jerryking + personal_finance   128

How the ultra-high-net-worth investor prepares for a recession
August 27, 2019 | - The Globe and Mail | by TARA DESCHAMPS, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

investment managers thinking more strategically about how to protect their clients’ wealth, which includes everything from traditional stocks and bonds to alternative assets such as real estate, private equity and debt.

Mr. Janson, who still has “deep, long scars” from the 2008 recession, which he spent in Switzerland as a portfolio manager, says his main advice for UHNW individuals is to diversify. By spreading assets around, investors have a better chance of softening the blow to their overall portfolio if one sector is hit harder than others.

“Too many Canadians have too many eggs in one or two baskets, usually stocks and bonds,” Mr. Janson says. “You should be thinking about all asset classes, whether that’s stocks, bonds, private equity, private debt, real estate debt, real estate equity, hedge funds and others.”

Mr. Janson also keeps an eye on real estate investments as an opportunity. Housing prices typically fall during a recession, and more homes hit the market when owners can no longer afford the mortgages or need to shore up cash.

If the UHNW want to be involved in real estate in a recession, Mr. Janson recommends they look for “defensive” pockets in the market.
asset_classes  diversification  high_net_worth  howto  personal_finance  precaution  preparation  recessions 
8 weeks ago by jerryking
Black Folk's Guide to Making Big Money in America
A primer on personal finance, business and real estate. It is truly comprehensive and a must read for anyone serious about improving their financial situation.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
First, Trower-Subira emphasizes the central importance of home ownership as a source of equity capital. He decried the usage of earned income and accumulated home equity to fuel (conspicuous) consumption binges. Trower-Subira got it right when he said that real estate should be the base asset for African Americans from which to build wealth. As long as you borrow against your home to acquire other, income producing assets, you are doing yourself a favor by pursuing homeownership.

Second, he stressed the importance of financial assets in building wealth. Trower-Subira puts forth a brilliant explanation of the types of assets that produce income and that African Americans in particular should endeavor to pursue (real estate is just one of several).

Third, Trower-Subira emphasizes the importance of continuing education combined with an asset-based approach to wealth building. Trower-Subira wrote in the context of his day, but now the game has shifted somewhat. That is not to say that the problems of his day are no more; indeed, many of the problems of his day still relentlessly follow the African American community, and in too many instances, the problem have actually gotten worse. Although we are presented with new opportunities, we also face new challenges- on top of the same old challenges that we have yet to vanquish.
'80s  advice  African-Americans  Amazon  books  business  home_ownership  mindsets  personal_finance  primers  real_estate  self-help  wealth_creation 
april 2019 by jerryking
Understanding Pensions
Defined contribution rather than defined benefit.

Defined Contribution



Defined Benefits
personal_finance  pensions  from notes
july 2018 by jerryking
Ten Lessons from Michael Batnick’s Book ‘Big Mistakes’ – Ivanhoff Capital
The best way for investors to learn from mistakes is to let others make them, then read about it

In his first book, Michael Batnick outlines the big investing and trading mistakes of some of the most successful investors and brightest minds that are known to humankind. Most mistakes revolve around the same themes:
– being overleveraged and building too big positions in assets that were illiquid or suddenly became illiquid;
– venturing outside of expert zone when having to manage a much bigger amount of capital;
– overconfidence and hubris;
– normal mistakes that cannot really be prevented; they are part of the investing process;
– fear of missing out.
lessons_learned  mistakes  investing  investors  overconfidence  books  book_reviews  personal_finance 
june 2018 by jerryking
The Psychology of Money · Collaborative Fund
“Investing is not the study of finance. It’s the study of how people behave with money… It helps, I’ve found, when making money decisions to constantly remind yourself that the purpose of investing is to maximize returns, not minimize boredom. Boring is perfectly fine. Boring is good. If you want to frame this as a strategy, remind yourself: opportunity lives where others aren’t, and others tend to stay away from what’s boring.......few things in money are as valuable as options. The ability to do what you want, when you want, with who you want, and why you want, has infinite ROI.”

The finance industry talks too much about what to do, and not enough about what happens in your head when you try to do it.

This report describes 20 flaws, biases, and causes of bad behavior I’ve seen pop up often when people deal with money.
biases  personal_finance  psychology  boring  optionality  investing 
june 2018 by jerryking
The trade war has arrived. Three things investors should consider doing right now - The Globe and Mail
JUNE 1, 2018 | THE GLOBE AND MAIL | GORDON PAPE.

As an investor, what should you do? Here are some suggestions.

Reduce exposure to Canada. We will fare far worse than the United States in a trade war, and growing uncertainty about the future will curtail capital investment. Apart from financial companies and the newly revived energy sector, there are few areas of the TSX that inspire confidence. One exception: Companies that do a lot of business in the U.S. and are not hit by the new tariffs.

Increase exposure to the U.S. Mr. Trump has proven he is no friend to Canada (or any other ally, for that matter). However, his policies have revitalized the U.S. economy, particularly with the corporate tax cut and the slashing of crippling regulations. Unemployment in the United States is below 4 per cent, the lowest in almost two decades, and the American stock market continues to hit new highs.

Raise cash. If the worst-case scenario unfolds, the world economy will eventually tank. At that point, you want to be in a position to take advantage of the bargains that will emerge, as they did in 2008.
crossborder  defensive_tactics  investors  personal_finance  trade_wars  worst-case 
june 2018 by jerryking
The joy of boring business ideas
April 11, 2018 | Financial Times | by JONATHAN MARGOLIS
Slippers, razors and even gas boilers offer ripe pickings for profit and disruption.

Simon Phelan and his online gas boiler installation company, Hometree, are “aiming to replicate the success of online estate agent Purplebricks in an equally large, albeit more boring market: boiler installations.”......Start-ups doing anything new, cute or plain off-the-wall often struggle. .....Boring may be the new interesting.......Mahabis, a carpet slippers start-up, has sold close to a million pairs of its £79 product....another boring domestic product, razors, have proved to be a lucrative market for what are essentially tech companies, such as Dollar Shave Club (bought by Unilever for $1bn) and Harry’s.....It is not just products: dull-sounding online services also seem to pay off. London start-up ClearScore, a millennial-focused fintech company which offers users free credit scoring and personal finance guides, sold to Experian last month for £275m, after just three years in business......Phelan is pursuing gas boilers, not because he was interested in them, but because he was looking for a way into the growing smart-home sector. He wants to build a slick way to modernise boiler installation, so that by the time newer, more eco-friendly home heating technologies become standard he will already have a loyal customer base. This is why Hometree has more in common with tech companies than with local plumbers.

“Where I think people go wrong in entrepreneurship is building a product, rather than a business for the future,” says Mr Phelan....Making a neglected category simple and elegant is attractive.”

“All you have to do,” he concluded, “is not to see it as a gas boiler business, but a much bigger play......Phelan’s idea that new businesses need to be strategic rather than excitable about this or that gimmicky new product is one that other entrepreneurs would do well to follow.
disruption  unglamorous  smart_homes  eco-friendly  reinvention  home_based  new_businesses  new_products  millennials  fin-tech  credit_scoring  personal_finance  boring  buying_a_business  Dollar_Shave_Club  Harry’s 
april 2018 by jerryking
What It Was Like to Finally Write My Will
April 3, 2018 | The New York Times | John Schwartz

Will to-do list
Get a will. Really. Dying without one — “intestate” — is a drag for everyone.

Get a lawyer. Unless your life is wonderfully uncomplicated, you’ll want the help of an adviser. Even if you do it yourself, have an attorney look over your work.

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Decide on your beneficiaries, and make sure your insurance policies and other investments are in agreement with what your will says.

Name an executor. It’s a tough and thankless job, so get someone with good judgment; this person can be paid out of your estate.

Got young kids? Name a guardian. If not, the courts will appoint one; why not take care of this essential matter ahead of time?

Secure your paperwork. Once the documents are done, put them in a safe place and make sure your relatives know how to find it.

Revisit it every five years. The world changes; your will should, too.
estate_planning  personal_finance  lists  wills  heirs 
april 2018 by jerryking
Should You Buy Bitcoin? Ask a Different Question First
JAN. 5, 2018 | The New York Times | By CARL RICHARDS.

Goals >> Process >> Investments

asking if we should all buy Bitcoin is the wrong question, and that we should ask a different one instead. The question we should be asking ourselves is this: Does buying Bitcoin fit into my investment plan?

That is a much more important question and one that we can all answer much more easily. It places the attention on the process of investing correctly and not on the outcome of events that we have no control over.
Bitcoin  investing  personal_finance  questions  Philip_Mudd  problem_framing 
january 2018 by jerryking
Five unpopular personal finance truths
November 15, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | by RYAN MODESTO SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

* You need to invest!!!! This element gets overlooked--Saving alone won't cut it. If saving is the workhorse to get you somewhere, investing is at least the reins that help to steer you to your destination. .... Investing is only going to become more important as pensions get leaner and less prominent and living costs rise while wages stay stagnant. Investing those savings is how one can bridge the gap. So if you are saving money, give yourself a pat on the back, but don't stop there – you are only part of the way through the journey.

