jerryking + pattern_recognition   47

Opinion | How Artificial Intelligence Can Save Your Life
June 24, 2019 | The New York Times | By David Brooks.
Opinion Columnist

In his book “Deep Medicine,” which is about how A.I. is changing medicine across all fields, Eric Topol describes a study in which a learning algorithm was given medical records to predict who was likely to attempt suicide. It accurately predicted attempts nearly 80 percent of the time. By incorporating data of real-world interactions such as laughter and anger, an algorithm in a similar study was able to reach 93 percent accuracy.....
algorithms  artificial_intelligence  books  David_Brooks  depression  diagnostic  doctors  medical  mens'_health  mental_health  op-ed  pattern_recognition  predictive_analytics  tools  visual_cues 
11 weeks ago by jerryking
Review: New biography Leonardo da Vinci examines the archetypal Renaissance Man - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL HARRIS
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED DECEMBER 3, 2017

Da Vinci was the archetypal Renaissance Man, ignoring the borders of science and art. His promiscuous curiosity was – well, the stuff of genius......Isaacson argues that da Vinci is history's greatest creative genius and, given the evidence amassed in this 600-page work, one would be hard-pressed to argue.....da Vinci's genius springs from his disregard for categories. Whereas a visual artist today would be encouraged by a hundred confounding factors to "stay in her lane" and pursue visual art for its own sake, da Vinci would have been disgusted by such constraints. Science was no distraction; in fact, science fed his paintings.....da Vinci had a reverence for the wholeness of nature and a feel for the harmony of its patterns, which he saw replicated in phenomena large and small."......Da Vinci's was a world where life held knowable patterns. Dig deep enough, expend enough honest curiosity, and the mysteries of the universe began to unfurl. .....The book – as approachable as it is enlightening – achieves something similar; it inspires the reader to become more curious about the patterns underlying its subject – just as da Vinci was curious about the patterns underlying everything else.
biographies  books  book_reviews  creativity  genius  Leonardo_da_Vinci  Medici  patterns  pattern_recognition  polymaths  Renaissance  Renaissance_Man  transgressiveness  Walter_Isaacson 
december 2017 by jerryking
Four Ways to Innovate Through Analogies - WSJ - WSJ
By JOHN POLLACK
Nov. 7, 2014 | WSJ |

Here are four rules for innovating through analogy.

(1) Question conventional analogies. Always kick the tires on the analogies you encounter or consider. Some analogies ring true at first but fall apart on closer examination.
(2) Explore multiple analogies. No matter how seductive an analogy may be, be sure to examine several others before deciding which one might be most useful. Usually, more than one analogy can shed light on a given situation.
(3) Look to diverse sources. The art of analogy flows from creative re-categorization and the information that we extract from surprising sources
(4) Simplify. Similarly, Steve Jobs recognized that the digital “desktop,” first developed but unappreciated at Xerox PARC, was an analogy with the potential to make computers accessible to millions of people—an insight he put to work when he launched the first Mac.
storytelling  pattern_recognition  innovation  analogies  simplicity  Charles_Darwin  theory  theory_of_evolution  conventional_wisdom  Steve_Jobs  under_appreciated  Xerox 
november 2014 by jerryking
The Philadelphia Eagles' Secret Coaches: Professors - WSJ
Sept. 16, 2014 | WSJ | Kevin Clark.

Kelly, in his second NFL season after an impressive run at the University of Oregon, has made academics as much a part of the team as the long snapper. He leans on them all off-season for new ideas and has them on speed dial when he needs a quick fix, according to those who have interacted with the Eagles coach.

"Chip says, 'This guy, with his social sciences or psychology or statistical model or his understanding of African-American history, let's bring him in and see if there's even one idea or one sentence that is a piece of trying to get done what I'm trying to accomplish,' ...Kelly is so devoted to the idea that one of his top lieutenants told professors that Kelly's goal is to have a sort of academic conference, where Kelly is essentially the only beneficiary. (Imagine, if you'd like to laugh, a TED talk with Kelly as the only audience member.)...Ericsson then addressed the entire staff in a 90-minute session in which Kelly tried to get to the heart of the matter. Kelly wanted Ericsson to understand the basic training methods of the Eagles, then ask of the professor, "What could be done differently?"

Ericsson's answer is tied to another Kelly secret. The Eagles use memory devices to get players to memorize formations. Safety Malcolm Jenkins said that during meetings, coaches will show an opponent's formation on a screen, and players will attempt to remember it and yell the play call they would use against it. Then, Jenkins said, snapping his fingers, "They start to flash it quicker and quicker. There's less time to process. And so you build those same cognitive skills where it's the same as getting a mental rep on the field."

Ericsson thought this a noble effort, but in his opinion, it wasn't enough. He recommended that the situations be harder to understand—to go beyond the formations and "get them to respond to video clips of more complex scenarios instead of simple, fast recognitions," he said. "You want to encourage players to be more analytical and open them up to more feedback on what they aren't paying attention to."
academia  coaching  football  innovation  memorization  NFL  overlooked  pattern_recognition  PhDs  sports  think_differently  video_clips  pay_attention 
september 2014 by jerryking
Andreessen Horowitz Invests in 'Big Data' Analytics Firm Adatao - NYTimes.com
By WILLIAM ALDEN AUGUST 7, 2014.

