jerryking + salesmanship   9

Boost your sales with tips from Warren Buffett
DECEMBER 18, 2012 | The Globe and Mail | by HARVEY SCHACHTER, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

How to Close a Deal Like Warren Buffett
By Tom Searcy and Henry DeVries
(McGraw-Hill, 217 pages, $24.95)

The authors recommend a process they call "the triples" that will help you make the case for your product or service:

Triple 1: The prospect's three problems

First, find out – and write down – the three biggest problems the prospect faces in the area your product or service can help. This aligns you with the buyer's interests.

Triple 2: Your three-part solution

Now think carefully about how you can solve each problem. As you write it out for the client, remember that generic language such as "improved," "better," and "big difference" are not that compelling. Use actual numbers and refer to specific pressure points to focus on the outcomes your prospect can expect.

Triple 3: Your three references

The third step is to identify at least three references you can share who have experienced similar outcomes when using your products and services. This may be sensitive, given confidentiality and competitive issues. But the authors stress: "The most effective way to get the attention of prospects is to drop the names of others just like them."

The authors urge you to become a student of psychology and develop profiles of members of the prospect's team. Try to determine each person's fears, since those qualms may send your pitch into the ditch. Determine each person's point of view about your solution, as well as any other personal trait or event that might be of importance. At the same time, study the team dynamics, from where people sit around the table to who they defer to.

The most dangerous person will be "the eel." The authors insist that "in every deal, and at every prospect's table, there is always an eel – a person who is against the deal. Always. Eels have a tendency to hang out in the shadows. They are hard to get to, and they usually talk you down when you're not around."

Usually eels are driven by fear that they don't want to acknowledge, so instead they insist they are against the deal on principle. They are dangerous, and must be identified early. Then you can try to co-opt them, taking the eel's ideas and baking them into your proposal.
Harvey_Schachter  deal-making  eels  Warren_Buffett  books  tips  salesmanship  pitches  think_threes  solutions  psychology  references  problems  obstacles  management_consulting  JCK  problem_solving  indispensable  enterprise_clients  aligned_interests 
august 2017 by jerryking
Do you know the value of what you’re selling? Many sales reps don’t - The Globe and Mail
TIBOR SHANTO
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Mar. 25, 2016

There are two questions I ask of sales people that confirm this. The first is “Why do people buy from you and your company?” The answers I get are not only underwhelming, but often indistinguishable from other companies in their sectors. The answers are generic and usually communicate the vendors’ own view of themselves, rather than that of the market. In most instances, if I took out the name of the company I am with, and put in the name of their least worthy competitor, the effect and accuracy of the statement changes little, if any. Which means that unworthy competitor can compete with you and deliver the same underwhelming experience at a lower cost.

This is even more pronounced when I ask: “Give me three specific value or positive business impacts you have delivered to your clients.” Instead of talking about how they were able to reduce delivery time by X, leading to a gain in revenue of Y, and reducing the cash sitting in inventory by Z, I hear a stream of beige, empty-calorie words.
value_propositions  sales  personal_branding  specificity  jargon  think_threes  salesmanship 
march 2016 by jerryking
Once the Foot Is In the Door, Be Sure to Leave it Open
??| WSJ | Thomas Petzinger Jr.

Even perfect products demand salesmanship--and when bargaining gets tough, be prepared to quit the talks and walk away.
negotiations  large_companies  software  Boeing  salesmanship  manufacturers  B2B  bargaining  automation  Thomas_Petzinger  reservation_prices 
february 2013 by jerryking
"Portrait of a perfect salesman."
3 May 2012| Financial Times | Philip Delves Broughton.

Tips for closing any deal

Know the odds

Most salespeople face far more rejection than acceptance. Knowing how many calls or meetings it takes to make each sale helps develop the positive attitude vital to succeed. After all, 99 rejections may be just the prelude to that triumphant yes.

Find a selling environment that suits you

Some people are great seducers, others dogged persuaders. Some like to make lots of sales each day, others prefer making one a year. Some enjoy high financial incentives, others thrive on the human relationships. Decide who you are first, then find a sales role that suits your personality type.

Be your customer's partner not their adversary

Great salespeople create value around products and services that they can convey and deliver to their customers. Paying attention and acting in the interests of your customer rather than yourself is very difficult. But as information about price and features becomes more widely available, service and relationships become the real value in each sale.
sales  selling  Philip_Delves_Broughton  Salesforce  character_traits  personality_types/traits  customer_centricity  ratios  partnerships  relationships  rejections  salesmanship  salespeople  success_rates  customer_focus  pay_attention  positive_thinking  solutions  solution-finders 
may 2012 by jerryking
Create a Software Demo Presentation That Wows Prospects: 5 Mistakes to Avoid | MarketingSherpa
6 Feb 2007 | Marketing Sherpa | by Peter Cohan

"Most demos take 20 minutes or 40 minutes or -- God help you -- longer to get to the point," says Peter Cohan, Founder and Principal of The Second Derivative, a company that helps organizations such as Ariba and Business Objects improve the success of their business software demos.

Whether you're creating a demo to teach your sales force about a new product or for their use in the field, most marketers fall into the pit of five worst practices that leave viewers snoring.

1. Presenting a linear demo from beginning to end
2. Failing to focus on customer needs
3. Showing feature after feature
4. The one-demo-fits-all practice
5. Death by corporate overview

So, how do you put together a demo that works? Here are some presentation notes from Cohan.
presentations  Communicating_&_Connecting  linearity  marketing  mistakes  one-size-fits-all  sales  salesmanship  salespeople  sales_presentations  William_Cohan 
january 2012 by jerryking
It's amazing where The Beatles sometimes turn up!
Apr 03, 2006 | GeorgeHarrison.com | HARVEY SCHACHTER
Presentations: Start with the customer, and end with your company
Most presentations and product demonstrations start with a corporate
overview of the company doing the selling. Instead, consultant Peter
Cohan tells MarketingSherpa you need to save the corporate overview for
the end and start with a powerful slide that captures the needs of the
buyer. The point is to say: "We understand the specific pain you are in,
and we can help you solve it." From there, move on to the actual result
if they buy your product -- the increased productivity or sales or
other benefit that will come from your services. Now you can take some
time to tell them the features of the product or service you are
offering, before ending with details on your company. He urges you to
leave 75 to 80 per cent of your presentation time for questions from the
prospects.
presentations  Communicating_&_Connecting  Harvey_Schachter  pitches  Beatles  services  salesmanship  sales  enterprise_clients 
april 2011 by jerryking
MARKETING: Selling by doing, not telling
20 Aug 2007| Globe and Mail Blog pg. B.5.| by Harvey Schachter.

MARKETING: SELLING BY DOING, NOT TELLING

If you're selling complex, intangible services, turn your next sales presentation into an action session where the client can sample what it is like to work with you. On RainToday.com, Charles Green tells of the firm that began its pitch session with: "We have 90 minutes with you. We can either do the march of a thousand slides, which we're happy to do, or we can get started now and begin to work with you. After 85 minutes we will stop, and you'll have first-hand experience of exactly how it feels to work with us." Buyers need a way to determine your expertise, and the best route is by offering them a sample rather than hearing you list your achievements.
presentations  execution  marketing  Harvey_Schachter  pitches  action-oriented  experiential_marketing  enterprise_clients  intangibles  services  sales  salesmanship 
march 2010 by jerryking

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