jerryking + referrals   9

5 Powerful Habits of the Wealthiest Salespeople
August 25, 2017 | Entrepreneur Magazine | Marc Wayshak - GUEST WRITER.

1. They sell to the top.
Rich salespeople never waste their time with non-decision makers who don’t have the power or budget to invest in their solutions. .... meeting with a low-level prospect costs you money....If you want to achieve the income levels of truly rich salespeople, stop pitching to mid-level management and only sell to high-level prospects.

2. They make bigger sales, not more sales.
This is, in general, one of the biggest misconceptions about successful salespeople. Most people think that rich salespeople are closing more sales than their competitors, but that’s simply not true. Instead, they’re closing much bigger sales. In fact, top salespeople only go after massive sales at larger companies. Shift your focus to those big deals, and you’ll quickly find that while they take the same amount of work as an average sale, the payoff is exponentially higher.

3. They only focus on money-making tasks.
There are two types of tasks you do each day -- those that make money and those that do not. Rich salespeople are crystal clear on which tasks make money, and they only do those things. They outsource absolutely everything else, such as paperwork, order fulfillment and customer service. Top salespeople focus on prospecting, sales meetings, key customer meetings and the occasional ballgame with critical clients.

4. They know how to get leverage.
When most salespeople make a sale, they pat themselves on the back and go after the next opportunity. Rich salespeople, on the other hand, see today’s sale as a stepping stone to a much bigger opportunity tomorrow. Your new and existing customers can be powerful resources for new business. Rich salespeople understand this and rely heavily on personal introductions to valuable leads.

5. They prioritize outcomes over to-dos.
You probably have 25 to-dos to complete today -- and if you get through all of those tasks, you probably aren’t going to be any richer than you were when you woke up this morning. You also have some key outcomes that you’d like to achieve, such as developing new relationships with ideal prospects, closing large sales and renewing existing accounts. However, you keep letting to-dos you view as “urgent” distract you from those outcomes that matter most. Rich salespeople don’t make that mistake. Toss out your to-do list, and focus on the outcomes that make you money.
habits  salespeople  ksfs  referrals  focus 
august 2017 by jerryking
7 Closing Strategies to Double Your Average Sale Size
August 11 | Entrepreneur Magazine | Marc Wayshak - GUEST WRITER
Your success depends on closing bigger, better deals. Put your time and energy into prospects with the power to make large investments and introduce you to others who can do the same.

1. Get over your fear.
Many salespeople are simply too scared to sell to huge companies...... large companies face the same problems as your small customers do, just on a bigger scale. This means they need a bigger version of your solution -- and they have the budget to match. Get over your fear.

2. Stand apart from the crowd.
High-level prospects hear from an average of 10 salespeople every day. If you do what everyone else is doing, you’ll never get through to them or earn their trust. To double your average sales size, you must be intentional about standing apart from the crowd in your industry. While others pitch, you should ask questions. While others are enthusiastic, you should be low-key and genuine. While your competitors focus on their products, you should focus on your prospect’s deepest frustrations and show how you can solve them.

3. Stop selling to low-level prospects.
Selling low-level prospects harms your close rate and decreasing your average sale size. Low-level prospects simply don’t have the power or budget to tell you “yes." They’re not the decision-makers. If you want to increase the size of your sales, stop selling to prospects who lack the budget to invest in your solution.

4. Sell to decision-makers.
It’s a best practice to head straight to the top of the food chain and sell to directors, vice presidents, and C-level executives. They have the power and budget to say “yes” to your offer. If someone refers you back down the chain, you’re still landing an introduction to the right person -- by his or her boss, no less.

5. Stop cold-calling.
Cold calls are miserable. Try implementing a sales-prospecting campaign. Plan your calls, letters and emails as follow-ups to a valuable letter or package you send via FedEx. This could be a special report, unique sample or company analysis. These intentional, repeated touches over a series of months will set you up as a familiar name by the time you actually get your prospect on the phone. When a huge sale is on the line, you can afford to invest time and money to catch a single prospect’s attention.

6. Know the decision-making process.
If you’ve closed only small deals at small companies in the past, you might be accustomed to working with just one or two decision-makers at a time. In large corporations, the decision-making process can be much more complicated. One of the biggest mistakes salespeople make is failing to understand the decision-making process. Get a grasp of this early on, and you can stay in front of the right people, build value for them and close your sales at higher prices.

7. Leverage sales for introductions.
When you close one large sale at a big organization, don’t stop there. Ask new customers for introductions to others in their company or network who could benefit from your offering. You have nothing to lose by asking for introductions, but failure to do so will cost you massive opportunity and revenue.
Gulliver_strategies  sales  fear  large_companies  differentiation  sales_cycle  buyer_choice_rejection  cold_calling  referrals  prospects  JCK  executive_management  campaigns  Aimia  LBMA  strategic_thinking  close_rate  questions  thinking_big  enterprise_clients  C-suite  low-key  authenticity  doubling  the_right_people 
august 2017 by jerryking
Informed Patient? Don’t Bet On It
MARCH 1, 2017 | The New York Times | By MIKKAEL A. SEKERES, M.D. and TIMOTHY D. GILLIGAN, M.D.

■ Ask us to use common words and terms. If your doctor says that you’ll end up with a “simple iliac ileal conduit” or a “urostomy,” feel free to say “I don’t understand those words. Can you explain what that means?”

■ Summarize back what you heard. “So I should split my birth control pills in half and take half myself and give the other half to my boyfriend?” That way, if you’ve misunderstood what we did a poor job of explaining, there will be a chance to straighten it out: “No, that’s not right. You should take the whole pill yourself.”

■ Request written materials, or even pictures or videos. We all learn in different ways and at different paces, and “hard copies” of information that you can take time to absorb at home may be more helpful than the few minutes in our offices.

■ Ask for best-case, worst-case, and most likely scenarios, along with the chance of each one occurring.

■ Ask if you can talk to someone who has undergone the surgery, or received the chemotherapy. That person will have a different kind of understanding of what the experience was like than we do.

■ Explore alternative treatment options, along with the advantages and disadvantages of each. “If I saw 10 different experts in my condition, how many would recommend the same treatment you are recommending?”
■ Take notes, and bring someone else to your appointments to be your advocate, ask the questions you may be reluctant to, and be your “accessory brain,” to help process the information we are trying to convey.
Communicating_&_Connecting  clarity  doctor's_visits  questions  mens'_health  learning_journeys  medical  probabilities  plain_English  referrals  note_taking  appointments  advocacy  worst-case  best-case  medical_communication 
march 2017 by jerryking
6 Things I'd Do If I Got Laid-off By IBM
Jan 26, 2015 | LinkedIn | J.T. O'Donnell

4) Become 100% clear on your specialty. Employers hire the aspirin to their pain. While you might be a diversely skilled, jack-of-all-trades, you can't market yourself that way. Saying you can do everything sounds unfocused and desperate. You need to know what your special problem-solving, pain-relieving expertise is (i.e. your special sauce). Then, you need to market it accordingly.

5) Optimize your sales tools for your business-of-one. Your resume and LinkedIn profile must be set up to showcase your specialty quickly - and with as much impact as possible. Keyword optimization is vital. Knowing what recruiters are looking for when it comes to your skill set and showcasing it in the proper format will dramatically increase the amount of activity you get on your candidacy. [Here's an article to help you understand how little time your resume has to get a recruiter's attention.]

6) Create an interview bucket list. The fastest way to find job opportunities is to build a bucket list of companies you want to work for and network your way into the process. The majority of jobs gotten today are done so via referral. Creating a target list of employers and working a strategy to build relationships with them is the smartest way to land a job with a company you admire and respect. Especially, when you may be competing against lots of other ex-IBM employees for positions. [Here's a step-by-step plan on how to create your own bucket list of employers.]
IBM  layoffs  tips  LinkedIn  bouncing_back  Managing_Your_Career  job_search  painkillers  pain_points  JCK  specialists  special_sauce  résumés  personal_branding  referrals  unfocused 
january 2015 by jerryking
The Manager - The Globe and Mail
Postscript

Charlotte Beers, former CEO of Ogilvy & Mather, provides a blueprint for women who are seeking leadership positions in I’d Rather Be in Charge (Vanguard Press, 242 pages, $29.00).