* You need to be able to save. Spending is fun; saving usually less so. The issue is one of delayed gratification. really is the crux of why people prefer to spend today than save for tomorrow.... trim unnecessary costs....and remember the power of compound interest.

* Personal finance is not fun (for most). Personal finance is boring....even a daunting topic.

* Personal finance is rarely black and white.....Different financial strategies work for different people. ...While the numbers can offer a guideline, the answers to personal finance questions are rarely black and white....The second part of this is the willingness to save, which is more psychological. You need to be both willing and able to save money to be able to help yourself in the first place. There are no silver bullets when it comes to finance. At the end of the day, you need to be willing and able to save money for anything else to matter.

* You have to treat yourself. At the end of the day, we make money so we can provide for those who rely on us, live a particular lifestyle and hopefully have a bit of fun. .... Personal finances are a life-long grind, and as long as the little things stay under control, they are not going to be what makes the difference in 80 years..... you can't take the money with you, so you have to spend some of it....But just some of it.
* A sixth rule might be: Don't blame "the world" for being not able to save. Look at what you are currently spending money on and think about whether you actually "need" to (vs "want") and also if there is any way to change to something that is less expensive.
* A seventh rule: Plan for financial shocks/emergencies. Keep some money in the bank (and invest it in something, of course) so if your car breaks down or you get laid off, you can keep the wolf from the door for at least a couple of months.
* An eight rule: If you go out shopping to 'cheer yourself up', stop doing it.
* A ninth rule : Just because a bank offers to give you tons of money doesn't mean it is a good idea for you to take it.
personal_finance  financial_literacy  investing  delayed_gratification  boring  personal_savings_rate  financial_shocks  emergencies 
november 2017 by jerryking
How I Avoid Confirmation Bias When Investing
Nov 8, 2017 | - The Experts - WSJ | By Ted Jenkin.

(1) Examine all evidence with equal rigor. If you have been sitting on cash during the stock market’s run this year or have been conservative with your investments choices, you may be feeling that you’ve missed out on big returns. And this could lead you to jump into some investments simply because you believe that the market highs will continue (and they have, after all), not because they are the right choice for your portfolio. I can remember a few years back when I thought I missed out on the 3-D printing run when those stocks were blazing.

You need to try to avoid such tendencies to accept confirming evidence without question by looking for real empirical data and evidence–and examining the evidence on both sides with equal rigor. For instance, consider whether the U.S. market is a better bet than international right now. Or, how the GOP tax plan will impact the markets. Make sure you ask yourself the tough questions.

In my case, I forced myself to first consider the downsides to investing in the emerging 3-D printing industry or what consolidation might happen along the way–and the effects it could have on the stocks I was considering. In the end, I took a pass.

(2) Get someone to play devil’s advocate. It has happened to the best of us, no matter our education or background in investing. You are at a dinner party or having a conversation in the kitchen at work when you hear someone say, “I just made 100% profit buying ABC stock, and this thing is just taking off.” When we hear of opportunities to make money, our interest is undoubtedly piqued. And if you hear a tip from a person you trust and like, chances are you will become convinced that it is, of course, a good idea.

Do yourself a favor and find someone you trust just as much to play devil’s advocate and argue the opposite. Ask the person to build a counter-argument using questions such as: What is the strongest reason to do something else? The second strongest reason? The third? What is the worst-case scenario? And can you live with it, if it happens? Then, consider this position with an open mind.

For me, it was a former boss. At times, I would grow frustrated with him because on the surface he would never agree with me when I presented an idea. Over the years, however, I realized it wasn’t really him challenging me as much as it was him challenging me to challenge my own thought process so I could be a better decision maker. His sage advice has made me a better investor today.

(3) Be honest with yourself about your motives. Have you ever heard the saying, “If you can see John Brown through John Brown’s eyes, you can sell John Brown what John Brown buys?” I think it applies to the way I’ve looked at investments in the past–and the motives behind my decisions. We often don’t realize the power of our own motives–and we aren’t honest with ourselves about what they are.

For instance, when I’ve made money in a stock in the past, I’ve felt that those gains justify holding onto to the stock for the long term–even if the stock isn’t performing as well as it once did. So now, when I start doing research about that stock’s prospects, I need to make sure that I am really gathering information to help figure me out the right time to sell the stock. This will help me to determine whether any long-held desire to keep an investment is rooted in sound financial reasoning or is just based on pride or another emotion.

