jerryking + prolificacy   10

Why can’t we all be as productive as Picasso?
MARCH 28, 2018 | FT | Jo Ellison.

The year 1932 was a landmark moment for Picasso both personally and professionally. Having recently turned 50, the artist found himself feverishly experimenting with new styles and subjects as he reflected on his own contemporaneity and relevance. It was the year his marriage to Olga broke down, and the year in which a group of Paris dealers would mount his first ever retrospective.

Picasso’s “year of wonders” is obviously a cause for celebration — even if only for his astonishing output.
......As the New Yorker writer and critic Malcolm Gladwell so deftly pointed out in his 2008 book, Outliers, those who are blessed with the talent of a genius only become so after 10,000 hours of practice: the “magic number of greatness”. Debate has raged ever since as to the precise number at which the merely good become gifted, but Gladwell’s theory has always held a beguiling allure. If only I weren’t so appallingly lazy, I too might write a bestselling novel, or win a gold medal for figure skating, or fulfil my life-long dream of becoming a lead soprano in a West End musical. It’s always served as a peculiar comfort to know that the only obstacle to my success has been feckless indolence — and possibly the invention of the iPhone.

Which is why the Picasso exhibition was so grim. It wasn’t so much that he worked extremely hard to become the world’s most famous artist. Anyone could, technically, slave away in a studio for hours crafting their genius. It’s that he still found time to finesse such a gloriously well-rounded and fulsome life in the spaces he found in between.
Pablo_Picasso  Malcolm_Gladwell  artists  reflections  aging  genius  prolificacy  productivity  midlife  well-rounded  interstitial  personal_accomplishments  10000_hours 
april 2018 by jerryking
Dancing with Disruption - Mike Lipkin
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By Mike Lipkin
#1. Become someone who knows.....a secret is a formula or knowledge that is only known to a few. If you own a secret, you have the power to share it so you can turn the few into the many. Secrets are everywhere – hiding in plain sight. The difference between someone who knows and someone who doesn’t is the willingness to do the work, find the information, talk to the people and formulate one’s strategy. Be a source of joy and not a source of stress!! Disruption begins long before.....Mastering other people's emotions....Add in a way that thrills and delights others!! Prospective of Personal Mastery....industry connection + internal influence.
# 2. Have an audacious ambition. If you want to be a disruptor, you can be humble, but you can’t be modest. You have to dream big....dream bigger than anything that gets in its way.
#3. Be simultaneously analytical and creative. There may be a gap in the market, but is there a market in the gap? ...Disruption demands left and right brain firing together. Your intuition may alert you to the opportunity but it’s your intellect that builds your business case. That’s why you need wingmen or women to complement your capacity. Fly social not solo.
#4. Be prolific. The more you lose, the more you win. 1.0 is always imperfect. You will hear the word “no” hundreds of times more than the word “yes.” The best way to get ready is to do things before you’re ready. The best you can do is get it as right as you can the first time [i.e. "good enough"] and then get better, stronger, smarter. Disruptors try a lot more things than disruptees. They fail fast and they fail forward. [Practice: repeated performance or systematic exercise for the purpose of acquiring skill or proficiency.
#5. Communicate like magic. If you want to be a disruptor, you must be a great communicator. ... the right words generate oxytocin – the love hormone, whereas the wrong words generate cortisol, the stress hormone. .... tell your story in a way that opens people’s hearts, minds and wallets to you. Create a vocabulary.
#6. Be a talent magnet. Disruption demands the boldest and brightest partners....The best talent goes where it earns the highest return. Reputation is everything. [What would Mandela do?]
#7. Play like a champion today. Disruptors may not always play at their best but they play their best every day. They bring their A-Game no matter who they’re playing....you feel their intensity and passion. How hard are you hustling on any given day? Everything matters. There is no such thing as small. They’re all in, all the time.
disruption  personal_branding  uncertainty  hard_work  Pablo_Picasso  creativity  intuition  intensity  passions  talent  failure  partnerships  reputation  Communicating_&_Connecting  storytelling  thinking_big  expertise  inequality_of_information  knowledge_intensive  imperfections  audacity  special_sauce  prolificacy  affirmations  unshared_information  good_enough  pairs  Mike_Lipkin  CAIF 
april 2017 by jerryking
Righting Wrongs and Generating Attention for Art of the African Diaspora
OCT. 16, 2016 | The New York Times | By TED LOOS.

