jerryking + strength_training   131

How to Increase Your Bench Press (FASTEST WAY!) - YouTube
How to increase your bench press by not actually doing the bench press. Casey Mitchell's biggest gains came from doing accessory movements that help to perform bench press better. Perform these accessory movements more often in a given training block, than the bench press itself. These work because they all us to work through our weak points.

(1) Pause bench. You have to overcome inertia. Also emphasizes the importance of leg drive....3-second or 5-second pause....The weight fatigues your chest, fatigues your triceps, to get it to move, you need to engage your legs.
(2) Dumbbell floor press. Opportunity to work the lockout portion of the bench press to help with the weak point (weak) triceps are impeding you from getting to a good full strong bench press. The adduction benefits, more activation of the chest; plus a good safety net of using the floor; finally, need to know how to get the dumbbells into position. Benefit of getting the elbows into the right position. Lot harder than the barbell. Cut the weight in pursuit of control
(3) Incline static dumbbell press. Combines elements of isometric strength and concentric strength--demands performance of your concentric strength in a fatigued state. Up (both arms) for one count. Then, bring one arm down to 45 degrees with the chest fully engaged. Then using the other arm, move for 5 reps. Then come down and hold with that arm. Now move the other (resting) arm for five reps. Then now move both arms for 5 reps.
accessory_movements  advice  AthleanX  bench_press  chest  howto  strength_training  tips 
4 days ago by jerryking
How ‘The Pump’ can help give your muscles – and ego – a quick boost - The Globe and Mail
PAUL LANDINI
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED 7 HOURS AGO

If, however, you’ve been putting in the hours and you’ve already built an appreciable amount of muscle that’s not hidden underneath a smooth layer of fat, keep reading, because you’re a prime candidate for taking advantage of the vainglorious lifter’s best friend – “the pump.”

Immortalized by Arnold Schwarzenegger in the 1977 documentary Pumping Iron, “the pump” is the temporary increase in a muscle’s size that follows ultraintense sets of high-repetition resistance exercises. As your muscles contract during a lift, metabolic compounds such as lactic acid accumulate in and around the muscle cells. Water and blood is then drawn into the muscle (“pumped,” if you will) as a defence mechanism against the inflammation brought on by these compounds. The longer and more taxing the set, the more fluid that enters the cells, the ultimate result being a muscle that looks like it’s been shrink-wrapped.

A side benefit of this practical biological function? For up to about an hour afterward your muscles will appear significantly larger, providing an instant ego boost before strutting one’s stuff on the beach-side boardwalk or disrobing for a photo shoot. But the pump isn’t all smoke and mirrors. This style of training forms the basis of all bodybuilding programs, where the end goal is the accumulation of maximum muscle........The pump-training protocol is the exact opposite of strength training. Whereas strength gains come from lifting relatively heavy weights for low reps with up to two minutes of rest between sets, building a pump is all about high volume and minimal rest. Anywhere from 12 to 20 reps will suffice, with 30 to 45 seconds of rest max. Adding some pauses at the end-point of the exercises will increase the intensity and test your mental fortitude, as will employing “finishers” such as drop sets, in which you extend the set for as long as you can by continually reducing the weight once you’ve hit failure so you can keep firing off a few more reps.

Resistance bands are the perfect tool for building a pump, as they offer constant tension throughout the entire range of motion during each exercise, never giving your muscles a chance to rest.
exercise  fitness  strength_training 
8 weeks ago by jerryking
Deadly Falls in Older Americans Are Rising. Here’s How to Prevent Them. - The New York Times
By Katie Hafner
June 4, 2019

for people over 75, the rate of mortality from falls more than doubled from 2000 to 2016.....The most likely reason is that people are living longer with conditions that in the past they might have died from,” she said. In addition, she continued, older adults are on medications that increase their risk of falling. Women are slightly more likely to fall than men, but men are slightly more likely to die as a result of a fall......“The take-home message is that falls kill,”....
Although the trend is disturbing, falls needn’t be an inevitable part of aging, and they are preventable.......The biggest risk factor for falls that can’t be changed is your age,” said Dr. Elizabeth Eckstrom, a geriatrician at Oregon Health & Science University. “Most of the other risks can be mitigated.”

