jerryking + partnerships   97

Amazon’s Ripple Effect on Grocery Industry: Rivals Stock Up on Start-Ups
Aug. 21, 2018 | The New York Times | By Erin Griffith.

When Amazon bought Whole Foods Market. The $13.4 billion deal shook the grocery world, setting off a frenzy of deals and partnerships that continues to intensify. Traditional retailers pursued digital technology, and online companies reconsidered their relationship with brick-and-mortar retail......“Are technology folks like us going to figure out retail faster than the retailers figure out technology?” [the Great Game] ..... “In some ways we’re all kind of fighting the same fight against the gigantic folks online.”

Food shopping is one of the last major holdouts to online retail. Groceries are unique in that their inventory is perishable, fragile and heavy. Grocery customers often shop at the last minute, like to see the food they are about to eat and don’t want to pay high delivery fees.

Even Amazon, with its Amazon Fresh online grocery service, has struggled to gain ground in the business. The company’s Whole Foods deal, paired with Walmart’s 2016 acquisition of Jet.com, underscored that the future of selling food and household items requires cooperation between the digital natives and the old-school retailers.....Grocery companies “are realizing that with Walmart and Amazon moving at their pace, you need to pick yours up, too,” .... “I wouldn’t call it fear. I would call it a wake-up call.”....... Market research conducted by Morgan Stanley in July found that 56 % of consumers who were likely to order groceries online said they would most likely order from Amazon, compared with 14 % who would go to a mass merchandiser and 10 % who would use their local supermarket. Phil Lempert, a grocery industry analyst, predicted store closings for chains that do not evolve to meet the changing needs of customers. Stores offering curated selections, specialty items, cooking classes and the option to buy online and pick up in person will thrive,......Josh Hix, chief executive of Plated, a meal kit start-up, said the Amazon-Whole Foods deal had immediately changed his discussions with grocery chains. Meal kit companies have a checkered record. But the grocery companies saw an opportunity to use Plated’s data and research on recipes and taste preferences......Most of the big grocers “have wanted to kill us, partner with us, invest in us or buy us — all probably in the course of the same conversation,”......The ownership structure allows Boxed to license its technology to its retail competitors in the United States as they try to become more digital. The company is in talks with 10 or so potential partners for various pieces of its technology. They include mobile app technology, personalization software, a packing algorithm that maximizes space in shipping boxes, software that tracks item expiration dates, order management software and warehouse robotics automation........Grocery delivery is difficult to do affordably, but tech-driven efficiencies like those developed by Boxed, Amazon and others have forced change on the industry.

“Consumers want convenience and will pay more for it,
Amazon  Amazon_Fresh  bricks-and-mortar  e-commerce  e-grocery  home-delivery  partnerships  retailers  same-day  start_ups  the_Great_Game  Whole_Foods  fulfillment  grocery  supermarkets  ripple_effects 
august 2018 by jerryking
‘You’re Stupid If You Don’t Get Scared’: When Amazon Goes From Partner to Rival - WSJ
By Jay Greene and Laura Stevens
June 1, 2018

The data weapon
One Amazon weapon is data. In retail, Amazon gathered consumer data to learn what sold well, which helped it create its own branded goods while making tailored sales pitches with its familiar “you may also like” offer. Data helped Amazon know where to start its own delivery services to cut costs, an alternative to using United Parcel Service Inc. and FedEx Corp.

“In many ways, Amazon is nothing except a data company,” said James Thomson, a former Amazon manager who advises brands that work with the company. “And they use that data to inform all the decisions they make.”

In web services, data across the broader platform, along with customer requests, inform the company’s decisions to move into new businesses, said former Amazon executives.

That gives Amazon a valuable window into changes in how corporations in the 21st century are using cloud computing to replace their own data centers. Today’s corporations frequently want a one-stop shop for services rather than trying to stitch them together. A food-services firm, say, might want to better track data it collects from its restaurants, so it would rent computing space from Amazon and use a data service offered by a software company on Amazon’s platform to better analyze what customers order. A small business might use an Amazon partner’s online services for password and sign-on functions, along with other business-management programs.
Amazon  AWS  cloud_computing  coopetition  partnerships  fear  data_centers  unfair_advantages 
june 2018 by jerryking
The Not-So-Glossy Future of Magazines -
SEPT. 23, 2017 | The New York Times | By SYDNEY EMBER and MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM.

Suddenly, it seemed, longstanding predictions about the collapse of magazines had come to pass.

Magazines have sputtered for years, their monopoly on readers and advertising erased by Facebook, Google and more nimble online competitors. But editors and executives said the abrupt churn in the senior leadership ranks signaled that the romance of the business was now yielding to financial realities.

As publishers grasp for new revenue streams, a ‘‘try-anything’’ approach has taken hold. Time Inc. has a new streaming TV show, “Paws & Claws,” that features viral videos of animals. Hearst started a magazine with the online rental service Airbnb. Increasingly, the longtime core of the business — the print product — is an afterthought, overshadowed by investments in live events, podcasts, video, and partnerships with outside brands.

The changes represent one of the most fundamental shifts in decades for a business that long relied on a simple formula: glossy volumes thick with high-priced ads.

“Sentimentality is probably the biggest enemy for the magazine business,” David Carey, the president of Hearst Magazines, said in an interview. “You have to embrace the future.”.......experiments are part of an industrywide race to find some way — any way — to make up for the hemorrhaging of revenue.

Hearst recently introduced The Pioneer Woman Magazine, a partnership with the Food Network host Ree Drummond that was initially sold only at Walmart. Its new travel publication, Airbnbmag, is geared toward customers of the do-it-yourself online rental site, with distribution at newsstands, airports and supermarkets. Meredith has started a magazine called The Magnolia Journal with the HGTV stars Chip and Joanna Gaines.

Even Condé Nast, the glitzy purveyor of luxury titles, has recognized the advantages of outside partnerships....debuting a quarterly print title for Goop, Gwyneth Paltrow’s lifestyle brand, with a cover featuring a topless Ms. Paltrow submerged in mud from France.
magazines  generational_change  brands  Vanity_Fair  print_journalism  churn  events  partnerships  sentimentality  digital_media  journalism  Hearst  Meredith  publishing  advertising  decline  experimentation  trends  Condé_Nast  resignations  exits  popular_culture 
september 2017 by jerryking
Libraries Can Be More Than Just Books - The New York Times
By MATT A.V. CHABAN SEPT. 18, 2017

New York, graced with the generosity of Astor, Tilden and Carnegie, was foundational in the library movement. Today, those foundations are crumbling. Despite their popularity, and because of it, the city’s 212 branches face nearly $1.5 billion in capital needs. And that is simply to reach a state of good repair.

