jerryking + slavery   160

How the 1619 Project Came Together
Aug. 18, 2019 | The New York Times | By Lovia Gyarkye.

This month is the 400th anniversary of that ship’s arrival. To commemorate this historic moment and its legacy, The New York Times Magazine has dedicated an entire issue and special broadsheet section, out this Sunday, to exploring the history of slavery and mapping the ways in which it has touched nearly every aspect of contemporary life in the United States.

The 1619 Project began as an idea pitched by Nikole Hannah-Jones, one of the magazine’s staff writers, during a meeting in January.......it was a big task, one that would require the expertise of those who have dedicated their entire lives and careers to studying the nuances of what it means to be a black person in America. Ms. Hannah-Jones invited 18 scholars and historians — including Kellie Jones, a Columbia University art historian and 2016 MacArthur Fellow; Annette Gordon-Reed, a professor of law and history at Harvard; and William Darity, a professor of public policy at the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University — to meet with editors and journalists at The Times early this year. The brainstorming session cemented key components of the issue, including what broad topics would be covered (for example, sugar, capitalism and cotton) and who would contribute (including Linda Villarosa, Bryan Stevenson and Khalil Gibran Muhammad). The feature stories were then chiseled by Ms. Hannah-Jones with the help of Ilena Silverman, the magazine’s features editor......Almost every contributor in the magazine and special section — writers, photographers and artists — is black, a nonnegotiable aspect of the project that helps underscore its thesis.......“A lot of ideas were considered, but ultimately we decided that there was an undeniable power in narrowing our focus to the very place that this issue kicks off,”.......even though slavery was formally abolished more than 150 years ago, its legacy has remained insidious. .....The special section.... went through several iterations before it was decided that it would focus on painting a more full, but by no means comprehensive, picture of the institution of slavery itself.......The 1619 Project is first and foremost an invitation to reframe how the country discusses the role and history of its black citizens. “

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The 1619 Project is, by far, one of the most ambitious and courageous pieces of journalism that I have ever encountered. It addresses American history as it really is: America pretended to be a democracy at its founding, yet our country practices racism through its laws, policies, systems and institutions. Our nation still wrestles with this conflict of identities. The myth of The Greatest Nation blinds us to the historical, juxtaposed reality of the legacy of slavery, racism and democracy, and the sad, inalienable fact that racism and white supremacy were at the root of this nation’s founding.
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KM
Well, look forward to 4 more years of Trump I guess. The Times' insistence on reducing all of American history to slavery is far more blind and dogmatic than previous narratives which supposedly did not give it enough prominence. The North was already an industrial powerhouse without slavery, and continued to develop with the aid of millions of European immigrants who found both exploitation but also often the American dream, and their descendents were rightly known as the greatest generation. I celebrate a country that was more open to immigrants than most, and that was more democratic than most, rather than obsess about its imperfections, since they pale against the imperfections of every other country on the planet.
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Linda
Aug. 19
@KM Can't let your comments go as the voice of Pittsburgh on this forum, so must register my disagreement with your comments as a different voice in Pittsburgh. FYI, my white immigrant ancestors toiled in the coal mines of western PA, so I'm aware of the work of the European immigrants. But I am grateful to have my eyes opened on many topics through Sunday's paper. Slavery is a deeply shameful chapter in our history. If trying to come to terms with the living legacy of that abominable chapter is "obsessing about its imperfections," then I hope I may be called an obsessive.
African-Americans  anniversaries  commemorative  focus  history  howto  journalism  legacies  newspapers  NYT  photography  slavery  storytelling 
29 days ago by jerryking
400 years since slavery: a timeline of American history
Fri 16 Aug 2019 07.00 BST Last modified on Fri 16 Aug 2019 07.57 BST | News | The Guardian by Khushbu Shah and Juweek Adolphe

This article drew on a number of books about the American history of slavery, including The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism by Edward E Baptist; American Slavery, 1619-1877 by Peter Kolchin; and Black Is a Country: Race and the Unfinished Struggle for Democracy by Nikil Pal Singh. It also used census data available online at census.gov.
African-Americans  anniversaries  books  Great_Migration  history  Jim_Crow  reparations  slavery  timelines  voter_suppression 
4 weeks ago by jerryking
Colin Palmer, Historian of the African Diaspora, Is Dead at 75 - The New York Times
July 11, 2019 | The New York Times | By Neil Genzlinger.