(1) Exercise!
incorporating exercise into a daily routine....at least 20 minutes a day, combining aerobic and anaerobic exercise. Weight lifting, particularly for strengthening the legs, is a good idea....Tai chi, the Chinese martial art, appears to be an effective way to improve balance. It involves very slow, purposeful movements in coordination with breathing and muscle activity.
(2) Mind your meds
Medications, especially those that help with sleep, can compromise balance. ....benzodiazepines such as Valium and Xanax are especially bad.....“Metabolism slows in older adults, so toxicity to benzos builds up, which can cause dizziness,”.....The same goes for non-benzodiazepines such as Ambien. Sedating antihistamines such as Benadryl and Advil PM are also bad for balance.
(3) Re-accessorize
Eyesight is a crucial component when it comes to falls. Avoid bifocal or progressive lenses when walking outside. “If you’re wearing bifocals and stepping down off a curb, that changes your depth perception,”.......use a single-focus lens for walking outside....Then there’s footwear. Fashion needs to take a back seat to function. “No high heels,”....Anything the foot slides into is a terrible idea, she said: “Avoid cute slide-in sandals.” All shoes should have a back, and a sole with good tread. Slippers, too, can be bad. “Slippers make you slip,”.....Are you too proud to use a cane or walker? Get over it.
(4) Eliminate tripping hazards.
The accumulated clutter of a lifetime can be lethal. Get rid of small scatter rugs in your home, and eliminate extension cords that stretch across a floor.
(5) Early and often to the bathroom.
Hydration is a good way to fight dizziness. Drink plenty of water throughout the day,
aging  footwear  geriatrics  hydration  prevention  risk_factors  strength_training 
10 weeks ago by jerryking
The FASTEST Way to Bigger Rear Delts! - YouTube
Rear delt activation using a wide bar (like you would use on a lat pulldown) and spacing our hands far apart. The setup will demand that your elbows drift away from your sides and place more of the load on the rear delts in the process.
AthleanX  shoulder_exercises  strength_training 
11 weeks ago by jerryking
When Is It Safe for Children to Start Strength Training?
May 26, 2019 | WSJ | By Heidi Mitchell.

Under the AAP guidelines, children as young as 7 can embark on a strength-training program, as long as they do all exercises with good form, she says. Though this may sound young, Dr. Benjamin notes that strength training can consist of push-ups, sit-ups, handstands and squats—“all of which a 6-year-old gymnast would think of as a normal part of the sport.” She wouldn’t suggest anyone start out a strength-training program with weights.

As with other physical activities, strength training by kids 7 years and older has been shown to help improve cardiovascular fitness, bone density and mental health.
children  exercise  fitness  strength_training  functional_strength 
12 weeks ago by jerryking
The 6 Best Lifts for NEW Muscle Growth (GUARANTEED!) - YouTube
(1) Deadlifts >>> (a) chest-supported row (T-Bar row); (b) Reverse dumbbell lunge or forward dumbbell lunge. Teaches you how to push hard through that forward leg to get all momentum of your body back up to a standing position. How to push with great force through your legs, one at a time, into the ground. Then go back to deadlifting with both feet.

(2) Squats >>> (value of the glutes when it comes to performing the squat. Don't half rep it. Activate the glutes to help with the bottom of the lift, but you have to get deep enough. A variation of the glute hamstring raise. Initiate the contraction by squeezing your butt cheeks together. Hip flextion.

(3) Overhead Press. Z press. Sit down on the ground, and overhead press from that position.

(4) Weighted Pull-ups. Work on stability of the shoulder blade.
AthleanX  breakthroughs  deadlifts  fitness  glutes  military_press  pull-ups  squats  strength_training 
may 2019 by jerryking
The shoes you work out in are affecting your health and performance
May 13, 2109 | The Globe and Mail | PAUL LANDINI.