(4) Don’t ask leading questions. One of the biggest mistakes you can make as an investor is to ask questions that set you up to get the answer you want–not the answer you need.....if you find that your financial adviser always agrees with your investment ideas, it may be time to find a different adviser. Healthy and heated debates with my adviser have allowed me to make better personal and business decisions over the years.
personal_finance  investing  confirmation_bias  questions  financial_advisors  worst-case  devil’s_advocates  biases  self-delusions  motivations  hard_questions  counter-arguments  red_teams  open_mind 
november 2017 by jerryking
Rich People
“Rich People plan for three generations
Poor people plan for Saturday night”

― Gloria Steinem
tags: class-distinction, inspirational
quotes  generational_wealth  Gloria_Steinem  personal_finance  social_classes  beforemath  forward_looking  foresight  preparation  time_horizons  from notes
october 2017 by jerryking
Throwing away an old rule
February 12th, 2013 | Getting Rick Slowly | by El Nerdo.

GRS rule #3 says, “Spend less than you earn.” But why should we continue to do that always? Because of tradition? Because of authority? Because that’s what everyone else claims they are doing? To the guillotine with the old rules, I say. It’s time for revolution!

It’s time to turn the old laws upside down. It’s time to say something better. It’s time to declare a new rule #3:

“Earn more than you spend!”

Putting earnings first

“Earn more than you spend” places the emphasis on the earning end of the formula. We want to get rich slowly, not live poor comfortably. And for this we need to make enough money so that our surpluses can actually get us rich.

PF articles of recent years have tended to treat income as a fixed quantity, touting savings as the great challenge ahead. I’d like to make a different call to arms.

When we put earnings first, we task our intelligence and imagination with finding ways to make more money, instead of asking them to figure out 101 ways to squeeze blood from a stone.

Please understand that I don’t equate “making more money” with “spending 14 hours at the cubicle every day of the week and never seeing the kids.” Money is an expression of economic value. If we can manage to increase the value of what we give to the world (products, services, labor), then we can increase our income without excessive toil, and we can find time for family, and friends, and vacation, and all the good things in life.
personal_finance  rules_of_the_game  inspiration  productivity  personal_enrichment 
july 2017 by jerryking
He Saves Fashion Models From Financial Chaos - The New York Times
By STEVEN KURUTZAPRIL 8, 2017
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personal_finance  financial_advisors  fashion 
april 2017 by jerryking
Wealth Management Simplified | Ivey Alumni | Ivey Business School
It was the proceeds Katchen earned from that sale, and a love for investing dating back to his childhood, that led him to launch online investment manager Wealthsimple in September 2014.

“Investing has always been a hobby of mine,” says Katchen, the youngest of three siblings, all of whom attended Ivey. (One sister specialized in marketing, the other sister in finance, while Katchen chose the entrepreneurship stream).

Wealthsimple, now the largest online investment manager in Canada, has 60 employees, about 25,000 customers, and close to $1 billion in assets. The financial technology company offers an alternative to traditional ways of managing investments, catering to consumers – in particular Millennials – who are comfortable with online banking and investing.

Katchen has a vision to build Wealthsimple into “one of the largest and most innovative financial services firms in the world,” including plans to expand outside of Canada to places such as the U.S. and Europe.
Ivey  alumni  WealthSimple  CEOs  start_ups  personal_finance  investment_management 
march 2017 by jerryking
You must do these two difficult things to invest as patiently as the greats - The Globe and Mail
TOM BRADLEY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jan. 15, 2017

Great investors have differences, but they share a number of key attributes.

They have an independent view. They feel no obligation to invest in something because others are doing it or because it’s a part of an index. Indeed, they prefer when a stock isn’t popular or heavily traded.

They buy when opportunities present themselves, not when the money is available. Cash doesn’t burn a hole in their pocket.

They buy assets that, in their reasoned opinion, will eventually be worth considerably more than they’re able to purchase them for. The key word being eventually. Their time frame is only slightly shorter than that.

They don’t get hung up on short-term events, although they do monitor them closely so they can take advantage of opportunities. Price movements and/or liquidity events may allow them to buy more or sell, and any new information can be used to update their valuation models.

You get the picture. Patient capital is focused on long-term value creation. It’s comfortable being out-of-sync with popular trends. And it doesn’t get distressed by market dislocations, it gets excited.

If working with a financial adviser, they have to understand and believe in the patient-capital approach. No prattling from them about quick stock or ETF flips. No recommendations of "hot" fund managers nor cold feet when short-term results are poor.

You want advisers and money managers who can live up to the traits listed above and, ideally, who are working in organizations that exemplify the same traits. You and your adviser have a better chance of being “patient capital” if the firm’s sales, marketing, product development and investment strategies are aligned.
Tom_Bradley  investors  long-term  strategic_patience  liquidity_events  personality_types/traits  dislocations  undervalued  opportunistic  unanimity  personal_finance  financial_advisors  contrarians  independent_viewpoints  financial_pornography  best_of 
january 2017 by jerryking
What to put in your TFSA, what’s best for an RRSP - The Globe and Mail
JOEL SCHLESINGER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014
RRSPs  TFSA  personal_finance  stocks 
january 2017 by jerryking
To Be a Great Investor, Worry More About Being Wrong Than Right - MoneyBeat - WSJ
By JASON ZWEIG
Dec 30, 2016

The stunning surprises of 2016 should have taught all of us that the unexpected will happen. To be a good investor, you have to be right much of the time. To be a great investor, you have to recognize how often you may be wrong. Great investors like Warren Buffett practice trying to disprove their investing assumptions to determine whether they are correct.

Techniques to combat these cognitive biases:

Shun peer pressure from social media or the Internet. If you reveal your opinion to a group that has strong views, the sociologist Robert K. Merton has warned, the ensuing debate becomes more “a battle for status” than “a search for truth.” Instead, get a second opinion from one or two people you know and can trust to tell you if they think you are wrong.

Listen for signals you might be off-base. Use Facebook or Twitter not as an amen corner of people who agree with you, but to find alternative viewpoints that could alert you when your strategies are going astray.

Write down your estimates of where the Dow Jones Industrial Average, oil, gold, inflation, interest rates and other key financial indicators will be at the end of 2017. If you don’t know, admit it. Ask your financial advisers to do the same. Next Dec. 31, none of you will be able to say “I knew that would happen” unless that’s what the record shows.

Book reference: Keith Stanovich, Richard West and Maggie Toplak point out in their new book, “The Rationality Quotient,” rational beliefs “must correspond to the way the world is,” not to the way you think the world ought to be.
==================================
Commenter:

What investors need to do is focus on their own investments, their strategies for each particular holding, long-term, income-oriented, speculative, etc. and stick to their plan without being distracted by peers and press looking for big headlines.
Warren_Buffett  biases  confirmation_bias  investors  books  Pablo_Picasso  personal_finance  investing  Jason_Zweig  pretense_of_knowledge  self-awareness  self-analysis  self-reflective  proclivities  warning_signs  signals  second_opinions  peer_pressure  DJIA  assumptions  mistakes  personal_economy  surprises  worrying 
january 2017 by jerryking
6 Ways Pretend Investors Differ From the Real Ones
NOV. 21, 2016 | The New York Times | By CARL RICHARDS.

* Have a long term plan
* Don't react to every single event that happens in the short term. Financial pornography is not 'actionable information' on which to make a decision about.
* Make changes to my investments based on what happens in my own life. If my goals change or there is a fundamental change in my financial situation, then I should consider an alteration.
* Real investors know that it takes a long time for a tree to grow, and it will not help to dig it up to see if the roots are still there. The same rule applies to investments. And because watching things get big slowly is not very exciting, real investors tend not to talk about that tree all that much.
* Real investors understand the difference between the global economy and their personal economy (aka micro economy) and choose to focus on the latter.
* Focus on the things I can control, like saving a bit more next year, keeping my investment costs low, not paying fees unless it’s necessary and managing my behavior by not buying high and selling again when prices are low.
howto  investors  advice  personal_finance  beyond_one's_control  habits  microeconomics  personal_economy  actionable_information  long-term  span_of_control  financial_pornography  patience  noise  discretion  global_economy 
november 2016 by jerryking
The Money Letter That Every Parent Should Write - The New York Times
By RON LIEBER JUNE 17, 2016

"....consider the old-fashioned letter. It’s long enough to tell some tales to bolster your advice, and if it’s written with enough soul, there’s a good chance the recipient will keep it for a long time. Plus, it’s a literal conversation piece, since the good letters will inspire more curiosity about how the writers oversee their own financial affairs....A good letter, according to Ms. Palmer, should include at least one story about a large financial challenge and another one about a big money triumph. Then, include a list of crucial habits and the tangible things they have helped the family achieve.

