jerryking + think_tanks   24

The Ivory Tower Can’t Keep Ignoring Tech
NOV. 14, 2017 | The New York Times | By Cathy O’Neil is a data scientist and author of the book “Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy. Follow her on Twitter at @mathbabedotorg.

We urgently need an academic institute focused on algorithmic accountability.

First, it should provide a comprehensive ethical training for future engineers and data scientists at the undergraduate and graduate levels, with case studies taken from real-world algorithms that are choosing the winners from the losers. Lecturers from humanities, social sciences and philosophy departments should weigh in.

Second, this academic institute should offer a series of workshops, conferences and clinics focused on the intersection of different industries with the world of A.I. and algorithms. These should include experts in the content areas, lawyers, policymakers, ethicists, journalists and data scientists, and they should be tasked with poking holes in our current regulatory framework — and imagine a more relevant one.

Third, the institute should convene a committee charged with reimagining the standards and ethics of human experimentation in the age of big data, in ways that can be adopted by the tech industry.

There’s a lot at stake when it comes to the growing role of algorithms in our lives. The good news is that a lot could be explained and clarified by professional and uncompromised thinkers who are protected within the walls of academia with freedom of academic inquiry and expression. If only they would scrutinize the big tech firms rather than stand by waiting to be hired.
algorithms  accountability  Cathy_O’Neil  Colleges_&_Universities  data_scientists  ethics  inequality  think_tanks  Big_Tech 
november 2017 by jerryking
Trump Looks to Ex-Intelligence Officer, Putin Critic for National Security Council - WSJ
By FELICIA SCHWARTZ and PAUL SONNE
March 2, 2017

Ms. Hill is known in Washington policy circles for her clear-eyed view of Mr. Putin, viewing his background in the Soviet security services as critical to the way he approaches power politics and foreign policy. Ms. Hill’s selection was first reported by Foreign Policy.

“In the KGB, Putin learned how to probe people’s vulnerabilities, uncover their secrets, and use compromising information against them,” Ms. Hill wrote in a piece that appeared on Vox.com last summer. “In his view, other world leaders are essentially targets.”

Ms. Hill, currently at the Brookings Institution, previously served as an officer for the National Intelligence Council focusing on Russia and Eurasia. She co-wrote a book about Mr. Putin and his world view, and formerly worked at the Eurasia Foundation.
White_House  appointments  Europe  Russia  NSC  security_&_intelligence  women  U.S.foreign_policy  Brookings  think_tanks  Vladimir_Putin 
march 2017 by jerryking
Recharging the Canadian right - The Globe and Mail
PRESTON MANNING
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jan. 18, 2016

As Henry Kissinger once observed, politicians in office use up their intellectual, human and organizational capital rather than adding to it. Time out of office, wisely employed, can be used to restock the cupboard....

.....This is not to say that personal attractiveness and communications capabilities should be ignored in the recruitment of the next generation of political leaders. But if the aim of conservatives is not only to recharge the right politically, but also to be better able to govern the country as a result, putting all the renewal eggs in the charismatic leader basket would be a mistake for both conservatism and the country....
1. Greater recognition of the character traits that Canadians want to see in their elected officials – openness, honesty, transparency, integrity, compassion, humility – and making the possession of such traits a much more important factor in recruiting candidates, leaders and staff.

2. More clearly embracing those Canadian values – such as freedom, responsibility, equality of opportunity, stewardship, respect for life, democratic accountability – that conservatives want to strengthen and apply more rigorously to public policy.

3. Continue to strongly communicate the importance of trade liberalization, public-spending constraints, balanced budgets, debt reduction and tax relief.

4. Undertake a fresh round of policy development to strengthen the creative application of conservative values and principles to those areas where conservatives are, rightly or wrongly, seen to be weak or disinterested, such as poverty, inequality, health care, education, environment, science and culture.

5. Investing heavily in training conservative-oriented Canadians for more effective participation in the country’s political processes; providing more and better training for volunteers, constituency executives, campaign managers and candidates.

