jerryking + pull-ups   14

As I enter middle age, these are the fitness lessons I wish I could teach my younger self
October 6, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by PAUL LANDINI.

Mistakes have been made. Efforts were wasted. Time was lost. If I could mentor my 20-year-old self, the first thing I would do is collect all of the tattered fitness and lifestyle magazines that would soon lead me astray and throw them all in the trash where they belong. Then, I would sit myself down and impart the following hard-earned knowledge.

* IT’S SUPPOSED TO BE FUN
Remember recess? Remember how much fun it was to be set loose upon the schoolyard after enduring hours of enforced sitting? ...Playground games such as double dutch, red rover and tag always appealed to me more than traditional sports, but as we age, society tells us to stop playing games, to get serious, to respect and follow the rules. The grown-up rules of physical fitness emphasize pain, suffering and drudgery over pleasure, joy and leisure. Exercise becomes a form of corporal punishment for simply existing; you can’t indulge in any of life’s rewards without having to pay the price on the treadmill the next day........The point here is that there is great happiness to be had in being active, you just have to find the right outlet. Powerlifting, CrossFit, kettlebell sport, parkour, gymnastics, cycling, swimming, dancing, walking, running, rowing, climbing – each of these activities has merit, each can deliver “results.” If your current workout is leaving you bored and listless, try something new. A whole world of movement possibilities awaits.

* START WITH STABILITY
Just like solving an algebra problem or landing a 747, the principles of getting in shape are governed by a specific order of operations. However, unlike the laws of mathematics and aerodynamics, the consequences for ignoring the rules of fitness aren’t as dire. The worst thing that will happen, outside of actually injuring yourself, is a complete lack of progress in reaching any of your goals.

There are variations on these steps, catchy turns of phrase that certain coaches will use to enhance their industry brand, but the gist is the same – first you enhance stability, then you build strength, then you apply that strength to some form of fast, explosive movement. The logic of this continuum is evident – you can’t be fast without being strong, and you can’t be strong without first building a stable foundation. Of course, all of this was beyond me when I first started lifting, which is why I didn’t progress for a long time.

The fitness industry sells itself by using exciting images of muscular people doing cool things – Kettlebell swings! Box jumps! Deadlifts! – the implicit message being: This could be you......know planks and push-ups are boring, but you must master your body first. Then, and only then, are you ready to increase resistance.

* YOU DON’T NEED BARBELLS
This is a corollary to the last two points, if not a summary of my fitness philosophy in general. Barbells are designed to support significant weight – hundreds upon hundreds of pounds – and in that respect, they do their job very well. Now, what about you. What are you wired to do?

If your answer is “move as much weight as humanly possible,” then stick with barbell training. It will serve you well for a time, as long as your technique and programming are sound, but eventually your body will break.......For everyone else, it’s time to think outside of the squat rack. If you’re walking into your workouts with anything less than a semi-reluctant enthusiasm, freeing yourself from the confines of barbells and benches can have a dramatic impact on your mindset. Think push-ups over bench press, pull-ups over pull-downs, sled pushes over squats. Actually, everyone should squat, you just don’t need to sling a barbell on your back to do so.
aging  CrossFit  exercise  fitness  lessons_learned  midlife  play  pull-ups  push-ups  squats  stability  strength_training 
12 days ago by jerryking
How to Get Bigger Biceps (TALLER & WIDER!) - YouTube
(1) Bend back the wrists. Use a single dumbbell.
(a) do reps so that the top of the dumbbell is always visible to you for the entire duration of the curl. Hold and squeeze at the top (use 'dead wrists').
(b) Never execute witht he curl bar in your fingers (you'll get golfer's elbow). Grip deep in our hands. Never stress your wrists.

(2) Chin-ups (no wrist curls) Bend back the wrists. Grip bar deep into the hand) Lift. Keep the tension on.

(3) High cable curl. Don't curl with your forearms. Use dead wrists. ll the work is to be done by the biceps.
AthleanX  biceps  chin-ups  pull-ups  strength_training 
9 weeks ago by jerryking
The 6 Best Lifts for NEW Muscle Growth (GUARANTEED!) - YouTube
(1) Deadlifts >>> (a) chest-supported row (T-Bar row); (b) Reverse dumbbell lunge or forward dumbbell lunge. Teaches you how to push hard through that forward leg to get all momentum of your body back up to a standing position. How to push with great force through your legs, one at a time, into the ground. Then go back to deadlifting with both feet.