Colin A. Palmer, a historian who broadened the understanding of the African diaspora, showing that the American slave trade was only one part of a phenomenon that spanned centuries and influenced cultures worldwide, died on June 20 in Kingston, Jamaica. He was 75.....Professor Palmer published his first of many books in 1976.....it was called “Slaves of the White God: Blacks in Mexico, 1570-1650,” chronicling a period when the colonies that would become the United States were still in their formative stages. The book set him on a career-long path.....Palmer definitely brought about a deeper, more nuanced understanding of the African diaspora, one that extended well beyond African-American history or the history of the slave trade,” ....Palmer did more than just show that the African diaspora was not a single event; he examined the various strands of it for differences and similarities.....any examination of diaspora began with a study of Africa itself.....Palmer also wrote well-regarded articles and books on the Caribbean countries, including “Eric Williams and the Making of the Modern Caribbean” (2006), about the historian and politician who led Trinidad and Tobago to independence.....Palmer's research showed that the Spaniards had brought in black slaves to Mexico as early as the 1520s.....Palmer identified five streams of African diaspora, the first being the initial spread of humans from Africa in prehistory....There were two other “premodern” streams, as he called them. One involved the movement of Bantu-speaking peoples out of the areas now known as Nigeria and Cameroon to other parts of Africa and India in about 3000 B.C. The other was related to trading in the fifth century B.C.

The Atlantic slave trade, which he said began in earnest in the 15th century, was the fourth stream; the fifth began after slavery’s demise and continues today.
Africa  Afro-Latinos  Caribbean  Diaspora  historians  history  Mexico  obituaries  PhDs  scholars  slavery  UWI 
9 weeks ago by jerryking
How Scotland erased Guyana from its past
Tue 16 Apr 2019 | News | The Guardian 06.00 BST | by Yvonne Singh.

The portrayal of Scots as abolitionists and liberal champions has hidden a long history of profiting from slavery in the Caribbean.
Caribbean  erasures  Guyana  historical_amnesia  hidden  history  invisibility  Scotland  slavery 
april 2019 by jerryking
An equation to ensure America survives the age of AI
April 10, 2019 | Financial Times | Elizabeth Cobbs.

Alexander Hamilton, Horace Mann and Frances Perkins are linked by their emphasis on the importance of human learning.

In more and more industries, the low-skilled suffer declining pay and hours. McKinsey estimates that 60 per cent of occupations are at risk of partial or total automation. Workers spy disaster. Whether the middle class shrinks in the age of artificial intelligence depends less on machine learning than on human learning. Historical precedents help, especially...... the Hamilton-Mann-Perkins equation: innovation plus education, plus a social safety net, equals the sum of prosperity.

(1) Alexander Hamilton.
US founding father Alexander Hamilton was first to understand the relationship between: (a) the US's founding coincided with the industrial revolution and the need to grapple with technological disruption (In 1776, James Watts sold his first steam engine when the ink was still wet on the Declaration of Independence)-- Steam remade the world economically; and (b), America’s decolonisation remade the world politically......Hamilton believed that Fledgling countries needed robust economies. New technologies gave them an edge. Hamilton noted that England owed its progress to the mechanization of textile production.......Thomas Jefferson,on the other hand, argued that the US should remain pastoral: a free, virtuous nation exchanged raw materials for foreign goods. Farmers were “the chosen people”; factories promoted dependence and vice.....Hamilton disagreed. He thought colonies shouldn’t overpay foreigners for things they could produce themselves. Government should incentivise innovation, said his 1791 Report on the Subject of Manufactures. Otherwise citizens would resist change even when jobs ceased to provide sufficient income, deterred from making a “spontaneous transition to new pursuits”.......the U.S. Constitution empowered Congress to grant patents to anyone with a qualified application. America became a nation of tinkerers...Cyrus McCormick, son of a farmer, patented a mechanical reaper in 1834 that reduced the hands needed in farming. The US soared to become the world’s largest economy by 1890. Hamilton’s constant: nurture innovation.