A profile of Pamela J. Joyner, a prolific art collector and supporter of artists of African descent..... Later, Ms. Joyner donated money to buy another Gilliam, “Whirlirama” (1970), and next year there are plans to exhibit both when the Met reinstalls its modern collection. “Pamela is such an informed champion of her artists,” Ms. Wagstaff said.

That trip to Washington was one of the many ways that Ms. Joyner, 58, exerts her power as an art-world influence behind the scenes. She has relinquished a successful business career to become what she calls a full-time “mission-driven” collector of a very specific niche: Abstract art by African-Americans and members of the global African diaspora. Now she leverages her relationships with the Met in New York, the Tate in London, the Art Institute in Chicago and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art to help these artists gain traction in the wider world.

“It’s no less ambitious than an effort to reframe art history,” said Ms. Joyner, who sees herself as righting a wrong. “First, to include more broadly those who have been overlooked — and, for those with visibility, to steward and contextualize those careers.”....“There was a keen sense in my household that you had to be prepared for whatever was going to happen,” Ms. Joyner said. “You needed these literacies, and cultural literacy was one of them.”
African-Americans  Diaspora  art  artists  collectors  museums  overlooked  philanthropy  leadership  patronage  high_net_worth  benefactors  cultural_literacy  women  marginalization  Pamela_Joyner  stewardship  reframing  mission-driven  champions  art_history  exclusion  prolificacy 
october 2016 by jerryking
Steve Golin: Hollywood’s Anonymous Power Player - WSJ
By JOHN JURGENSEN
Feb. 11, 2016

Anonymous Content also assembled the popular dramas “True Detective,” “The Knick” and “Mr. Robot,” which won a Golden Globe for best TV drama on the same night “The Revenant” dominated the film categories.

Though his company is just one hub in Hollywood’s sprawling machinery of financiers, talent agencies, production companies and distributors, Mr. Golin’s career mirrors the changes reshaping the industry......He turned elsewhere, five years ago, when he saw “House of Cards” sold to Netflix as a two-season package complete with movie stars and director David Fincher. He told his staff to double down on its then-slight television business. Anonymous expects to have 11 series on the air this year, including new shows on Netflix, Hulu and cable channels such as Starz. While a movie is usually a one-off for production fees and other revenue, TV shows can keep on giving over numerous seasons.

Anonymous is a rare example of a production company that moved into talent management.
Hollywood  films  movies  entrepreneur  entertainment  entertainment_industry  talent_representation  packaging  prolificacy 
february 2016 by jerryking
The world according to Tyler Cowen - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL POSNER

The Globe and Mail

Published Monday, Sep. 10 2012

50-year-old Tyler Cowen is a formidable presence on the American economic landscape. Chairman of Economics at George Mason University in Virginia, he is a prolific writer and editor and blogger; his Marginal Revolution – co-written with his Canadian colleague Alex Tabarrok – is among the best read blogs in the field. His last book,The Great Stagnation, was a bestseller. His next, he told Globe and Mail reporter Michael Posner in an interview, will explore what the path out of the great stagnation will look like.
economists  economic_downturn  books  economic_stagnation  the_Great_Decoupling  Tyler_Cowen  prolificacy 
september 2012 by jerryking
How to Build Your Network
December 2005 | HBR | Brian Uzzi and Shannon Dunlap.

Strong personal networks don't just happen at the watercooler. They have to be carefully constructed.Networks offer three unique advantages: private information, access to different skills and power. Leaders see the benefits of working every day, but perhaps not pause to examine how their networks are governed....Here's how to strengthen your connections.