(2) Squats >>> (value of the glutes when it comes to performing the squat. Don't half rep it. Activate the glutes to help with the bottom of the lift, but you have to get deep enough. A variation of the glute hamstring raise. Initiate the contraction by squeezing your butt cheeks together. Hip flextion.

(3) Overhead Press. Z press. Sit down on the ground, and overhead press from that position.

(4) Weighted Pull-ups. Work on stability of the shoulder blade.
AthleanX  breakthroughs  deadlifts  fitness  glutes  military_press  pull-ups  squats  strength_training 
may 2019 by jerryking
In defence of the pull-up and the push-up
April 15, 2019 | THE GLOBE AND MAIL | by PAUL LANDINI.

As we age, moving well-mobility-becomes increasingly important....calisthenics – along with developing strength and endurance, body-weight training has a built-in mobility element that’s missing from many barbell lifts. It’s an efficient and, a pair of upper-body exercises: the pull-up and the push-up, are ideal builders of strength.

Pull-ups
* Bring your chest to the bar (mental cue)
* Retract your scapular (mental cue)
Pulling exercises are the toughest part of body-weight training.....THE FIXES
The active hang is the bottom portion of a pull-up, and it’s great for strengthening the hands as well as developing a sense for the mechanics of pulling exercises. Grab an overhanging bar with your palms facing away, arms extended. From there, pull your shoulder blades down flat and squeeze them tight to your spine, then extend your legs forward, flattening the arch in your low back. Maintain tension throughout your body, working up to a 60-second hang.

The flex hang is the top portion of a pull-up. This variation places more emphasis on the arms and the upper back. It’s similar to the active hang, only your palms face in and your arms are flexed rather than extended so your chin is over the bar.

Push-ups
Forget about the bench press – for a well-built chest and powerful shoulders, push-ups deliver the goods.
THE PROBLEMS
You may not think of push-ups as being a core exercise, but if you think about it, the whole movement is basically an up-and-down plank. A stable core, mobile shoulder blades and healthy wrists are a must, not to mention strong triceps and shoulders.
bench_press  calisthenics  core_stability  exercise  functional_strength  pull-ups  push-ups  strength_training 
april 2019 by jerryking
Unlocking the secrets to military-grade fitness - The Globe and Mail
ALEX HUTCHINSON
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL

.A recent study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research reveals some telling clues about which physical abilities are the best predictors of success in the U.S. Army’s storied 75th Ranger Regiment – though such clues, military experts are quick to point out, don’t tell the whole story.

Would-be rangers have to complete a gruelling obstacle course called the Ranger Physical Assessment Test (RPAT) that involves climbing ropes, scaling walls, dragging an 84-kilogram sled, and running more than five kilometres, all while wearing combat boots and nearly 10 kilograms of body armour. They have to finish in less than 40 minutes to pass.

A test such as this requires full-body strength, power and endurance in various proportions. So how do you train for it?

A team of U.S. Army researchers combed through data from more than 1,000 recruits who completed this test between 2014 and 2017, looking to see if success or failure could be predicted from the baseline physical tests the recruits had previously completed – things such as deadlifts, push-ups, jumps and sprints.

All seven of the tests they analyzed were linked to RPAT success, but there were three in particular that had significant independent predictive power: broad jump (standing start and you have to stick the landing); pull-ups (overhand grip, straight body, locked elbows at the bottom each time); and average time in a pair of 300-yard shuttle runs (back and forth between two lines 25 yards apart, with two-minutes rest between runs).......“After pulling tens of thousands of pieces of hard data,” he says, “there was one that correlated in some statistically significant way to a higher likelihood of graduating from our basic special warfare training school: pull-ups.”
elite  exercise  fitness  pull-ups  strength_training  U.S._Special_Forces  functional_strength 
march 2019 by jerryking
6 GREATEST EXERCISES (Old School Edition!!) - YouTube
* Plug energy leaks in your pull-ups. Tighten core, tight legs, buttocks, point feet down and away from the chest down.
* Bench press--keep grips shoulder width, don't go out wide. Focus on adduction across the front of your body towards midline.
* Deadlifts--master the hip hinge. Bar and the knees.
* Barbell curl--cheat the rep on the start. When it gets to vertical, stop cheats. SLOW down the eccentric.
AthleanX  bench_press  biceps  deadlifts  military_press  pull-ups  squats  strength_training  old_school 
february 2019 by jerryking
Adopt a movement-based approach for optimized workouts - The Globe and Mail
MAY 25, 2017 | SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED | PAUL LANDINI

the four most common movement patterns: 1. pushing (vertical and horizontal), 2. pulling (vertical and horizontal), 3. squatting (knee-dominant) and 4. hinging (hip-dominant). Master these movements and you'll be able to execute just about any exercise that comes your way.