* KICKING IT OLD SCHOOL - Classic skate shoes such as Vans, Airwalks, Chuck Taylors and Converse are perfect for lifting.
* KICKING IT SUPER OLD SCHOOL - lose the shoes all together, at least on lower-body exercises (you can keep your socks on if you’d like).
* TAKING IT TO THE NEW SCHOOL - Nike’s Metcon Trainers (supposedly a bit narrow for those with wide feet) and Reebok’s Crossfit NANO 8.0 bleu line (preferred training shoe for running,)are designed specifically for weight-room workouts.
* If seeking a second skin for your feet, the New Balance Minimus and the Xero Prio (my personal favourite).
* Metcon Flyknit if you run in addition to lifting, they're a bit more flexible
* a good place to start is by reaching for a low-support, low-heeled shoe, like the Reebok Nano, Nike Metcon, Under Armour TriBase Reign, or Altra HIIT XT, to get that close-to-ground feel. “The less of a heel, the better,”

If, however, you care about things such as lifting in a pain-free manner and increasing your quality of movement in general, you need to pay more attention to your choices in weight-room footwear.

Whether you’re squatting a barbell, throwing a punch or swinging a baseball bat, the force behind these movements comes from the ground up, channelled through the body via the feet. This is why I shudder every time I see someone bench-press with their legs casually extended, or worse, with their feet elevated off the floor. Even though it’s ostensibly an upper-body exercise, your legs play an important role in bench-pressing. If all you’re relying on is your arms and chest to move that weight, you’re limiting your potential progress and putting yourself at risk of an injury.........soft, wedge-heeled support is the exact opposite of what you want in a lifting shoe. In fact, everything that makes running shoes suitable for the road is what makes them awful for lifting. Let’s say you’re about to deadlift. How are you supposed to push through the floor with maximum force if you’re standing on two inches of cushy foam? You’ll never get the barbell off the floor with enough speed to allow for a max-effort lift.

The same principle applies to squats; however, here, the consequences are more dire. Most non-lifting shoes have thick heels that slope down to the floor. This shifts your weight forward, to the toes. The deeper you sink into that squat, the more your weight shifts forward. Add a barbell to this mix and it won’t be long until you’re one of those poor misguided souls who says squatting is bad for your knees, when really it’s your beat-up Brooks that are to blame.

So what, then, should we wear on our feet when lifting weights? This is one of the few easy answers in this business, and thankfully the solutions don’t have to cost a whole lot. Generally speaking, you want a shoe that offers a wide toe box and a flat, flexible sole that sticks to the floor. Some arch support is fine and may even be necessary, but the less structure to the shoe the better. Remember those hundred-plus moving parts in each of your feet? They need training, too! If they’re constantly being supported by artificial means, they’ll never get stronger.
fitness  footwear  shoes  strength_training 
may 2019 by jerryking
In defence of the pull-up and the push-up
April 15, 2019 | THE GLOBE AND MAIL | by PAUL LANDINI.

As we age, moving well-mobility-becomes increasingly important....calisthenics – along with developing strength and endurance, body-weight training has a built-in mobility element that’s missing from many barbell lifts. It’s an efficient and, a pair of upper-body exercises: the pull-up and the push-up, are ideal builders of strength.

Pull-ups
* Bring your chest to the bar (mental cue)
* Retract your scapular (mental cue)
Pulling exercises are the toughest part of body-weight training.....THE FIXES
The active hang is the bottom portion of a pull-up, and it’s great for strengthening the hands as well as developing a sense for the mechanics of pulling exercises. Grab an overhanging bar with your palms facing away, arms extended. From there, pull your shoulder blades down flat and squeeze them tight to your spine, then extend your legs forward, flattening the arch in your low back. Maintain tension throughout your body, working up to a 60-second hang.

The flex hang is the top portion of a pull-up. This variation places more emphasis on the arms and the upper back. It’s similar to the active hang, only your palms face in and your arms are flexed rather than extended so your chin is over the bar.