6. With respect to all of the above, consulting and involving ordinary Canadians at every stage – not just party insiders and elites.
Preston_Manning  conservatism  revitalization  intellectual_capital  human_capital  constituencies  rebuilding  think_tanks  political_infrastructure  institutions  politicians  institution-building  right-of-center  Canadian  values  training  Henry_Kissinger  organizational_capital  renewal  character_traits  charisma  APNSA  right-wing 
january 2016 by jerryking
How to right the Conservative ship - The Globe and Mail
TONY CLEMENT
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Dec. 23, 2015

Over time, Conservatives must not shy away from a broader suite of policy solutions as an alternative to what the Liberals and NDP have on offer. For example, can Conservatives have a distinctively conservative policy on poverty elimination? What is the Conservative vision regarding the relationship with indigenous peoples? How about an environmental policy that is consistent with Canadian values? Or Internet rights and responsibilities? Answers to these questions will require a good amount of consultation and discussion, and will require time and energy. But there is no reason why Conservatives cannot offer compelling alternatives to Liberal and NDP policies.

There are also critical issues facing the Conservative Party as an electoral machine. We must also do a better job of organizing and training in our Conservative ranks, and adapt far better to the new online world. Better social media presence is just the start of the effort. Community is now defined not only as what exists in our cities and towns but the virtual communities of the online world. Our volunteers must be motivated and welcomed. Feedback loops from the field must be taken seriously.

We must also not write off 100 or more electoral districts without a fight. I would like to see an organizational unit within our party, specifically charged with how to make hard-to-win ridings easier to win.
renewal  Conservative_Party  post-mortems  Liberals  NDP  politics  think_tanks  online_communities  aboriginals  environment  social_media 
december 2015 by jerryking
A fighter for immigration, inclusion and diversity - The Globe and Mail
RICHARD BLACKWELL
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 17 2015,

After years of running the poverty-fighting Maytree Foundation, last fall Ratna Omidvar was named head of the new Global Diversity Exchange housed at the Ted Rogers School of Management at Toronto’s Ryerson University. The GDX, as she calls it, will do research and exchange information about diversity and the inclusion of immigrants and visible minorities – not just in Canada but all over the world.

It is essentially a “think-and-do tank,”...the GDX will tap into the great minds who have studied immigration and settlement, while sharing concrete strategies and experiences that have worked effectively.

While national governments function as the gatekeepers for immigration – letting people in or keeping them out – it is local efforts, usually at the city level, that make the difference in getting immigrants to prosper, she said.
immigration  women  diversity  Ryerson  leaders  immigrants  leadership  networking  boards_&_directors_&_governance  Maytree  talent_pipelines  under-representation  Ratna_Omidvar  Toronto  cities  think_tanks 
april 2015 by jerryking
Strong intellectual property rights are key to prosperity - The Globe and Mail
BRIAN LEE CROWLEY
Strong intellectual property rights are key to prosperity
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Feb. 10 2015,

The stability of property and its transference by consent were thus rightly deemed by the great Scottish philosopher David Hume as two of the three rules that underpinned truly civilized societies (the third was the keeping of promises). Strong, reliable and consistent property rights unlock prosperity because they reduce conflict, promote stewardship and reward investment..... A strong IP regime therefore unlocks creativity, surely one of the keys to prosperity in a society increasingly dependent on intangible services for its wealth creation. Ultimately, all wealth is created by human knowledge, and increasingly the wealth of societies such as Canada takes the form of the fruits of our fertile minds, in software, design, film, fashion, engineering, disease control and more.
capitalism  intellectual_property  rule_of_law  Congo  Zaire  property_rights  abuses  impunity  intangibles  patents  wealth_creation  think_tanks  counterfeits  creativity  digital_economy  protocols  David_Hume  knowledge_economy  prosperity 
february 2015 by jerryking
Think tanks need to show us the money - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Feb. 09 2015

Like Brookings, almost of all of Canada’s leading think tanks claim to be independent and non-partisan. But while none – not even the Broadbent Institute – is directly affiliated with a political party, it’s not hard to discern an identifiable political agenda in the research they produce. American think tanks, says former think-tank founder David Callahan, “often operate as the motherships of ideological movements – weaving together a jumble of values and ideas into a coherent story and actionable agenda.” You could easily say the same of most of their Canadian counterparts.
Konrad_Yakabuski  think_tanks  lobbying  Brookings  institution-building  networks  institutions  political_infrastructure  transparency  political_advocacy  policy_analysis  policy  conflicts_of_interest  policymaking 
february 2015 by jerryking
True democracy starts with the municipal - The Globe and Mail
Preston Manning

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Aug. 15 2013

there are more than 25,000 elected municipal officials in Canada, not counting elected school boards and health boards in many jurisdictions, and some 75,000 to 100,000 Canadians likely gave serious thought to running for their municipal council over the past three years.

And while there are numerous think tanks, interest groups, party organizations and communications vehicles that provide intellectual capital and training opportunities for politicians at the federal and provincial levels, candidates for municipal office are not nearly as well served. This is a situation that needs to be remedied – not by bringing federal or provincial party politics to the municipal level, but by creating and supporting more think tanks, training programs, and communications vehicles dedicated to the provision of better ideas and training for those willing to run for municipal office.

Of course, political innovation of this type at the municipal level will run into the same criticism and opposition that invariably greets political innovation at any level in Canada.
Preston_Manning  municipalities  democracy  political_infrastructure  institutions  institution-building  politicians  political_innovation  think_tanks  training  training_programs 
august 2013 by jerryking
How Reform changed our system
JUNE 1, 2007 | G&M | by PRESTON MANNING.

It is the job of a conservative party - in a minority situation, with a leader who (contrary to the common perception) tends to be more cautious and pragmatic than ideological - to target and win the support of the median voter. And it is the job of the conservative movement - the think tanks, public intellectuals, interest groups, and communications vehicles - to move that median voter onto more conservative ground.

In the 21st century, finding the right division between movement and party - something Reformers wrestled with for 10 years - will be a key determinant of political success.
Preston_Manning  Stephen_Harper  Conservative_Party  social_movements  grass-roots  interest_groups  think_tanks 
september 2012 by jerryking
Canadian beef exports in rapid decline - The Globe and Mail
Sept. 10 2012 | Globe & Mail | BARRIE McKENNA.

Canada’s $6-billion beef industry is in a state of chronic decline that could soon see the country become a net importer for the first time in at least a generation, a new report says.

Canada is increasingly shipping live cattle and low-value meat cuts to its main foreign customer – the United States – while importing higher value beef, according to the report by the Canadian Agri-Food Policy Institute, an independent think tank set up by Ottawa in 2004....The size of the Canadian beef herd is also in decline, dropping by a million head, or 20 per cent, since 2005.

The report identifies several causes for the industry’s reversal of fortunes, including more aggressive competition from foreign suppliers; the high value of the Canadian dollar; a surge in corn-feed prices due to drought and ethanol production; stricter regulations; higher costs; U.S. country-of-origin labelling rules; and declining beef consumption.

What Canada needs is “a robust, long-term strategy and a sustained commitment to execute the strategy,” CAPI said. The strategy should include more collaboration between ranchers, producers and governments, clear leadership, better use of market information and promotion of industry “champions” in the supply chain.

“Continued indecision will rob us of very real opportunities,” the report said.
exporting  beef  think_tanks  agriculture  farming  supply_chains 
september 2012 by jerryking
A New Black Vanguard
February 29, 1996 | Wall Street Journal pg. A18 | by Glenn C. Loury and Shelby Steele
African-Americans  leadership  Shelby_Steele  conservatism  GOP  Democrats  think_tanks  Glenn_Loury 
august 2012 by jerryking
The Canadian Agri-Food Policy Institute
CAPI is proactively addressing the challenges of the next five to ten-year period in order to advance the success of Canada's agriculture and agri-food sector. The Institute aims to provide primary producers, processors, and food manufacturers with new opportunities, and to provide benefits to consumers in rural and urban settings. CAPI is working toward a competitive, sustainable, and healthy agri-food sector.
agriculture  farming  think_tanks  agribusiness  opportunities 
may 2012 by jerryking
Wiring the Vast Left-Wing Conspiracy - New York Times
By Matt Bai
Published: July 25, 2004 (look at Preston Manning links)

The presentation itself, a collection of about 40 slides titled ''The Conservative Message Machine's Money Matrix,'' essentially makes the case that a handful of families -- Scaife, Bradley, Olin, Coors and others -- laid the foundation for a $300 million network of policy centers, advocacy groups and media outlets that now wield great influence over the national agenda. The network, as Stein diagrams it, includes scores of powerful organizations -- most of them with bland names like the State Policy Network and the Leadership Institute -- that he says train young leaders and lawmakers and promote policy ideas on the national and local level. These groups are, in turn, linked to a massive message apparatus, into which Stein lumps everything from Fox News and the Wall Street Journal op-ed page to Pat Robertson's ''700 Club.'' And all of this, he contends, is underwritten by some 200 ''anchor donors.'' ''This is perhaps the most potent, independent institutionalized apparatus ever assembled in a democracy to promote one belief system,'' he said.
Matt_Bai  Democrats  George_Soros  political_infrastructure  left-wing  GOP  think_tanks  grass-roots  discipline  social_movements  institutions  ideas  ideologies  conservatism  politicians  right-wing  Fox_News  advocacy  messaging  belief_systems 
may 2012 by jerryking
Manufacturing: The end of cheap China
Mar 10th 2012 | HONG KONG AND SHENZHEN | The Economist

The era of cheap China may be drawing to a close. Costs are soaring, starting in the coastal provinces where factories have historically clustered (see map). Increases in land prices, environmental and safety regulations and taxes all play a part. The biggest factor, though, is labour...If cheap China is fading, what will replace it? Will factories shift to poorer countries with cheaper labour? That is the conventional wisdom, but it is wrong....Louis Kuijs of the Fung Global Institute, a think-tank, observes that some low-tech, labour-intensive industries, such as T-shirts and cheap trainers, have already left China. And some firms are employing a “China + 1” strategy, opening just one factory in another country to test the waters and provide a back-up.

But coastal China has enduring strengths, despite soaring costs. First, it is close to the booming Chinese domestic market. This is a huge advantage. No other country has so many newly pecunious consumers clamouring for stuff.

Second, Chinese wages may be rising fast, but so is Chinese productivity. The precise numbers are disputed, but the trend is not. Chinese workers are paid more because they are producing more.

Third, China is huge. Its labour pool is large and flexible enough to accommodate seasonal industries that make Christmas lights or toys, says Ivo Naumann of AlixPartners. In response to sudden demand, a Chinese factory making iPhones was able to rouse 8,000 workers from their dormitory and put them on the assembly line at midnight, according to the New York Times. Not the next day. Midnight. Nowhere else are such feats feasible.

Fourth, China’s supply chain is sophisticated and supple. Professor Zheng Yusheng of the Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business argues that the right way to measure manufacturing competitiveness is not by comparing labour costs alone, but by comparing entire supply chains. Even if labour costs are a quarter of those in China to make a given product, the unreliability or unavailability of many components may make it uneconomic to make things elsewhere.
China  cheap  comparative_advantage  competitive_advantage  competitiveness  factors_of_production  flexibility  Hong_Kong  low-cost  manufacturers  measurements  productivity  supply_chains  think_tanks 
march 2012 by jerryking
Investing in Ideas - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 28, 2005 | WSJ | By MARK LASSWELL

Last month, the trustees of the John M. Olin Foundation met to approve its final grants. After a half-century of operation, the foundation is closing up shop, following the wishes of its founder, who deliberately limited the organization's life-span to prevent its one day falling into the hands of directors who were foes of his ideas. (Mr. Olin took comfort in the wisdom of this policy after Henry Ford II's angry resignation from the Ford Foundation in 1977 over its antipathy to capitalism.) Conservatives will thus lose one of their great sponsors and encouragers, a foundation that -- with its support of writers, intellectuals and magazines -- has had a profound effect on the dissemination of right-of-center ideas. Those ideas now inform much of the national conversation, but they struggled to be heard back in the 1970s, when the foundation got going in earnest.....Olin dollars helped fortify research institutions (including the American Enterprise Institute and Heritage Foundation), got the Federalist Society off the ground, promoted the teaching of law and economics, and funded valuable publications (including the New Criterion, the National Interest, Commentary and an array of conservative college newspapers)...."A Gift of Freedom" is essential reading for anyone hoping to understand precisely how conservative thinking was reinvigorated over the past quarter-century. Even liberals might find it worthwhile -- as a playbook for plotting their own intellectual renaissance
philanthropy  foundations  ideas  ideologies  right-of-center  stewardship  conservatism  patronage  think_tanks  institution-building  networks  institutions  political_infrastructure  grants  book_reviews  '70s  right-wing  playbooks 
november 2011 by jerryking
Preston Manning's next big conservative idea
Oct 20, 2004 | The Globe and Mailpg. A.25 ||Jeffrey Simpson.