(2) Horace Mann
America’s success gave rise to the idea that a free country needed free schools. The reformer Horace Mann, who never had more than six weeks of schooling in a year, started the Common School Movement, calling public schools “the greatest discovery made by man”.....Grammar schools spread across the US between the 1830s and 1880s. Reading, writing and arithmetic were the tools for success in industrialising economies. Towns offered children a no-cost education.......Americans achieved the world’s highest per capita income just as they became the world’s best-educated people. Mann’s constant: prioritise education.

(3) Frances Perkins
Jefferson was correct that industrial economies made people more interdependent. By 1920, more Americans lived in towns earning wages than on farms growing their own food. When the Great Depression drove unemployment to 25 per cent, the state took a third role....FDR recruited Frances Perkins, the longest serving labour secretary in US history, to rescue workers. Perkins led campaigns that established a minimum wage and maximum workweek. Most importantly, she chaired the committee that wrote the 1935 Social Security Act, creating a federal pension system and state unemployment insurance. Her achievements did not end the depression, but helped democracy weather it. Perkins’s constant: knit a safety net.

The world has ridden three swells of industrialisation occasioned by the harnessing of steam, electricity and computers. The next wave, brought to us by AI, towers over us. History shows that innovation, education and safety nets point the ship of state into the wave.

Progress is a variable. Hamilton, Mann and Perkins would each urge us to mind the constants in the historical equation.
adaptability  Alexander_Hamilton  artificial_intelligence  automation  diadaptability  constitutions  disruption  downward_mobility  education  FDR  Founding_Fathers  Frances_Perkins  gig_economy  historical_precedents  hollowing_out  Horace_Mann  Industrial_Revolution  innovation  innovation_policies  James_Watts  job_destruction  job_displacement  job_loss  life_long_learning  low-skilled  McKinsey  middle_class  priorities  productivity  public_education  public_schools  safety_nets  slavery  steam_engine  the_Great_Depression  Thomas_Jefferson  tinkerers 
april 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | New Year’s Day Is Also Emancipation Day - The New York Times
By Jesse L. Jackson Sr.
Mr. Jackson is the founder and president of the Rainbow PUSH Coalition.

Dec. 30, 2018
Emancipation  slavery  history  Jesse_Jackson 
january 2019 by jerryking
The Black must be discharged!
Sep 09, 2018 | Kaieteur News | Columnists, Ronald Sanders 0 Comments
Caribbean  justice_system  colonialism  slavery 
september 2018 by jerryking
Sterling Stuckey, 86, Dies; Charted African Culture in Slavery - The New York Times
By Sam Roberts
Aug. 28, 2018

Sterling Stuckey, an eminent black historian who challenged his white colleagues by documenting how uprooted Africans not only retained their culture while they survived slavery but eventually suffused the rest of American society with their transplanted folkways, died on Aug. 15 in Riverside, Calif. He was 86.....He had recently finished the manuscript of his latest book, “The Chambers of the Soul: Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville and the Blues.”.....Through meticulous research, Professor Stuckey sought to discredit the white academics who had dominated and, in his view, devalued the field of African studies.

Early on he was bitterly critical of “numerous white experts on black Africa,” as he described them, who “have elaborated a fabric of untruths to rationalize continued white control over African studies.”.... his breakthrough essay, “Through the Prism of Folklore: The Black Ethos in Slavery,” published in 1968 by The Massachusetts Review, Professor Stuckey maintained that political and cultural studies of Africa must encompass people in North America and the West Indies.

...Professor Stuckey’s books included “Slave Culture: Nationalist Theory and the Foundations of Black America” (1987) and “Going Through the Storm: The Influence of African American Art in History” (1994).
Africa  African-Americans  black_nationalism  books  Colleges_&_Universities  history  historians  obituaries  PhDs  scholars  slavery 
august 2018 by jerryking
Not just another long weekend: Why Canada should rebrand the August ‘Civic Holiday’ - The Globe and Mail
DAN GARDNER
CONTRIBUTED TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED 2 DAYS AGO
UPDATED AUGUST 3, 2018
Dan Gardner is a senior fellow at the University of Ottawa’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. His books include Risk: The Science and Politics of Fear and Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction
Canada  Ontario  rebranding  Emancipation  slavery  history 
august 2018 by jerryking
Opinion | At This Memorial, the Monuments Bleed - The New York Times
By Jesse Wegman

Mr. Wegman is a member of the editorial board.