If you serve on the board of a not-for-profit organization, you might find some guidance from the third edition of The Nonprofit Board Answer Book (Jossey Bass, 363 pages, $51.95), put together by BoardSource, which works to provide excellence in such boards.

Illinois-based consultant Matt Anderson has built his business through referrals; he shares his advice in Fearless Referrals (McGraw-Hill, 232 pages, $21.95).
books  Harvey_Schachter  blueprints  Charlotte_Beers  Ogilvy_&_Mather  nonprofit  boards_&_directors_&_governance  referrals 
march 2012 by jerryking
HIRE LEARNING
22 Nov. 2006 | Report on Small Business | by Ken Hunt.

Finding the best people for the job takes time, money and focus.

(1) Know what you're looking for
(2) Consider how a new hire will fit into your company culture.
(3) Don't wait until you're desperate to hire.
(4)Use structured interviews.
(5) Ask behaviour-based questions.
(6) Get referrals.
(7) Check references and qualifications.
hiring  talent_management  interviews  personality_types/traits  small_business  referrals  reference-checking  references  cross-checking 
december 2011 by jerryking
Ten ways to become a tenacious marketer -
Sep. 16, 2011 | G & M | RYAN CALIGIURI.

Here are 10 ways to become a more tenacious marketer:
(1) Test and benchmark. test different strategies and gauge what works best. One technique is called split testing.
(2) Always have a strategy. A strategy pts. you in the right direction & ensures your actions build to something.
(3) Always be on the lookout for revenue-generating opportunities.
(4) Be direct-response driven
(5) Get personal
(6) Get more out of a website.
(7) Deliver more value
(8) Show commitment
(9) Be driven by referrals
(10) Focus on the most likely buyers
direct-response  marketing  tips  experimentation  benchmarking  trial_&_error  strategy  commitments  opportunistic  websites  referrals  JCK  growth_hacking  Ryan_Caligiuri  strategic_thinking  tenacity  revenue_generation  overdeliver 
september 2011 by jerryking
Why Networking Isn't About Achieving Personal Gain
2004 | Wall Street Journal | By Barbara Moses. Good networkers
extend their connections beyond their immediate professional boundaries.
They cultivate relationships with people who know how to get things
done... They enjoy bringing together interesting people and ideas, and
they are as proud of making things happen for others as they are of how
many people are listed in their personal organizers. Skilled networkers
don't view staying connected with others as networking, seeing it
instead as exchanging information. The best networkers rarely expect a
personal payoff...having benefited from their contacts' kindness and
help, they`re seeking opportunities to reciprocate and hope they'll do
the same...Adept networkers are huge information synthesizers who can
see connections that aren't obvious between people, things and ideas.
From the initial presenting issue, they can identify a higher idea the
other person might not have seen and make creative referrals...they're
idea generators.
personal_connections  Barbara_Moses  connecting_the_dots  networking  tips  serving_others  Communicating_&_Connecting  idea_generation  ideas  non-obvious  latent  hidden  information_synthesis  referrals  value_added  packaging  personal_payoffs 
december 2010 by jerryking
Straying From Tradition to Generate Solid Leads - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 10, 2010 | WSJ | Mike Michalowicz. One shortcut to
getting solid referrals from clients is a process I call "fast-flow
prospecting." It starts with simply asking, "Would you mind referring me
to your other top vendors so that we can explore ways to serve you
better?" You might get a raised eyebrow, but your clients will almost
always say yes. It's a no-brainer for your client because you're not
asking them to hook you up with new leads; you're simply asking them to
help you, help them....Because you are working with other vendors to
create a better service protocol for mutual clients and prospects, this
lead-generation strategy will result in the best of referrals. Not only
will you land more clients, but you'll also build strong client
relationships that lead to other vendor referrals, and so on.
lead_generation  prospecting  referrals  running_a_business  shortcuts  protocols  business_development 
november 2010 by jerryking

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