Andreessen Horowitz and the other investors in the round, which include Lightspeed Venture Partners and Bloomberg Beta, are betting that companies will embrace Adatao’s subscription-based software. The software, which aims to combine analytical rigor with intuitive design, lets companies search for patterns in the troves of data they collect in their regular course of business.

Christopher T. Nguyen, the chief executive and co-founder of Adatao, said he had already signed up customers in telecommunications and finance, though he declined to identify them.
massive_data_sets  Andreessen_Horowitz  pattern_recognition  Marc_Andreessen  subscriptions 
august 2014 by jerryking
New software allows insurers to track driving habits and personalize premiums - The Globe and Mail
OMAR EL AKKAD

The Globe and Mail

Published Monday, Aug. 19 2013,

The ability to monitor and adapt to the behaviour of individual customers, for example, was part of the rationale for last month’s announcement by Loblaw Cos. Ltd. that it will acquire Shoppers Drug Mart Corp. for $12.4-billion. Shoppers’ Optimum loyalty program will give Loblaw purchasing information on some 10 million customers.
Omar_el_Akkad  telematics  insurance  personalization  massive_data_sets  pattern_recognition  data_mining  sensors  meat_space  SAP  Shoppers  loyalty_management  Loblaws 
january 2014 by jerryking
Palantir Reloads for the Corporation - NYTimes.com
December 5, 2013, 10:00 am Comment
Palantir Reloads for the Corporation
By QUENTIN HARDY

Palantir Technologies is a big data software company whose roots in government security mask a growing corporate presence. It is also getting a larger war chest to go with that growth....The company’s initial customers included several United States defense and intelligence agencies. But today, more than 60 percent of its revenue is from commercial sources, according to the Palantir executive, who spoke on the condition on anonymity.

While most big data companies create databases that gather large and diverse information sources, then apply pattern-matching software to see if something interesting pops up, Palantir’s technology tries to encode a human element. It has worked on augmenting the way humans in a given field parse information by studying specialists in such areas as fraud spotting, or doctors who isolate outbreaks of food poisoning. The software then augments those human pattern-finding skills.

While this has proved effective for finding insurgent bomb makers and missing children, it also seems to work in finance, health care and other industries.
Palantir  data  data_mining  artificial_intelligence  large_companies  massive_data_sets  security_&_intelligence  pattern_recognition  information_sources 
december 2013 by jerryking
Start-Ups Are Mining Hyperlocal Information for Global Insights - NYTimes.com
November 10, 2013 | WSJ | By QUENTIN HARDY

By analyzing the photos of prices and the placement of everyday items like piles of tomatoes and bottles of shampoo and matching that to other data, Premise is building a real-time inflation index to sell to companies and Wall Street traders, who are hungry for insightful data.... Collecting data from all sorts of odd places and analyzing it much faster than was possible even a couple of years ago has become one of the hottest areas of the technology industry. The idea is simple: With all that processing power and a little creativity, researchers should be able to find novel patterns and relationships among different kinds of information.

For the last few years, insiders have been calling this sort of analysis Big Data. Now Big Data is evolving, becoming more “hyper” and including all sorts of sources. Start-ups like Premise and ClearStory Data, as well as larger companies like General Electric, are getting into the act....General Electric, for example, which has over 200 sensors in a single jet engine, has worked with Accenture to build a business analyzing aircraft performance the moment the jet lands. G.E. also has software that looks at data collected from 100 places on a turbine every second, and combines it with power demand, weather forecasts and labor costs to plot maintenance schedules.
start_ups  data  data_driven  data_mining  data_scientists  inflation  indices  massive_data_sets  hyperlocal  Premise  Accenture  GE  ClearStory  real-time  insights  Quentin_Hardy  pattern_recognition  photography  sensors  maintenance  industrial_Internet  small_data 
november 2013 by jerryking
How to develop the mind of a strategist Part 1 of 3 - Google Drive
Apr/May 2001|Communication World. Vol. 18,Iss.3; pg. 13, 3 pgs.| by James E Lukaszewski.

Management wants and needs:

Valuable, useful, applicable advice beyond what the boss already knows

Well-timed, truly significant insights (insight is the ability to
distill wisdom and useful conclusions from contrasting, even seemingly
unrelated, information and facts)

Advance warning, plus options for solving, or at least managing, trouble
or opportunity, and the unintended consequences both often bring

Someone who understands the pattern of events and problems

Supporting evidence through the behavior of their peers

To be strategic, ideas must pass four tough tests: They must help the
boss achieve his/her objectives and goals. They must help the
organization achieve its goals. They must be truly necessary (and pass
the straight face and laugh tests). Without acting on the strategy recommended, some aspect of the business will fail or fail to progress.
strategic_thinking  strategy  public_relations  Communicating_&_Connecting  generating_strategic_options  indispensable  JCK  howto  endgame  wisdom  insights  warning_signs  ambiguities  advice  job_opportunities  job_search  actionable_information  pattern_recognition 
september 2013 by jerryking
Meet Bloomberg's data-driven Daniel Doctoroff
Aug. 09 2013 | The Globe and Mail |JOANNA SLATER.

Mr. Doctoroff’s job, as deputy mayor for economic development, would include rebuilding the site and pushing ahead with projects envisaged in the Olympic bid....Founded by Mr. Bloomberg in 1982, the firm grew into a global juggernaut that disrupted every field it touched, from market data to financial journalism....Mr. Doctoroff had a yen for precision and a belief in the power of data. To eliminate clutter on his desk, he never touches a piece of paper twice. “I either delegate something, I dump it, or I deal with it,”...Mr. Doctoroff’s mission at Bloomberg is twofold. The first is to sell more terminals – a subscription service that costs more than $20,000 (U.S.) a year per person and offers access to an expanding universe of data, analytical tools and news. Last year was a tough one for terminal sales; Wall Street firms continued to shed staff in what Mr. Doctoroff describes as “the fourth year of post-financial crisis adjustment.”

The second task is to lead the company into other areas and make those investments pay off. Bloomberg has launched what it hopes will become indispensable data products for fields like law and government and also for back-office personnel within finance. Then there’s the media business, which includes a news service, television, radio and magazines, among them Bloomberg Businessweek, which was purchased in 2009. Businessweek still isn’t profitable, but it’s losing much less money than it used to. The magazine, like the rest of the news operation, serves another objective in the Bloomberg ecosystem, Mr. Doctoroff said: heightening the firm’s profile so it can attract more market-moving scoops, which in turn helps to sell more terminals....On his career path: I believe we’re all endowed with a very small set of narrow skills that make us unique. You’ve got to find what that is. Most often what you truly understand makes you unique is something that you’re also going to build passion around. For me – and I didn’t really discover this until I was in my 40s, the line that connected the dots … [is] seeing patterns in numbers that enable me to tell a compelling story which helps to solve a problem. So whether it is helping a candidate get elected or doing a road show for a company, getting a project done in New York or hopefully setting a vision for a company, it’s that narrow skill.
New_York_City  Bloomberg  data_driven  precision  CEOs  organizational_culture  Wall_Street  private_equity  digital_media  disruption  privately_held_companies  Michael_Bloomberg  fin-tech  journalism  pattern_recognition  career_paths  gtd  mayoral  Daniel_Doctoroff  storytelling  product_launches  sense-making  leadership  insights  leaders  statistics  persuasion  ratios  analogies  back-office  connecting_the_dots  scoops  financial_journalism  financial_data  special_sauce  non-routine  skills 
august 2013 by jerryking
The new number crunchers
May 31, 2013 | The Financial Times p12| by Emma Jacobs.

One of the world's first data scientists turned his geeky love of maths into a lucrative career

When Jeff Hammerbacher lies in bed at nigh...
data_scientists  massive_data_sets  Cloudera  pattern_recognition  data  data_driven  from notes
june 2013 by jerryking
Car Companies Tap Data Trove - WSJ.com
March 7, 2013 | WSJ| By IAN SHERR And MIKE RAMSEY.
Drive Into the Future
Your car knows a lot about you. And it's talking....Automakers are exploring ways to use information form cars on the road to improve the driving experience, car design, fuel efficiency and financing, among other things...Improving safety, however, isn't the only way car companies can use that data. Mr. Koslowski estimates that by 2016, up to a third of all interactions between car companies and their customers will happen in the vehicle. Car companies, for example, could collect and analyze data about how customers use leased vehicles, and based on that information suggest other cars a driver might like around the time his or her lease is expiring, he says.

"They can notice all the vehicle seat belts are occupied and they can say, hey, maybe you want a family vehicle," Mr. Koslowski says....In the coming years, auto makers like Ford, Audi AG NSU.XE +0.34% and others see even more potential in big data. They envision taking information from customers' typical driving patterns, schedules and movements on the road to recommend routes the drivers might feel more comfortable with, either because they prefer city streets to freeways or don't respond well to bumper-to-bumper traffic.
massive_data_sets  automotive_industry  data  pattern_recognition  traffic_congestion  data_driven  product_recalls  social_media  telematics  customer_experience  UX 
march 2013 by jerryking
The Philosophy of Data - NYTimes.com
By DAVID BROOKS
Published: February 4, 2013

Big Data carries with it carry with certain cultural assumptions — that everything that can be measured should be measured; that data is a transparent and reliable lens that allows us to filter out emotionalism and ideology; that data will help us do remarkable things — like foretell the future....some of the questions raised by the data revolution: In what situations should we rely on intuitive pattern recognition and in which situations should we ignore intuition and follow the data? What kinds of events are predictable using statistical analysis and what sorts of events are not? Two things data does really well are:
(1) expose when our intuitive view of reality is wrong.
(2) data can illuminate patterns of behavior we haven’t yet noticed.
David_Brooks  massive_data_sets  assumptions  data  critical_thinking  pattern_recognition  measurements  intuition  biases 
february 2013 by jerryking
Surprise business result? Explore whether it is a hidden opportunity
June 18, 2007 | G&M pg. B8 | George Stalk Jr.

What does it take to capitalize on anomalies systematically?

For starters, you need to have metrics and information systems that are sufficiently refined to identify anomalies in the first place. Knowing the average margins and market share isn’t enough; look at the entire range of outcomes—across customers, geographies, products, and the like. This allows you to surface out-of-the-ordinary results for closer inspection.

The next step is to separate wheat from chaff: those anomalies that signal a potential business opportunity from those that are merely one-time events. The key is to examine the pattern of unusual performance over time. The customer who consistently buys high volumes or the market that outperforms the average year after year are, by definition, not random. Is there an underlying cause that can be identified and then replicated elsewhere?

Finally, you need to understand the precise mechanisms that animate the anomalies you identify. Why is the unusual pattern of performance happening? What specific features of the product or the local environment or the customer experience are bringing it about? Don’t accept the usual first-order explanations. It’s not enough to know that a particular customer has been loyal for years; find out precisely why.

It’s up to senior management to create the forum for asking why and to persist until the question is answered with genuine insight.
metrics  George_Stalk_Jr.  BCG  anomalies  growth  opportunities  customer_insights  surprises  systematic_approaches  quizzes  ratios  pattern_recognition  insights  questions  first-order  second-order  OPMA  Waudware  curiosity  new_businesses  one-time_events  signals  noise  overlooked_opportunities  latent  hidden  averages  information_systems  assessments_&_evaluations  randomness  5_W’s 
january 2013 by jerryking
Jeff Hawkins Develops a Brainy Big Data Company - NYTimes.com
November 28, 2012, 12:13 pmComment
Jeff Hawkins Develops a Brainy Big Data Company
By QUENTIN HARDY

Jeff Hawkins, who helped develop the technology in Palm, an early and successful mobile device, is a co-founder of Numenta, a predictive software company....Numenta’s product, called Grok, is a cloud-based service that works much the same way. Grok takes steady feeds of data from things like thermostats, Web clicks, or machinery. From initially observing the data flow, it begins making guesses about what will happen next. The more data, the more accurate the predictions become.
massive_data_sets  Grok  pattern_recognition  start_ups  streaming  aftermath  cloud_computing  predictions  predictive_analytics  Quentin_Hardy 
november 2012 by jerryking
Trader Hits Jackpot in Oil, As Commodity Boom Roars On - WSJ.com
February 28, 2008| WSJ | By ANN DAVIS.
Mr. Hall Bet Early On Market Shift; Buoying Citigroup.

Profiles Andrew J. Hall, an enigmatic British-born trader who, in 2003, anticipated an important shift in the way the world valued oil -- and bet big....Mr. Hall's bet -- that long-term and short-term energy prices would soon abandon their historical relationship with one another -- looked like a long shot when he made it....Around 2003, Mr. Hall became convinced big structural changes were looming in the oil markets. For more than a decade, oil had ranged from $10 to $30 a barrel. But growth in demand was starting to outstrip growth in supply. And the once-sleepy economies of China and India were starting to compete for that fuel.

To place his bet, he focused on what was then a stagnant corner of the commodities world: The extremely long-term market in which traders buy and sell oil to be delivered years in the future.

Futures are contracts to buy or sell a product later on, at a price agreed upon today. Back in 2003, oil for future delivery was considerably cheaper than oil in the "spot," or current, market. For instance, a barrel of oil for delivery in 2005 was as much as 20% cheaper than spot oil....A key to Mr. Hall's success, says a friend, Thomas Coleman, a Louisiana oil-storage executive and fellow art collector, is an ability to block out the noise of the crowd. When Mr. Hall "locks in on an idea, he'll take it to the extreme," Mr. Coleman says.
Citigroup  Phibro  traders  oil_industry  hedge_funds  big_bets  commodities  collectors  pattern_recognition  structural_change  extremities  commodities_supercycle  ratios  noise  turbocharge  extremes 
june 2012 by jerryking
How to Play to Your Strengths.
January 2005 | HBR |by Laura Morgan Roberts, Gretchen Spreitzer,. Jane Dutton, Robert Quinn, Emily Heaphy, and Brianna Barker.
Managing_Your_Career  introspection  pattern_recognition  HBR  feedback  self-analysis  strengths 
march 2012 by jerryking
"The bruises of the bandwagon: ENTREPRENEURSHIP: Reality television is revealing how desperately some people want to break into business. But many fail to analyse their ideas,
Apr. 25, 2005 | Financial Times pg 16.| by Paul Tyrrell

Everyone wants to run their own business. But many fail to prepare thoroughly before scrambling on to the bandwagon. Among the television hopefuls, the most widespread and humiliating trait is a failure to appreciate that an entrepreneur's personal qualities are just as important as their ideas.

It is a salutary warning. Venture capitalists and business angels have always been more inclined to back a great team with a mediocre idea than a mediocre team with a great idea. They attach a lot of importance to what they term "scar tissue" - evidence that the person has learned from experience.

"People who are enamoured of their own idea can be great, but only if they listen really hard,"... "Nothing goes to plan, so you're looking for people you can trust off-plan." ...Entrepreneurs are more likely to succeed if they can come up with an idea that exploits their experience. This is particularly clear in product development situations - for example, where an engineer takes the knowledge he gains at a large company and uses it to set up a rival.

Research suggests that "spin-outs have a survival edge in the market over other entrants as the result of a combination of entrepreneurial flexibility and inherited knowledge"....what distinguishes successful entrepreneurs is their ability to spot commercially exploitable patterns where others cannot. Herbert Simon, winner of the 1978 Nobel Prize in economic sciences, suggests this process is intuitive: a good business idea stems from the creative linking, or cross-association of two or more in-depth "chunks" of experience - know-how and contacts.
Infotrac_Newsstand  entrepreneurship  entrepreneur  pattern_recognition  personality_types/traits  television  spin-offs  entertainment  venture_capital  angels  cross-pollination  tacit_data  knowledge_intensive  scar_tissue  teams  team_risk  off-plan  Plan_B  tacit_knowledge  nimbleness  combinations 
november 2011 by jerryking
The Big Data Revolution Will Affect Us From Head To Toe - Venture Capital Dispatch - WSJ
April 5, 2011 By Deborah Gage Six years ago, John Webster and
Chris Stakutis wrote a book called “Inescapable Data,” in which they
talked to nearly 50 corporate executives and entrepreneurs about how
massive accumulations of data could transform their businesses and their
lives.
massive_data_sets  data  pattern_recognition  books 
july 2011 by jerryking
Stop Looking for Ideas, Look for Problems to Grow Your Business - India Chief Mentor - WSJ
April 19, 2010, | WSJ | By Gautam Gandhi. Stop looking for
good ideas. That’s right, you read this correctly. Please don’t speak of good ideas ever again. Instead tell me about good problems. They'll most likely bring a business opportunity, Where are the problems?

If you look around there are problems everywhere. Question things you
take for granted and think to yourself: Is there a better way? When you
have your next business meeting, whether it is with a client or
customer, ask them what their biggest problems are. You will be
surprised by what people tell you. Hopefully, you will start to notice
patterns and will soon identify a problem to solve. Better still, if it
is a problem that affects you directly.

When you think of the problem that you are going to solve, ensure that:

You are tackling it for a sizable market
People are willing to pay for your solution
You assess your rivals

The last one is important. Never think: “I don’t have any competition.”
growth  problem_solving  pattern_recognition  idea_generation  problems  challenges  worthiness  messiness  uncharted_problems  large_markets  competition  questions  ideas  assumptions  criteria  India  pain_points  discernment  curiosity  dissatisfaction  opportunities  inquisitiveness  Michael_McDerment  worthwhile_problems 
july 2011 by jerryking
The Start-Up of You - NYTimes.com
July 12, 2011 | NYT | Tom Friedman. Reid Hoffman, has a book
coming out in 2012 called “The Start-Up of You,” co-authored with Ben
Casnocha. Its subtitle could easily be: “Hey, recent graduates! Hey,
35-year-old midcareer professional! Here’s how you build your career
today.” ....Hoffman argues that professionals need an entirely new
mind-set & skill set to compete. “The old paradigm of climb up a
stable career ladder is dead & gone,” “No career is a sure thing
anymore. The uncertain, rapidly changing conditions in which
entrepreneurs start companies is what it’s like for fashioning a career.
Therefore, approach career strategy the same way an entrepreneur
approaches starting a business.” Ditch the grand life plan.
Entrepreneurs don’t write a 100-pg. biz plan and execute it one time; be
emergent....use your netwk. to pull in info. & intelligence about
where the growth opportunities are [this would be knowledge or market intelligence] — & invest in yourself to build [transferrable] skills that will allow you to profit from those opportunities.
books  career  career_paths  careers  Managing_Your_Career  start_ups  market_intelligence  transferable_skills  entrepreneurship  pattern_recognition  opportunistic  Tom_Friedman  LinkedIn  Reid_Hoffman  new_graduates  individual_initiative  rapid_change  emergent 
july 2011 by jerryking
Can Todd Park Revolutionize the Health Care Industry? - Technology
June 2011 - The Atlantic By Simon Owens.

The potential benefits of open government initiatives are immense. .. In
the 1970s, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration began
releasing its daily weather data to the public, and today that data is
used by hundreds of companies, from Weather.com to a variety of
smartphone apps. The govt. also opened up its GPS data in the '80s, a
move that gave birth to an entire industry of companies that use the
data across millions of devices. A recent report from the McKinsey
Global Institute found that, as the NYT put it, "the value [of open
data] to the health care system in the United States could be $300
billion a year, and that American retailers could increase their
operating profit margins by 60 %." Given that U.S. health care costs
billions of dollars a year and makes up 17 % of GDP, companies have more
than enough incentive to create applications and tools that can cut
costs and drive economic activity within this sector.
data  open_government  healthcare  health_informatics  government_2.0  CTO  HHS  pattern_recognition  patterns  open_data  open_source 
june 2011 by jerryking
The Paradoxes of Intelligence Reform :
March 10, 2003 The New Yorker by Malcolm Gladwell
Connecting the dots is easier said than done in retrospect. intentions
didn’t form a pattern. They formed a Rorschach blot. What is clear in
hindsight is rarely clear before the fact.
security_&_intelligence  pattern_recognition  Malcolm_Gladwell  connecting_the_dots  military_intelligence  sense-making  hindsight 
may 2011 by jerryking
Wealth and Fitness Secret – Ratios - Rich Karlgaard - Innovation Rules -
Dec. 21 2010 | Forbes | Rich Karlgaard. Success is often a
matter of getting the ratios right. Business and investing success is
hardly possible without understanding ratios. Knowing the numbers is
important. But knowing the numbers in relation to other numbers will
make you a millionaire. You will see anomalies that others miss. I’ll
never forget a comment made by George Soros in July 2008, when oil was
$147.50 a barrel. A Goldman Sachs analyst had predicted oil was headed
to $200, but Soros knew better. Why? Because oil was already too
expensive compared to gold. At $147.50, oil was 1:6 the price of gold.
The normal ratio band is 1:10 to 1:15, said Soros. Either gold had to
rise, or oil had to fall. Because Soros could not see any inflation that
might drive gold higher, oil had to fall.
ratios  metrics  Rich_Karlgaard  ksfs  pattern_recognition  George_Soros  jck  life_skills  lessons_learned  moguls  anomalies  fingerspitzengefühl  contextual_intelligence  insights  base_rates 
december 2010 by jerryking
Green Column - Insurance Companies Find There Is Money to Be Made in Green Technology - NYTimes.com
Aug. 8, 2010 | NYT | By JULIE MAKINEN.
idea for Dwayne Matthews and/or Nick Parker.

The up-front costs of adopting renewable energy can be daunting. Increasingly, insurers are stepping in to bridge the gap between green intentions and actual capital outlays on green technology. They're backstopping warranties on solar panels, helping start-ups with short track records offer
multi-decade guarantees on their products and win over skeptical customers & project financiers. They're studying weather patterns to offer protection in the event of, say, unusually weak winds that fail to spin turbines, or a volcanic ash cloud from Iceland that diminishes the output of a solar energy facility in Spain. They're advising companies on how best to incorporate renewable energy systems into their
factory operations & offering property insurance that will pay not just to rebuild a structure in the event of a loss like fire but reconstruct it in a more environmentally friendly & energy-efficient way. They're offering coverage to carbon traders.
insurance  climate_change  green  project_finance  weather  renewable  massive_data_sets  pattern_recognition  patterns  intermittency  start_ups  funding 
december 2010 by jerryking
Introducing IDEO's New Column: Patterns Affecting Business and Design Today | Co.Design
August 24. 2010 | Fast Company | Suzanne Gibbs Howard. Beyond
spotting emerging themes, PATTERNS provides a way to tap into collective
intelligence and to do better work faster. The Web site helps us reach
out to others and encourages people to document what intrigues them and
comment on what they feel passionately about. We post provocative
articles that distill the current thinking on myriad topics and clearly
articulate how people can respond to any given pattern through design.
In our current collection, pattern spotters Makiko Taniguchi and Eddie
Wu explore copycat design as an open platform for innovation and point
to a range of industries and challenges, from technology and education
to the optimism of humor and legitimacy through participation.
patterns  pattern_recognition  design  ideo 
september 2010 by jerryking
What Knockoffs Can Teach Companies About Chinese Markets | Co.Design
Sep 8, 2010 | Fast Company | by Makiko Taniguchi & Eddie
Wu. Fakes and knockoffs often express unmet desires that big firms miss.
Learn from them...Countries, from the U.S. to Japan, regularly accuse
China of copying designs. Indeed,MNCs in these countries spend an
inordinate amount of time and money trying to prevent their products
from being copied. But Shanzhai -- "copycat" design --represents a vast
business opportunity. Shanzhai is an open platform for grassroots
innovation: Apple, Nokia, and Samsung smartphones get copied, but the
knockoffs adapt the original designs in ways that appeal to Chinese
customers. E.g., Shanzhai designers might add a flashlight, key in areas
with unstable electricity. The effect is to make products accessible to
common folks in terms of price, aesthetics, values, and needs. Shanzhai
designs are an opportunity for international companies to introduce
Chinese consumers to their brands, and then observe how local Chinese
culture adapts their offerings.
counterfeits  China  customer_insights  discoveries  pattern_recognition  ideo  opportunities  innovation  design  adaptability  patterns  copycats  unarticulated_desires  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  emerging_markets  brands  multinationals  aesthetics  knockoffs  creative_appropriation  cost-consciousness  low-income  affordability 
september 2010 by jerryking
Computer Science Loses to Math in New Hiring Formula - WSJ.com
APRIL 8, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By JESSICA E.
VASCELLARO. New Hiring Formula Values Math Pros. Region's Employers Seek
Statistical Experts Over Computer-Science Generalists.
hiring  silicon_valley  statistics  competingonanalytics  pattern_recognition  Jessica_E._Vascellaro  data_scientists 
april 2010 by jerryking
New Economists Scour Urban Data for Trends - WSJ.com
APRIL 8, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by CARI TUNA. New Ways
to Read Economy. Experts Scour Oddball Data to Help See Trends Before
Official Information Is Available. A growing number of economists and
urban planners [are] scouring for economic clues in unconventional urban
data—oddball measures of how people are moving, spending and working.
"Mr. Egan said he would like to build software to monitor Craigslist
prices for furniture, concert tickets, haircuts and other goods and
services to measure changes in local prices. The online classified-ads
site, he said, would give a quicker and more detailed read than the
bimonthly data from the Labor Department."

Broadway ticket sales are a favorite indicator for the chief economist of the New York City Economic Development Corp., Francesco Brindisi. He says they are a good gauge of city tourism.

In Jacksonville, Fla., community planner Ben Warner keeps tabs on calls to the city's 2-1-1 hotline for social services. Since late 2008, he has seen spikes in calls for help with food, housing, utilities payments and suicide prevention. It is "direct, real-time monitoring of the economic and social situation," he said.
data  urban  unconventional_thinking  economic_analyses  craigslist  Hal_Varian  hotlines  massive_data_sets  Freshbooks  economists  trends  pattern_recognition  measurements  real-time  forecasting  indicators  unorthodox  economic_data  metrics  Cari_Tuna  data_driven  unconventional  economics  non-traditional 
april 2010 by jerryking
The Six Stages of Growth
2000 | Ministry of Economic Development and Trade. • To help
CEOs of leading growth companies understand the patterns of growth in
their companies, so that they can see their own challenges and
opportunities in the context of the stages through
which they have passed,are passing and will pass, thereby enabling them
to identify and deal with emerging situations more effectively. These
insights will also help the startup entrepreneur to develop his/her
vision for their future.
•To help business service providers to understand the needs of this
vital sector in their present and
future client base, so that they can attract leading growth firms as
clients by approaching them in
a way that meets their unique needs. This applies to organizations
ranging from banks, through
consultants, to economic development agencies.
growth  small_business  life_cycle  start_ups  entrepreneurship  patterns  pattern_recognition  filetype:pdf  media:document 
february 2010 by jerryking
Questioning Authority
May/June 2007 | The Conference Board Review | By Elizabeth
Edersheim who describes being Peter Drucker’s final collaborator. "What
Peter Drucker was better at than any person I've ever read or met was
his ability to translate trends into social implications. That was his
unique skill, his unique intellect. His passion was making organizations
work."
Peter_Drucker  profile  trends  pattern_recognition 
october 2009 by jerryking
Computers helped chess experts and can do the same for investors - The Globe and Mail
Oct. 23, 2009 |Globe & Mail | by Avner Mandelman. Look for
an ability to see a pattern, not just details and in doing this,
man-machine partnerships (i.e. instantaneous access to data which you
can query smartly on the fly) can be effective in drilling deep for
company due diligence. When talking to management, always have the
company's financial statements, and those of their competitors, on an
interactive spreadsheet before you. Then, anything management tells you,
check for veracity, logic, and impact, and use what you find to refine
your questions. It's a simple but effective form of man-machine
interaction that should help any investor improve his due diligence.
Avner_Mandelman  pattern_recognition  due_diligence  artificial_intelligence 
october 2009 by jerryking
How to Be a Billionaire: Worry!
Monday, Feb. 05, 2001| TIME | By JOSHUA COOPER RAMO. For
George Soros, the problem is not how to make money. That's easy, he
believes. You do that by spotting mistakes. The problem is the mistakes
themselves. Soros thinks that our history, especially economic history,
is sculpted by blunders. It's a radical proposition, as if you suggested
that Botticelli's best art was the result of paint splatters. But Soros
is insistent: mistakes make history. They also make--and
destroy--fortunes. Soros, who made a fortune looking for and finding
mistakes, worries we are making one now. He picks up on these errors by
listening to his money. These days he doesn't like what he
hears..."George is signal," says a Fed adviser, referring to the high
noise-signal ratio among advice givers to Alan Greenspan.

===================================================
From Farhad Manjoo
Step 1: Worry. If you're an investor, employee, founder, tech journalist or in some other way connected to the tech business, worrying about the bubble is your best defense against the bubble. Worrying keeps you sharp. Worrying keeps magical thinking (i.e. happy talk) at bay. As in the 1990s, the tech industry is pushing grand, society-transforming novelties on the rest of the world. If you're not worried that some of these claims are crazy, you're not paying attention.
====================================================
George_Soros  Joshua_Cooper_Ramo  financial_history  wishful_thinking  Kissinger_Associates  pattern_recognition  patterns  moguls  lessons_learned  mistakes  Bank_of_England  financiers  negative_space  investors  signals  worrying  paranoia  human_errors  economic_history  happy_talk  pay_attention 
october 2009 by jerryking
Trendspotter gets help from a Calgary carpenter
Sept. 2009 | - The Globe & Mail | by JANETTE EWEN,
Special to The Globe &Mail. Interview of Jeremy Gutsche, founder and
chief trend hunter of the popular style website, TrendHunter.com.
Trends  pattern_recognition  Jeremy_Gutsche  websites  blogs  popular_culture 
october 2009 by jerryking
When you're drowning in knowledge, it's experience that counts
Aug. 20, 2009 | Globe & Mail | by Dan Richards. The key
to success today is no longer knowledge and information alone; more than
ever it's the discipline, experience, perspective and insight to know
what to do with that information, something that only comes from the
battle scars earned working through multiple market cycles....The bottom line is simple: If knowledge alone drives success, then years of experience may be less critical than intellect and analytical prowess. But in a time of market uncertainty such as we see today, intellect and knowledge alone aren't enough. Financial advisers and money managers also need the acumen that only years of hard-won experience can bring.
business_acumen  commoditization_of_information  Dan_Richards  discernment  experience  financial_advisors  information_overload  insights  investment_advice  money_management  pattern_recognition  uncertainty  wisdom  self-discipline  judgment  perspectives 
august 2009 by jerryking
How to sell innovation services?
23 August 2005 | CPH127 | by Magnus Christensson.It is through
looking at the patterns in customers’ stories that we can
provide our clients with a startlingly different and enormously useful
picture of the market and its direction — the most valuable input into
an innovation strategy that anyone can offer. If this (customer
research, future scenario) is our point of entry (and we deliver) we
might be able to overcome the first three issues and get the trust
needed to engage in further collaboration.
innovation  selling  marketing  howto  pattern_recognition  JCK  insights  customer_insights  storytelling 
june 2009 by jerryking
Emerging Patterns in the Crisis Economy - Vineet Nayar - Harvard Business Review
Vineet Nayar Inverted Wisdom rss RSS Feed
Emerging Patterns in the Crisis Economy

10:30 AM Thursday May 14, 2009

Tags:Economy, Financial crisis, Recession
pattern_recognition  economy  economic_downturn  recessions  hbr 
june 2009 by jerryking
Experience preferred
March 2008 | Globe and Mail | DOUG STEINER

Take advantage of opportunities, regardless of your age. Some abilities
actually sharpen as we age. Yes, short-term memory deteriorates—did I
take my daily mini-Aspirin last night? But other faculties can improve
with time. One is solving problems by recognizing patterns. Pattern
recognition also applies to your finances. As you get older, economic
crises that might scare a young person start to look more familiar, and
you can get better at dealing with them.
Doug_Steiner  experience  opportunistic  pattern_recognition  personal_finance  aging  problem_solving 
may 2009 by jerryking
I.B.M. Unveils Software to Find Trends in Vast Data Sets - NYTimes.com
May 20, 2009 | New York Times | By ASHLEE VANCE. New software
from I.B.M. can suck up huge volumes of data from many sources and
quickly identify correlations within it. The company says it expects the
software to be useful in analyzing finance, health care and even space
weather.
data_mining  IBM  pattern_recognition  massive_data_sets  Ashlee_Vance  haystacks 
may 2009 by jerryking
How Hard Could It Be?: Start-up Static | Printer-friendly version
March 2009| Inc. Magazine | Joel Spolsky

A new business is like a shortwave radio. You have to fiddle patiently with all the dials until you get the reception you want.
morale_management  failure  start_ups  Paul_Graham  new_businesses  pattern_recognition  tinkering  Joel_Spolsky  Y_Combinator  experimentation  trial_&_error 
april 2009 by jerryking
L. Gordon Crovitz Says Technological Creativity Could Help Wall Street Make Sense of Data - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 9, 2009 | WSJ | By L. GORDON CROVITZ reports on
the annual Technology, Entertainment and Design conference. TED as an
antidote to recessionary pessimism. Reminder that other industries,
especially Wall Street, need to embrace the technologist ethos of
constant creativity and innovation. "Raw data, now!" Find new
relationships among data and new answers to problems in ways we haven't
been able to imagine
analytics  L._Gordon_Crovtiz  Web  data  Wall_Street  TED  unimaginable  sense-making  pattern_recognition  patterns  data_mining  problems 
february 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com - Is the answer to business success a never-ending question?
Feb. 25, 2008 G&M column by Harvey Schachter. Take an organized approach to developing thought-provoking questions.

Identifying

The source for questions already exist around us, in books, white papers, journals, brochures, competitive intelligence, market research and technical documents. Consider the various outside experts, industry leaders, competitors, suppliers, customers, and even family members who already ask questions about your workplace. "With a little imagination, the sources for questions are nearly endless," she says.

Collecting

Send an e-mail to 30 people asking "what questions should be asked before taking on a new project?" A helpful question to start that process is: "What are all the questions that people might answer in order to address the company's goals, challenges or problems?" Collect questions in advance of decision-making meetings to help plan each session better and make it more effective.

Organizing

Look for patterns that will indicate the categories that the questions can be stored in, for appropriate retrieval when needed. Sometimes the topic might have an industry standard categorization already.

Refining

Although it's common to begin brainstorming with "there's no such thing as a bad question," not all questions are good ones. So keep refining your questions to make sure they are open-ended, not easy to answer, and provocative.

Follow Kipling

Rudyard Kipling : What and Why and When and How and Where and Who." A good QuestionBank contains a mix of those question types. Two of the most provocative questions you can ask are: "What or how might people change or improve ____ to ____?" and "What new or different ideas might change or improve _____?"

Ownership

Make sure somebody is accountable for each QuestionBank, ensuring periodic improvements and maintenance. That person should be in a position of responsibility in the organization.
Harvey_Schachter  career  creativity  innovation  questions  Rudyard_Kipling  pattern_recognition  open-ended  insights  Dr.Alexander's_Question  incisiveness  inquisitiveness  5_W’s  prospecting 
january 2009 by jerryking

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