jerryking + second-class_citizenship   4

Opinion | 1919: The Year of the Crack-Up
Dec. 31, 2018| The New York Times By Ted Widmer, distinguished lecturer at the Macaulay Honors College of the City University of New York.

In his essay “The Crack-Up,” F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote, “The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function.”
1919  African-Americans  F._Scott_Fitzgerald  history  WWI  second-class_citizenship  segregation  Woodrow_Wilson  Paris  turning_points 
january 2019 by jerryking
The History the Slaveholders Wanted Us to Forget - The New York Times
By HENRY LOUIS GATES Jr.

Except for the relatively few African-Americans who saw through such racist fictions of Africa, drawn upon to devalue their humanity and justify their relegation to second-class citizenship — people such as Garvey, Henry Highland Garnet, Martin R. Delany, W.E.B. Du Bois (who would die a citizen of Ghana), Langston Hughes and Maya Angelou — far too many of us felt that “Africa” was something of an embarrassment. Richard Wright, the great novelist, published a book titled “Black Power” in 1954 about feeling that way.
historical_amnesia  historians  history  slavery  Africa  ignorance  slaveholders  Henry_Louis_Gates  African-Americans  second-class_citizenship  humanity  W.E.B._Du_Bois  Black_Power  erasures 
february 2017 by jerryking
N.Y. Military Museum Recognizes the Harlem Hellfighters - WSJ
by Leslie Brody Nov. 28, 2014

They were in heroes in France during World War I, only to be treated as second-class citizens when they returned to New York.

Now, the Harlem Hellfighters, a black infantry regiment that won awards for valor, are getting a new life online thanks to a project posting their personnel records on a museum website....The unit was originally formed as the 15th Colored Regiment of the New York National Guard, according to New York University Professor Jeffrey Sammons. Started in 1916, it was the first black National Guard unit recognized by New York, and one of the few black regiments that saw combat during World War I.

Because of racism in the military, the unit was kept separate from the rest of the state’s National Guard and trained separately, according to Mr. Sammons, co-author of a book on the subject, “Harlem’s Rattlers and the Great War: The Undaunted 369th Regiment and the African American Quest for Equality.”

The unit was sent to Europe to dig ditches, unload ships and build railroads but was deployed in combat in 1918 when the French military needed reinforcements, Mr. Sammons said.

He said the entire regiment won the high honor of a Croix de Guerre from the French government for its distinguished service, but then came home to have a parade in New York City that was separate from other events for returning veterans.
WWI  African-Americans  segregation  New_York_City  museums  heroes  France  second-class_citizenship 
november 2014 by jerryking

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