Push-ups
Forget about the bench press – for a well-built chest and powerful shoulders, push-ups deliver the goods.
THE PROBLEMS
You may not think of push-ups as being a core exercise, but if you think about it, the whole movement is basically an up-and-down plank. A stable core, mobile shoulder blades and healthy wrists are a must, not to mention strong triceps and shoulders.
bench_press  calisthenics  core_stability  exercise  functional_strength  pull-ups  push-ups  strength_training 
april 2019 by jerryking
Unlocking the secrets to military-grade fitness - The Globe and Mail
ALEX HUTCHINSON
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL

.A recent study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research reveals some telling clues about which physical abilities are the best predictors of success in the U.S. Army’s storied 75th Ranger Regiment – though such clues, military experts are quick to point out, don’t tell the whole story.

Would-be rangers have to complete a gruelling obstacle course called the Ranger Physical Assessment Test (RPAT) that involves climbing ropes, scaling walls, dragging an 84-kilogram sled, and running more than five kilometres, all while wearing combat boots and nearly 10 kilograms of body armour. They have to finish in less than 40 minutes to pass.

A test such as this requires full-body strength, power and endurance in various proportions. So how do you train for it?

A team of U.S. Army researchers combed through data from more than 1,000 recruits who completed this test between 2014 and 2017, looking to see if success or failure could be predicted from the baseline physical tests the recruits had previously completed – things such as deadlifts, push-ups, jumps and sprints.

All seven of the tests they analyzed were linked to RPAT success, but there were three in particular that had significant independent predictive power: broad jump (standing start and you have to stick the landing); pull-ups (overhand grip, straight body, locked elbows at the bottom each time); and average time in a pair of 300-yard shuttle runs (back and forth between two lines 25 yards apart, with two-minutes rest between runs).......“After pulling tens of thousands of pieces of hard data,” he says, “there was one that correlated in some statistically significant way to a higher likelihood of graduating from our basic special warfare training school: pull-ups.”
elite  exercise  fitness  pull-ups  strength_training  U.S._Special_Forces  functional_strength 
march 2019 by jerryking
The PERFECT Back Workout (Sets and Reps Included) - YouTube
Here is how to construct the perfect back workout:

1A. Deadlift x 10,8
1B. Weighted Chin x 4RM, 8RM

2A. Deadlift x 6,6
2B. BW Wide Grip Pullups x F,F

3. Barbell Dead Rows (12RM) - 2-3 x 8-10

4. Alternating 1 Arm High Cable Row OR Rocking Pulldown - 2-3 x 10-12

5. Hyper Y/W Combo - 2 x 14-20 (alternate Y/W each rep)

6. Barbell Ladder Shrug Finisher - 1 x F
AthleanX  back_exercises  strength_training 
february 2019 by jerryking
Stop Doing Chest Flys - I'm Begging You!! - YouTube
Do one-arm cable crossovers PAST midline. Ball the fist of the non-working arm.
AthleanX  chest  strength_training 
february 2019 by jerryking
6 GREATEST EXERCISES (Old School Edition!!) - YouTube
* Plug energy leaks in your pull-ups. Tighten core, tight legs, buttocks, point feet down and away from the chest down.
* Bench press--keep grips shoulder width, don't go out wide. Focus on adduction across the front of your body towards midline.
* Deadlifts--master the hip hinge. Bar and the knees.
* Barbell curl--cheat the rep on the start. When it gets to vertical, stop cheats. SLOW down the eccentric.
AthleanX  bench_press  deadlifts  military_press  pull-ups  squats  strength_training  old_school  arm_curls 
february 2019 by jerryking
Indulge your gym lover with this last-minute gift guide - The Globe and Mail
One of the best memoirs I’ve read, Muscle: Confessions of an Unlikely Bodybuilder tells the story of Sam Fussell, bookish Oxford graduate turned steroid-abusing powerhouse. Whether recalling the halcyon days of the 1980s California lifting scene or analyzing the insecurities that fuelled his torturous workouts, Fussell’s impressive literary chops make this a must-read.

Part instructional guide, part historical encyclopedia, The Purposeful Primitive is a contemporary classic of weightlifting literature. Marty Gallagher, powerlifting coach extraordinaire, digs deep into the history of physical culture, delivering biographical portraits of iron giants such as Bill Pearl, Dorian Yates and Ed Coan while dissecting the training methods that made these men legends.

Regular readers of my column know that consistency is the key to achieving your fitness goals. In Atomic Habits, author and self-improvement guru James Clear outlines a practical framework for improving just about every aspect of your life through the power of habit. Needless to say, the strategies put forth in this instant bestseller have implications that reach far beyond the gym.
books  consistency  fitness  footwear  gift_ideas  gyms  habits  self-improvement  shoes  strength_training 
december 2018 by jerryking
Is Aerobic Exercise the Key to Successful Aging?
Dec. 12, 2018 | - The New York Times | By Gretchen Reynolds.

Aerobic activities like jogging and interval training can make our cells biologically younger, according to a noteworthy new experiment. Weight training may not have the same effect, the study found, raising interesting questions about how various types of exercise affect us at a microscopic level and whether the differences should perhaps influence how we choose to move.
aerobic  aging  benefits  exercise  fitness  health  interval_training  strength_training 
december 2018 by jerryking
(9) 5 Biggest Arms Workout Lessons Learned (HOW HE DID IT!) - YouTube
(1) Intensity -- go past point of fatigue with drop sets or rest/pause techniques. Push yourself
(2) Full range of motion - full extensions!! Don't short arm it.
(3) Static bicep chin holds up on the chin-up bar. Contract, contract, contract at the top port.
(4) Rocking tricep pushdown.
(5) Stop worrying about what everybody else is thinking, saying, etc. Stop caring about what other people say.
AthleanX  biceps  power_of_the_pause  strength_training 
october 2018 by jerryking
Are you cheating at the gym? | The GoodLife Fitness Blog
most common short cuts.
SWINGING
Lifting weights is built of two parts, the concentric and eccentric, or the contract and stretch. If you’re swinging into the move to build momentum then you’re not able to control the eccentric phase and you sacrifice results. You also risk injury when you’re not in control. Use a one second count on the concentric movement, and four on the eccentric.
strength_training  shortcuts  exercise  fitness  gyms  cheating 
july 2018 by jerryking
Adopt a movement-based approach for optimized workouts - The Globe and Mail
MAY 25, 2017 | SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED | PAUL LANDINI

the four most common movement patterns: 1. pushing (vertical and horizontal), 2. pulling (vertical and horizontal), 3. squatting (knee-dominant) and 4. hinging (hip-dominant). Master these movements and you'll be able to execute just about any exercise that comes your way.

(1) Pushing

Main muscles: Pectorals (chest), deltoids (shoulders), triceps (back of arms).

Best exercises: Push-ups; landmine press; one-arm kettlebell press.
(2) Pulling
Main muscles: Latissimus dorsi (mid back), rhomboids (upper back), biceps (front of arms).

Best exercises: Pull-ups; inverted row; face pull

(3) Squatting

Main muscles: Quads (front of legs), glutes (butt), hamstrings (back of legs).

Best exercises: Goblet squat; split squat; reverse lunge.

(4) Hinging

Main muscles: Hamstrings, glutes, spinal erectors (low back).

Best exercises: Deadlift; Romanian deadlift; kettlebell swing
back_exercises  deadlifts  exercise  fitness  face-pulls  glutes  movement-based  pull-ups  push-ups  shoulder_exercises  squats  strength_training  functional_strength 
april 2018 by jerryking
The Common Advice for Those With Thinning Bones Could Be All Wrong - WSJ
Bone building happens specifically at the areas of the bone you stress during your workout, says Pamela S. Hinton, associate professor of nutrition and exercise physiology, at the University of Missouri, in Columbia.