Manning is working through a set of plans to spread the conservative movement. The plans are still in the formative stage, but they involve everything from grassroots organization to new conservative publications and websites to think-tanks and conferences for discussing and disseminating conservative ideas.

Mr. Manning likens a political party to a plane. The leader, like the pilot, keeps it aloft. But a plane also needs a competent crew, ground staff, mechanics, engineers -- just as a political party needs workers, ideas, organization and outlets for its message. Conservatives in Canada lack enough of all this.

Mr. Manning says he doesn't look to the United States for inspiration. But there, the conservative movement since Barry Goldwater's presidential defeat in 1964 has outorganized and outfinanced the liberals.

Conservatives, not liberals, frame the majority of political discourse in the United States. Conservatives have their own publications (such as the Washington-based Weekly Standard), think-tanks (Cato, Hoover, American Enterprise Institute), links to religious groups, training programs for campaign workers, and conferences.

That's the kind of network Mr. Manning wants to build beneath the Conservative Party. The idea needs money, and lots of it, from people Mr. Manning rather euphemistically describes as "political venture capitalists."

This means encouraging very rich people or companies to contribute millions of dollars.
Jeffrey_Simpson  Preston_Manning  ideas  ProQuest  ideologies  conservatism  think_tanks  institution-building  networks  institutions  political_infrastructure  training_programs 
october 2011 by jerryking
Building better conservatives to build a better democracy
Sep 14, 2005 |The Globe and Mail. pg. A.21| Preston Manning.

A contemporary political philosophy such as democratic conservatism needs a vehicle -- a party -- to participate effectively in the democratic process. To fly successfully over the long haul, it also needs a multitude of think tanks and links with academia to generate ideas and policy analyses; education and training institutions and programs to train everyone from poll captains to potential cabinet ministers; communications vehicles to link itself to its grassroots and voters; national forums and political trade shows to bring conservatives together from across Canada; and links with interest groups capable of waging issue campaigns on subjects of importance to conservatives and voters. And of course it needs institutions and programs to finance all the above....

The Manning Centre intends to facilitate the development of such conservative democratic infrastructure, with guidance from the Toronto roundtable and follow-up advisory panels. As a "do tank" rather than a think tank, we hope to bridge the gap between conservative idea-generation and the practical implementation of those ideas in the real political world.
Preston_Manning  conservatism  institutions  nonprofit  Manning_Centre  training  think_tanks  activism  ProQuest  political_infrastructure  idea_generation  long-haul 
october 2011 by jerryking
Fort Leavenworth and the Eclipse of Nationhood - 96.09
September 1996 | The Atlantic | by Robert D. Kaplan.

Here historical precedent rules. Officers study previous battles and
interventions, and the political circumstances surrounding them, the way
law students study torts. The underlying message is that knowledge of
the past helps foresight, and those with foresight accrue power....."The
military," Major Kellett-Forsyth told me, "is in the nation-state
world. The media represents the postmodern, or transnational world.
Overseas, [U.S. soldiers] sit down with each other. The American media
sits down with foreign journalists: that's its socialization group."
U.S._Army  Robert_Kaplan  military_academies  foresight  civilian-military_relations  think_tanks  far-sightedness  historical_precedents 
august 2011 by jerryking
The rise of the grassroots movements - The Globe and Mail
Feb. 24, 2011 | G&M |PRESTON MANNING. At a time when
support for traditional parties is diminishing worldwide, support for
bottom-up socio-economic movements with political agendas is on the rise
and becoming increasingly easy to organize through the use of social
netwkng tools...What roles can the movements play in revitalizing our
democratic sys.? (1) mobilize public opinion and support to raise
specific issues higher on the public agenda – high enough that parties
are obliged to respond. (2) be able to alter their positions to meet
changing conditions more easily and quickly than parties, especially
governing parties. (3) principled parties need their own philosophically
compatible “movements” to sustain and enrich them because modern
parties have become primarily mktg. mechanisms for fighting elections.
They do little development of their own intellectual capital--depending
on others – think tanks, academics, interest groups and the civil
service, if they’re a governing party.
grass-roots  social_movements  Preston_Manning  responsiveness  think_tanks  bottom-up  intellectual_capital  political_parties 
march 2011 by jerryking

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