(1) Pushing

Main muscles: Pectorals (chest), deltoids (shoulders), triceps (back of arms).

Best exercises: Push-ups; landmine press; one-arm kettlebell press.
(2) Pulling
Main muscles: Latissimus dorsi (mid back), rhomboids (upper back), biceps (front of arms).

Best exercises: Pull-ups; inverted row; face pull

(3) Squatting

Main muscles: Quads (front of legs), glutes (butt), hamstrings (back of legs).

Best exercises: Goblet squat; split squat; reverse lunge.

(4) Hinging

Main muscles: Hamstrings, glutes, spinal erectors (low back).

Best exercises: Deadlift; Romanian deadlift; kettlebell swing
back_exercises  compound_movements  deadlifts  exercise  face-pulls  fitness  functional_strength  glutes  movement-based  pull-ups  push-ups  shoulder_exercises  squats  strength_training 
april 2018 by jerryking
Running Is the Worst Way to Get Fit - Tonic
Nick English

Nov 17 2016

Running is a crappy way to lose fat and an inferior way to boost cardiovascular health, but it's somehow become the most popular exercise on Earth after walking.....It's an incredibly inefficient way to build strength. And as we all know, a strong body is the number one way to prevent injuries, increase metabolism, burn fat, and stay mobile and functional in old age. Folks "do cardio" because they want to burn off their bellies. And running is a bad pick.

"That's usually what the mentality is, that it's a way to get leaner and lose weight, but doing other things outside of running will probably have a better effect at catalyzing that result," he says. Boyce's fat-loss prescription, like that of practically any trainer worth their salt, is compound strength exercises. That means multi-joint movements like the squat, deadlift, overhead press, chin-ups, pull-ups, and push-ups......Studies have consistently shown that weight training and sprinting are more effective than running at targeting belly fat and creating a good hormonal environment for fat loss, meaning better insulin sensitivity, less of the stress hormone cortisol, and more growth hormone and testosterone. ....exercising the heart at a higher intensity is a better way to get the job done. Studies have shown that shorter sessions of anaerobic training, like fast-paced resistance training or sprints, are just as good for heart health as long, drawn-out runs and better at maintaining muscle and increasing aerobic fitness (or VO2 max, if you want to be specific). ...."In many ways, sprinting is safer than running,"....you're going to have more of a fat loss effect from sprinting for the same reasons you get it from weights: You're doing things that require strength, explosiveness, exertion, and intensity, so your muscles are going to have to work a little bit harder, they're going to burn more calories, and you're going to be more metabolic after you finish your workout as well.".....
aerobic  cardiovascular  compound_movements  deadlifts  exercise  fast-paced  fat-burning  fitness  functional_strength  howto  interval_training  high-impact  high-intensity  injury_prevention  military_press  pull-ups  running  squats  strength_training 
april 2018 by jerryking
What's Your Workout: Killer Pull-Ups, Brutal Sprints and a Nap for Ski Champ Kikkan Randall - WSJ.com
May 14, 2012 | WSJ |By MATTHEW FUTTERMAN.

Kikkan Randall's regimen is a brutal, six- (sometimes seven) day-a-week mix of roller skiing, biking, running and strength training. Pull-ups are a fairly unpleasant experience for most humans, but the ones Ms. Randall does resemble a form of medieval torture. She straps on a belt with a chain dangling from it and attaches a 60-pound weight to it. Or she'll pull herself up with such power that she is able to clap her hands above the bar and then grab it to slowly lower herself. Eight is her record.

The Workout
Ms. Randall does two workouts each day.....distance varies depending on whether the team is working on endurance or speed. Speed work requires interval training, which can be multiple one-minute bursts of sprinting with little rest in between......After lunch and a nap, she works out on her own. Twice a week she does strength training at a local gym, though even that 90-minute session begins with a 30- to 60-minute run or roller ski. She says half of her exercises are weight-training focused on specific muscles, while the other half is focused on strengthening her core balance.

That's where the pull-up bar comes in. Ms. Randall will hang from the bar, bring her legs up into a pike position, then slowly lower them repeatedly. She'll do the same routine with weights strapped to her ankles. Then, keeping her ankles together and her legs raised, she'll swing legs back and forth in front of her face like windshield wipers. "Just as I start to get good at something, my trainer figures out something to add to make it harder," she says.
abdominals  exercise  fitness  interval_training  pull-ups  strength_training 
may 2012 by jerryking

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