jerryking + scarcity   65

Why You Should Try to Be a Little More Scarce
May 18, 2019 | The New York Times | By Cindy Lamothe.

* Conventional wisdom tells us we should eagerly embrace every opportunity that comes our way, but playing a little hard to get has its advantages.
* Robert Cialdini, a leading expert on influence and the author of “Pre-Suasion: A Revolutionary Way to Influence and Persuade.”
* John Lees, a Britain-based career strategist and the author of “How to Get a Job You Love.”
* Liz Ryan, founder of Human Workplace and the author of “Reinvention Roadmap: Break the Rules to Get the Job You Want and Career You Deserve.”
* Shirli Kopelman, author of “Negotiating Genuinely: Being Yourself in Business,”

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Studies show that opportunities are seen to be more valuable as they become less available.....the scarcity principle says that people are more attracted to those options or opportunities that are rare, unique or dwindling in availability,”. The underlying principle is “reactance”: Essentially, when we think something is limited to us, we tend to want it more....it’s possible to harness this concept and increase our appeal in things like negotiations and career advancement.....if you find yourself becoming overzealous over every little opportunity that comes your way, here are a few ways to keep things in balance:

(1) Be less eager - Appearing readily available can work against you....This comes down to economics — if you’re in low supply and high demand, you’re worth more. Making something harder to get, “tends to increase at least the perception of the value, if not its actual value.”....tell people that you're “..selective with who you work with, but you would consider working with or for them.”... “Well, I do have a couple of other projects that I’m working on. However, I could prioritize this for you if you want.”

(2) Don’t jump the gun - It’s easy to become excited when an unexpected opportunity presents itself, Ms. Ryan said, but remember that your power in any negotiation is related to your ability to walk away. Once you have interest, channel that into due diligence, Mr. Lees said. “Research the organization as if you were going to invest half your life savings in it,” he said. It’s also important to continually check in with your gut, Ms. Ryan added, and remember: Don’t accept an offer before fully considering the terms.

(3) Know your market value - continually assessing our market worth, “so that if an unexpected opportunity comes up, you don’t have to rush and do a slack job on this crucial factor.”...Keep an updated spreadsheet on hand with a list of your skills and achievements so you can quickly review it when you have an offer. You also have to know how much to charge for your services beforehand. The idea is to plan ahead so you’re not scrambling in the moment.

(4) Adopt an abundance mind-set - Recognizing that there are unlimited possibilities can give you the security and confidence you need to create successful outcomes. ....reframe how we use scarcity and abundance in our own head before we can apply it outwardly. When you worry about all the things you’re going to lose out on if you don’t take a particular opportunity, you’re using the scarcity mind-set on yourself rather than as a persuasion strategy, he said. “You’re at a real disadvantage mentally.”

(5) Trust the process - appearing less available isn’t about limiting our enthusiasm or being unnecessarily hard on ourselves. It’s about trusting in our own self-worth so we can be proactive, experts say. This means mindfully aligning our excitement into strategy....“Emphasize the uniqueness of your resources and your collaborative approach"
abundance  bank_shots  books  conventional_wisdom  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  mindsets  opportunities  overeagerness  overzealous  preparation  scarcity  selectivity  self-worth  think_differently  unexpected 
may 2019 by jerryking
Stop fighting over scarce educational opportunities
March 26, 2019 | Financial Times | by Sarah O’Connor
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, US Democratic congresswoman, believes there is a shortage of routes available to children who want a better future.

Ms Ocasio-Cortez put her finger on a phenomenon that is showing up in many different guises as economic growth has slowed in the developed world. When the pie stops growing, the fights become fiercer and dirtier over how to divide it. One of the areas where this is playing out most emotively is education — an issue critical to the life chances of our children.

As developed countries grew steadily richer over much of the 20th century and educational opportunities expanded, absolute social mobility — the likelihood that children would do better than their parents — was commonplace.

There was never a perfect meritocracy, of course. Elites have always used their wealth and connections to put a “glass floor” under their children’s feet. But that seemed to matter less when it was easy enough for others to join them.

Now, in a world of stalling growth and yawning gaps between the top and the bottom, the chances of making it into the elite feel slimmer, even as the economic rewards for doing so grow fatter. At the same time, the economic penalties for not securing a decent education have become harsher....The underlying problem, as Ms Ocasio-Cortez points out, is the scarcity of routes available to young people who want a better future.

There is no single solution, but the list of fixes would include better state schools, more affordable higher education that is less variable in quality, a broader range of alternatives to university that still lead to decent jobs, and a revival of broad-based economic growth that lifts all boats, not just the yachts.

That may sound like an expensive laundry list, but inaction would cost more in the end.
Alexandria_Ocasio-Cortez  children  college-educated  cost_of_inaction  education  elitism  income_inequality  scarcity  Varsity_Blues 
march 2019 by jerryking
Let the grocery chains fix Canada’s cannabis-supply mess
January 11, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | ANDREW WILLIS.

Despite the long run-up to legalization of recreational marijuana last October, demand for legal cannabis is outstripping supply and the retail system is a mess. ....The Ontario government held a lottery last Friday to award licenses for its first 25 stores, which aren’t expected to open until April. Experts say the nascent industry’s nation-wide logistical issues will take months, if not years, to fix.

Who wins out of this chaos? Criminals. Removing the social stigma from cannabis without ensuring robust cultivation and retail networks are in place opens the door to black-market suppliers, the folks the federal Liberals were trying to put out of business when they started down the path to legalization. Who can set things right, by getting cannabis into the hands of those who want it at prices the black market will be hard pressed to match? How about Jim Pattison, along with the Weston and Sobey clans and the folks running Metro Inc. Provincial governments should be looking to the national grocery and drug store chains to deliver on the federal Liberals' promise of a modern approach to marijuana sales.

Mr. Pattison, who runs the 45,000-employee Jim Pattison Group, has been showing shoppers the love for six decades. Think about what greets you when you walk into one of the former car salesman’s Save-On-Foods grocery stores in Western Canada, or a large-format Loblaws, Sobeys and Metro outlet.
Andrew_Willis  black_markets  cannabis  criminality  grocery  retailers  supermarkets  raw_materials  scarcity  supply_chains  gangs  nationwide  organized_crime 
january 2019 by jerryking
Luxury Brands Buy Supply Chains to Ensure Meeting Demand
Nov. 15, 2018 | The New York Times | By Mark Ellwood.

The luxury markets are booming to such an extent that brands look to ensure they can meet demand by buying companies that supply their raw materials.

In the last six years, David Duncan has been on a buying spree. This Napa Valley-based winemaker and owner of Silver Oak Cellars hasn’t been splurging on fast cars or vacation homes, though. He’s been buying up vines — close to 500 acres in Northern California and Oregon.

It’s been a tough process, at times: He almost lost one site to a wealthy Chinese bidder. It was only when he raised his offer by $1 million that he clinched the sale at the last moment. At the same time, Mr. Duncan also took full control of A&K Cooperage, now the Oak Cooperage, the barrel maker in Higbee, Mo., in which his family had long held a stake. These hefty acquisitions are central to his 50-year plan to future-proof the family business against a changing luxury marketplace.

As Mr. Duncan realized, this market faces what might seem an enviable problem: a surfeit of demand for its limited supply. The challenge the winery will face over the next decade is not marketing, or finding customers, but finding enough high-quality raw materials to sate the looming boom in demand. Though there might be economic uncertainty among the middle classes, wealthier consumers are feeling confident and richer because of changes like looser business regulations and lower taxes.
artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  brands  competitive_advantage  core_competencies  future-proofing  high_net_worth  high-quality  luxury  raw_materials  scarcity  supply_chains  sustainability  vertical_integration  vineyards 
november 2018 by jerryking
How Financial Products Drive Today’s Art World
July 20, 2018 | The New York Times | By Scott Reyburn.

How does one invest in art without going through the complications of buying and owning an actual artwork?

That is the question behind financial products for investors attracted by soaring art prices but intimidated by the complexity and opacity of the market..... entrepreneurs are trying to iron out the archaic inefficiencies of the art world with new types of financial products, particularly the secure ledgers of blockchain...... “More transparency equals more trust, more trust equals more transactions, more transactions equals stronger markets,” Anne Bracegirdle, a specialist in the photographs department at Christie’s, said on Tuesday at the auction house’s first Art & Tech Summit, dedicated to exploring blockchain......blockchain’s decentralized record-keeping could create a “more welcoming art ecosystem” in which collectors and professionals routinely verify the authenticity, provenance and ownership of artworks on an industrywide registry securely situated in the cloud...... blockchain has already proved to be a game-changer in one important area of growth, according to those at the Christie’s event: art in digital forms.

“Digital art is a computer file that can be reproduced and redistributed infinitely. Where’s the resale value?”.....For other art and technology experts, “tokenization” — using the value of an artwork to underpin tradable digital tokens — is the way forward. “Blockchain represents a huge opportunity for the size of the market,” said Niccolò Filippo Veneri Savoia, founder of Look Lateral, a start-up looking to generate cryptocurrency trading in fractions of artworks.

“I see more transactions,” added Mr. Savoia, who pointed out that tokens representing a percentage of an artwork could be sold several times a year. “The crypto world will bring huge liquidity.”......the challenge for tokenization ventures such as Look Lateral is finding works of art of sufficient quality to hold their value after being exposed to fractional trading. The art market puts a premium on “blue chip” works that have not been overtraded, and these tend to be bought by wealthy individuals, not by fintech start-ups.....UTA Brant Fine Art Fund, devised by the seasoned New York collector Peter Brant and the United Talent Agency in Los Angeles.

The fund aims to invest $250 million in “best-in-class” postwar and contemporary works,...Noah Horowitz, in his 2011 primer, “Art of the Deal: Contemporary Art in a Global Financial Market,”.... funds, tokenization and even digital art are all investments that don’t give investors anything to hang on their walls.

“We should never forget that in the center of it all is artists,”
art  artists  art_advisory  art_authentication  art_finance  auctions  authenticity  best_of  blockchain  blue-chips  books  Christie's  collectors  conferences  contemporary_art  digital_artifacts  end_of_ownership  fin-tech  investing  investors  opacity  post-WWII  provenance  record-keeping  scarcity  tokenization  collectibles  replication  alternative_investments  crypto-currencies  digital_currencies  currencies  virtual_currencies  metacurrencies  art_market  fractional_ownership  primers  game_changers 
july 2018 by jerryking
The Choice Explosion - The New York Times
David Brooks MAY 3, 2016

Americans have always put great emphasis on individual choice. But even by our own standards we’ve had a choice explosion over the past 30 years.....making decisions well is incredibly difficult....It’s becoming incredibly important to learn to decide well, to develop the techniques of self-distancing to counteract the flaws in our own mental machinery....assume positive intent (i.e. when in the midst of some conflict, start with the belief that others are well intentioned).....People are overly biased by the immediate pain of some choice, but they can put the short-term pain in long-term perspective by asking these questions [Suzy Welch’s 10-10-10 rule. When you’re about to make a decision, ask yourself how you will feel about it 10 minutes from now? 10 months from now? and 10 years from now?]....make deliberate mistakes....our tendency to narrow-frame, to see every decision as a binary “whether or not” alternative. Whenever you find yourself asking “whether or not,” it’s best to step back and ask, “How can I widen my options?” In other words, before you ask, “Should I fire this person?” Ask, “Is there any way I can shift this employee’s role to take advantage of his strengths and avoid his weaknesses?”....It’s important to offer opportunity and incentives. But we also need lessons in self-awareness — on exactly how our decision-making tool is fundamentally flawed, and on mental frameworks we can adopt to avoid messing up even more than we do.
David_Brooks  choices  decision_making  biases  thinking_deliberatively  scarcity  self-awareness  metacognition  binary_decisionmaking  abundance  optionality  narrow-framing  Suzy_Welch  wide-framing  self-distancing 
may 2016 by jerryking
Too much stuff, with no one to buy it: Is this the future economy? - The Globe and Mail
Scott Barlow
Too much stuff, with no one to buy it: Is this the future economy?
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Feb. 02, 2016

University of California professor Brad DeLong’s “Economics and the Age of Abundance” highlighted the new economic study of global production growth – a new-ish school of thought that attributes much of the economic malaise in the developed world to a technology-driven “too much of everything.....The economic challenges of abundance, however, go far beyond commodities. There’s too many mutual funds, television channels, cereal brands, auto companies (China hasn’t even started exporting cars and trucks yet), land-line telephones, clothing brands, taxis, department stores and, if we’re being honest, journalism. Technology and its ability to increase productivity are to blame for virtually any major market sector beset with poor profit margins and layoffs. ....... The larger problem, and I suspect Mr. DeLong would agree, is that technology increases efficiencies and reduces the need for labour. A dystopian future in which anything can be produced quickly and cheaply, except everyone’s unemployed with no money to spend, is easy to envisage without considerable structural change in the economy.

Unemployment is the most severe outgrowth of abundance and low profitability ....... ......
abundance  economics  economists  Colleges_&_Universities  structural_change  developed_countries  dystopian_future  oversupply  technology  commodities  over_investment  scarcity  innovation  China  productivity  deflation  manufacturers  outsourcing  unemployment  job_destruction  job_displacement  downward_mobility  hollowing_out  books  developing_countries 
february 2016 by jerryking
Wiping out California’s almond industry won’t fix the water crisis - The Globe and Mail
OMAR EL AKKAD
Wiping out California’s almond industry won’t fix the water crisis
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
PORTLAND, ORE. — The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Apr. 21 2015, 11:08 AM EDT
Last updated Tuesday, Apr. 21 2015,
California  droughts  water  scarcity  farming  agriculture  water_footprints  almonds  Omar_el_Akkad 
april 2015 by jerryking
Water shortages could open taps on corporate risk - The Globe and Mail
NEW YORK — Reuters Breakingviews
Published Monday, Jan. 05 2015

two-thirds of the world’s largest companies worry about how constraints may affect their business....A few high-profile droughts have helped shake off some complacency. ...Illinois and Indiana are starting to use their relative abundance of water to lure companies to their states....Often, a company’s idea of water risk is very narrow,
water  scarcity  water_footprints  risks 
january 2015 by jerryking
The Risks of Cheap Water - NYTimes.com
OCTOBER 14, 2014 | NYT | Eduardo Porter.

the proliferation of limits on water use will not solve the problem because regulations do nothing to address the main driver of the nation’s wanton consumption of water: its price.

“Most water problems are readily addressed with innovation,” said David G. Victor of the University of California, San Diego. “Getting the water price right to signal scarcity is crucially important.”... markets and prices are an indispensable part of the tool kit to combat scarcity....The signals today are way off. Water is far too cheap across most American cities and towns. ...Adding to the challenges are the obstacles placed in the way of water trading.
California  droughts  water  scarcity  pricing  signals 
october 2014 by jerryking
The CRTC needs to start thinking outside the idiot box - The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Sep. 27 2014,

...Watching CRTC commissioners questioning cable-company executives and other stakeholders about whether Canadians should be able to choose which channels they pay for made it painfully clear that the commission’s usefulness is being outstripped by technology. ..The new scarce resource is not bandwidth, but viewers. Broadcasters and cable carriers that once had captive markets now compete with Netflix, Youtube and other Internet-based services that exist outside CRTC regulations. These newcomers, including millions of people producing and posting their own content, from Vines to videos, are stealing viewers and changing Canadians’ habits.....the reason why the CRTC still talks "television" – is because it remains the only avenue for Canada’s heavily regulated broadcasters and cable companies to hold onto their current revenue streams while they buy time and figure out what their next move should be. The CRTC’s most critical role – ensuring Canada’s stories are told, as required under the Broadcasting Act – has lately transmogrified from obliging broadcasters to produce Canadian content, and making sure the cable companies prioritize it, to something a little less noble: namely, temporarily protecting Canadian companies from the stateless, unregulated, market-driven onslaught of the Internet....There are significant advances coming down the pipe that are going to get here faster than the end of your next two-year cable contract. This is where the CRTC should be focusing its energies. The future is not “pick-and-pay”; the future is fibre-optic Internet in every home that is magnitudes faster than the current co-axial standard, and which will become the backbone of the digital economy.... The future is not limiting access or enforcing nationalistic content rules; the future is more border-ignoring services with more content than ever, some of which will inevitably be Canadian. The future is asking the question, Do we need a national television broadcaster, or would we be better off subsidizing a national content producer that sells its programming to the highest bidder? Or produces it with a taxpayer subsidy – and then instead of broadcasting via a traditional TV channel, simply posts it online for anyone to watch on Youtube and other sites?

Talking about TV – about pick-and-pay and basic packages and Canadian content – is at best a distraction while the future barrels down on us.
Netflix  Canada  CRTC  streaming  data  roaming  CATV  television  scarcity  statelessness  bandwidth  Youtube  future  Vine  content  DIY  bite-sized 
september 2014 by jerryking
In California’s brown fields, an arid future - The Globe and Mail
ELIZABETH RENZETTI
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Aug. 25 2014

Astoundingly, considering that it supplies a vast proportion of North America’s agricultural goods and regularly suffers terrible droughts, California is the only state without a groundwater-management strategy.

This, as you might imagine, has scientists alarmed. “I see a state that is standing on the edge of a cliff,” Jay Famiglietti of the University of California’s Center for Hydrologic Modelling wrote in National Geographic. “This current drought, if it continues, will be like none other in recent times. The stress on groundwater will be far greater than ever before.”

Another UC professor studying water use, Richard Howitt, put it this way: “We’re acting like the super rich who have so much money they don’t need to balance their chequebook.”

Dr. Howitt and his team estimate the drought is costing the state $2-billion this year alone. The only reason that price tag isn’t even higher is because farmers are relying on groundwater to keep their crops growing and sent to market – kind of like taking out a second mortgage, with no prospect of repaying it. Maybe that price tag will be enough to shock California into action. More likely, it’ll be the sight of all those depressing brown lawns.
California  water  scarcity  droughts 
august 2014 by jerryking
Age of the water wars - The Globe and Mail
BRAHMA CHELLANEY
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Oct. 09 2013
water  scarcity  conflicts 
august 2014 by jerryking
Clare Hasler-Lewis on the Future of Agriculture - WSJ
By CLARE HASLER-LEWIS
July 7, 2014

I also see a steady stream of new farming technologies, practices and ideas that are increasing our ability to use limited resources efficiently—particularly water. And that promises a future agriculture that can feed the world, sustainably, for generations to come.

Smart Winery
Capturing, recycling and reusing water will become the rule rather than the exception in food production and processing. Processing the food we eat every day makes up 50% of our total water footprint. It is not difficult to imagine most consumer products of the future bearing a "Water Footprint" rating.

A glimpse of that water-efficient future is already visible at the University of California, Davis, where my colleagues recently opened the world's only LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Platinum-certified winery, brewery and food-processing facility.
agriculture  farming  future  water  scarcity  water_footprints  food 
august 2014 by jerryking
How do we avert a thirsty future? - The Globe and Mail
BRAHMA CHELLANEY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jul. 15 2014
water  scarcity  conflicts 
august 2014 by jerryking
In a water war, Canada could get hosed - The Globe and Mail
GARY MASON
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 28 2014

According to Canada’s ambassador to the United States, water is the new oil. In a recent interview, Gary Doer said that by the end of the decade, the pressure on water quality and quantity will be immense. He predicted that water debates and disputes between the two countries will make the clash over the Keystone XL pipeline “look silly” by comparison.... A 2012 intelligence report from the U.S. State Department predicted global water shortages beyond 2022 that could lead to armed conflict and failed states. Water as a tool or target of war or terrorism will increase, the report said, particularly in South Asia, the Middle East and North Africa.

In his Postmedia interview, Mr. Doer listed off a string of potential Canada-U.S. flashpoints, ranging from the St. Lawrence Seaway to Lake of the Woods, which borders Ontario, Manitoba and Minnesota and has seen growing concerns about water quality.

But the most pressing issue is drought. Some hold the view that the moment an ounce of our water is exported south, it will become subject to the provisions of the North American free-trade agreement. And that once that tap is turned on, there may be no stopping it – Canada’s water resources will suddenly become a U.S. national security concern.
crossborder  water  Great_Lakes  droughts  scarcity  security_&_intelligence  flashpoints 
july 2014 by jerryking
When Diamonds Are Dirt Cheap, Will They Still Dazzle? - NYTimes.com
APRIL 19, 2014| NYT | ROBERT H. FRANK.

In many domains, perhaps even including signed baseballs, it’s becoming possible to produce essentially perfect replicas of once rare and expensive things.

That’s true, for example, of diamonds and paintings. Renowned art originals will always be scarce, and so will high-quality mined diamonds, at least while De Beers holds sway. But what will happen to the lofty prices of such goods if there is an inexhaustible supply of inexpensive perfect copies? Economic reasoning can help answer this question. It can also shed light on how new technologies might alter traditional ways in which people demonstrate their wealth to others, or might change what society embraces as tokens of commitment and other gifts....Not even perfect replicas, however, will extinguish strong preferences for original paintings and mined diamonds. In the short run, price premiums for such goods are likely to persist, as collectors scramble for certificates of authenticity.

Longer term, those premiums may prove fragile
...Tumbling prices will transform many longstanding social customs. An engagement diamond, for instance, will lose its power as a token of commitment once flawless two-carat stones can be had for only $25.

Replication technologies also raise philosophical questions about where value resides.
...Technology won’t eliminate our need for suitable gifts and tokens of commitment, of course. And such things will still need to be both intrinsically pleasing and genuinely scarce. But technology will change where those qualities reside.
art  De_Beers  collectibles  artifacts  collectors  authenticity  inexpensive  replication  scarcity  valuations  digital_artifacts  high-quality 
april 2014 by jerryking
RARE EARTH ELEMENTS SET TO BECOME RARER
RARE EARTH ELEMENTS SET TO BECOME RARER

China's exports of rare earth elements fell 9.3 per cent in 2010, deepening fears among Western governments of a coming shortage of the highly sought-after metals. China produces 97 per cent of the world's supply of rare earths.
rare_earth_metals  scarcity  China  Geoffrey_York  infographics 
october 2012 by jerryking
Ten Laws Of The Modern World
04.19.05 | Forbes | Rich Karlgaard.

• Gilder's Law: Winner's Waste. The futurist George Gilder wrote about this a few years ago in a Forbes publication. The best business models, he said, waste the era's cheapest resources in order to conserve the era's most expensive resources. When steam became cheaper than horses, the smartest businesses used steam and spared horses. Today the cheapest resources are computer power and bandwidth. Both are getting cheaper by the year (at the pace of Moore's Law). Google (nasdaq: GOOG - news - people ) is a successful business because it wastes computer power--it has some 120,000 servers powering its search engine--while it conserves its dearest resource, people. Google has fewer than 3,500 employees, yet it generates $5 billion in (current run rate) sales.

• Ricardo's Law. The more transparent an economy becomes, the more David Ricardo's 19th-century law of comparative advantage rules the day. Then came the commercial Internet, the greatest window into comparative advantage ever invented. Which means if your firm's price-value proposition is lousy, too bad. The world knows.

• Wriston's Law. This is named after the late Walter Wriston, a giant of banking and finance. In his 1992 book, The Twilight of Sovereignty, Wriston predicted the rise of electronic networks and their chief effect. He said capital (meaning both money and ideas), when freed to travel at the speed of light, "will go where it is wanted, stay where it is well-treated...." By applying Wriston's Law of capital and talent flow, you can predict the fortunes of countries and companies.

• The Laffer Curve. In the 1970s the young economist Arthur Laffer proposed a wild idea. Cut taxes at the margin, on income and capital, and you'll get more tax revenue, not less. Laffer reasoned that lower taxes would beckon risk capital out of hiding. Businesses and people would become more productive. The pie would grow. Application of the Laffer Curve is why the United States boomed in the 1980s and 1990s, why India is rocking now and why eastern Europe will outperform western Europe.

• Drucker's Law. Odd as it seems, you will achieve the greatest results in business and career if you drop the word "achievement" from your vocabulary. Replace it with "contribution," says the great management guru Peter Drucker. Contribution puts the focus where it should be--on your customers, employees and shareholders.

• Ogilvy's Law. David Ogilvy gets my vote as the greatest advertising mind of the 20th century. The founder of Ogilvy & Mather--now part of WPP (nasdaq: WPPGY - news - people )--left a rich legacy of ideas in his books, my favorite being Ogilvy on Advertising. Ogilvy wrote that whenever someone was appointed to head an office of O&M, he would give the manager a Russian nesting doll. These dolls open in the middle to reveal a smaller doll, which opens in the middle to reveal a yet smaller doll...and so on. Inside the smallest doll would be a note from Ogilvy. It read: "If each of us hires people who are smaller than we are, we shall become a company of dwarfs. But if each of us hires people who are bigger than we are, we shall become a company of giants." Ogilvy knew in the 1950s that people make or break businesses. It was true then; it's truer today.
Rich_Karlgaard  matryoshka_dolls  Moore's_Law  Metcalfe's_Law  Peter_Drucker  Ogilvy_&_Mather  Gilder's_Law  hiring  talent  advertising_agencies  transparency  value_propositions  capital_flows  talent_flows  David_Ogilvy  inexpensive  waste  abundance  scarcity  constraints  George_Gilder 
june 2012 by jerryking
Take the Subway - NYTimes.com
March 3, 2012 | NYT | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN.

Two recent, smart books. The first is called “The Sixth Wave: How to Succeed in a Resource Limited World,” by James Bradfield Moody and Bianca Nogrady. Moody, who works at Australia’s national research agency, and Nogrady, a science journalist, argue that, since the industrial revolution, we’ve seen five long waves of innovation — from water power to steam to electrification to mass production and right up to information and communications technologies. They argue the sixth wave will be resource efficiency — because rising populations, with growing appetites, will lead to both increasing scarcity of resources and dangerously high pollution, waste and climate change.

This will force us to decouple consumption from economic growth.

Amory Lovins, the physicist who is chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute, begins in his new book, “Reinventing Fire: Bold Business Solutions for the New Energy Era,” which is summarized in the current Foreign Affairs. The Rocky Mountain Institute and its business collaborators show how private enterprise — motivated by profit, supported by smart policy — can lead America off both oil and coal by 2050, saving $5 trillion, through innovation emphasizing design and strategy.

“You don’t have to believe in climate change to solve it,” says Lovins. “Everything we do to raise energy efficiency will make money, improve security and health, and stabilize climate.”
Tom_Friedman  climate_change  Moscow  books  Amory_Lovins  energy_efficiency  physicists  sustainability  pollution  scarcity  constraints  waste  resource_efficiency 
march 2012 by jerryking
BETTER THAN FREE
[2.5.08] | EDGE | By Kevin Kelly.

This super-distribution system has become the foundation of our economy and wealth. The instant reduplication of data, ideas, and media underpins all the major economic sectors in our economy, particularly those involved with exports — that is, those industries where the US has a competitive advantage. Our wealth sits upon a very large device that copies promiscuously and constantly....how does one make money selling free copies?

I have an answer. The simplest way I can put it is thus:

When copies are super abundant, they become worthless.
When copies are super abundant, stuff which can't be copied becomes scarce and valuable. When copies are free, you need to sell things which can not be copied. What can't be copied?
(1) "Trust." Trust cannot be copied. You can't purchase it. Trust must be earned, over time. It cannot be downloaded. Or faked. Or counterfeited (at least for long).
(2) Immediacy
(3) Personalization
(4) Interpretation — As the old joke goes: software, free. The manual, $10,000.
(5) Authenticity — You might be able to grab a key software application for free, but even if you don't need a manual, you might like to be sure it is bug free, reliable, and warranted. You'll pay for authenticity.
(6) Accessibility — Ownership often sucks. You have to keep your things tidy, up-to-date, and in the case of digital material, backed up. And in this mobile world, you have to carry it along with you. Many people, me included, will be happy to have others tend our "possessions" by subscribing to them. We'll pay Acme Digital Warehouse to serve us any musical tune in the world, when and where we want it, as well as any movie, photo (ours or other photographers).
(7) Embodiment — At its core the digital copy is without a body. You can take a free copy of a work and throw it on a screen. But perhaps you'd like to see it in hi-res on a huge screen? Maybe in 3D? PDFs are fine, but sometimes it is delicious to have the same words printed on bright white cottony paper, bound in leather.
(8) Patronage — It is my belief that audiences WANT to pay creators. Fans like to reward artists, musicians, authors and the like with the tokens of their appreciation, because it allows them to connect. But they will only pay if it is very easy to do, a reasonable amount, and they feel certain the money will directly benefit the creators.
(9)Findability — findability is an asset that occurs at a higher level in the aggregate of many works. A zero price does not help direct attention to a work, and in fact may sometimes hinder it. But no matter what its price, a work has no value unless it is seen; unfound masterpieces are worthless. — being found is valuable.
network_effects  free  Kevin_Kelly  value_creation  digital_economy  immediacy  scarcity  personalization  abundance  findability  patronage  embodiment  accessibility  authenticity  interpretation  replication  Information_Rules  value_added  superfans  SaaS  ownership 
november 2011 by jerryking
Jenkins: Wi-Fi and the Mobile Meltdown - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 18, 2011, 7:00 P.M. ET

Wi-Fi and the Mobile Meltdown
Hotspots may be the workaround for the spectrum 'shortage.'

...the biggest deliverer of data to smart phones and related devices isn't any of the wireless carriers. It's Wi-Fi, which accounts for 33% compared to 8% for AT&T and 18% for Verizon.

Hmm.

Look at your AT&T iPhone in Manhattan. You're getting four bars and yet broadband is agonizingly slow because too many users are trying to jam bits through at the same time. Look again. Five, 10, 20 or more Wi-Fi networks are also in range of your device. Altogether, within the radius of a single cell tower might be dozens or hundreds of Wi-Fi transceivers.

Hmm.

Virtually every mobile device today comes with Wi-Fi capability. The first iPad was Wi-Fi only. Amazon's new Kindle Fire tablet will, at least in the first installment, be a Wi-Fi-only device.

Hmm.
By HOLMAN W. JENKINS, JR.
Wi-Fi  mobile  wireless_spectrum  scarcity  Holman_Jenkins  hotspots 
october 2011 by jerryking
The Unexamined Society - NYTimes.com
By DAVID BROOKS
July 7, 2011

Eldar Shafir of Princeton and Sendhil Mullainathan of Harvard have a
book coming out next year, exploring how scarcity — whether of time,
money or calories (while dieting) — affects your psychology, how it
produces its own cognitive traits. It is a 3rd theory alongside two
more traditional understandings of poverty: The first presumes people
are rational. They are pursuing their goals effectively and don’t need
much help in changing their behavior. The second presumes that the poor
are afflicted by cultural or psychological dysfunctions that sometimes
lead them to behave in shortsighted ways. Neither of these traditional
theories has produced much in the way of effective policies.
David_Brooks  scarcity  psychology  decision_making  books  constraints  policymaking 
july 2011 by jerryking
Plans to export water, though unpopular, keep springing up
Mar. 30, 2011 | Globe and Mail | RENATA D’ALIESIO. In Canada,
MPs of all political stripes are in no mood to entertain water exports.
Mr. Chrétien’s call for a debate was essentially rejected by the NDP,
the federal Conservative government, and the party he led for nearly 13
years, the Liberals. All said they oppose large water exports.

“The vast, vast majority of Canadians are against the idea of exporting
our water in bulk,” said Quebec Liberal MP Francis Scarpaleggia, noting
most of the nation’s renewable water flows north, away from large
population centres. “It could cause irreparable damage to ecosystems.
Moving water around brings invasive species from one basin into
another.”

Mr. Scarpaleggia, the party’s water critic, said Canada should instead
look to export its scientific and technological expertise to developing
countries coping with water scarcity – a growing problem in many regions
of the world, particularly the Middle East and North Africa.
water  exporting  scarcity  Jean_Chrétien 
april 2011 by jerryking
The Dangerous Miscalculation of 'Scarcity Drives Innovation'
March 31, 2011 | BNET | By Sean Silverthorne.

If you want to be an innovative company, don't do it by cutting off resources in the hopes that it will inspire people to be more creative.

"This artificial scarcity can make people creative all right, but it makes them creative at finding resources, not at solving the central problem or inventing the next big thing," warns Teresa Amabile, a Harvard Business School professor who is an expert on creativity.

No, the real mother of invention is constraint. Hand a person a blank piece of paper, and they freeze about what to do next. But if the paper has a squiggle on it, they have a place to start.

For companies who want to be more innovative this means handing your bright people an idea with boundaries, Amabile says.

"Creativity-friendly constraints include: (1) a clear problem definition with clear goals, like the specific challenges of online innovation competitions, or the Iron Chef 'secret ingredient' constraints; and (2) a truly urgent, challenging need, like bringing the Apollo 13 astronauts safely back to earth."
scarcity  constraints  innovation  creativity  miscalculations  problem_framing  resourcefulness  problem_definition  urgency  life_and_death 
april 2011 by jerryking
Water's Scarcity Spells Opportunity for Entrepreneurs - NYTimes.com
By ERICA GIES
March 21, 2011
2030 Water Resources Group = an association of the World Bank, major
industrial water users and the consulting firm McKinsey.
Hydrovolts, a start-up company in Seattle, has developed a portable
turbine that generates energy from water flowing in irrigation canals.
BlackGold Biofuels, from Philadelphia, takes fats, oils and grease out
of wastewater to create biodiesel. WaterSmart Software = software helps
residential users track their consumption to save water and money.
Imagine H2O competition
the Artemis Project, a specialist consulting practice based in San
Francisco
water  scarcity  start_ups  XPV  venture_capital  vc  entrepreneur  water_footprints  fats  wastewater-treatment  contests  GE  Veolia 
march 2011 by jerryking
20 Small Businesses of the Future: Water Trader - BusinessWeek
Water Trader
The Idea: Water becoming scarce

Stage: Bottled water already a billion-dollar business

It has been said that water is the oil of the 21st century. But humans
don't need to drink a liter or two of oil every day. Early signs of
coming conflicts over water are already apparent around the world and in
the U.S., where the Southwest is ever-thirsty. Dickson Despommier, a
professor of microbiology at Columbia University, says water issues are a
coming tidal wave, especially considering the amount of water needed
for agriculture. "People will actually make a choice: I could drink this
water, or I could let my plants drink this water," Despommier says.
"It's going to be the subject of conflicts and wars."
small_business  water  scarcity  commodities  traders 
november 2010 by jerryking
Water Shortages: How to Prevent Them - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 18, 2010 \By MICHAEL TOTTY. Software that can spot
leaks, improved recycling—and other innovations to keep things flowing
water  desalination  recycling  wastewater-treatment  scarcity  shortages 
october 2010 by jerryking
What is Scarce in Advocacy and Campaigns?
August 28, 2007 | NetCentric Advocacy | Ways for Campaigns
to be unique and offer something scarce... (things you have that others
don't in a mass marketing world)...

1. Real stories.
2. Genuine passion.
3. A base of real people that care about the issue.
4. Staff that have insights on the science, politics, policies and
dynamics at play that keep an issue form being solved.
5. The ability to convene people that care.
6. Clarity and purpose in a world of shallow consumerism
7. No need to make money while solving a problem ( can do things that
solve problems and loose money by design)
8. you have fun working on an issue most people would burn out on.
9. maybe truth and science to support your claims.
10. faith and confidence in your work.
advocacy  authenticity  campaigns  cause_marketing  passions  public_relations  scarcity  storytelling 
october 2010 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: The Scarcity Shortage
Aug. 27, 2007 | Seth Godin.

Scarcity has a lot to do with value. Scarcity is the cornerstone of our economy. The best way to make a profit is by trading in something that's scarce.

How to deal with the shortage of scarcity? Well, the worst strategy is whining--about copyright laws/fair trade/how hard you've worked. etc. Start by acknowledging that most of the profit from your business is going to disappear soon. Unless you have a significant cost adv. (e.g. Amazon's or Wal-Mart's), someone with nothing to lose is going to offer a similar product for less $.....So what's scarce now? Respect. Honesty. Good judgment. L.T. relationships that lead to trust. None of these things guarantee loyalty in the face of cut-rate competition, though. So I'll add: an insanely low-cost structure based on outsourcing everything except your company's insight into what your customers really want to buy. If the work is boring, let someone else do it, faster & cheaper than you ever could. If your products are boring, kill them before your competition does. Ultimately,
what's scarce is that kind of courage--which is exactly what you can
bring to the market.
scarcity  Seth_Godin  customer_loyalty  respect  judgment  honesty  whining  trustworthiness  inspiration  entrepreneurship  proprietary  cost-structure  relationships  kill_rates  courage  customer_insights  insights  competitive_advantage  low-cost 
october 2010 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: Seek scarcity
October 01, 2010 | Seth Godin.

If you're managing a project, figure out what the scarce resource is
(it's not usually money). Climbing Everest? It's warmth and weight you
care about, not how much the sleeping bag costs.

If you're creating a business, figure out what contribution you make and
what you offer that your competitors can't. If 1,000 people can provide
typing services the way you do, don't expect to get paid a premium.

Scarcity creates value.
Seth_Godin  scarcity 
october 2010 by jerryking
Managing Water as Scarcity Looms - WSJ.com
SEPT. 27, 2010 | WSJ | By GERALDINE AMIEL. Suez
Environnement's CEO Taps Opportunities Amid Escalating Global Shortages;
a Particular Thirst for China. As the world's population grows and
migrates to cities, water shortages are happening in places where
scarcity was unthinkable only 5 yrs ago, such as the Spanish coast,...
London,--is described by the U.K. Environment Agency as "seriously water
stressed." And in March 2009, a report by the WEF said the lack of
water would "soon tear into various parts of the global economic system"
and "start to emerge as a headline geopolitical issue."...``on the U.S.
East Coast, "people are used to having water—they don't think further,
they don't think about future generations." Mr. Chaussade prefers
thinking for the long term. His main hobby is planting trees in his
garden and watching them grow, imagining what people will think of them
in 100 yrs. "The garden must be beautiful when you create it,--It must
remain so when you're gone."
water  scarcity  China  Suez  Veolia  CEOs  smart_grid  desalination  imagination  wastewater-treatment  sensors  HBS  gardening  long-term  far-sightedness  unthinkable  geopolitics 
september 2010 by jerryking
Scarcity, Fountain of Innovation - The CSR Blog - corporate social responsibility
Sep. 16 2010 | Forbes | Posted by Gregory Unruh. "Panel members
came at scarcity from diverse disciplines.(e.g. perspective of
environmental sustainability), where scarcity has been a polemic since
at least the 18th century....Talk of resources scarcity, tends to focus
on energy and material constraints, but that’s only ½ of the story
because it overlooks a 3rd important resource: human
creativity (jk: human ingenuity)...Scarcity is relative. And the mere act of perceiving
scarcity changes the game...Great designers understand this. Charles
Eames says design is all about innovating around constraints. And it’s
the constraints – the scarcity – that fires the designer’s
creativity...Nature is the ultimate example of leveraging the power of
self-imposed constraints. 95% of every living thing is made out of just 4
elements: C, H, O2 and N. Scarcity of design options has not limited
nature’s creativity. There are tens of millions of diverse species and
even more miraculous functions.
constraints  creativity  design  DNA  evolution  human_ingenuity  innovation  nature  self-imposed  scarcity 
september 2010 by jerryking
Op-Ed Contributor - Drowning Today, Parched Tomorrow
August 15, 2010 | - NYTimes.com | By STEVEN SOLOMON. HARD
as it may be to believe when you see the images of the monsoon floods
that are now devastating Pakistan, the country is actually on the verge
of a critical shortage of fresh water. And water scarcity is not only a
worry for Pakistan’s population — it is a threat to America’s national
security as well.

Given the rapid melting of the Himalayan glaciers that feed the Indus
River — a possible contributor to the current floods — and growing
tensions with upriver archenemy India about use of the river’s
tributaries, it’s unlikely that Pakistani food production will long keep
pace with the growing population.
water  scarcity  Pakistan  India  U.S.foreign_policy 
august 2010 by jerryking
Master Planner: Fred Brooks Shows How to Design Anything
July 28, 2010 | Wired Magazine | By Kevin Kelly who
interviews Fred Brooks who has written a new book, The Design of Design.
It’s a collection of essays that extends his ideas into the fields of
architecture, hardware systems, and leadership..Know Your
Scarcity.....Brooks: The critical thing about the design process is to
identify your scarcest resource. Despite what you may think, that very
often is not money. For example, in a NASA moon shot, money is abundant
but lightness is scarce; every ounce of weight requires tons of material
below. On the design of a beach vacation home, the limitation may be
your ocean-front footage. You have to make sure your whole team
understands what scarce resource you’re optimizing.
design  advice  books  failure  programming  creativity  scarcity  Kevin_Kelly  interviews  moonshots  constraints  NASA  optimization 
july 2010 by jerryking
Tweet to Lululemon: Smaller sizes, please
Jun. 11, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | by Marina Strauss
Retailing Reporter. Lululemon has wrestled with a problem that rivals
can only envy: not being able to keep up with heavy demand for its $100
hoodies and yoga pants. The immediate feedback of social media means the
company doesn't have to wait for customer data from the stores' cash
registers....Comments through social media about the chain running out
of women's size 4s and 6s, for example, are helping Lululemon CEO,
Christine Day, adjust her product purchasing to ensure she's in stock
of those sizes rather than forfeiting sales, as has happened in the
past. Identifying the high-demand products to carry for her “guests,” as
the company calls its customers, is crucial for the purveyor of premium
athletic wear...Still, part of Ms. Day's strategy is something she
calls a “scarcity model.” She doesn't want the stores to carry too many
size 4s and 6s, to keep customers coming back.
social_media  Lululemon  twitter  Marina_Strauss  high-demand  customer_feedback  apparel  speed  retailers  yoga  scarcity  customer_risk 
june 2010 by jerryking
Seth Godin on What it Takes to be a Linchpin [INTERVIEW]
Feb. 14, 2010 | Mashable | Interview of Seth Godin by Steve
Cunningham is the CEO of Polar Unlimited, a digital marketing agency.
In his book — Linchpin: Are You Indispensable? — Seth Godin poses a
challenge: Take your gift, whatever it is, and use it to change the
world. As Godin says, “a linchpin is the essential element, the person
who holds part of the operation together. Without the linchpin, the
thing falls apart.” "If I told you, step-by-step, what to do to become
indispensable, then anyone could do it. And if anyone could do it, it
wouldn’t be worth very much. Scarcity creates value. And, this is going
to frustrate people, but the emotional labor of work, today — the thing
that makes you worth $50,000 or $100,000 or $150,000 a year — is that
you can navigate the world without a map. People who need a map, are
going to get paid less and less and work harder and harder every day,
because there’s plenty of those people, and I can find them with a click
of the mouse."
Seth_Godin  indispensable  howto  entrepreneur  inspiration  scarcity  interviews  proprietary  sense-making  ambiguities  uncertainty  navigation  non-routine  uncharted_problems 
february 2010 by jerryking
Video - The Coming Currency Revolution
9/8/2009 | The Wall Street Journal | by Andy Jordan. A digital
currency for Microsoft Outlook? Social Networks? Jordan talks to
currency renegades tired of big-government centralized cash, and
desperate to make their own (legal) money systems. Currencies of
attention, trust, moments of authentic connection, reputation and
experience.
digital_currencies  currencies  virtual_currencies  P2P  scarcity  social_networking  video  metacurrencies 
september 2009 by jerryking
Climate change: Wake up to the value of water
April 17 2008 | Financial Times | By Fiona Harvey, Environment
Correspondent. For most companies in the developed world, water is not
much of a problem. Water bills are generally a tiny part of overheads,
and unless there is a drought or flood, companies can count on it
flowing from the tap. Companies with higher water uses – such as food
processors or computer chip makers – may pay more attention, but the
increasing scarcity of water around the world, which is being
exacerbated by global warming, is forcing a rethink. Embedded water,
also known as virtual or hidden water, is the water used in the
production of goods that is invisible to the end user.
water  climate_change  scarcity 
august 2009 by jerryking
Businesses face clean water scarcity risks
March 30 2008 | Financial Times | By Aline van Duyn. Companies
around the world face disruptions to their supply chains and other
risks from the growing scarcity of clean water, but assessing such
exposure is near-impossible due to the highly inadequate information
companies make available. Managing water supplies, has, of course also
generated large investment opportunities for investors and banks like
JPMorgan Chase. Around the world there have been privatisations of water
systems and investments in water supply infrastructure and waste water
treatment.
scarcity  risks  water  investing  privatization  supply_chains 
august 2009 by jerryking
Hal Varian on how the Web challenges managers
January 2009 | The McKinsey Quarterly | interview with Hal
Varian . We have to look at today’s economy and say, “What is it that’s
really scarce in the Internet economy?” And the answer is attention.
[Psychologist] Herb Simon recognized this many years ago. He said, “A
wealth of information creates a poverty of attention.” So being able to
capture someone’s attention at the right time is a very valuable asset.
And Google really has built an entire business around this, because
we’re capturing your attention when you’re doing a search for something
you’re interested in. That’s the ideal time to show you an advertisement
for a product that may be related or complimentary to what your search
is all about.
management  strategy  innovation  McKinsey  psychologists  attention_spans  Information_Rules  Google  Hal_Varian  digital_economy  scarcity  attention  intentionality  information_overload 
july 2009 by jerryking
The Role Of Abundance In Innovation | Techdirt
May 29th 2009 | Techdirt | by Mike Masnick