HEED YOUR IGNORANCE Quite often, the best stories and takeaways come from the biggest mistakes.
BEWARE OF GENIUS: Don’t trust the person who claims to be omniscient either.
STICK TO YOUR SELLING PLANS We can be blinded by flattery from the seats of power,” “Be aware of this in your business lives.” Selling something that is still valuable is the hardest part of any trade, he added. So if you can’t name three good reasons to continue owning something, then it’s time to sell.
BUDGETS ARE ABOUT VALUES. What you spend says a lot about what you stand for, and if you don’t like what your own notebook says about you, try to make it look different next month.
personal_finance  parenting  Communicating_&_Connecting  writing  investing  investors  mentoring  values  budgets  advice  self-discipline  lessons_learned  wisdom  habits  financial_planning  ownership  ignorance  origin_story  takeaways  family  storytelling  financial_challenges  family_office  generational_wealth  soul-enriching  coverletters  unsentimental 
june 2016 by jerryking
Racial Wealth Gap Persists Despite Degree, Study Says - The New York Times
By PATRICIA COHEN AUG. 16, 2015

The lack of family wealth is pivotal to understanding the racial economic gap, he argues.

While the researchers from the St. Louis Fed, when asked, played down the importance of financial support from family when explaining their results, Mr. Darity said he believed that family aid helped individuals avoid the type of risky big-ticket borrowing that ensnared so many Hispanic and black graduates.

“Prior family wealth is the key,” Mr. Darity explained in an email, noting that it “shapes both income-generating opportunities and the capacity to allow wealth to grow more wealth.”
racial_disparities  wealth_management  African-Americans  generational_wealth  downward_mobility  social_mobility  social_classes  personal_finance  financial_literacy  wealth_creation 
august 2015 by jerryking
David Chilton’s rise from The Wealthy Barber to The Wealthy Dragon - The Globe and Mail
IAN MCGUGAN
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 23 2015,

Clips from the Wealthy Barber

On luck: “I’ve been incredibly lucky in life, and my health is my greatest gift. I don’t work out much, I love Nibs and Diet Pepsi, but I’m never sick a day, I never get a cold, I hardly ever sleep, and it’s all from my mom and dad. They’re in their early 80s and still have crazy energy.”

On the economy: “I try to be optimistic but you have to be concerned about debt levels just about anywhere in the developed world. I think governments are making promises they may not be able to keep. It would not shock me to see another financial crisis at some point over the next three to five years.”

On investing: “It’s shocking how badly many people manage their own investments. Mutual fund fees and expenses are part of that, but we also appear to have mastered the art of buying mutual funds that are just about to underperform.”

On mutual funds: “Paying 2 per cent [in mutual fund fees] doesn’t sound like much, because we still relate things to our high school marks. Losing 2 per cent off a mark of, say, 70 per cent is no big deal. But with mutual funds, you’re talking about losing two percentage points of an estimated 8 per cent or so return. That’s a quarter of your expected gain.”

On alternative investing: “If you’re going to get involved with hedge funds, don’t invest in them, run them.”

On entrepreneurship: “A lot of the people we see on Dragons’ Den have the naive idea that the biggest challenge in business is getting their product on the shelves. It’s not – it’s getting it off the shelves. Once it’s in the store, how do you create demand, how do you make it stand out among the competition?”

On perseverance: “No author in history did more interviews about a single book than I did about The Wealthy Barber. I did hundreds of interviews a year. For years and years and years.”
creating_demand  personal_finance  personal_branding  angels  entrepreneurship  luck  fees_&_commissions  perseverance  debt  investing  writers  authors  developed_countries  developing_countries 
january 2015 by jerryking
TD to help customers pinch pennies with new app - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 30 2014 | The Globe and Mail |OMAR EL AKKAD - TECHNOLOGY REPORTER

This week, TD will announce a partnership with Moven, a company whose namesake app monitors spending habits and, as a result, allows users to tighten up their discretionary spending and save money....Moven's app works in much the same way as health-tracking apps such as FitBit – but for personal finance....The result is an instant analysis of the user's financial health....With the Moven partnership, TD hopes to reintroduce the concept based on “soft advice” – an app that, rather than chastising users for spending too much money, offers them updates and tidbits of information about their spending habits with every purchase.... ...The move is part of an aggressive push by TD into mobile finance. Earlier this month, the bank announced it is partnering with UGO, a mobile wallet platform that allows users to digitize their credit and loyalty cards for use on smartphones.
mobile_applications  personal_finance  TD_Bank  Moven  Nudge  Omar_el_Akkad 
december 2014 by jerryking
Welcome to ‘StockCity,’ where virtual reality meets money - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL LIEDTKE
SAN FRANCISCO — The Associated Press
Published Wednesday, Nov. 19 2014
virtual_reality  personal_finance 
november 2014 by jerryking
Do We Need To Fire PIMCO
SEP. 28, 2014 | Business Insider | OSHUA BROWN, THE REFORMED BROKER
Bill_Gross  Pimco  financial_advisors  wealth_management  personal_finance 
september 2014 by jerryking
Video - Five Things Rich People Know That You Don't, General Strict Financial Discipline - WSJ.com
(1) Start early. RRSP Save, save, save.
(2) Automate set up automatic payroll contributions to feed retirement funds
(3) Maximize those contributions. Save like you mean it.
(4) Never carry credit credit card balances. Pay off credit bill every month.
(5) Live like your poor. Rein in spending habits. Stay away from the mall. Unsubscribe from retail e-mails.
web_video  high_net_worth  wealth_creation  personal_finance  frugality  habits  self-discipline  savings 
july 2014 by jerryking
Car costs can save you thousands in taxes - The Globe and Mail
TIM CESTNICK

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published
Wednesday, Apr. 16 2014,
personal_finance  taxes 
april 2014 by jerryking
Invest like a legend: Peter Thiel
Jan. 30 2014 | The Globe and Mail | Alec Scott.Special to The Globe and Mail.

Is tech investing different from other sorts of investing?

It’s incredibly hard to get people to adopt new tech solutions, and you only get adoption of something if it’s 10 times as good as the next best thing. Amazon had 10 times as many books. PayPal was at least 10 times as fast as cashing a cheque....How do your years of competitive chess-playing help you invest?

Chess champion José Raúl Capablanca said, “In order to improve your game, you must study the endgame before everything else.” Successful businesses have a very long arc. In 2001, we concluded that three-quarters of PayPal’s value would come from 2011 and beyond. The same thing applies to all the big tech companies currently—LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter. Most of their value comes from the 2020s, 2030s and beyond. And so one of the critical questions is, what does the endgame look like, not how they will do in the next month.
Peter_Thiel  endgame  chess  Palantir  start_ups  long-term  market_risk  strategic_thinking  customer_adoption  personal_finance  orders-of-magnitude  Big_Tech  10x 
february 2014 by jerryking
The 1% Secret to Getting Richer - The Experts - WSJ
December 17, 2013 | WSJ | MIKE PIPER.

Save 1% more. That is, increase your retirement savings contributions by 1% of your gross income.
personal_finance  wealth_management 
december 2013 by jerryking
Marc Faber's Biggest Mistake - WSJ.com
Sept. 20, 2013 | WSJ |By Jamie Lee.


Faber also lent an old buddy $50,000 and never saw it again. "When you want to collect, people don't return emails, they don't call back," he said. Lesson learned: He now only makes family-friend loans that are backed by assets. He has done a lot better buying and keeping a host of memorabilia. Faber, who lives in Thailand and races around on motorbikes, began building a stash of Chairman Mao posters, badges and other collectibles in the '70s when Mao was close to death.

Once worth just a few cents each, some of the 330,000 badges he bought are now worth at least $150 apiece. But Faber is in no hurry to sell. "I don't need the money," he says. "It's an unusual collection, and I have a very large office."
collectors  collectibles  high_net_worth  money_management  Marc_Faber  personal_finance  Thailand  Swiss  financiers  mistakes  investors 
december 2013 by jerryking
Five mental mistakes that sabotage investors
Oct. 11 2013 | The Globe and Mail | John Heinzl.

Trying to break even

You buy a stock for $50 and it falls to $45 – and stays there. “I’ll just wait until it gets back to $50 and then I’ll sell it,” you tell yourself. The technical term for this behaviour is “anchoring,” and it’s a problem because the psychological desire to break even could cause you to hang on when there may be better opportunities elsewhere. What you paid for the stock is actually irrelevant; the only thing that matters now are the future prospects for the investment. If the outlook is lousy, you might be better off taking your lumps and moving on. If you still like the company’s prospects, then holding on may indeed make sense.

Focusing on your cost base

This is a closely related concept. You buy a stock for $50, and it rises to $60. Because you have an unrealized capital gain or “cushion” of $10, you feel good about holding on to the stock because a lot has to go wrong before you lose all of your paper profit. But as with the first example, the original price you paid for the stock is irrelevant. It’s history. What matters is where the stock goes from its current price of $60, not whether it stays above your original purchase price.

Recency bias

This is one of the most common traps. You see a stock chart that goes straight up, and you assume the stock will keep rising. Conversely, you see a chart that goes down and assume the losses will continue. Humans are wired to expect things that happened in the past to happen again, but investing is not that simple. In fact, mutual fund studies indicate that many investors underperform the market because they tend to buy near the top and sell near the bottom in the mistaken belief that the recent trend will continue, which it often doesn’t.

Mental accounting

Some investors compartmentalize their money based on its source or its purpose. ...When we use mental accounting, we ignore the fact that a dollar is a dollar; where the money came from shouldn’t influence how we spend it.

Refusing to put dividend stocks inside an RRSP
biases  personal_finance  investors  mistakes  recency_bias  anchoring  psychology  human_errors 
october 2013 by jerryking
Andy Kessler: Hedge Funders Are All a Little Nuts - WSJ.com
August 27, 2013 | WSJ | by ANDY KESSLER.

Hedge Funders Are All a Little Nuts
Sleepless nights, minds racing, working out both sides of all arguments, second guessing. Stay sane? No gain.

Carl Icahn bought $1.5 billion in Apple shares and tweeted, "We believe the company to be extremely undervalued. Spoke to Tim Cook today. More to come." This is known in the business as talking your book and, predictably, the stock popped to $500. (It's now $488.) Mr. Icahn apparently wants Apple to borrow $150 billion to finance more share buybacks, figuring the stock will go to $625. Maybe, but new products and earnings growth are the only long-term drivers of value, not an impatient investor with a few billion to throw around. Apple should ignore him.

When hedge-fund managers grab onto "sure things" rather than float, it's usually a sign they've lost their touch. Stay thirsty, my friends.

And what's an individual investor to do? Teach yourself how to think ahead of those who are scrambling for ideas. When everyone else is thinking short term, start thinking long term. Embrace ideas when everyone else hates them. Out-Costanza the hedgies.
Andy_Kessler  hedge_funds  contrarians  strategic_thinking  long-term  personal_finance  investors  Seinfeld 
september 2013 by jerryking
INVESTING TAX PLANNING Tax traps to avoid when you borrow for investments Pitfall could hurt interest deduction
October 25, 1997 | The Globe and Mail B.20. |Tim Cestnick.

In [STEVE]'s case, he had borrowed $50,000 to invest. The investment increased in value to $80,000 over time, and Steve sold $20,000 of t...
personal_finance  taxation  tax_planning  investing  financial_planning  from notes
august 2013 by jerryking
Tired of being dumb money? Here’s how to get smart fast
Mar. 29 2013 | The Globe and Mail | DAVID BERMAN.
First, ignore the herd. Retail investors get into trouble because they like to follow the market. They love stocks when they’re expensive and bull markets are in full swing, and loathe stocks when they’re cheap and the bear is growling. Do the opposite: As the saying goes, buy when there is blood in the streets.

Second, accept that you are not Mr. Buffett. Over-confident investors get themselves into trouble because they take on too much risk in the hope of scoring spectacular gains. Instead, diversify and aim for the unspectacular, perhaps with low-cost exchange-traded funds that track a basket of stocks.

Third, think long-term. Retail investors are prone to expect their investments to pay off in a big way immediately – and when they don’t, these investors switch tactics, often with dismal results.
investment_advice  personal_finance  contrarians  long-term  patience  Warren_Buffett  overconfidence  individual_initiative  smart_people  independent_viewpoints  bull_markets  ETFs  low-cost 
march 2013 by jerryking
What Explains the Racial Wealth Gap? - Real Time Economics - WSJ
February 27, 2013| WSJ| By Neil Shah.

What Explains the Racial Wealth Gap?

Differences related to inheritances, college education and unemployment also play a role. Whites are five times more likely to inherit, while 80% of black students graduate with debt compared with 64% for whites. “Similar college degrees produce more wealth for whites,” Shapiro said.
wealth_creation  personal_finance  financial_literacy  racial_disparities  generational_wealth  college-educated 
february 2013 by jerryking
Chasing Start-ups May Not Always Lead to a Pot of Gold
| WSJ | Hal Lancaster.

* Be realistic about the potential rewards.
* Bet on smart, experienced managers, not sexy technology.
* Get your finances in top shape.
* Make sure you and your family can handle what's ahead.
start_ups  Managing_Your_Career  Hal_Lancaster  personal_finance  large_companies  venture_capital 
february 2013 by jerryking
On Top of the World -- and Afraid to Fall
January 1996 | WSJ | John Rau. To drive home the need to build independence and flexibility, this article in the Wall Street Journal gives several exercises for removing the `golden handcuffs' of one's current job:

* Get Paid at Least Once for a Skill or Hobby (Find new ways of earning)
* Live Way Below Your Income for Three Weeks (To find
your real bottom line)
* Do a Full-Scale Liquidation Drill (How much can you raise to finance your new start somewhere else)
Spend Time with a Couple of People Who Pursue Satisfaction by Constantly Changing Their Possessions and Status Symbols
Write your Obituary
entrepreneurship  obituaries  golden_handcuffs  personal_finance 
february 2013 by jerryking
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