April 25, 2018
the_South  slavery  lynchings  memorials 
april 2018 by jerryking
On the money: a history of the Bank of England
SEPTEMBER 1, 2017 by: John Plender, the FT columnist and author of ‘Capitalism: Money, Morals and Markets’ (Biteback)

Till Time’s Last Sand: A History of the Bank of England 1694-2013, by David Kynaston, Bloomsbury £35, 896 pages
An enduring theme is the friction that existed from the outset between the Bank and its main client, the government. The Bank’s original charter was granted so that it could provide finance for the Nine Years’ War against France. On each renewal, the terms were the subject of much haggling and in the interim the Bank was constantly pressed to advance more money than it felt prudent. ....Another constant theme is forgery and fraud, with some of the Bank’s most senior employees being caught with their fingers in the till. In marked contrast to today’s post-crisis financial world, punishment was harsh. Many miscreants were hanged at Tyburn while the lucky ones were condemned to transportation.

As the 19th century progresses, Kynaston’s story turns increasingly on the issue that preoccupied great Victorian writers on monetary policy such as Henry Thornton and Walter Bagehot: how to reconcile adherence to the gold standard with financial stability. Numerous financial crises, including those surrounding the rescue of Barings and the collapse of Overend Gurney and the City of Glasgow Bank, are retold here with panache.
Bank_of_England  history  central_banks  book_reviews  books  monetary_policy  slavery  Walter_Bagehot  financial_history  19th_century  Victorian  financial_crises 
september 2017 by jerryking
When Jack Daniel’s Failed to Honor a Slave, an Author Rewrote History - The New York Times
By CLAY RISEN AUG. 15, 2017

“It’s absolutely critical that the story of Nearest gets added to the Jack Daniel story,” Mark I. McCallum, the president of Jack Daniel’s Brands at Brown-Forman, said in an interview.

The company’s decision to recognize its debt to a slave, first reported last year by The New York Times, is a momentous turn in the history of Southern foodways. Even as black innovators in Southern cooking and agriculture are beginning to get their due, the tale of American whiskey is still told as a whites-only affair, about Scots-Irish settlers who brought Old World distilling knowledge to the frontier states of Tennessee and Kentucky.

Green’s story changes all that by showing how enslaved people likely provided the brains as well as the brawn in what was an arduous, dangerous and highly technical operation......Mr. May said that so far, visitor response to the new tours spotlighting Green’s contribution has been positive. It’s not hard to see why: At a rough time for race relations in America, the relationship between Daniel and Green allows Brown-Forman to tell a positive story, while also pioneering an overdue conversation about the unacknowledged role that black people, as slaves and later as free men, played in the evolution of American whiskey.
African-Americans  authors  distilleries  history  liquor  origin_story  slavery  storytelling  whiskey  writers 
august 2017 by jerryking
Enterprising Bostonians - WSJ
By John Steele Gordon
June 25, 2017

BRAHMIN CAPITALISM

By Noam Maggor
Harvard, 284 pages, $39.95
Boston  history  slavery  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  books  Boston_Brahmins 
june 2017 by jerryking
Hot Links and Red Drinks: The Rich Food Tradition of Juneteenth - The New York Times
By NICOLE TAYLOR JUNE 13, 2017

For over 150 years, African-Americans have gathered on June 19 — the day known as Juneteenth — to celebrate freedom. The holiday is rooted in Texas, signifying the day in 1865 when, more than two years after Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, a Union general who had made his way to Galveston delivered the news that slavery had been abolished. Texans who had been chattel erupted in triumph.
African-Americans  Emancipation  freedom  Texas  the_South  slavery  picnics  traditions  Civil_War  Abraham_Lincoln 
june 2017 by jerryking
40 Acres and a Mule Would Be at Least $6.4 Trillion Today—What the U.S. Really Owes Black America by Tracy Loeffelholz Dunn and Jeff Neumann — YES! Magazine
Slavery made America wealthy, and racist policies since have blocked African American wealth-building. Can we calculate the economic damage?

Tracy Loeffelholz DunnJeff Neumann posted May 14, 2015
reparations  race  slavery  African-Americans  generational_wealth  racism  racial_disparities  infographics 
march 2017 by jerryking
A Different Bargain on Race
MARCH 4, 2017 | The New York Times | Ross Douthat.

Instead, the demographic transformation of America has given us a Democratic Party more attuned to racial injustice or committed to ethnic patronage (depending on your point of view) than ever, and a Republican Party that has exploited white racism or ridden a white backlash against ethnic patronage (again, depending on your perspective) on its way to control of the House, the Senate and the White House.

At one end of this polarized political landscape, you have the liberal acclaim that greeted Ta-Nehisi Coates’s case for reparations, his argument that the debt owed by “the people who believe themselves to be white” to the descendants of African slaves is vast and essentially unpaid.

At the other end you have the fears of those white Trump voters who feel like the new liberalism offers affirmative action for everyone but them, allowing immigrants and minorities to “cut the line” (to borrow an image from Arlie Russell Hochschild’s recent study of working-class Republicans) and claim an American dream that they themselves can no longer reach.

These views are worlds apart, but it is actually possible to accept elements of both. It can be simultaneously true that slavery and Jim Crow robbed black Americans on a scale that still requires redress, and that offering redress through a haphazard system of minority preferences in hiring, contracting and higher education creates a new set of reasonable white grievances in its turn.
Ross_Douthat  race  race_relations  slavery  GOP  identity_politics  Democrats  reparations  affirmative_action  bargaining  one-time_events  the_American_dream 
march 2017 by jerryking
The History the Slaveholders Wanted Us to Forget - The New York Times
By HENRY LOUIS GATES Jr.

Except for the relatively few African-Americans who saw through such racist fictions of Africa, drawn upon to devalue their humanity and justify their relegation to second-class citizenship — people such as Garvey, Henry Highland Garnet, Martin R. Delany, W.E.B. Du Bois (who would die a citizen of Ghana), Langston Hughes and Maya Angelou — far too many of us felt that “Africa” was something of an embarrassment. Richard Wright, the great novelist, published a book titled “Black Power” in 1954 about feeling that way.
historians  erasures  history  slavery  Africa  ignorance  slaveholders  Henry_Louis_Gates  African-Americans  second-class_citizenship  humanity  W.E.B._Du_Bois  Black_Power 
february 2017 by jerryking
Henry Louis Gates Jr.: Restoring Black History
SEPT. 23, 2016 | - The New York Times | By HENRY LOUIS GATES Jr.

The opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington helps to resolve the protracted debate about the contributions of black people to American history and, indeed, about whether they had a history worth preserving at all. Those questions were at the heart of the nation’s original debate about whether, and how, black lives matter.....“History,” James Baldwin wrote, “is not merely something to be read. And it does not refer merely, or even principally, to the past. On the contrary, the great force of history comes from the fact that we carry it within us, are unconsciously controlled by it in many ways, and history is literally present in all that we do.”.... the opening of the museum ...reinscribes race at a symbolically central place in American culture, on the National Mall, where we celebrate our collective public histories, ensuring that a mountain of evidence about black contributions to America will be on permanent display....More than a museum, the building on the National Mall is a refutation of two and a half centuries of the misuse of history to reinforce a social order in which black people were enslaved, then systematically repressed and denied their rights when freed. It also repudiates the long and dismal tradition of objectifying black people in museums.
slavery  Jim_Crow  history  historians  Henry_Louis_Gates  museums  Washington_D.C.  African-Americans  Thomas_Jefferson  Enlightenment  Hegel  John_Hope_Franklin  W.E.B._Du_Bois  Carter_Woodson  Arthur_Schomburg  Obama  James_Baldwin  Smithsonian  David_Adjaye 
september 2016 by jerryking
Yes, Slaves Did Help Build the White House - The New York Times
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVISJULY 26, 2016
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slavery  White_House  history  Michelle_Obama  DNC  Campaign_2016  African-Americans 
july 2016 by jerryking
Race, Truth and Our Two Realities - The New York Times
Chris Lebron
THE STONE JULY 11, 2016

The distance between the left and right is represented by ideology and self-interest. While ideology and self-interest have something to do with our differences on racial truth, it crucially has more to do with the moment at which my experience enlivens my perception of how the racial past makes the racial present and how your experience leaves race in the past and renders the present as something unrecognizable to me but comforting to you.
race_relations  Dallas  slavery  police_shootings  MLK  LBJ  civil_rights 
july 2016 by jerryking
Super Tuesday was a referendum on racism - The Globe and Mail
SARAH KENDZIOR
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Mar. 02, 2016
Campaign_2016  racism  slavery 
march 2016 by jerryking
Slowly, new attitudes taking root across America’s Old South - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
Slowly, new attitudes taking root across America’s Old South
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Sep. 01, 2015
Marcus_Gee  the_South  race_relations  Civil_War  racism  slavery  South_Carolina  race  Confederacy  symbolism  flags  Charleston_shootings 
september 2015 by jerryking
“It’s symbolic annihilation of history, and it’s done for a purpose. It really enforces white supremacy”: Edward Baptist on the lies we tell about slavery - Salon.com
NOV 9, 2014 01:30 PM EST
“It’s symbolic annihilation of history, and it’s done for a purpose. It really enforces white supremacy”: Edward Baptist on the lies we tell about slavery
Edward Baptist on horrifying truth that we memorialize Confederate soldiers and not Americans who died enslaved
MICHAEL SCHULSON
slavery  the_South  cotton  history  financial_history  economic_development  lying  white_supremacy 
july 2015 by jerryking
Lowering of Confederate flag marks both an end and a beginning - The Globe and Mail
Omar El Akkad
Lowering of Confederate flag marks both an end and a beginning
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jul. 10, 2015
flags  symbolism  Charleston_shootings  the_South  Confederacy  Omar_el_Akkad  slavery 
july 2015 by jerryking
The Right Way to Remember the Confederacy
In June of 1865, Confederate Gen. Joseph Shelby and about a thousand of his cavalrymen rode into Mexico and exile rather than remain in a conquered South. As they forded the Rio Grande, they stopped…
secession  slavery  the_South  Confederacy  Civil_War  flags  symbolism  white_supremacy  Charleston_shootings 
july 2015 by jerryking
Divisive questions: Remove Confederate monuments or use them to educate?
Just down the road from the church where a racist gunman killed nine people last month stands a tall column in a grassy square. Atop it stands an imperious figure with a cape over his shoulders, a…
racism  slavery  South_Carolina  race  Confederacy  symbolism  flags  Marcus_Gee  the_South 
july 2015 by jerryking
Obama delivers eulogy for Charleston preacher, sings ‘Amazing Grace’ - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
CHARLESTON, S.C. — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 26, 2015

Since he was elected in 2008 and became the first black man to sit in the Oval Office, Mr. Obama has usually been cautious in his pronouncements about race, speaking out only after incidents like the fatal shooting of black teenager Trayvon Martin or the violence after the police shooting of a black man in Ferguson, Mo.

But the attack on a Charleston church last week was on another scale. The emotions it has provoked and the issues it has raised clearly called for a deeper, stronger response.

The result was an oration in which a president drawing toward the end of his second and final term put caution aside and jumped into the discussion of race that he himself is such a part of. He spoke to console but also to challenge, calling on Americans not to squander the moment of grief and of anguished questioning that has followed the Charleston killings....The best way to do that, he said, is not just to have yet another “conversation” about race but to work on the country’s problems, from poverty to failing schools to the “unique mayhem” of gun violence to the many thousands of men marooned in the vast U.S. prison system.

This was Mr. Obama’s first opportunity to speak at length about the shocking church killings that have Americans talking once again about racism, racial division and the sources of hate. Mr. Obama is reported to have been working on his speech all week.

When it came to delivering it, he was direct. Mr. Obama said the country had been blind to hurt caused by the waving of the Confederate flag – a symbol, he said, not just of ancestral pride but of “racial subjugation.” He said that the cause for which Confederates fought – “the cause of slavery – was wrong.”