abundance, innovation, invention, patents

Permalink.
The Role Of Abundance In Innovation
from the it-increases-it... dept

A few weeks back, Dennis wrote about a recent Malcolm Gladwell article
in the New Yorker about innovation, but I was just shown another article
from the same issue, by Adam Gropnik, which may be even more
interesting. Gopnik points to evidence challenging the idea that
"necessity is the mother of invention," by noting that more innovation
seems to occur in times of abundance, rather than times of hardship. The idea is that in times of hardship you're just focused on getting through the day. You don't have time to experiment and try to improve things -- you make do with what you have. It's in times of plenty that people finally have time to mess around and experiment, invent and then innovate.
abundance  innovation  scarcity  patents  Mike_Masnick  inventions  constraints  hardships 
july 2009 by jerryking
Tech Is Too Cheap to Meter: It's Time to Manage for Abundance, Not Scarcity
Excerpted from Free: The Future of a Radical Price, copyright
©2009 Chris Anderson, to be published by Hyperion in July. Chris
Anderson (canderson@wired.com) is Wired's editor in chief.
Chris_Anderson  free  scarcity  abundance 
june 2009 by jerryking
Associations in the Age of the Long Tail - Associations Now Magazine - Publications and Resources - ASAE & The Center for Association Leadership
February 2006 | ASSOCIATIONS NOW | By: Jeff De Cagna and Jamie
Notter

Evidence for a new market theory is emerging. Dubbed the "long tail,"
the theory challenges the notion that one megahit with wide popular
appeal is more valuable than tons of other offerings with narrow appeal.
For associations, this means rethinking the very core of the business
model.
The_Long_Tail  associations  business_models  scarcity  abundance  CARP 
may 2009 by jerryking
FT.com / Companies / Energy - Water shortage promises times of plenty for private sector
April 4, 2007 Financial Times pg. 2, by Leslie Crawford in
Barcelona.

Opportunities for water -companies are booming around the world because
of looming shortages and decades of underinvestment, a conference in
Barcelona heard yesterday.
water  opportunities  infrastructure  scarcity  shortages  underinvestments 
march 2009 by jerryking
Is Water the Next Carbon? | Green Day | Fast Company
Mon Feb 9, 2009 FAST COMPANY blog post by Anya Kamenetz
depicting water as needing to be allocated among competing human needs
such as industries, agriculture, and cities. And the solutions have to
do with finding efficiencies and closing loops to achieve "water
neutrality"--when an enterprise returns the same amount of clean water
to the world as it uses.
scarcity  water  water_footprints  allocation  neutrality  Anya_Kamenetz 
february 2009 by jerryking
How Hard Times Can Drive Innovation - WSJ.com
Dec. 15, 2008 WSJ interview of Dr. Clayton Christensen by MIT/Sloan Management Review Senior editor Martha E. Mangelsdorf.
innovation  adversity  scarcity  tension  rethinking  disruption  Clayton_Christensen  hard_times 
february 2009 by jerryking
Yet Another 'Footprint' to Worry About: Water - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 17, 2009 WSJ article by ALEXANDRA ALTER on upsurge by companies to track their water footprints
water  scarcity  eco-friendly  climate_change  water_footprints  sustainability  shortages 
february 2009 by jerryking
The Art Fair Explosion and Its Fallout - WSJ.com
JUNE 4, 2008 WSJ By ALEXANDRA PEERS cautions on the
proliferation of art fairs when the volume of quality art has more or
less remained standard. A escalation in great amounts of wealth has
created collectors seeking assets to invest in.
scarcity  artists  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  Basel  debased  fine_arts 
february 2009 by jerryking
Scarcity
Seth Godin post on scarcity, customer loyalty.
Seth_Godin  scarcity  branding  customer_loyalty 
february 2009 by jerryking

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