For this reason, a dead lift is one of the best exercises because it “uses big muscles around the hips and hamstrings,” causing the muscle to pull on the bone. It also recruits the muscles around the lumbar and thoracic spine to stabilize the body during the lift, says Polly de Mille, exercise physiologist at the Women’s Sports Medicine Center at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York. Proper form is critical to safety, she adds.
aging  longevity  strength_training  intensity  fitness  exercise  high-intensity  trauma  overcompensation  deadlifts  osteoporosis  bone_density  high-impact 
april 2018 by jerryking
Running Is the Worst Way to Get Fit - Tonic
Nick English

Nov 17 2016

Running is a crappy way to lose fat and an inferior way to boost cardiovascular health, but it's somehow become the most popular exercise on Earth after walking.....It's an incredibly inefficient way to build strength. And as we all know, a strong body is the number one way to prevent injuries, increase metabolism, burn fat, and stay mobile and functional in old age. Folks "do cardio" because they want to burn off their bellies. And running is a bad pick.

"That's usually what the mentality is, that it's a way to get leaner and lose weight, but doing other things outside of running will probably have a better effect at catalyzing that result," he says. Boyce's fat-loss prescription, like that of practically any trainer worth their salt, is compound strength exercises. That means multi-joint movements like the squat, deadlift, overhead press, chin-ups, pull-ups, and push-ups......Studies have consistently shown that weight training and sprinting are more effective than running at targeting belly fat and creating a good hormonal environment for fat loss, meaning better insulin sensitivity, less of the stress hormone cortisol, and more growth hormone and testosterone. ....exercising the heart at a higher intensity is a better way to get the job done. Studies have shown that shorter sessions of anaerobic training, like fast-paced resistance training or sprints, are just as good for heart health as long, drawn-out runs and better at maintaining muscle and increasing aerobic fitness (or VO2 max, if you want to be specific). ...."In many ways, sprinting is safer than running,"....you're going to have more of a fat loss effect from sprinting for the same reasons you get it from weights: You're doing things that require strength, explosiveness, exertion, and intensity, so your muscles are going to have to work a little bit harder, they're going to burn more calories, and you're going to be more metabolic after you finish your workout as well.".....
aerobic  cardiovascular  compound_movements  deadlifts  exercise  fast-paced  fat-burning  fitness  functional_strength  howto  interval_training  high-impact  high-intensity  injury_prevention  military_press  pull-ups  running  squats  strength_training 
april 2018 by jerryking
How to reduce the risk of joint injuries in your fitness routine - The Globe and Mail
more young people are having joint replacement surgeries due in large part to their “repetitive athletic pursuits.” In other, less measured words: too many young people are training like dummies.

In most cases, overuse injuries are a result of poor program design, improper exercise selection or bad technique. All three of these factors tend to arise when overly excited rookie lifters go it alone. A smart strength coach or personal trainer will know how to help their clients avoid grinding their joints into dust by choosing the right exercises, in the right order, done the right way.

Strength Training Anatomy-3rd Edition Paperback – Mar 9 2010
by Frederic Delavier (Author)
fitness  injuries  exercise  strength_training  books  pain  anatomy 
april 2018 by jerryking
(6) BODY FAT % LIES | Real Examples of Body Fat Percentage - YouTube
Body fat misconceptions........Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, previously DEXA[1][2]) is a means of measuring bone mineral density (BMD). Two X-ray beams, with different energy levels, are aimed at the patient's bones. When soft tissue absorption is subtracted out, the BMD can be determined from the absorption of each beam by bone. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry is the most widely used and most thoroughly studied bone density measurement technology.
strength_training 
april 2018 by jerryking
(6) Best Exercises to Build Your Lats | How-To Get a Wide Back - YouTube
Best Exercises to Build Your Lats | How-To Get a Wide (Back)

Pull with your elbows. Mind muscle focus on lats. Chin up.
strength_training  back_exercises  James_Grage 
april 2018 by jerryking
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