it isn't always clear what these conferences are meant to be about. The ideal speaker, therefore, is someone able to cross many intellectual boundaries at once [jk: does this meet the definition of "transgressive"??] - as with Nassim Nicholas Taleb, author of The Black Swan, who kicked off the Portmeirion gathering with a magisterial address on the topic of "anti-fragility" in complex social and economic systems. His remarks ranged from mathematics and economics to political theory and Greek history, leaving attendees at once stimulated and more than a little perplexed.

There is an underlying economic rationale too. Delegates often work in professions that place a premium on finding and exploiting the ideas central to processes of innovation in modern businesses. This makes the events business-friendly too - a fact compounded by their need to win extensive corporate sponsorship, which in turn pays for the meals and accommodation that non-paying guests and speakers enjoy.

Yet if the ideas are a little fuzzy, and the business jargon a little too prevalent, this is because, more than anything, these conferences are meant as a celebration, and a test, of the individuals picked to attend - those high-powered, busy, professionally successful types who make a living telling others what they should watch, read or buy.

RSA chief executive Matthew Taylor notes the importance of intellectual cross-dressing at such events: "They allow people to throw off their professional persona for 48 hours: journalists become social theorists, businesspeople become green warriors, and academics become showmen. But on Monday morning - perhaps to everyone's secret relief - it's back to work."

Although their easygoing participants would tend to deny this, these events are a new form of elitism: a novel way of marking out a social and professional hierarchy, in which sensibility and interestingness replaces class or creed. What follows is stimulating, but also reflects the similar outlooks of the media and intellectual elite in a post-ideological world: an ersatz form of intellectualism, which might have raised an eyebrow in Eric Hobsbawm's day.

Even so, such ideas events prosper because they solve a problem faced by many at the top of their professions. The much-discussed "death of distance" never happened; globalisation and the profusion of technology makes place more important. Similarly, a world of abundant, instantly accessible information seems to make personal connection more vital. This puts a premium on private events, which force their participants to spend time developing ideas without distraction. The ideas conference is here to stay.

The Polymath

Nassim Nicholas Taleb

As the guru credited with spotting the unexpected "black swan" events behind the global financial meltdown, Nassim Nicholas Taleb (illustration above) has a track record for spotting unusual ideas. He worries that we have still not learnt the lessons of the crisis, identifying ongoing major threats arising from "expert problems". The risk, he notes, is that "a pseudo-expert astrologist doesn't have many damaging side- effects, but a pseudo-expert economist certainly does".

Taleb is sceptical of some ideas gatherings. Davos is a particular bugbear; he turns down the annual invitation on the grounds that it is "too big, on the wrong topics, and with the wrong people". Other events have their problems too - in particular their tendency to turn "scientists into entertainers and circus performers".

Taleb is currently developing his thinking for a forthcoming book, which he describes as a deeper "volume two" of the themes he explored in The Black Swan. His new big idea is "anti-fragility", or the stability that comes from decentralised, complex systems - such as those found in nature (i.e. biomimicry), or artisan industries - which allow regular small acts of self-destruction, but adapt to keep the system as a whole stable. He contrasts this with fragile, centralised systems - such as the post-crisis banking industry - which prop up their failing parts.

The Agent

Caroline Michel

It is the books with the "big themes" that sell well nowadays, explains Caroline Michel (below), one of London's leading literary agents. Her job, she says, is one in which "amazing people come to me with brilliant ideas, and it is my job to work out what to do with them". In this role she styles herself as part of a new class of "professional mediators", a cadre of ideas professionals whose role it is to weed out "Pot-Noodle knowledge", and give the public new ways to find the valuable information they need.

Consequently, she is a confirmed ideas conference fan, citing book gatherings such as the annual Hay Festival as a source of inspiration. But when facing "an extraordinary spaghetti of knowledge and information", she says, even knowledge professionals find themselves struggling to "to pull through strands" they can understand. A world in which "we have access to this huge mass of information, and in which we are all instant doctors and instant reporters" therefore only increases the importance of those few "people you trust to show you the way through it" - and makes doubly important the chance to listen to them, and to interact with them, in person.

The Entrepreneur

Will … [more]
conferences  ideas  TED  ideaCity  Davos  cross-disciplinary  cross-pollination  antifragility  Nassim_Taleb  self-destructive  Tim_O'Reilly  David_Hume  fragility  Zeitgeist  thinking_big  invitation-only 
march 2011 by jerryking
Bonobos: Very Fit to Lead -Thinking Big
May 18, 2010 | TIME | By Carlye Adler. "Bonobos is now
launching a plan to bring "mobile fit pods", or portable, collapsible,
dressing rooms to airports, train stations, corporations, college
tailgates, beach parties, and farmer's markets — wherever the potential
customers are — to get guys measured by its experts (so-called style
ninjas), who will then direct them to the website. Bonobos's web site
and pop up fitting rooms have entirely eradicated the brand's need for
leases, sales staff, and distribution. "The concept has such validity in
today's world," says Maxine Martens, the CEO of fashion industry search
firm Martens & Heads, and an investor in the company. In 2009, a
retail environment that saw shrinking sales, reduced traffic, store
closures, and bankruptcies, Bonobos tripled its business, earning $4.9
million in gross sales. And even though the pants aren't cheap,
($88-$195 a pair), Dunn says there's enough appeal to double business
this year. "
apparel  e-commerce  fashion  mens'_clothing  inspiration  reinvention  Bonobos  pop-ups  retailers  thinking_big  inventory-free  product_launches 
may 2010 by jerryking
C.K.'s Lessons For Executives
(1) Think Big (2) Cater to the Poor (3) Don't Get Blindsided (4) Reconsider Outsourcing
tips  executive_management  CEOs  C.K._Prahalad  overdeliver  chutzpah  game_changers  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  thinking_big  blindsided  blind_spots 
december 2009 by jerryking
Dear Graduate...
JUNE 19, 2006 | Business Week | By Jack and Suzy Welch. (1) As
an ambitious 22-year-old readying to enter the corporate world, how can I
quickly distinguish myself as a winner? -- Dain Zaitz, Corvallis, Ore.

One gets ahead by over-delivering. Start thinking big. Go beyond being the grunt assigned. Do the extra legwork and data-crunching to give [clients] something that really expands their thinking—an analysis, for instance, of how an entire industry might play out over the next three years. What new companies and products might emerge? What technologies could change the game? Could someone, perhaps the client's own company, move production to China?

(2) Revenue growth is at the top of my to-do list. What should I look
for in hiring great sales professionals? -- John Cioffi, Westfield, N.J.
questions  hiring  recruiting  Managing_Your_Career  advice  Jack_Welch  strategic_thinking  anticipating  new_graduates  chutzpah  movingonup  overdeliver  Pablo_Picasso  individual_initiative  generating_strategic_options  independent_viewpoints  thinking_big  game_changers 
november 2009 by jerryking
Thinking bigger
Posted by Seth Godin on September 19, 2008

The bigger point is that none of us are doing enough to challenge the assignment. Every day, I spend at least an hour of my time looking at my work and what I've chosen to do next and wonder, "is this big enough?.... What are you doing to go beyond the expectations...Thinking bigger isn't about being bigger. It's about changing the game. Do what you've always done and you'll get what you've always gotten....Yesterday, I was sitting with a friend who runs a small training company. He asked, "I need better promotion. How do I get more people to take the professional type design course I offer at my office?" My answer was a question, as it usually is. "Why is the course at your office?" and then, "Why is it a course and not accreditation, or why not turn it into a guild for job seekers, where you could train people and use part of the tuition to hire someone to organize a private job board? You could guarantee clients well-trained students (no bozos) and you could guarantee students better jobs... everyone wins."

I have no idea if my idea for the training company is a good one, but I know it's a bigger one.
Seth_Godin  inspiration  overdeliver  chutzpah  individual_initiative  expectations  upselling  thinking_big  scaling  ideas  creating_valuable_content  overambitious  new_categories  game_changers  Play_Bigger 
july 2009 by jerryking
Seven Ways to Fail Big
September 2008 | Harvard Business Review | by Paul B. Caroll
and Chunka Mui.
(1) The Synergy Mirage (2) Faulty Financial Engineering (3) Stubbornly
Staying the Course (4) Pseudo-Adjacencies (5) Bets on the Wrong
Technology (6) Rushing to Consolidate (7) Roll-Ups of Almost Any Kind.
Avoiding Disasters: The Devil's Advocate.
See also "Questions Every Company Should Ask" at the end of article.
HBR  magazines  overoptimism  synergies  failure  devil’s_advocates  roll_ups  decision_making  thinking_big  strategic_bets  taxonomy  financial_engineering  questions  red_teams 
may 2009 by jerryking
Risky Business - HBR.org
September 2008 | Harvard Business Review | The Editors. an
article about investment strategies in the Persian Gulf—“Where Oil-Rich
Nations Are Placing Their Bets.” The authors—Rawi Abdelal, Ayesha Khan,
and Tarun Khanna—persuasively argue that there’s a world of difference
between what the Gulf countries are actually trying to achieve and what
Western leaders imagine they’re aiming for. “Seven Ways to Fail Big,”
by Paul Carroll and Chunka Mui, has an ambitious agenda: to categorize
the bad strategic bets that companies make and to identify
decision-making processes that will help other companies avoid similar
failures. The key process is appointing devil’s advocates with enough
clout to stop a bad decision in its tracks.
big_bets  HBR  risks  magazines  decision_making  Persian_Gulf  Middle_East  failure  devil’s_advocates  petro-dictators  petro-politics  thinking_big  strategic_bets  taxonomy  red_teams 
may 2009 by jerryking
Brave New Board -
June 2003 | ASSOCIATION MANAGEMENT | By Joe Connolly