He praised South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley for moving to take down the rebel flag that flies on the grounds of the State House.

“But I don’t think God wants us to stop there. For too long, we’ve been blind to the way past injustices continue to shape the present.”
Obama  Marcus_Gee  tributes  Charleston_shootings  Clementa_Pinckney  grief  eulogies  racial_subjugation  Confederacy  slavery 
june 2015 by jerryking
South Carolina’s challenge: Shaking off the shadows of the past
If you’ve ever laid eyes on the 19th-century mansions that line the seawall in Charleston, S.C., you get a better sense of what President Barack Obama meant last week when he said that…
slavery  columbia  South_Carolina  Nikki_Haley 
june 2015 by jerryking
Tearing Down the Confederate Flag Is Just a Start - The New York Times
JUNE 24, 2015 | NYT | Nicholas Kristof.

the movement is in some ways chimerical. It’s about a symbol — and now the progress on the symbol needs to be matched by progress on racial inequality in daily life.

America’s greatest shame in 2015 is not a piece of cloth. It’s that a black boy has a life expectancy five years shorter than a white boy. It’s that the net worth of the average black household in 2011 was $6,314, compared with $110,500 for the average white household, according to census data.

It’s that almost two-thirds of black children grow up in low-income families. It’s that more than one-third of inner-city black kids suffer lead poisoning (and thus often lifelong brain impairment), mostly from old lead paint in substandard housing.

More consequential than that flag is our flawed system of school finance that perpetuates inequity. Black students in America are much less likely than whites to attend schools offering advanced science and math courses.

The one public system in which America goes out of its way to provide services to African-Americans is prison.
Nicholas_Kristof  flags  Charleston_shootings  institutional_racism  rebellions  slavery  Nat_Turner  Confederacy 
june 2015 by jerryking
Slavery’s Long Shadow - The New York Times
JUNE 22, 2015
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Paul Krugman
Paul_Krugman  slavery  Jim_Crow  racism  political_economy  Charleston_shootings 
june 2015 by jerryking
Why Reconstruction Matters - NYTimes.com
By ERIC FONER MARCH 28, 2015

Reconstruction also made possible the consolidation of black families, so often divided by sale during slavery, and the establishment of the independent black church as the core institution of the emerging black community. But the failure to respond to the former slaves’ desire for land left most with no choice but to work for their former owners.

It was not economic dependency, however, but widespread violence, coupled with a Northern retreat from the ideal of equality, that doomed Reconstruction. The Ku Klux Klan and kindred groups began a campaign of murder, assault and arson that can only be described as homegrown American terrorism. Meanwhile, as the Northern Republican Party became more conservative, Reconstruction came to be seen as a misguided attempt to uplift the lower classes of society.
African-Americans  segregation  Jim_Crow  the_South  Reconstruction  violence  slavery  emancipation  Civil_War  KKK  terrorism 
march 2015 by jerryking
Argentina Rediscovers Its African Roots - NYTimes.com
SEPT. 12, 2014 | NYT |By MICHAEL T. LUONGO.

There have been other attempts to examine Argentina’s African roots in Buenos Aires, including a now-closed maritime museum discussing the slave trade in the La Boca neighborhood. And during Argentina’s 2010 bicentennial, cultural institutions sought to mark the country’s diverse past. The National Historical Museum grouped paintings from the museum’s permanent collection of the five-decade-long Emancipation era. The exhibition center Casa Nacional del Bicentenario occasionally surveys African influences in Argentine music. Outside the capital, in San Antonio de Areco, there are exhibits on Argentina’s black gauchos, or cowboys, in the Museo Ricardo Güiraldes and Museo Las Lilas de Areco. Near Cordoba, the Museo de la Estancia Jesuítica de Alta Gracia, part of Unesco’s slave trail list, also contains exhibitions on the relationship among Jesuits, natives and African slaves.

But those attractions all look backward. As part of the shift toward embracing Afro-Argentine culture, the country is beginning to welcome contemporary African influence.
Argentina  travel  things_to_do  Diaspora  Africa  slavery  history  invisibility  tango  Buenos_Aires  African  tunnels  Afro-Latinos  exclusion 
september 2014 by jerryking
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