jerryking + think_differently   17

Why You Should Try to Be a Little More Scarce
May 18, 2019 | The New York Times | By Cindy Lamothe.

* Conventional wisdom tells us we should eagerly embrace every opportunity that comes our way, but playing a little hard to get has its advantages.
* Robert Cialdini, a leading expert on influence and the author of “Pre-Suasion: A Revolutionary Way to Influence and Persuade.”
* John Lees, a Britain-based career strategist and the author of “How to Get a Job You Love.”
* Liz Ryan, founder of Human Workplace and the author of “Reinvention Roadmap: Break the Rules to Get the Job You Want and Career You Deserve.”
* Shirli Kopelman, author of “Negotiating Genuinely: Being Yourself in Business,”

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Studies show that opportunities are seen to be more valuable as they become less available.....the scarcity principle says that people are more attracted to those options or opportunities that are rare, unique or dwindling in availability,”. The underlying principle is “reactance”: Essentially, when we think something is limited to us, we tend to want it more....it’s possible to harness this concept and increase our appeal in things like negotiations and career advancement.....if you find yourself becoming overzealous over every little opportunity that comes your way, here are a few ways to keep things in balance:

(1) Be less eager - Appearing readily available can work against you....This comes down to economics — if you’re in low supply and high demand, you’re worth more. Making something harder to get, “tends to increase at least the perception of the value, if not its actual value.”....tell people that you're “..selective with who you work with, but you would consider working with or for them.”... “Well, I do have a couple of other projects that I’m working on. However, I could prioritize this for you if you want.”

(2) Don’t jump the gun - It’s easy to become excited when an unexpected opportunity presents itself, Ms. Ryan said, but remember that your power in any negotiation is related to your ability to walk away. Once you have interest, channel that into due diligence, Mr. Lees said. “Research the organization as if you were going to invest half your life savings in it,” he said. It’s also important to continually check in with your gut, Ms. Ryan added, and remember: Don’t accept an offer before fully considering the terms.

(3) Know your market value - continually assessing our market worth, “so that if an unexpected opportunity comes up, you don’t have to rush and do a slack job on this crucial factor.”...Keep an updated spreadsheet on hand with a list of your skills and achievements so you can quickly review it when you have an offer. You also have to know how much to charge for your services beforehand. The idea is to plan ahead so you’re not scrambling in the moment.

(4) Adopt an abundance mind-set - Recognizing that there are unlimited possibilities can give you the security and confidence you need to create successful outcomes. ....reframe how we use scarcity and abundance in our own head before we can apply it outwardly. When you worry about all the things you’re going to lose out on if you don’t take a particular opportunity, you’re using the scarcity mind-set on yourself rather than as a persuasion strategy, he said. “You’re at a real disadvantage mentally.”

(5) Trust the process - appearing less available isn’t about limiting our enthusiasm or being unnecessarily hard on ourselves. It’s about trusting in our own self-worth so we can be proactive, experts say. This means mindfully aligning our excitement into strategy....“Emphasize the uniqueness of your resources and your collaborative approach"
abundance  bank_shots  books  conventional_wisdom  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  mindsets  opportunities  overeagerness  overzealous  preparation  scarcity  selectivity  self-worth  think_differently  unexpected 
may 2019 by jerryking
Ten Ways Ridiculously Successful People Think Differently
December 4, 2017 | LinkedIn | Dr. Travis Bradberry Influencer.

Obstacles do not block the path; they are the path. This perspective helps successful people to think differently to everyone else, which is important, because if you think like everyone else, no matter how smart or experienced you are, you’ll hit the same ceiling. By thinking outside the box and going against the grain, successful people rise above their limitations.

They’re confident.
They’re composed. They know that no matter how good or bad things get, everything changes with time. All they can do is to adapt and adjust to stay happy and in control.

They’re honest.

They seek out small victories.

They’re always learning.