Hovering at a plateau of performance in the 1990s, Big Brothers Big
Sisters of America realized it was time to think big. See how the
national board's self-assessment led to a dramatic overhaul of its
meeting format, a search for new skills, and a dramatic goal of making 1
million mentoring matches by 2010.
CARP  plateauing  breakthroughs  boards_&_directors_&_governance  thinking_big  overhaul 
may 2009 by jerryking
Practically Speaking - Creative People Say Inspiration Isn’t All Luck - NYTimes.com
Published: October 22, 2008 | New York Times | By MICKEY MEECE

Serendipity often plays a role in generating big ideas...inspiration,
but equally as important is having an open mind — especially in
tumultuous times like these. Big and small ideas are out there--if you
are looking for them.

2008 IdeaFestival was created by Kris Kimel whose own “Aha!” moment
occurred after attending the Sundance Film Festival and wondering about
hosting a diverse festival that celebrates ideas. In 2000, he helped
create the IdeaFestival, which brings together creative thinkers from
different disciplines to connect ideas in science, the arts, design,
business, film, technology and education. The goal is to promote
“out-of-the-box thinking and cross-fertilization as a means toward the
development of innovative ideas, products and creative endeavors.”
Aha!_moments  chance  conferences  contingency  creativity  creative_types  cross-pollination  entrepreneurship  ideas  idea_generation  ideacity  inspiration  luck  Mickey_Meece  open_mind  out-of-the-box  science_&_technology  serendipity  small_business  TED  thinking_big 
april 2009 by jerryking
reportonbusiness.com: Changing Gears
April 25, 2008 | Globe & Mail | by JOSHUA KNELMAN. Their
goal: Improve the experience of cancer patients at Toronto's Princess
Margaret Hospital. GEAR 1 DEEP USER UNDERSTANDING - Grichko and Leung
spent weeks hanging around PMH. GEAR 2 IDEATION AND PROTOTYPING The team
sat down with 20 PMH staffers—managers, surgeons, nurses and support
workers. "The idea of brainstorming is to have no limits—think big,"
says Leung. GEAR 3 STRATEGIC BUSINESS DESIGN Grichko and Leung asked
two key questions: "What do we need, and what's possible?" The answer
was simple: to create a better waiting-room chair
brainstorming  design  design_thinking  furniture  hospitals  idea_generation  ideation  innovation  MBAs  observations  OCAD  product_design  prototyping  Rotman  strategic_thinking  thinking_big 
february 2009 by jerryking

related tags

'90s  accelerators  adaptability  advice  affirmations  aggressive  Aha!_moments  Aimia  Airbus  Alignvest  Amazon  ambitions  America_in_Decline?  Anthony_Lacavera  anticipating  antifragility  apparel  appointments  architecture  Asia  asking_the_right_questions  Atlantic_Canada  audacity  authenticity  barriers_to_entry  beyondtheU.S.  bicycles  big_bets  bike_sharing  Blackberry  blindsided  blind_spots  boards_&_directors_&_governance  Bonobos  bottlenecks  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  boxing  brainstorming  brands  breakthroughs  Brian_Mulroney  buyer_choice_rejection  C-suite  C.K._Prahalad  CAIF  Calin_Rovinescu  campaigns  Canada  CARP  cash_flows  CEOs  champions  chance  change_agents  chief_of_staff  chutzpah  city_hall  close_rate  cold_calling  commercialization  Communicating_&_Connecting  competitiveness  competitiveness_of_nations  competitive_advantage  complacency  compounded  condominiums  conferences  constraints  consumer_needs  contingency  counterintuitive  courage  CPPIB  creating_valuable_content  creative_types  creativity  cross-disciplinary  cross-pollination  curiosity  customer_centricity  Daniel_Henninger  Danish  David_Hume  Davos  decision_making  design  design_thinking  devil’s_advocates  differentiation  discernment  disruption  diversification  doubling  e-commerce  economics  economic_development  ecosystems  Elon_Musk  emerging_markets  Endeavor  enterprise_clients  entertainment_industry  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  execution  executive_management  expectations  experience  experimentation  expertise  Facebook  failure  fallacies_follies  fashion  fear  fearlessness  financial_engineering  Fortune_500  fragility  Freshbooks  frugality  furniture  game_changers  gamification  generating_strategic_options  good_enough  GOP  Gordon_Pitts  growth  gtd  Gulliver_strategies  hard_times  hard_work  Harvey_Schachter  HBR  heritage  heterogeneity  hidden  high-growth  high-impact  HireArt  hiring  historians  hollowing_out  honesty  hospitals  housing  howto  humiliation  ideacity  ideas  ideation  ideaviruses  idea_generation  imagination  immigrants  immigration  imperfections  in-person  incisiveness  incrementalism  incubators  independent_viewpoints  indispensable  individual_initiative  inequality_of_information  ingenuity  innovation  innovation_vacuum  iNovia  inspiration  Instagram  intensity  internationally_minded  internships  interviews  intuition  inventory-free  invitation-only  Jack_Welch  James_A._Baker_III  Janan_Ganesh  JCK  Jeff_Bezos  JFK  Jim_Balsillie  job_search  John_Tory  judgment  Kevin_Lynch  Kindle  King_Street  knowledge_intensive  Konrad_Yakabuski  large_companies  latent  lawyers  LBMA  leaps_of_faith  livability  long-term  low-key  luck  magazines  Managing_Your_Career  Marcus_Gee  marginal_improvements  market_opportunities  Mark_Evans  Mark_Wiseman  Mark_Zuckerberg  MBAs  McGill  mens'_clothing  Mickey_Meece  Middle_East  Mike_Lipkin  mindsets  missed_opportunities  moguls  moonshots  movingonup  multicultural  multilingual  Nassim_Taleb  negative_space  negativity_bias  Newbridge  new_categories  new_graduates  Nicholas_Carr  Nick_Clegg  noise  non-routine  nonprofit  Nortel  nudge  obituaries  observations  OCAD  Occam's_Razor  oil_sands  OMB  open_mind  organizational_change  organizational_culture  organizational_improvements  organizational_structure  out-of-the-box  overambitious  overdeliver  overhaul  overlooked_opportunities  overoptimism  overreach  Pablo_Picasso  pairs  paranoia  parks  partnerships  passions  Persian_Gulf  personal_branding  persuasion  Peter_Munk  petro-dictators  petro-politics  pitches  plateauing  Play_Bigger  pop-ups  predictability  preparation  priorities  private_equity  problem_solving  productivity  productivity_payoffs  product_design  product_launches  prolificacy  property_development  prospects  prototyping  public_spaces  publishing  punch-above-its-weight  questions  Quora  radical_ideas  Rail_Deck_Park  recruiting  red_teams  referrals  reinvention  rentals  reputation  resource_extraction  retailers  risk-taking  risks  Rob_Ford  roll_ups  Rotman  sales  sales_cycle  scaling  science_&_technology  self-confidence  self-control  self-destructive  sellout_culture  serendipity  serving_others  Seth_Godin  shortsightedness  signals  slight_edge  small_business  small_wins  software  solutions  soul-enriching  special_sauce  staying_hungry  Steve_Jobs  storytelling  strategic_bets  strategic_thinking  subscriptions  synergies  taciturn  talent  talent_management  taxonomy  tax_codes  TED  television  the_right_people  thinking  thinking_big  think_differently  This_Time_is_Different  thought_leadership  Tim_Harford  Tim_O'Reilly  tinkerers  tips  Tom_Friedman  torchbearers  Toronto  transit  transportation  tributes  uncertainty  uncharted_problems  unconventional_thinking  unglamorous  United_Kingdom  unshared_information  upselling  urban  urban_planning  value_added  value_creation  variations  vc  vegetarian  venture_capital  virality  visionaries  Vélib  weak_links  wealth_creation  wide-framing  worthiness  wsj  Xiaomi  Zeitgeist 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: