jerryking + repeatability   2

Why growth hacking is a foreign concept to many business owners - The Globe and Mail
MIA PEARSON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, May. 21 2015,

Quite simply, growth hacking is about focusing your energy in the right areas, being creative and using a combination of analytical thinking, social metrics and long-term thinking to power low-cost innovation....“The most successful businesses are always trying to find scalable and repeatable methods for growth, and their marketing strategies and tactics are rooted in data and technology,”...Use data analytics Markus Frind, CEO of PlentyOfFish and a speaker at Traction Conf, describes growth hacking for him as “applying data to marketing to achieve growth, via virality.”

Mr. Frind started his company in 2003 and grew it into one of the largest online dating sites in the world. With more than 100 million users and $100-million in revenue, he knows what he’s talking about. And luckily, Google Analytics is available to everyone.

For Mr. Frind, growth hacking boils down to a combination of “SEO, split-testing and understanding the virality of the users.” He believes understanding that made it “easy to see what was working and what wasn’t.”

By understanding where traffic is coming from and why people are seeking you out, you have a stronger understanding of your consumer – and you’re incredibly short-sighted if you don’t think your consumer defines your brand. This is a significant piece of the puzzle for growing a business.
analytics  customer_insights  effectiveness  growth_hacking  innovation  long-term  marketing  repeatability  SEO  short-sightedness  small_business  virality 
june 2015 by jerryking
Venture Capitalists Are Making Bigger Bets on Food Start-Ups - NYTimes.com
By JENNA WORTHAM and CLAIRE CAIN MILLER
Published: April 28, 2013

Yet some investors say the projects have a better chance of success if they steer clear of selling actual food. “The food category has been a hard nut to crack because it’s a perishable item,” said Mark Suster, an investor at GRP Partners. “The No. 1 thing V.C.’s are looking for are scalable and repeatable, high-margin businesses. You can create those in food, it’s just harder.”
Claire_Cain_Miller  venture_capital  vc  food  perishables  scaling  big_bets  repeatability  high-margin 
april 2013 by jerryking

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