They expose themselves to a variety of people. There’s no easier way to learn to think differently than spending time with someone whose strengths are your weaknesses or whose ideas are radically different from your own. This exposure sparks new ideas and makes you well rounded. This is why we see so many great companies with co-founders who stand in stark contrast to each other. Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak from Apple were a prime example. Neither could have succeeded without the other.

They keep an open mind.

They’re fearless.

They turn tedious tasks into games.

They dream big but remain grounded.
affirmations  thinking_big  gamification  self-confidence  fearlessness  self-control  honesty  Steve_Jobs  heterogeneity  incrementalism  negative_space  open_mind  think_differently  small_wins 
may 2018 by jerryking
Marty Chavez Muses on Rocky Times and the Road Ahead
NOV. 14, 2017 | - The New York Times | By WILLIAM D. COHAN.

Mr. Chavez is about as far from the stereotypical Wall Street senior executive as you can imagine, and that is one reason his musings about the future direction of Wall Street are listened to carefully.

He grew up in Albuquerque, one of five children, who all went to Harvard. He got a doctorate in medical information sciences from Stanford University. (At that time, he was known by his full name Ramon Martin Chavez.)

In 1990, Mr. Chavez came out, the day after he defended his doctoral dissertation. – “Architectures and Approximation Algorithms for Probabilistic Expert Systems.” He is one of the few openly gay executives on Wall Street. ......In his current role as Goldman's CFO, Marty views his job as a simple one that is hard to get right: “I’m not paid or evaluated on the accuracy of my crystal-ball predictions,” he said. “I’m paid to enumerate every possible outcome and do something about every possible outcome well in advance, when it’s still possible to do something, because once it’s happened it’s too late.”....Unlike many of his peers on Wall Street, Mr. Chavez does not complain about the extent of the regulation that hit the financial industry as a result of Dodd-Frank. Generally speaking, he says, the regulations have helped banks “confront their problems and capitalize and bolster their liquidity,” making them “stronger as a result,” and the financial system safer and more profitable.....Instead of complaining about the extra expense and manpower required to comply with the mountain of new regulations, Mr. Chavez chooses instead to think about it differently. “If you approach the regulations as ‘Oh, we’ve got to comply,’ you’ll get one result,” he said. He prefers thinking about the regulations as, “This makes us and the system and our clients safer and sounder, and yes it’s a lot of work, but what can we learn from this work and how can we use this work in other ways to make a better result for our shareholders and our clients? Everywhere we look we’re finding these opportunities and they’re very much in keeping with the spirit of the times.”

Like any good senior Goldman executive, he does worry. (Lloyd Blankfein, the Goldman chief executive, once told me he spent 98 percent of his time worrying about things with a 2 percent probability.)

His biggest concern at the moment is the risk of “single points of failure” in the vast world of cybersecurity. He worries about any individual “repository of information” that does not have a backup and that can “be hacked.”

He does not even trust Goldman’s own computer system; he treats it as a potential enemy.

.....What also makes Goldman different from its peers is the firm’s love affair with engineers. At the moment, he said, engineers comprise around 30 percent of Goldman’s work force of about 35,000. It’s what drew him to Goldman in the first place — to work on Goldman’s in-house software, “SecDB,” short for “Securities Database,” an internal, proprietary computer system that tracks all the trades that Goldman makes and their prices, and regularly monitors the risk that the firm faces as a result.

He said the system generates some million and a half points of data that were used to calculate, for the first time, the firm’s “liquidity coverage ratio” — now 128 percent — and that were shared with regulators every day. He’s been busy trying to figure out how the newly generated data can be used to help him understand what the firm’s liquidity will be a year from now.

That way, he said, in his principal role as Goldman’s chief financial officer, he can perceive a problem in plenty of time to do something about it. “We’re able to get much better actionable insights that make the firm a less risky business because we’re able to go much further out into the future,” he said......
actionable_information  CFOs  cyber_security  databases  Dodd-Frank  engineering  financial_system  Goldman_Sachs  improbables  information_sources  jujutsu  Martin_Chavez  proprietary  regulation  SecDB  SPOF  think_differently  Wall_Street  William_Cohan  worrying 
november 2017 by jerryking
It’s Time for Apple to Go Hollywood - WSJ
By Steve Vassallo
June 20, 2017

Apple’s hires, however, appear to be another in a series of plodding steps. It’s been a wildly successful slough, but there’s a palpable sense that the company is losing momentum with its testudine gait—that it’s been taken over by bean counters and no longer has the nerve or verve to “think different.”

Apple could change that impression and supercharge its video play by doing something that would make the Whole Foods deal look like small potatoes: buy Netflix .

It would cost several times the Whole Foods deal to buy Netflix, but with almost $260 billion in cash reserves, Apple can afford it. (Full disclosure: my firm was an early investor in Netflix but no longer holds any shares in the company.)

Purchasing Netflix would give Apple three critical things it needs to succeed.

• Content creation. As Apple learned from “Planet of the Apps,” its failed reality TV series about iPhone app developers (really), producing original programming is difficult. With all due respect to Messrs. Erlicht and Van Amburg, simply adding a couple of studio execs probably won’t be enough. In acquiring Netflix—which has produced an endless string of award-winning hits, from “House of Cards” to “Stranger Things”—the iPhone company would gain instant credibility and proven expertise in creating premium content at scale.

• Vertical integration. Apple is the most successful walled garden in history. Taking video creation and distribution in-house would satisfy that longstanding business model.

• International expansion. Content providers now have to think and act globally.... Netflix is available in more than 190 countries. Buy it, and Apple owns the world’s first truly global TV network.

One more thing, to quote the man in the black turtleneck. In addition to content, another enormous asset Apple would get from buying Netflix is its CEO, Reed Hastings. Without a clear successor to Tim Cook on the horizon, it would be malpractice if Apple’s board didn’t have some names in mind.
Apple  Netflix  economies_of_scale  M&A  Hollywood  content_creators  vertical_integration  in-house  Reed_Hastings  international_expansion  think_differently  original_programming 
june 2017 by jerryking
One Firm Getting What It Wants in Washington: BlackRock - WSJ
By RYAN TRACY and SARAH KROUSE
Updated April 20, 2016

The Problem: BlackRock believed that the U.S. Federal Reserve was leaning towards designating it as a source of financial system risk, like other big banks, and as such, be “too big to fail”.

What Was At Stake: the designation “systemically important” would draw BlackRock in for greater oversight by the Federal Reserve which would mean tougher rules and potentially higher capital requirements from U.S. regulators.

The Solution: BlackRock didn't take any chances. The company began spending heavily on lobbying and engaging policymakers. Executives at the firm began preparing for greater federal scrutiny of their business in the months following the 2008 financial crisis. BlackRock aggressively prepared a counter-narrative upon discovered a Treasury Department’s Office of Financial Research report that asset-management firms and the funds they run were “vulnerable to shocks” and may engage in “herding” behavior that could amplify a shock to the financial system. The response took the form of a 40-plus-page paper rebutting the report. The firm suggested that instead of focusing on the size of a manager or fund, regulators should look at what specific practices, such as the use of leverage, might be the source of risks. While other money managers such as Fidelity and Vanguard sought to evade being labeled systemically important, BlackRock’s strategy stood out.
BlackRock  crony_capitalism  Washington_D.C.  risks  lobbying  too_big_to_fail  asset_management  advocacy  government_relations  influence  political_advocacy  policy  U.S._Federal_Reserve  systemic_risks  Communicating_&_Connecting  U.S.Treasury_Department  counternarratives  oversight  financial_system  leverage  debt  creating_valuable_content  think_differently  policymakers  policymaking 
april 2016 by jerryking
In business and government, think differently - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL SABIA
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, May. 16 2015

here’s the paradox. At a time when creativity is relentlessly driving change in so much of our world, many would limit governments to managing their way through, rather than working with others to solve problems.

It started in the 1980s and ’90s, when we decided governments needed to become “more like businesses,” adopting the metrics – and vocabulary – of corporations. Citizens became “clients.” Compliance replaced creativity.

The job of government was defined in terms of its “efficiency,” and the emphasis was placed on the minimal “must do” instead of the aspirational “can be.”

Of course, governments have to demonstrate good stewardship of public resources. But if all they do is count change, it limits their ability to effect change. The fact is when big problems arise – whether it’s a financial crisis like 2008 or a tragedy like Lac-Mégantic – people’s first instinct is to look to government for a solution.

Yet opinion researchers tell us that people are increasingly disappointed with our collective response to the issues that matter most: income inequality, health care for the elderly, climate change and so on....It’s about different government. This is about government moving away from a manager’s obsession with doing things better to a leader’s focus on doing better things. Think of fostering innovation, being open to new ideas, encouraging experimentation, rewarding risk-taking. And, frankly, accepting failure as a condition precedent to success.
Michael_Sabia  CDPQ  thinking  CEOs  innovation  leadership  experimentation  risk-taking  failure  trial_&_error  government  public_sector  open_source  disappointment  business  stewardship  compliance  replaced  creativity  efficiencies  effectiveness  think_differently 
may 2015 by jerryking
The Philadelphia Eagles' Secret Coaches: Professors - WSJ
Sept. 16, 2014 | WSJ | Kevin Clark.

Kelly, in his second NFL season after an impressive run at the University of Oregon, has made academics as much a part of the team as the long snapper. He leans on them all off-season for new ideas and has them on speed dial when he needs a quick fix, according to those who have interacted with the Eagles coach.

"Chip says, 'This guy, with his social sciences or psychology or statistical model or his understanding of African-American history, let's bring him in and see if there's even one idea or one sentence that is a piece of trying to get done what I'm trying to accomplish,' ...Kelly is so devoted to the idea that one of his top lieutenants told professors that Kelly's goal is to have a sort of academic conference, where Kelly is essentially the only beneficiary. (Imagine, if you'd like to laugh, a TED talk with Kelly as the only audience member.)...Ericsson then addressed the entire staff in a 90-minute session in which Kelly tried to get to the heart of the matter. Kelly wanted Ericsson to understand the basic training methods of the Eagles, then ask of the professor, "What could be done differently?"

Ericsson's answer is tied to another Kelly secret. The Eagles use memory devices to get players to memorize formations. Safety Malcolm Jenkins said that during meetings, coaches will show an opponent's formation on a screen, and players will attempt to remember it and yell the play call they would use against it. Then, Jenkins said, snapping his fingers, "They start to flash it quicker and quicker. There's less time to process. And so you build those same cognitive skills where it's the same as getting a mental rep on the field."

Ericsson thought this a noble effort, but in his opinion, it wasn't enough. He recommended that the situations be harder to understand—to go beyond the formations and "get them to respond to video clips of more complex scenarios instead of simple, fast recognitions," he said. "You want to encourage players to be more analytical and open them up to more feedback on what they aren't paying attention to."
academia  coaching  football  innovation  memorization  NFL  overlooked  pattern_recognition  PhDs  sports  think_differently  video_clips  pay_attention 
september 2014 by jerryking
Stephen Dubner and Steven Levitt teach us how to think like a freak - The Globe and Mail
IVOR TOSSELL
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 23 2014

In a collection of stories that read like modern parables, Mr. Dubner and Mr. Levitt try to teach their approach to problem-solving to the rest of us, with tactics that range from “thinking like a child” to devising incentives for miscreants to reveal themselves....they want to deputize the entire world to think differently about the world's problems differently... there’s a growing body of research that suggests the human mind does a lot of things incredibly well between the ages of late childhood and late adolescence.

I asked these kids, what if I told you that your brain right now, at 13, is almost at its peak power, and that you have another 12 or 15 years where it’s just gonna be kicking ass, and then it’s going to start to diminish. Once you start to think about that, what would you use your brain to do now, knowing that it’s a perishable resource?

That for me was a takeaway I got from the book. I really want to encourage my kids to understand that their brains are not the premature versions of the adult brains. Their brains are the optimal brain. When we say, “think like a child,” if you’re over 25 or 30, that’s the best we can do.
economists  book_reviews  incentives  freakonomics  economics  takeaways  books  thinking  howto  children  cognitive_skills  problem_solving  conventional_wisdom  metacognition  think_differently 
may 2014 by jerryking
Four Lessons from Rockstar Games: The Innovator...
September 18, 2013 | Quora | by Ross Simmonds [Life & Pixels]
(1) Give The Customers What They Want - When you focus on giving your customers what they want, the media and customers will do the talking for you. Creating an impact doesn't happen by saying you're going to make one. It happens from actually doing it.
(2) Don't Be Afraid To Break The Rules - In business, it's more important than ever to push boundaries. To be successful, you need to do things that other people question but you know is going to be right for your clients, partners, employees or customers. As the world gets smaller, the importance of pushing boundaries and striving for greatness is at an all-time high. When you're thinking about how your business can generate some additional press or how you could win new business - think differently.
(3) Don't Be Afraid To Kill Your Bad Puppies - It's the idea of killing something that is at the core of what makes you feel uncomfortable....In business, the initial stages of customer research and product development are just one part of the puzzle. As you build your business and establish a client base, you're required to make more decisions as new opportunities arise with your business growth. Decision making quickly becomes a key part of your job as you're forced to make choices on a daily basis...It's our obsession with the past and our own creations that hold our businesses back from continuing to evolve and grow.
(4)Take Pride In The Entire Experience--A great business is one that sweats the little things. It's a business that focuses on the minor details and ensures that their entire business is built on the idea of an experience....At the end of the day, you can get excited about using Instagram for a new promotion or work relentlessly on developing a great content marketing strategy but if your product sucks, you'll fail. The key for business success is to be mindful of these four lessons as you build your business and strive to make it grow.
lessons_learned  culling  customer_satisfaction  execution  hard_work  detail_oriented  games  rule_breaking  customer_centricity  videogames  kill_rates  Pablo_Picasso  innovators  think_differently 
september 2013 by jerryking
Data Is the World
Aug 1, 2005 | Inc.com | Michael S. Hopkins.

Use your data. "Companies aren't taking advantage of the data they generate, Levitt says. "Often, data generated for one purpose is useful for another. Freakonomics describes the case of an entrepreneur selling bagels in corporate offices who kept meticulous records to track profits and loss—data that eventually yielded insights about white-collar crime and the effects of office size on honesty.
Ask different questions. The abortion-crime link revealed itself when Levitt thought to stop asking what made crime fall and try asking why it had risen so much in the first place. That led him to justice system practices in the 1960s, which led him to a statistical understanding of which individuals were likeliest to commit crimes, and ultimately to the question of why a large segment of that population seemed to have vanished.
Don't mistake correlation for causality. Innovative policing and a drop in crime happened simultaneously, but data proved the one didn't cause the other. (Be mindful of the feudal king who, having learned disease was greatest in regions with the most doctors, figured that reducing doctors would reduce disease.)
Question conventional wisdom. An idea that is both easy to understand and a source of comfort (such as the credit quickly given to innovative policing for cutting crime) should be especially suspect.
Respect the complexity of incentives. "You can't imagine, says Levitt, "all the ways humans will connive to beat a system.
Employ data against cheating. Just as companies don't sufficiently capitalize on the data they have access to, they aren't exploiting what Levitt calls "opportunities to think about fraud or theft in their businesses.
'60s  bank_shots  causality  cheating  conventional_wisdom  correlations  data  data_driven  exhaust_data  Freakonomics  gaming_the_system  incentives  insights  justice_system  massive_data_sets  metadata  oversimplification  questions  skepticism  social_data  Steven_Levitt  theft  think_differently  white-collar_crime 
january 2013 by jerryking
Jenkins: The Jury Has Spoken—Think Different - WSJ.com
August 28, 2012, 7:07 p.m. ET

The Jury Has Spoken: Think Different
Samsung's loss is Microsoft's opportunity.

Microsoft is a pygmy in the smartphone business though, unlike Google, Microsoft troubled itself to design a smartphone operating system that does everything a smartphone must without being an iPhone knockoff.

Microsoft may genuinely have believed there's a better way than Apple's of organizing a user's interaction with a mobile device. Microsoft may have concluded there was no future in merely making another Apple knockoff, then trying (thanklessly) to give birth to a third app ecosystem around it.

Maybe Microsoft was just worried about lawsuit vulnerability. Whatever the reason (how's this for irony?), Microsoft was the company to "think different" and create a mobile operating system "for the rest of us"—i.e., an alternative to Apple's vision. The result is Windows Phone 8, the operating system behind the oft-praised but slow-selling Nokia Lumia 900....a too-weak patent system can be as bad for competition as a too-strong one. Until Friday's verdict, it was just too easy for Google-Samsung to gain a dominant share by copying Apple's innovations and giving them away for free. That's especially true of the subtle feedback Apple figured out how to provide users through a touch-screen. Google's business model, Apple could be forgiven for thinking, is more like piracy than competition.

Apple's lawsuits are not without strategic design, of course. The aim is to raise the cost to handset makers of using Google's "free" Android software—one reason Samsung, not Google, was the target of Apple's legal vendetta....But the verdict has an ironic potential. With Android seeming less "free," handset makers now have more incentive to get behind real innovation, such as Microsoft's promising but negligibly patronized operating system. Sooner rather than later, in other words, we might have a choice not just between Apple and fake Apple.

Microsoft and other innovators still face a monumental hurdle, it's true, in a lack of apps. What would really hasten the icejam breakup would be more decisions like one recently from the Financial Times.

The FT has decided to stop making Android or Apple apps or other ecosystem-specific apps in favor of a universal app riding on the mobile browser layer, using the tool set known as HTML5.

By HOLMAN W. JENKINS, JR.
Apple  Samsung  Microsoft  Holman_Jenkins  patents  patent_law  ecosystems  Android  HTML5  knockoffs  think_differently  legal_strategies  lawsuits  litigation 
august 2012 by jerryking
J.C. Penney to Overhaul Department-Store Concept - WSJ.com
JANUARY 26, 2012 |WSJ| By DANA MATTIOLI.

J.C. Penney Chief Thinks Different
With Apple in His Head, New CEO Tosses Out Old Pricing Models and Formats at Department Store

Department stores increasingly are setting up "stores in a store" and carving out areas for specific brands. Mr. Johnson, however, wants to set up as many as 100 of them—including branded spaces like a new Nanette Lepore shop and "Martha Stewart's Kitchen," private-label stores for the company's Liz Claiborne line, and themed areas for seasons and trends.

Penney's plans to launch 10 new shops in the fall and add new stores monthly until it reaches its goal by 2015. ...Two things Mr. Johnson isn't interested in are celebrity lines and private label apparel. Mr. Johnson, a believer in brands, says in-house labels lack distinctiveness and pricing power
department_stores  retailers  J.C._Penney  CEOs  first90days  Dana_Mattioli  Apple  product_launches  think_differently 
january 2012 by jerryking
FT.com / UK - Sharp focus gives design group the edge
February 18 2005 | Financial Times | By Scott Morrison. What
sets Ideo apart from most design companies is that it begins every
project by focusing on the consumer experience - whether it is asked to
design a product, a store or a service. This is where the group's
so-called "human factors" team comes in: shadowing consumers, taking
pictures of them as they use or buy products and interviewing them to
evaluate their experiences. "We are looking to design a better consumer
experience,"..."We want to know what is going right and what is wrong."
Ideo says it is selling more than just hot product designs. By drawing
clients into the design process, it is trying to teach them to think
differently and show them how to shake up their own internal design
processes.
ideo  design  customer_experience  P&G  AT&T  Ford_Motor_Co.  human_factor  primary_field_research  think_differently 
january 2010 by jerryking
How To Make Your Own Luck
December 19, 2007 | Fast Company | By Daniel H. Pink. Lucky
people think differently from unlucky people in different ways. One way
is to be open to new experiences. Unlucky people are stuck in routines.
When they see something new, they want no part of it. Lucky people
always want something new. They're prepared to take risks and relaxed
enough to see the opportunities in the first place.
Daniel_Pink  personal_growth  career_paths  innovation  strategic_planning  luck  chance  contingency  risk-taking  howto  routines  rainmaking  open_mind  curiosity  think_differently 
june 2009 by jerryking