Paul Revere was an information broker, a person who occupies a key role in a social network by connecting disparate groups of people....Networks determine which ideas become breakthroughs, which new drugs are prescribed, which farmers cultivate pest-resistant crops, and which R&D engineers makes the most high impact discoveries....When we make judgments, we use both public and private information. These days, public information is readily available from various sources, including the Internet, but precisely because it is so accessible, public information provides a competitive advantage much less than usual. Privacy, however, gathered from personal contacts that can offer something unique that can not be found in public spaces such as the release of a new product, the novel software code, or knowledge of this what a particular investigator seeks in candidates. Private information, therefore, may provide an advantage for executives, but is more subjective than public information, because it usually is not marked by an independent third party, such as Dun & Bradstreet. Therefore, the value of your private information to others and the value of your private information depends on how much confidence exists in the network of relationships....the best way to have a good idea is to have a lot of ideas....And when you trade information or skills with people whose experiences differ from your own, you provide one another with unique, exceptionally valuable resources....Power was repositioned in the network's information brokers, who could adapt to changes in the organization, develop clients, and synthesize opposing points of view.
These brokers weren't necessarily at the top of the hierarchy or experts in the field, but they linked specialists in the firm with trustworthy and informative ties.
networking  social_networking  social_capital  HBR  howto  networks  nonpublic  confidence  slight_edge  proprietary  relationships  exclusivity  public_information  private_information  inequality_of_information  homogeneity  heterogeneity  dual-consciousness  power_brokers  network_power  personal_chemistry  personal_connections  judgment  prolificacy  subjectivity  information_brokers  intentionality 
march 2012 by jerryking
China’s Race for Patents to Build an Innovation Economy
Jan 1, 2011 | NYT | STEVE LOHR. China is trying to build an
economy that relies on innovation rather than imitation & intends to
engineer a more innovative society. The Chinese are focusing on
spiking the indigenous generation of “utility-model patents,” which
typically cover items like engineering features in a product & are
less ambitious than “invention patents.” China intends to roughly
double: (a) its # of patent examiners, to 9,000, by 2015. (The U.S. has
6,300 examiners); & (b) the # of patents that its residents &
companies file in other countries. To lift its patent count, China has
introduced incentives including cash bonuses, better housing for
individual filers & tax breaks for companies that are prolific
patent producers...DESPITE China’s inevitable rise, Kao says, the U.S.
has a comp. adv. because it is the country most open to innovation,
forgiving failure, tolerating risk & embracing uncertainty,” “the
future lies in being the orchestrator of the innovation process,”
competitiveness_of_nations  John_Kao  China  patents  industrial_policies  innovation  innovation_policies  Steve_Lohr  taxonomy  Silicon_Valley  bounties  orchestration  incentives  risk-tolerance  prolificacy 
january 2011 by jerryking
The Unwisdom of Crowds
12/22/2008 | The Weekly Standard Vol. 014, Issue 14 | by
Christopher Caldwell. Financial panics still require what Walter
Bagehot prescribed--that practical men violate their own principles.
Common sense is often not much use in a financial panic. This was the
great discovery of Walter Bagehot, the prolific 19th-century essayist
and journalist, who was editor of the Economist from 1860 to 1877. (His
name rhymes with gadget.) in the so-called Anglo-Saxon world, Bagehot's
book still provides the bedrock of policy thinking during financial
emergencies, including our present one.
bailouts  banking  banks  capitalism  economics  economy  finance  financial_crises  financial_history  financial_journalism  panics  policymaking  politicaleconomy  prolificacy  Walter_Bagehot 
october 2009 by jerryking
Psychology Today: The Laws of Urban Energy
July/August 2007| Psychology Today | Anya Kamenetz
The world is flatter than ever. But while technology may give us each
the tools of creativity, it takes urban proximity and unpredictability
to sharpen them. One's mental garden buds, blooms, and proliferates when
cross-pollinated with the many other flowers and fruits crowding the
urban jungle. People come up with more and better ideas and produce more
results from those ideas by finding more collaborators as well as
critics.

By: Anya Kamenetz
cities  creativity  economics  urban  community  idea_flows  idea_generation  inspiration  cross-pollination  Anya_Kamenetz  playing_in_traffic  prolificacy  proximity  psychology  unpredictability  serendipity  collaboration  information_spillover  densification 
april 2009 by jerryking

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