Chipping away at these needs can seem overwhelming. But New York has an opportunity, one shared by cities across the country, to improve library infrastructure while creating badly needed housing. By using aging branches as sites for development, new libraries may rise with affordable apartments on top. The administration of Mayor Bill de Blasio should seize the chance at sites citywide to link these crucial needs.......
Libraries have become 21st-century settlement houses, providing a world of resources under one roof. They help bridge the digital divide, invest in early literacy and lifelong learning, increase language skills and serve as civic hubs. Let’s add affordable housing to the list.
libraries  NYPL  property_development  community_development  partnerships  New_York_City 
september 2017 by jerryking
Amazon’s Alexa allies with Microsoft’s Cortana to take on Google, Siri
AUGUST 30, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | SUPANTHA MUKHERJEE AND MUNSIF VENGATTIL for REUTERS.

Amazon.com Inc and Microsoft Corp have joined forces to let their voice-controlled virtual assistants talk to each other, offering users the ability to seamlessly tap into work, their homes and shop online.

The partnership is the first time two technology companies open up their artificial intelligence-powered virtual aides to each other, and will be aimed at outsmarting rivals Google Assistant and Apple's Siri.

The move in itself is rare as most virtual assistants are known to use data from their own ecosystems and not talk to one another......Not to be left behind, Alphabet Inc said on Wednesday Google Assistant will soon be available on third-party speakers and other home appliances. (http://bit.ly/2vERgEc)

"Starting later this year, with manufacturers like LG, you'll be able to control your appliances, including washers, dryers, vacuums and more from your Assistant on your smart speaker, Android phone or iPhone," Google said.
Siri  Alexa  Cortana  artificial_intelligence  Apple  Amazon  Microsoft  Google  Google_Assistant  LG  partnerships 
september 2017 by jerryking
New partnership aims to create ‘a Bloomberg for private companies’ - The Globe and Mail
JACOB SEREBRIN
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Apr. 27, 2017

The lack of data on Canada’s startup ecosystem is a major problem, says Dan Breznitz, the co-director of the Innovation Policy Lab and the Munk Chair of Innovation Studies at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs. “On anything that has to do with innovation policy, and I would actually say a lot of other growth policies, we have horrible data in Canada,” Mr. Breznitz says.

Gathering more data on accelerators and incubators is a good step, he says......Hockeystick’s platform acts as a tool for private companies to store data and share it with investors and potential investors. That data ranges from investments and sales numbers, to the number of employees and the names of the company’s founders.

Over 10,000 companies are currently using the platform. The new partnership will help the company reach its goal of having data on the majority of private companies in Canada instead of just a fraction, according to Raymond Luk, Hockeystick’s founder and CEO.
partnerships  WLU  start_ups  Kitchener-Waterloo  financial_data  privately_held_companies 
april 2017 by jerryking
Dancing with Disruption - Mike Lipkin
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By Mike Lipkin
#1. Become someone who knows.....a secret is a formula or knowledge that is only known to a few. If you own a secret, you have the power to share it so you can turn the few into the many. Secrets are everywhere – hiding in plain sight. The difference between someone who knows and someone who doesn’t is the willingness to do the work, find the information, talk to the people and formulate one’s strategy. Be a source of joy and not a source of stress!! Disruption begins long before.....Mastering other people's emotions....Add in a way that thrills and delights others!! Prospective of Personal Mastery....industry connection + internal influence.
# 2. Have an audacious ambition. If you want to be a disruptor, you can be humble, but you can’t be modest. You have to dream big....dream bigger than anything that gets in its way.
#3. Be simultaneously analytical and creative. There may be a gap in the market, but is there a market in the gap? ...Disruption demands left and right brain firing together. Your intuition may alert you to the opportunity but it’s your intellect that builds your business case. That’s why you need wingmen or women to complement your capacity. Fly social not solo.

HBR September 2016
Value Hierarchy
Functional >> Emotional >>Life changing >> social

#4. Be prolific. The more you lose, the more you win. 1.0 is always imperfect. You will hear the word “no” hundreds of times more than the word “yes.” The best way to get ready is to do things before you’re ready. The best you can do is get it as right as you can the first time and then get better, stronger, smarter. Disruptors try a lot more things than disruptees. They fail fast and they fail forward. [Practice: repeated performance or systematic exercise for the purpose of acquiring skill or proficiency.
#5. Communicate like magic. If you want to be a disruptor, you must be a great communicator. ... the right words generate oxytocin – the love hormone, whereas the wrong words generate cortisol, the stress hormone. .... tell your story in a way that opens people’s hearts, minds and wallets to you. Create a vocabulary.
#6. Be a talent magnet. Disruption demands the boldest and brightest partners....The best talent goes where it earns the highest return. Reputation is everything. [What would Mandela do?]
#7. Play like a champion today. Disruptors may not always play at their best but they play their best every day. They bring their A-Game no matter who they’re playing....you feel their intensity and passion. How hard are you hustling on any given day? Everything matters. There is no such thing as small. They’re all in, all the time.
affirmations  audacity  Communicating_&_Connecting  creativity  disruption  expertise  failure  hard_work  inequality_of_information  intuition  intensity  Pablo_Picasso  partnerships  passions  personal_branding  reputation  storytelling  talent  thinking_big  knowledge_intensive  imperfections  special_sauce  prolificacy  uncertainty  unshared_information 
april 2017 by jerryking
Why Andreessen Horowitz Models Itself After A Hollywood Talent Agency - Venture Capital Dispatch - WSJ
By DEBORAH GAGE
Jan 21, 2011

Andreessen Horowitz’s investors, including university endowments, foundations and funds of funds, are also betting big money on the firm’s story, Horowitz says. The firm aims to flip the venture industry on its head by acting more like a talent agency – specifically Creative Artists Agency, which became so prominent in Hollywood that it was hard to do deals without them being involved.

CAA co-founder Michael Ovitz, who served on Opsware’s board from 2000 until H-P’s acquisition in 2007, shared his secrets with the two partners, Horowitz said — even talking to Andreessen Horowitz’s employees when the firm started so that everybody could be on the same page.

Horowitz says he and Andreessen looked hard at everything Ovitz did, “and a lot of little things, we copied,” including even how Ovitz ran staff meetings.

Like CAA – and unlike more traditional venture capital firms – Andreessen Horowitz employs over 20 well-paid partners whose job is to help clients, i.e. the entrepreneurs, much in the same way CAA agents serve the talent.

Instead of book and movie and TV deals, the partners, each specialists in their fields, find engineers, designers, and product managers; the best marketing and public relations; and relationships with key customers – not just top management, but the guys who run the network and the database. They check references, and research companies and markets.

“When we were at Netscape, John Doerr introduced us to the CEO of AT&T,” Horowitz said. “That’s great, but he’s not buying a Web server. If you have no relationship at that level, it’s not as powerful, so we invest a lot in that.”...Like his firm, Horowitz believes every company should have a great story, too, because it motivates employees and helps explain the company to the outside world. “In a company, hundreds of decisions get made, but objectives and goals are thin,” he says. “I emphasize to CEOs, you have to have a story in the minds of the employees. It’s hard to memorize objectives, but it’s easy to remember a story.”
Andreessen_Horowitz  Marc_Andreessen  Ben_Horowitz  creating_valuable_content  Michael_Ovitz  CAA  partnerships  insights  professional_service_firms  talent_representation  storytelling  reference-checking 
march 2017 by jerryking
Facebook Is Rolling Out a Handful of New Measurement Tools for Advertisers – Adweek
By Marty Swant|September 21, 2016

Third-party partnerships help track sales, lift and clicks
Facebook  LBMA  Tune  measurements  omnichannel  effectiveness  tools  partnerships 
february 2017 by jerryking
Uber Extends an Olive Branch to Local Governments: Its Data
JAN. 8, 2017 | - The New York Times | By MIKE ISAAC.

unveiled Movement, a stand-alone website it hopes will persuade city planners to consider Uber as part of urban development and transit systems in the future.

The site, which Uber will invite planning agencies and researchers to visit in the coming weeks, will allow outsiders to study traffic patterns and speeds across cities using data collected by tens of thousands of Uber vehicles. Users can use Movement to compare average trip times across certain points in cities and see what effect something like a baseball game might have on traffic patterns. Eventually, the company plans to make Movement available to the general public.
municipalities  urban  urban_planning  cities  Boston  partnerships  traffic_patterns  Uber  Movement  data  data_driven 
january 2017 by jerryking
a16z Podcast: Ben and Marc Explain (Practically) Everything – Part 1 – Andreessen Horowitz
Marc: Cheaper to start. More expensive to grow. So, it goes back to what we were talking about before. So the market sizes are much larger. So, the prize is bigger. The market is larger and it takes more money to be able to build a company in the market. And so, yeah, you can start a lot of these companies with three laptops and three lattes a day and you’re off to the races. Three kids living on ramen noodles. But at some point, you need to build the company. And you need to build the company that is then going to go take the market. And the market is big. And the market is global and you’re going to need a company around that.

You’re going to need a sales force. You’re going to need marketing. You’re going to need a big development organization. You’re going to need customer service, customer support. You’re going to have a big recruiting campaign. You’re going to need partnerships. You’re going to need expansion capital. All these things kick in. And so these companies almost never stay small. It’s extremely rare that you’d see any company that does anything big in tech that doesn’t end up raising…doesn’t end up, number one, raising money and then number two, if you’re going to raise money, raise money from venture capital.
Andreessen_Horowitz  scaling  start_ups  marketing  partnerships  expansions  growth 
december 2016 by jerryking
From Michael Lewis, a Portrait of the Men Who Shaped ‘Moneyball’ - The New York Times
By ALEXANDRA ALTERDEC. 3, 2016
Lewis decided to explore how it started.

The inquiry led him to the work of two Israeli psychologists, Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman, whose discoveries challenged long-held beliefs about human nature and the way the mind works.

Mr. Lewis chronicles their unusual partnership in his new book, “The Undoing Project,” a story about two unconventional thinkers who saw the world differently from everyone around them. Their peculiar area of research — how humans make decisions, often irrationally — has had profound implications for an array of fields, like professional sports, the military, medicine, politics, finance and public health.....Tversky and Kahneman's research demonstrating how people behave in fundamentally irrational ways when making decisions, relying on their gut rather than available data, gave rise to the field of behavioral economics. That discipline attracted Paul DePodesta, a Harvard student, who later went into sports management and helped upend professional baseball when he went to work for Mr. Beane.....Unlike many nonfiction writers, Mr. Lewis declines to take advances, which he calls “corrupting,” even though he could easily earn seven figures. Instead, he splits the profits from the books, as well as the advertising and production costs, with Norton. The setup spurs him to work harder and to make more money if the books are successful, he says.

“You should have the risk and you should enjoy the reward,” he said. “It’s not healthy for an author not to have the risk.”
Michael_Lewis  Moneyball  books  book_reviews  risk-taking  unconventional_thinking  partnerships  biases  cognitive_skills  unknowns  information_gaps  humility  pretense_of_knowledge  overconfidence  conventional_wisdom  overestimation  metacognition  behavioural_economics  irrationality  decision_making  nonfiction  writers  self-awareness  self-analysis  self-reflective  proclivities  Daniel_Kahneman  psychologists  delusions  self-delusions  skin_in_the_game  gut_feelings 
december 2016 by jerryking
Auction houses embracing digital technology to sell to the new global rich
SEPTEMBER 18, 2014 by: John Dizard.

....The auction houses have been under pressure to adapt to this changing universe. While the most visible aspect of the houses’ digital revolution may be their online auctions, the most essential is in the systematising and networking of their customer, market and lot information. Without that, the auctioneers would lose control of their ability to charge gross margins in the mid-teens as intermediaries of the $30bn global art auction market....Within the quasi-duopoly of Christie’s and Sotheby’s at the top of the auction world, Christie’s has now moved to implement what it calls its “digital strategy”....Christie’s now has James Map (as in founder James Christie), a sort of private internal social network that allows specialists, client service staff, support staff and executives to see what is known about a client and his tastes. Past auction records, relatives’ purchases and sales, statistical inferences on how likely clients are to move from buying an expensive watch online to participating in a high-end evening sale – it all can be in the mix.

The idea, Murphy explains, was “to create an internal app that spiders into our database of information and brings up on our internal [screen] environment lots of connectivity. This is faster and better than the email chains [that it replaced].”....This summer, Sotheby’s announced a partnership with eBay, the online auction giant. While the details of the partnership are still being developed, it is understood eBay will distribute live Sotheby’s auctions to its global audience of 150m buyers.

Ken Citron, Christie’s head of IT

The digital strategy is also making it easier to take part in auctions. Even with all the unseen know-your-customer checks now required by financial supervisory agencies, it has become much faster and easier to register as an auction house client. About half now do so online.

But while the online revolution may have left some auction houses behind, for others it is generating new business. Auction houses used to regard the sale of smaller, cheaper objects from, for example, estate liquidations as an annoying loss-leader business that just wasted their specialists’ time. Now, however, many are making money selling objects for $2,000-$3,000; it’s just a matter of cutting transaction costs. “We have a new app with which you can take a picture, push a button, and it goes to a specialist, with a description. Then the specialist can decide if it might fit into an auction,” says Citron.
auctions  Sotheby's  Christie's  data  art  collectors  high_net_worth  partnerships  eBay  duopolies  digital_strategies  CRM  IT  margins  intermediaries  internal_systems  loss-leaders  transaction_costs  cost-cutting  know_your_customer  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  estate_planning  liquidity_events 
november 2016 by jerryking
How should you tap into Silicon Valley? | McKinsey & Company
September 2015
How should you tap into Silicon Valley?
By Alex Kazaks, Eric Kutcher, and Michael Uhl
McKinsey  Silicon_Valley  Communicating_&_Connecting  OPMA  howto  partnerships  innovation  boot_camps  corporate_investors 
february 2016 by jerryking
The bold rush to the Internet
Aug 2000 | Association Management pgs. 130-146 | by Carole Schweitzer,

START REFERRING TO ASSOCIATIONS AS "roadkill" (as Greg Dalton did in his February 7, 2000, article "Trade Groups: The Next Ro...
associations  online  business_models  partnerships  from notes
september 2015 by jerryking
Sree Sreenivasan
| Fast Company | Business + Innovation

What is something about your job that you think would surprise people?
Most people are surprised to know that the digital media team at the Met has 70 people in it. Our world-class team works on topics I love: web, digital, social, mobile, video, data, email, gallery interactives, media lab, and so much more. We like to run our team like a 70-person startup inside a 145-year-old company.

People always ask me how I justify the museum spending so many resources of digital media. I would always talk about the importance of connecting the physical and the digital, the in-person and the online (here's a TEDx talk I gave on this topic). But I recently got concrete proof that I've been sharing with anyone who will listen.

The photographer Carleton Watkins shot photos in 1861 of Yosemite that he showed to President Lincoln and inspired him to sign legislation that protected Yosemite forever and started the conservation movement. He did this without ever seeing Yosemite, just the facsimiles. We had an exhibition of these beautiful photos and they make the case better than I can for the value of something artificial (or digital) to inspire support, interest, and more, for something real.
innovation  digital_media  social_media  museums  cyberphysical  New_York_City  executive_management  partnerships  analog  meat_space  Sree_Sreenivasan  digital_strategies  physical_assets  physical_world  Abraham_Lincoln  photography  Yosemite  conservation 
may 2015 by jerryking
The Mind of Marc Andreessen - The New Yorker
MAY 18, 2015 | New Yorker | BY TAD FRIEND.

Doug Leone, one of the leaders of Sequoia Capital, by consensus Silicon Valley’s top firm, said, “The biggest outcomes come when you break your previous mental model. The black-swan events of the past forty years—the PC, the router, the Internet, the iPhone—nobody had theses around those. So what’s useful to us is having Dumbo ears.”* A great V.C. keeps his ears pricked for a disturbing story with the elements of a fairy tale. This tale begins in another age (which happens to be the future), and features a lowborn hero who knows a secret from his hardscrabble experience. The hero encounters royalty (the V.C.s) who test him, and he harnesses magic (technology) to prevail. The tale ends in heaping treasure chests for all, borne home on the unicorn’s back....Marc Andreessen is tomorrow’s advance man, routinely laying out “what will happen in the next ten, twenty, thirty years,” as if he were glancing at his Google calendar. He views his acuity as a matter of careful observation and extrapolation, and often invokes William Gibson’s observation “The future is already here—it’s just not very evenly distributed.”....Andreessen applies a maxim from his friend and intellectual sparring partner Peter Thiel, who co-founded PayPal and was an early investor in LinkedIn and Yelp. When a reputable venture firm leads two consecutive rounds of investment in a company, Andreessen told me, Thiel believes that that is “a screaming buy signal, and the bigger the markup on the last round the more undervalued the company is.” Thiel’s point, which takes a moment to digest, is that, when a company grows extremely rapidly, even its bullish V.C.s, having recently set a relatively low value on the previous round, will be slightly stuck in the past. The faster the growth, the farther behind they’ll be....When a16z began, it didn’t have even an ersatz track record to promote. So Andreessen and Horowitz consulted on tactics with their friend Michael Ovitz, who co-founded the Hollywood talent agency Creative Artists Agency, in 1974. Ovitz told me that he’d advised them to distinguish themselves by treating the entrepreneur as a client: “Take the long view of your platform, rather than a transactional one. Call everyone a partner, offer services the others don’t, and help people who aren’t your clients. Disrupt to differentiate by becoming a dream-execution machine.”
Marc_Andreessen  Andreessen_Horowitz  Silicon_Valley  transactional_relationships  venture_capital  vc  Peter_Thiel  long-term  far-sightedness  Sequoia  mindsets  observations  partnerships  listening  insights  Doug_Leone  talent_representation  CAA  mental_models  warning_signs  signals  beforemath  unevenly_distributed  low_value  extrapolations  acuity  professional_service_firms  Michael_Ovitz  execution  William_Gibson 
may 2015 by jerryking
Lunch with the FT: Jeremy King - FT.com
September 26, 2014 | FT | By Susie Boyt.

“Great restaurants should not define things, they should be the catalyst for things to happen.”...The thought that goes into his establishments, King tells me is, designed to create atmosphere and possibilities, leaving star billing to the diner. ...What, I ask him, is the secret of such a longstanding partnership?
“I always think the secret of a great relationship is [that] when one of the pair asserts an opinion and the other disagrees, the other examines and looks for the virtue in the person’s argument before looking for the downside.”
restaurants  restauranteurs  hospitality  hotels  partnerships  disagreements  argumentation  dining 
september 2014 by jerryking
5 Things Super Lucky People Do
Mar 17, 2014 | Inc. Magazine | BY Kevin Daum.

1. Play to your strengths. So much time and energy is wasted trying to do things you probably don't do very well. Author and Inc. columnist Lewis Schiff learned from his survey of incredibly wealthy people that they got that way by focusing only on what they do best. Everything else you can delegate, or you could find a partner to compensate for your weaknesses. That way, you will shine where you excel and attract opportunity. Good things come to those who emanate success.

2. Prepare in advance. Unlucky people often get that way because they're reactive and unprepared for whatever comes. People who have stored food and water in their basements aren't lucky to find themselves prepared when disaster strikes, they used forethought to make sure they had what they might need just in case. I personally scoff at this horrible recent trend of disparaging business plans because things change constantly. The point of a business plan isn't to follow it no matter what, it's to establish a structure for smart decision making that allows you to succeed no matter what the future might bring.

3. Start early. Some people seem to have more hours in the day. I myself don't need more than six hours of sleep and am constantly finding ways to be more efficient. I use that extra time to start my projects well in advance. My rewards aren't dependent upon the time of day that I take action. (This column is being written at 3 a.m.) But it does matter that I'm beginning to explore projects I expect to complete months or years from now. So many people only want to put their energy into things that provide immediate gratification. The most fortunate people I know are the ones who planted seeds early and now reap that harvest of happiness.

4. Connect with as many people as possible. The key to success is access to opportunity. Access comes from influence. If you're influential, people will come and bring opportunities to you. The bigger your following, the more powerful your influence. The only way to build a big following is to provide value to many people. You have to provide the sort of value that will cause people to spread your thoughts far and wide, attributing credit to you when they do. Are you creating that kind of value? If not, figure how you can.

5. Follow up. Opportunities often come and go because people don't respond in a timely manner. I'm always amazed when people ask me for something and I respond only to never hear from them again. Three months ago, a young woman asked me if I hire interns or assistants. I replied immediately saying I'm always willing to consider hiring people who bring value to my work. I asked her how she thought she could enhance what I could do. I never heard from her again. Perhaps she now considers herself unlucky that opportunity doesn't come her way. I believe that following up is often more powerful and impressive than the act of initiating.
tips  luck  Communicating_&_Connecting  opportunities  JCK  partnerships  focus  preparation  value_creation  networking  following_up  self-starters  overachievers  high_achieving  strengths  affirmations  forethought  weaknesses  individual_initiative  unprepared  chance  contingency 
march 2014 by jerryking
Future strategies: Feeding the culture-vultures
Dec 21st 2013 | | The Economist |

If museums are to be relevant to their local communities and keep up the flow of visitors, especially in western and southern states, they will have to appeal to radically different audiences and rethink their relationships with those who will be voting on public funding for museums in future.

...Consumers of culture now prefer to decide for themselves how they want knowledge and information served up to them, as testified by the growing popularity of pop-up museums and crowdsourced projects. “They want the opportunity to play in our sandbox,” says Ms Merritt. Curators, who used to be seen (and saw themselves) as experts, are now having to act more like facilitators or mentors.
future  museums  partnerships 
december 2013 by jerryking
Why newness, not nostalgia, is the way forward for the CBC - The Globe and Mail
Dec. 03 2013 |The Globe and Mail | JOHN DOYLE.

Pardon me if I seem like a CBC bore, but the future cannot be found in nostalgia for a fondly remembered past or in endless collaboration with the enemy. The future is niche and broad, both the new and the familiar....It’s unwise to posit a recalibrated CBC on the antiquities of the past. Nostalgia for The Journal, Barbara Frum, and Patrick Watson’s series is understandable, but there is no going back to the good old days. The TV landscape has changed utterly. Nostalgia is not the way forward....Lacroix’s reliance on partnerships is a red herring. Of course it makes sense to use partnerships with other broadcasters to deliver big sporting events. But to cite “collaboration” with giant private-broadcasting conglomerates as a general panacea is a mistake. CBC-TV’s future is being both niche and broad – and distinctive; its mandate must not be diminished by “collaboration.”...[CBC's]news and documentary coverage must be different. That means more progressive voices heard, filling a huge gap in the Canadian media, an arena dominated by centre and right-wing views. The politically-progressive base in Canada remains stable and remains largely unheard. It’s the CBC’s job to fill that vacuum. Less of the Don Cherry-style dismissal of “pinkos out there that ride bicycles” and more attention to those who reject the right-wing, Big Business view of the country....CBC needs to put art on the air and cover the arts and media with a vigour that no commercial broadcaster will allow....Instead, a sharp questioning of establishment views and establishment stars. Something to make people talk about – whether it’s the demolition of received opinion or the creation of an artistic work for TV that makes your eyes pop and your mind reel.

It’s a fact that CBC is presented with a new circumstance, less reliant on, and preoccupied with, hockey.
CBC  CBC_Radio  CBC_TV  Konrad_Yakabuski  niches  nostalgia  partnerships  digital_media  future 
december 2013 by jerryking
Creative partnerships are CBC’s new norm - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 28 2013 |The Globe and Mail | Hubert Lacroix

In the public interest, we are partnered with no fewer than four companies that some might consider our fierce competitors. Together, we will bring Canadians closer to their athletes, closer to the Games than ever before. We’ll be there in Rio too, not to mention the FIFA World Cup and the Pan American Games.

The media landscape is increasingly dominated by conglomerates with very deep pockets that both produce and distribute content. Let’s be honest, CBC can’t put a $5.2-billion bid on the table because we don’t have the specialty networks, pay-TV and mobility platforms to monetize those rights. So, we need to change our mindset. We look for how and where the public interest can be served by collaborating with those giants, in this case Rogers, to share national consciousness and preserve Canadian heritage.

Change has become something that CBC/Radio-Canada relishes. It represents an opportunity to renew our relationship with Canadians in novel and surprising ways. We now offer more services than ever before – 30 in all, up from 19 a decade ago – and in recent years have made the public broadcaster more Canadian, more regional and more digital.
creativity  partnerships  CBC  NHL  hockey  digital_media 
november 2013 by jerryking
Do Things that Don't Scale
July 2013 | Paul Graham

The question to ask about an early stage startup is not "is this company taking over the world?" but "how big could this company get if the founders did the right things?" And the right things often seem both laborious and inconsequential at the time.
advice  start_ups  Y_Combinator  Paul_Graham  scaling  recruiting  experience  user_growth  Steve_Jobs  management_consulting  barriers_to_entry  product_launches  partnerships  customer_acquisition 
november 2013 by jerryking
Two ‘fired guys’ poured ambition into Steam Whistle - The Globe and Mail
Oct. 03 2013 | The Globe and Mail | WALLACE IMMEN.

Steam Whistle is a case study for entrepreneurs trying to carve a niche in a competitive industry, says Eric Morse, associate dean of the University of Western Ontario’s Richard Ivey School of Business, who oversees the school’s Quantum Shift program for entrepreneurs.

“They figured out what they wanted to be good at early on, and that’s not always an easy thing to do,” Dr. Morse says. “Entrepreneurs are often throwing a bunch of stuff at the wall to see what sticks.”

“Don’t vary until proven necessary,” is another lesson this emphasizes, he says.

It actually takes more focus and dedication to stay successful once you have initial success,
Wallace_Immen  craftsmanship  entrepreneurship  entrepreneur  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  beers  Steam_Whistle  brewers  partnerships  variations  focus  dedication 
october 2013 by jerryking
Retiree Start-Ups With Age and Youth as Partners - NYTimes.com
By KERRY HANNON
Published: September 9, 2013

The rise of senior entrepreneurs like Mr. Lowe has been well documented. But start-ups like the one begun by Mr. Lowe and Mr. Uselton are a new twist in the trend, and a variant of traditional family businesses: so-called legacy partnerships. The partnerships are started at or near the older partner’s retirement from a lifelong career, so two generations bring complementary assets to a new business. The assets are typically capital and experience from the older partner and energy, technical expertise or online marketing skills from the younger.
retirement  entrepreneurship  start_ups  partnerships  generations  multigenerational  seniorpreneurs  Second_Acts 
september 2013 by jerryking
Checked your demographics lately?
August 30, 2013 | Adam Smith, Esq.| Bruce MacEwen.

So, to all the non-equity partners in the crowd, this is not about you. Rather, what follows is written from the perspective of someone who thinks a lot about the industry’s long run.

One of the strongest indices of organizations’ competitive strength over time is the ability to align and renew itself faster than rivals. As Scott Keller and Colin Price wrote in Beyond Performance: How Great Organizations Build Ultimate Competitive Advantage (Wiley, 2011):

Organizational health is about adapting to the present and shaping the future faster and better than the competition. Healthy organizations don’t merely learn to adjust themselves to their current context or to challenges that lie just ahead; they create a capacity to learn and keep changing over time. This, we believe, is where ultimate competitive advantage lies.

This is about, in a word, people.

We know talent matters, we pay through the nose roof for headhunters to deliver lateral upon lateral, the statistical majority of whom will disappoint, we recruit the “best and the brightest” from law school (the statistical majority of whom, etc.), and yet when it’s time for our organizations to be agile and responsive to changing client expectations and market conditions, we find ourselves throttled. How can this be?

Change—real not superficial, meaningful not trivial, lasting not flavor-of-the-month—requires people to go above and beyond. It’s not comfortable, and comfortable people won’t do it. This is where, I believe, the performance hazard of too many non-equity partners in a firm begins to come in.
law_firms  Bruce_MacEwen  workforce  workforce_planning  partnerships  complacency  change  organizational_effectiveness  organizational_learning  adaptability  learning_agility  books  disappointment  discomforts  competitive_advantage  talent  the_best_and_brightest 
september 2013 by jerryking
A radical idea for union leaders: partnership - The Globe and Mail
Aug. 19 2013 |The Globe and Mail | Konrad Yakabuski

Unions know they have an image problem, but just can’t seem to shake their old habits. A secret CAW-CEP discussion paper prepared last year identified the “growing negative public opinion of unions, and the view that unions are self-interested and outdated” as one of the factors requiring a radical rethinking of the union movement’s overall strategy.
unions  mergers_&_acquisitions  partnerships  Konrad_Yakabuski  radical_ideas 
august 2013 by jerryking
Cirque, Sid Lee team up to create marketing ‘events’ - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 20 2013 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER.

Cirque du Soleil is bringing its sense for spectacle to the marketing world, teaming up with Montreal ad agency Sid Lee to launch a branded entertainment company. The joint venture will aim to help brands create experiences that people actually want to watch, listen to, and experience. The joint venture, Sid Lee Entertainment, has been a year and a half in the making, and is an attempt to address a fundamental shift in advertising: away from pushing messages to consumers, and toward creating engaging content....Marketers have been approaching Cirque for years to develop entertainment projects, Mr. Lamarre said, but the company was unable to figure out how to do that without having it conflict with its own brand.

The goal is to create events engaging enough that the brands behind them can sell tickets, Mr. Cesvet said – and to potentially create a new economic model for an industry in flux.

“With advertising, we’re still selling hours,” he said. “What we want to do with this entertainment division is transform the revenue stream of our business … what clients expect from agencies is a lot more complex. You have to do an app, you have to do interactive experiences. I don’t think the value is recognized.”
marketing  branding  brands  Cirque_du_Soleil  Montreal  fascination  advertising_agencies  partnerships  joint_ventures  events  event_marketing  ideaCity  product_launches  customer_experience  experiential_marketing  content_creators  live_performances  interactivity  inbound  entertainment  Sid_Lee  Susan_Krashinsky  creating_valuable_content 
june 2013 by jerryking
Sanofi head sees cures for what ails Canada’s pharma sector - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 16 2013 |The Globe and Mail | SOPHIE COUSINEAU.

Canada and Quebec, where the country’s pharmaceutical R&D is concentrated, must also adapt quickly to the downsizing of in-house research.

“The business model has changed not only for financial considerations, but because the science has shifted,” he said. “It has become so complex that no single organization has all the disciplines to be successful.”

The collaborative approach that Mr. Viehbacher has tried to instill at Sanofi since he took over the company in late 2008 relies on creating an ecosystem like the one found in Boston, where the company acquired rare-disease specialist Genzyme Corp. for $20.1-billion (U.S.) in 2011.

In Boston, researchers from universities, biotech firms and pharmaceutical companies often work together from the get-go, in a public-private partnership, or PPP, culture. Big pharma doesn’t wait around to pick the biotech fruits when they are ripe. “We can accelerate the development or, in certain cases, kill a project earlier, so that resources can go elsewhere,” Mr. Viehbacher explained.
pharmaceutical_industry  Montreal  CEOs  Sanofi  accelerators  kill_rates  competitive_landscape  patents  intellectual_property  PPP  partnerships  Sophie_Cousineau 
june 2013 by jerryking
Past lessons for China’s new joint ventures
December 2010 | McKinsey & Company| by Stephan Bosshart, Thomas Luedi, and Emma Wang.
China  joint_ventures  collaboration  partnerships  McKinsey  lessons_learned 
june 2013 by jerryking
Unlikely expansion: When retail brands go wholesale -
Apr. 16 2013 | The Globe and Mail | MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER.

Aldo Group Inc. is on the hunt for retail space – inside the stores of other retailers, as the shoe specialist pursues a cost-conscious expansion in which it is teaming up with a growing roster of indirect rivals.

Merchants ranging from Aldo to fashion purveyor Joe Fresh (owned by grocery giant Loblaw Cos. Ltd.), Reitmans (Canada) Ltd. and Hudson’s Bay Co., have stepped up their partnering efforts, even as they raise the stakes by being tied to sometimes unstable chains....multichannel distribution allows rapid expansion into new markets without the expense or time needed to open new stores....Retailers are trying to cash in on brand awareness and production expertise to reach more customers in a cost-savvy way. But the business model isn’t without drawbacks, as merchants lose some control over the placement, prominence and marketing of their products....For years, in a reverse trend, manufacturers – from Nine West to Apple – have set up their own standalone stores to showcase their products and ensure their brands are not lost among many others within a larger retailer.

“Retailers want to be wholesalers and wholesalers want to be retailers,” Mr. Lichtszral said. “The lines are blurred everywhere … Wholesale distributors are opening their own websites and shipping directly to the consumer and, in doing that, are technically competing with their retail customers.”
growth  retailers  brands  distribution_channels  Aldo  Loblaws  Nine_West  Apple  wholesalers  multichannel  omnichannel  Joe_Fresh  partnerships  Reitmans  HBC  business_models  drawbacks  merchandising  manufacturers  expansions  store_within_a_store  cost-consciousness  Marina_Strauss  standalone  Fortune_500 
may 2013 by jerryking
'Congratulations, you've become a Goldman Sachs partner' | Business | The Guardian
Jill Treanor, City editor
The Guardian, Thursday 8 November 2012

To be selected, candidates will have survived a process known as "cross-ruffing", a term borrowed from the card game bridge. Insiders describe it as a rigorous cross-checking procedure that involves teams of Goldman partners interviewing each other about potential candidates.

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The individuals being cross-ruffed should, in theory, be unaware that their strengths and weaknesses are being scrutinised. They are not interviewed........ describes how partners are given the job of interviewing their fellow partners to discuss candidates put forward by divisional heads. The partner selected to cross-ruff is always drawn from another part of the firm, possibly even in another part of the world. No stone is left unturned — every aspect of their career to date is scrutinised — the deals they have worked on, the profit they have generated and the way they are regarded by their colleagues and staff.

The process, which Cohan believes was formalised by former Goldman banker and existing board member Stephen Friedman, continues even though the firm was floated on the stock market in 1999 and is no longer a partnership in the conventional sense. But the idea of partnership was retained "to maintain various core aspects of the firm's partnership culture among its leaders, including teamwork, client focus and a commitment to excellence".
Goldman_Sachs  partnerships  movingonup  howto  Wall_Street  career_paths  investment_banking  cross-checking  William_Cohan 
november 2012 by jerryking
Connery, Pissarro, Seydoux - Dealers in a New Partnership - NYTimes.com
Partners Create a Superdealership
By CAROL VOGEL
Published: September 6, 2012
art  auctions  dealerships  partnerships 
september 2012 by jerryking
Real-World Advice for the Young
04.11.05 | Forbes | Rich Karlgaard.

We owe our young people ...a set of "road rules" for the real world.

Purpose. Every young person needs to know that he was created for a purpose. ...I would, however, argue that there is also an economic purpose to our lives. It is to discover our gifts, make them productive and find outlets for their best contribution.

Priorities. The best single piece of advice from Peter Drucker: Stop thinking about what you can achieve; think about what you can contribute (to your company, your customers, your marriage, your community). This is how you will achieve. Enron had an achievement-first culture; it just achieved the wrong things...how many schools teach young people to think in terms of contribution?

Preparation. Lest you think I'm urging young people down a Mother Teresa-like path of self-sacrifice, I'm not. The task is to fit purpose and contribution into a capitalistic world. There is a crying need for prepared young people who can thrive in a realm of free-market capitalism. This great system works magnificently, but it doesn't work anything like the way it's taught in most universities. In the real world, the pie of resources and wealth is not fixed; it is growing all the time. In the real world, the game is not rigged and static; rather, money and talent move at the speed of light in the direction of freedom and opportunity. In the real world, greed is bad (because it takes your eye off customers), but profits are very good. Profits allow you to invest in the future. In the real world, rising living standards do not create pollution. Instead, they create an informed middle class that wants and works to reduce pollution.

Pan-global view. The economy is global.... There is no going back.

Partner. Many of the great startups of the last 30 years began as teams of two...Behind this phenomenon is a principle: Build on your strengths. To mitigate your weaknesses--and we all have them--partner up! Find your complement.
Perseverance. Young people are smarter and more sophisticated today. It's not even close. My own generation's SAT scores look like they came out of baseball's dead-ball era. But apart from the blue-collar kids who are fighting in Iraq, most American kids today are soft. That's a harsh statement, isn't it? But cultural anecdotes back it up. Kids weigh too much. Fitness is dropping. Three American high schoolers ran the mile in under four minutes in the 1960s. It's been done by one person since. Parents sue coaches when Johnny is cut from the team. Students sue for time extensions on tests. New college dorms resemble luxury hotels. College grads, unable to face the world, move back in with their parents and stay for years.

Does this sound like a work force you'd send into combat against the Chinese?
Rich_Karlgaard  advice  Peter_Drucker  youth  students  self-sacrifice  entrepreneurship  partnerships  rules_of_the_game  purpose  globalization  Junior_Achievement  perseverance  millennials  serving_others  priorities  preparation  profits  greed  fitness  talent_flows  capital_flows  static  risk-mitigation  complacency  blue-collar  Chinese  capitalism 
august 2012 by jerryking
Partnering with private label
March 1998 | Frozen Food Age | by Dan Harrison.

Deals with issues concerning private label marketing in the frozen foods market. Challenges of private label marketing; Perception of the emerging swing shoppers toward private label products; Key to success in private labeling; Idea behind the as good as the next one strategy in private labeling; Other proven strategies for private labeling.
frozen_foods  private_labels  partnerships 
august 2012 by jerryking
Partnership Charter
June 28, 2004 | Publishers Weekly | Mark Rotella, Sarah F Gold, Lynn Andriani. Michael Scharf. Emily Chenoweth.

business partners should have an operating charter in addition to a partnership agreement. This operating charter, while not legally binding, is a strategic way for partners to have a serious. ongoing discussion about how they plan to run their business. deal with work issues and people, and spell out their expectations. The actual charter is far less important than the conversations leading up to its drafting. Gage discusses the four key questions that should be considered when deciding to form a partnership. While sonic people can explain why they want to own a business and why they want to have a partner. two questions - are there better alternatives than choosing a partner and is the person you're choosing the best partner -are more to answer.
partnerships 
june 2012 by jerryking
Facebook, Apple girding for Google threat -
Jun. 12 2012 | The Globe and Mail | Robert Cyran.

It has become a Silicon Valley article of faith that companies need to master mobile, social and cloud technologies to prosper. Google is making efforts in both smartphones and social networks. For example, gripping social networks encourage customers to upgrade to more powerful phones. By teaming up, Facebook gets access to arguably the best smartphone platform, and Apple the world’s biggest social network. Partnerships are hard to manage – after all, Google and Apple used to be best buddies – but it gives both companies powerful tools to take on a fierce common enemy.
Facebook  Apple  Google  partnerships  frenemies 
june 2012 by jerryking
P&G's $3 Billion Sideline - WSJ.com
March 20, 2012 | WSJ | By EMILY GLAZER.

Procter & Gamble Co. PG -0.75% has been licensing out hundreds of undeveloped patents, brands and rights to new products as it tries to turn around some languishing businesses and extend successful ones. The little-known practice includes brands such as Febreze, Pampers Kandoo, Mr. Clean and others....P&G ramped up its licensing efforts—often partnering with smaller companies—after discovering that the side business had been generating significant revenue. P&G says it didn't even calculate how much its external partners were bringing in from P&G products until three years ago. When it did, the answer was a surprise—$3 billion in each of the past three years.
P&G  outlicensing  partnerships 
june 2012 by jerryking
"Portrait of a perfect salesman."
3 May 2012| Financial Times | Philip Delves Broughton.

Tips for closing any deal

Know the odds

Most salespeople face far more rejection than acceptance. Knowing how many calls or meetings it takes to make each sale helps develop the positive attitude vital to succeed. After all, 99 rejections may be just the prelude to that triumphant yes.

Find a selling environment that suits you

Some people are great seducers, others dogged persuaders. Some like to make lots of sales each day, others prefer making one a year. Some enjoy high financial incentives, others thrive on the human relationships. Decide who you are first, then find a sales role that suits your personality type.

Be your customer's partner not their adversary

Great salespeople create value around products and services that they can convey and deliver to their customers. Paying attention and acting in the interests of your customer rather than yourself is very difficult. But as information about price and features becomes more widely available, service and relationships become the real value in each sale.
sales  selling  Philip_Delves_Broughton  Salesforce  character_traits  success_rates  personality_types/traits  customer_centricity  ratios  partnerships  relationships  rejections  salesmanship  salespeople 
may 2012 by jerryking
Indirect Approach Helps A Start-Up Win Business - WSJ.com
November 11, 2003 | WSJ | By PAULETTE THOMAS | Special to THE WALL STREET JOURNAL.

For start-ups attempting to pitch a sale to a big corporation, it may make more sense to penetrate the target through a side door. Piggyback with a current vendor of record already serving that large corporation.
small_business  serial_entrepreneur  large_companies  Sodexho  subcontracting  partnerships  Aramark 
may 2012 by jerryking
FORGET REVENUE & PROFITS, think about ROPE
| EDGE International | Friedrich Blase.

Making ROPE part of your cockpit dashboard
is a fairly straight forward exercise; it
promises that you individually as well as your
firm collectively are not overly focused on
achieving high revenue and profitability, but
the efficiency with which partner effort is converted
into revenue and ultimately profits.
law_firms  time-management  lawyers  Managing_Your_Career  billing  metrics  partnerships  professional_service_firms 
october 2011 by jerryking
Do You Need a Partner? - WSJ.com
MARCH 7, 2010 | WSJ | By ALEXANDRA LEVIT. A biz partnership is
like a marriage, know your top candidates on a personal level. Make
sure you genuinely enjoy spending time with them. Pay special attention
to whether you trust & can communicate openly with them, as these
are essential traits in a successful partnership. Next, you'll want to
do a background check, which involves asking potential partners for
detailed resumes, financial statements & references from people
they've done business with before. Once you select a partner, approach
the new relationship with total transparency. Put mutual expectations on
paper and have an attorney draw up a formal partnership agreement.

This agreement should include details such as how the business is
organized (general partnership, corp., LLC, etc.); how profits &
losses will be managed; how the business will run on a daily basis; what
will happen if one partner dies, retires or leaves the business; &
relevant liability, insurance & tax info..
partnerships  RFID  reference-checking 
july 2011 by jerryking
How the Beatles strike a chord in business - The Globe and Mail
Harvey Schachter
From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Posted on Tuesday, May 3, 2011
Harvey_Schachter  Beatles  partnerships 
may 2011 by jerryking
Microsoft Co-Founder Hits Out at Gates -
MARCH 30, 2011 | WSJ.com | By NICK WINGFIELD And ROBERT A. GUTH
partnerships  Microsoft  billgates  Paul_Allen 
march 2011 by jerryking
The Power of Partnerships - NYTimes.com
March 10, 2011, By DAVID BORNSTEIN. There is an effort in
the social sector that is gaining momentum called “collective impact”.
It's a strategy of creating alliances of civic and business leaders that
is being applied to social problems across the nation. It involves a
disciplined effort to bring together dozens or even hundreds of
organizations in a city (or sector) to establish a common vision, adopt a
shared set of measurable goals and pursue evidence-based actions that
reinforce one another’s work and further those goals. Collaboration
isn’t new but this kind of directed coordination across many groups, and
spanning different sectors, is novel....One difficulty is that most
foundations and governments like to target their support to individual
programs or organizations. They are used to thinking about impact
through scale and replication, not integration of effort. Very few
funders invest in the connective tissue that is necessary to foster
meaningful collaborations.
problem_solving  partnerships  foundations  SUNY  collaboration  social_entrepreneurship  social_enterprise  Communicating_&_Connecting 
march 2011 by jerryking
Andreessen Horowitz Adds Another Partner - Digits - WSJ
January 14, 2011, | | By Pui-Wing Tam. Andreessen Horowitz,
the Menlo Park, Calif.-based venture-capital firm led by Netscape
Communications co-founder Marc Andreessen and entrepreneur Ben Horowitz,
is adding a new partner who will work with start-ups on market
development.

Mark Cranney, 46 years old, who worked with Messrs. Andreessen and
Horowitz at their previous company, enterprise technology firm Opsware,
will join Andreessen Horowitz as a partner on market development.
Andreessen_Horowitz  venture_capital  Pui-Wing_Tam  partnerships 
january 2011 by jerryking
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