related tags

'60s  5G  abundance  academia  actionable_information  advocacy  affirmations  Android  Apple  artificial_intelligence  asset_management  AT&T  bank_shots  biometrics  BlackRock  books  book_reviews  business  career_paths  causality  CDPQ  CEOs  CFOs  chance  cheating  children  clichés  coaching  codebreaking  cognitive_skills  Colleges_&_Universities  commencement  Communicating_&_Connecting  compliance  content_creators  contingency  conventional_wisdom  correlations  counternarratives  creating_valuable_content  creativity  crony_capitalism  cryptography  culling  curiosity  customer_centricity  customer_experience  customer_satisfaction  cyberthreats  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  Dana_Mattioli  Daniel_Pink  data  databases  data_driven  debt  department_stores  design  detail_oriented  disappointment  diversity  Dodd-Frank  economics  economies_of_scale  economists  ecosystems  Edward_Snowden  effectiveness  efficiencies  encryption  engineering  execution  exhaust_data  experimentation  failure  fearlessness  financial_system  first90days  Five_Eyes  football  Ford_Motor_Co.  freakonomics  games  gamification  gaming_the_system  GCHQ  Goldman_Sachs  government  government_relations  hard_work  heterogeneity  high_net_worth  Hollywood  Holman_Jenkins  honesty  howto  HTML5  Huawei  human_factor  humint  ideo  improbables  in-house  incentives  incrementalism  influence  information_sources  innovation  innovators  insights  international_expansion  J.C._Penney  job_search  jujutsu  justice_system  kill_rates  knockoffs  lawsuits  leadership  legal_strategies  lessons_learned  leverage  LGBT  litigation  lobbying  luck  M&A  machine_learning  Managing_Your_Career  Martin_Chavez  massive_data_sets  mathematics  memorization  metacognition  metadata  Michael_Sabia  Microsoft  mindsets  negative_space  Netflix  new_graduates  NFL  NSA  offensive_tactics  open_mind  open_source  opportunities  original_programming  overeagerness  overlooked  oversight  oversimplification  overzealous  P&G  Pablo_Picasso  patents  patent_law  pattern_recognition  pay_attention  personal_growth  PhDs  policy  policymakers  policymaking  political_advocacy  preparation  primary_field_research  privacy  problem_solving  product_launches  proprietary  public_sector  quantum_computing  questions  rainmaking  recruiting  Reed_Hastings  regulation  replaced  retailers  retention  retirement  risk-taking  risks  rogue_actors  routines  rule_breaking  Samsung  satellites  scarcity  SecDB  security_&_intelligence  selectivity  self-confidence  self-control  self-worth  sigint  Silicon_Valley  skepticism  small_wins  social_data  speeches  SPOF  sports  spycraft  spymasters  Steven_Levitt  Steve_Jobs  stewardship  strategic_planning  systemic_risks  takeaways  talent_management  teams  technological_change  theft  thinking  thinking_big  think_differently  Tim_Cook  too_big_to_fail  traffic_analysis  trial_&_error  U.S.Treasury_Department  U.S._Federal_Reserve  unexpected  United_Kingdom  vertical_integration  vetting  videogames  video_clips  Wall_Street  warfare  war_for_talent  Washington_D.C.  wealth_management  white-collar_crime  William_Cohan  worrying 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: