jerryking + ontario   128

Weekend Getaway from Toronto: Why Elora is the perfect fall escape - The Globe and Mail
CHRISTY WRIGHT
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 17, 2019
UPDATED SEPTEMBER 18, 2019
9 COMMENTS
Elora  Ontario  things_to_do 
27 days ago by jerryking
New Ontario initiative targets complex, white-collar crimes
AUGUST 20, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | GREG MCARTHUR.

The Ontario government has quietly launched an initiative intended to solve a problem that has vexed Canadian law enforcement: the successful prosecution of complex, white-collar crimes.

With little fanfare, the province has created what it is calling the Serious Fraud Office (SFO), with a structure that is novel to Canada: teaming up investigators and prosecutors and dedicating them to financial crimes that are too sprawling for any one municipal police force to handle.....Ontario’s office, however, will investigate an array of financial crimes, not just money laundering but large-scale fraud and corruption. It was created to fix long-standing issues with how the government combats such crimes, the two officials in charge of the initiative said in an interview......One of the primary goals is to bridge gaps between investigators and prosecutors......to prevent cases from languishing and forcing judges to throw them out because of unconstitutional court delays. Unlike a traditional police investigation, the SFO’s structure means prosecutors will be heavily involved from the outset of a case........The SFO is also designed to thwart an issue common to most police departments: the frequent shifting of resources away from fraud units whenever police are confronted with a more pressing public-safety issue, such as a threat of terrorism......“White-collar crime investigations are both complex and lengthy. Specialization and long-term experience of both prosecutors and the investigators will be critical to success.”
corruption  financial_crimes  financial_penalties  fraud  fraud_detection  groundbreaking  large-scale  law_enforcement  legal_strategies  money_laundering  Ontario  prosecutors  Queens_Park  securities_enforcement  securities_industry  white-collar  white-collar_crime 
8 weeks ago by jerryking
Canada’s AI Ecosystem — Toronto - Believing - Medium
Aug 8, 2018
Part 2: Ontario’s complete artificial intelligence value chain
artificial_intelligence  Canada  ecosystems  Ontario  value_chains 
july 2019 by jerryking
Not just another long weekend: Why Canada should rebrand the August ‘Civic Holiday’ - The Globe and Mail
DAN GARDNER
CONTRIBUTED TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED 2 DAYS AGO
UPDATED AUGUST 3, 2018
Dan Gardner is a senior fellow at the University of Ottawa’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. His books include Risk: The Science and Politics of Fear and Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction
Canada  Ontario  rebranding  Emancipation  slavery  history 
august 2018 by jerryking
Ontario airports must accommodate traffic growth, study says - The Globe and Mail
REG KEENAN - AIRLINE INDUSTRY REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, May 09, 2017
Ontario  airports  GTAA  congestion  user_growth 
may 2017 by jerryking
Southern Ontario should be an innovation cluster, not a farm team - The Globe and Mail
PATRICK DEANE, MERIC GERTLER AND FERIDUN HAMDULLAHPUR
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Dec. 28, 2015
industrial_policies  uToronto  uWaterloo  innovation  Ontario  clusters  Kitchener-Waterloo 
december 2015 by jerryking
Ms. Wynne: Painting wasteful policies with a green brush won’t fool Ontarians - The Globe and Mail
CHRISTINE VAN GEYN
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Dec. 21, 2015

The cap-and-trade system for reducing emissions of greenhouse gases is a revenue plan couched in green language. It is a complex scheme that involves the government creating financial products called “carbon credits” that it then forces industries to buy and trade. Of course it requires the establishment of an enormous bureaucracy. The plan is projected to raise $2-billion in revenue for the government each year.
Ontario  Liberals  green  Kathleen_Wynne  cap-and-trade  environment  politics  policy  green_washing  carbon_credits 
december 2015 by jerryking
Ontario Tender Fruit Lab
October- December 2014

Found by Googling "challenges import exotic fresh produce ontario"
Ontario  fruits  fresh_produce  branding  organic  agribusiness  agriculture  farming  retailers  supermarkets  grocery  MaRS  sustainability  challenges  problems  solutions  farmland  local 
august 2015 by jerryking
Notley can weather the storm in Alberta - The Globe and Mail
BOB RAE
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, May. 07 2015

But 1990 in Ontario is not 2015 in Alberta. The economy truly cratered in Ontario: 300,000 jobs lost in just a few months; collapsing real estate prices; high interest rates and a strong dollar high; and a new free-trade agreement creating a “structural adjustment” that saw an avalanche of plant closings. It became clear that the reason for the early election was to get back in before the recession really started to bite. The downturn was the worst since 1930, and worse than anything faced in 2008-2009....Ms. Notley’s fiscal challenge is real, but does not compare to Ontario’s in those days...Her risks are pressures from within to push ahead with an ambitious agenda, and dealing with a business community and broader electorate that have their own preoccupations. But by being completely transparent about choices, and tempering unrealistic expectations and fears (as she is already doing), she can weather the storm.

Finding allies in the business community is key. There will be the diehards – and the blowhards – but beyond that, there are leaders who care about the province, who have deep roots in their communities, and who recognize that in Ms. Notley they have someone whose popularity and competence do not seem ephemeral. That process of reaching out is both public and private, and will require all her skills. But it can be done.

The harder task is dealing with expectations from the many groups and supporters whose connections to the NDP run deep....It ain’t easy.
Bob_Rae  Rachel_Notley  NDP  Ontario  '90s  expectations  Alberta  provincial_governments  elections 
may 2015 by jerryking
Ontario will eventually have to pay the piper - The Globe and Mail
JEFFREY SIMPSON
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Dec. 13 2014,

Fortunately, Bonnie Lysyk, the province’s Auditor-General, is not beholden to the vagaries of politics and speaks truth both to power, where it most likely will not be heeded, and to the general public, where it will be ignored. As she plaintively wrote in a report this week, the office has been warning about the debt for three years but “has attracted little public attention.”

The AG urged “legislators and the public to start a conversation about paying down the province’s total debt.” Note the words “paying down.” Not stabilizing, but reducing. A tall order.

The AG’s numbers were stark. Even if the government balances the books by 2017-18 (which is rather implausible), net debt will have more than doubled in a decade....The AG could have added three other factors that will make Ontario’s situation even more difficult than the report conveyed.

First, the population is aging, and aging comes with more costs for the government. Second, health care is now rising at just 2 per cent a year (compared to about 7 per cent from 2000 to 2010). It’s doubtful that this modest rate of increase can be sustained. Third, the population’s aging will contribute to lower rates of economic growth, which in turn will crimp government revenues at current levels of taxation.
debt  Jeffrey_Simpson  Ontario  aging  slow_growth  auditors  speak_truth_to_power  grey_tsunami 
december 2014 by jerryking
Is there life in MaRS? Dubious - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Oct. 16 2014
MaRS  Konrad_Yakabuski  Ontario  Liberals  Vivek_Wadhwa 
october 2014 by jerryking
Ontario to pay $308-million for MaRS real-estate bailout - The Globe and Mail
ADRIAN MORROW
Toronto — The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Sep. 23 2014,
bailouts  MaRS  real_estate  Ontario 
september 2014 by jerryking
Ontario Liberals promise $1-billion for Ring of Fire - The Globe and Mail
KALEIGH ROGERS
THUNDER BAY, Ont. — The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, May. 25 201
Ring_of_Fire  Ontario  Liberals 
august 2014 by jerryking
Wynne’s Ontario can no longer afford to ignore fiscal reality - The Globe and Mail
JEFFREY SIMPSON
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Jul. 05 2014,

Now, having systematically fled from reality before and during the election, and having been rewarded handsomely for this evasion, Ms. Wynne and her government face the difficult task of beginning to tell the truth. This volte-face is always hard for a government that lives and dies by what pollsters tell politicians that voters want to hear, rather than by what they need to hear.

Squaring the circle of Ontario’s deteriorating fiscal situation with the expansionist Liberal budget will require spending restraint of a kind for which the party did not prepare the electorate, because the spending restraint will have to be tighter than anything the Liberals imagined.
Jeffrey_Simpson  Kathleen_Wynne  Ontario  deficits  budgets  credit-analysis  credit-ratings 
july 2014 by jerryking
Toronto wise to hold off celebrating Wynne’s victory - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 13 2014

Ontario, and by extension its capital city, is facing big challenges. Once the dynamo of the national economy, the province is struggling to create jobs and maintain growth. Joblessness runs consistently above the national average. Ontario’s troubles have obvious and serious effects on Toronto. This city is in the process of moving from big city to true metropolis. Hundreds of thousands of immigrants are arriving every decade from all corners of the world. The city is growing up (quite literally, in its booming downtown). Will it thrive on this growth or choke on it?

To cope, Toronto needs to invest in transit, roads, water systems and other key infrastructure. It needs to reform its often-inept city government, making it leaner and more responsive. If it is to overcome the stresses of growth and continue to thrive in the coming years, it needs the consistent help of the provincial government, to which city hall is tightly tethered.

More than that, it needs Ontario to succeed. Ontario’s problem is Toronto’s problem.

Mr. Hudak’s Conservatives and Ms. Wynne’s Liberals offered starkly different solutions. Mr. Hudak promised to cut big government down to size, trim corporate taxes and spur job creation that way. Ms. Wynne promised to invest instead of cut, pouring money into transit and other needs.
Marcus_Gee  Toronto  Kathleen_Wynne  Ontario  Liberals  joblessness  job_creation  immigrants  immigration  responsiveness 
june 2014 by jerryking
Ontario PCs offer a bit of doable, a lot of dreamland - The Globe and Mail
JEFFREY SIMPSON
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 30 2014

Conversely, there are two very doable and sensible ideas in the Conservative arsenal. Private clinics of the kind that operate in other public health systems, authorized, regulated and reimbursed by the state, should be allowed to do routine, repetitive surgeries. And arbitrators, when settling public-sector disputes, must take into account the “ability to pay,” instead of just ratcheting up settlements based on comparisons with other groups of workers.
Jeffrey_Simpson  elections  myths  Ontario  Tim_Hudak  transit  provincial  Progressive_Conservatives  Queen’s_Park 
june 2014 by jerryking
Why the Ontario election campaign is a mystery, even to those involved - The Globe and Mail
ADAM RADWANSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 23 2014

reports from candidates and their teams who are out knocking on doors indicate that even fewer voters than usual are aware there is an election on, let alone have strong impressions of how it’s playing out.

That’s especially the case in the suburban ridings of the Greater Toronto Area, generally considered Ontario’s most important electoral battleground, where the commuter-heavy population is particularly difficult to make contact with. ...Then there are the uncertainties about what campaign Ontarians will see the rest of the way. Just as the pollsters are trying to adjust to the difficulty of reaching people the way they used to, so too are the parties. Amid experimentation with online and other less traditional forms of advertising, nobody is quite sure what will break through; neither is it obvious whose efforts to use data to micro-target voters in ground campaigns will work.
Ontario  elections  data  political_campaigns  GTA  microtargeting  open_data 
may 2014 by jerryking
Ontario’s ‘none of the above’ election - The Globe and Mail
JEFFREY SIMPSON
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, May. 24 2014

Start with economic growth after inflation. From 1982 to 2013, it averaged 2.6 per cent. From 2014 to 2035, it will be 2.1 per cent. Roughly speaking, therefore, growth will be about 20 per cent slower.

The labour force will grow more slowly largely because of an aging population, a change being felt throughout Canada. Labour productivity will be flat at best, and quite likely lower than from 1985 to 2000. In the meantime, global competition will intensify.

Manufacturing has been declining as a share of the economy in North America and Western Europe. Ontario’s decline was halted temporarily back when the Canadian dollar plunged to nearly 60 cents, but those days are long gone.

The province’s cost competitiveness – this is one of the two or three central challenges – has been poor. Unit labour costs have gone up by a little over 5 per cent per year over the last 13 years, compared with just over 2 per cent in the United States.

When a province’s unit labour costs rise more than twice as fast as the country where it does 78 per cent of its trade, the results are obvious: plant shutdowns, unemployment and not enough new capacity added. Automobiles are the classic case: plant openings in Mexico and the U.S., but none recently in Ontario.

Business investment in machinery and equipment has lagged the Canadian average and is far below the United States. Research and development, a pathway to innovation, also lags. It’s better than the very poor Canadian average, but far below the U.S. Take away the healthy financial sector and the Toronto’s overheated housing market, and what do you have?

In Toronto and Ottawa, where prosperity is sustained, it’s easy to forget the swaths of the province in the southwest, north and east, where very little new economic activity has been taking place. The old industrial cities – Hamilton, Windsor, St. Catharines, Thunder Bay, Sudbury, Sault Ste. Marie – and smaller cities, such as Leamington, are nearly all suffering in one form or another.

For most of the past quarter-century, Ontario provincial governments have run deficits. Slowly, the debt has risen. Such is the situation that Ontario now receives yearly small payments from the country’s equalization scheme. (And such is the absurdity of the scheme that Ontario taxpayers remain net contributors to Ottawa, which then turns around and gives a small portion of the revenues back in equalization.)

The Ontario government has reached far, but failed to execute: clean energy, gas plants, e-health, Ornge air ambulance, nuclear cost overruns. No wonder trust in government is low. For almost a decade, the Liberal government let health-care spending rip – 7-per-cent yearly increases without commensurate improvements in the system. (Spending increases are now down to 2.5 per cent a year.)

Very, very powerful – and very, very conservative – public-sector unions and associations in schools, universities, health care, policing, firefighting and municipal government make change very, very difficult.
Ontario  elections  turnout  Jeffrey_Simpson  challenges  long-term  slow_growth  low_growth  Queen’s_Park 
may 2014 by jerryking
Why crime is plunging but police costs are soaring - The Globe and Mail
Margaret Wente

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Apr. 17 2014

Orangeville’s police force is the highest-paid in Ontario. Of the 34 municipal employees who made more than $100,000 last year, 14 are cops. Another seven are firefighters. hat’s the way it is across much of Canada. The cops and firefighters are taking home the biggest paycheques in town. While other public-sector salaries are frozen, their pay is rising faster than inflation. And the cost is eating small-town budgets alive.
Margaret_Wente  Ontario  public_sector  criminality  pensions  unions  police_unions  overpaid 
april 2014 by jerryking
About Data Catalyst - MaRS Data Catalyst
Helen Kula, Manager, Data Product
Adam Jacobs, Data Analyst
Sameer Vasta, Manager, Public Affairs
MaRS  open_data  entrepreneurship  Ontario  Toronto 
december 2013 by jerryking
Horizon Milling G.P. Purchases Land in Guelph, Ontario, to Build State-of-the-Art Flour Mill
13 Dec 2011 | Targeted News Service [Washington, D.C]

Horizon Milling G.P., a partnership formed by Cargill and CHS, today announced plans to construct a new flour mill in Guelph, Ontario. The fac...
agribusiness  grains  Ontario  Guelph  Cargill  from notes
november 2013 by jerryking
Slide 1 - Growing Forward 2 Processor Program Information.pdf
Terrific Growing Forward 2 presentation. use in conjunction with Montu.
presentations  agribusiness  Ontario  GF2 
november 2013 by jerryking
Blue Goose revitalizing Manitoulin ag industry
8/13/2012 2:08:11 PM Print | Font Sizes: Normal Text Large Text
inShare
Blue Goose revitalizing Manitoulin ag industry

By: Lindsay Kelly
organic  Ontario  cattle  beef  private_equity  agriculture  agribusiness 
november 2013 by jerryking
This Canadian cheese named best in the world - The Globe and Mail
SUE RIEDL

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Oct. 15 2013
cheese  Ontario  Sue_Riedl 
october 2013 by jerryking
Yes you can (and should) escape Toronto’s concrete jungle. Here's how
Oct. 04 2013 | The Globe and Mail | ROBERT SARNER
Biking through Elora
travel  Ontario  parks  Guelph  things_to_do 
october 2013 by jerryking
Living the Grand life
01 May 2002| Globe & Mail pg.: T.2.|by Steve Galea.

Just an hour and a half's drive from Toronto lies the Grand River, one of Ontario's best and most scenic trout waters for fly-fishing

Picture ...
fishing  Ontario  fly-fishing  trout  from notes
september 2013 by jerryking
Debate flares up over Northern Ontario's Ring of Fire - The Globe and Mail
JOSH WINGROVE

THUNDER BAY, ONT. — The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Jul. 05 2013,

The so-called Ring of Fire is a 5,000-square-kilometre crescent of chromite, nickel, copper, zinc and gold – a vast deposit discovered a decade ago in remote Northern Ontario, much of it inaccessible by road and surrounded by nine Matawa First Nations. Interest in development took off when Mr. Gravelle held the mining portfolio from 2007 to 2011. /// The Ring of Fire’s proponents say it would be a jolt to the national economy. Tony Clement, the federal cabinet minister responsible for economic development in Northern Ontario, has estimated the deposit’s value at between $30-billion and $50-billion.
Ring_of_Fire  Ontario  Bob_Rae  aboriginals  economic_development  mining 
july 2013 by jerryking
Holland Marsh madness
Oct. 09 2009 | - The Globe and Mail | by Anthony Reinhart.
farming  farmland  Ontario  Toronto  agriculture  fresh_produce  local  locavore  Holland_Marsh 
may 2013 by jerryking
Confederate flag ugly symbol of human bondage that should not be used - The Globe and Mail
March 7, 2013 | Globe & Mail
The flag of the Confederate States during the American Civil War has been the subject of recent controversy in two places in Ontario. Though it should not be prohibited as hate speech, Canadians should not regard the flag as a harmless cultural symbol. There would have been no such Confederacy and no such emblem if slavery had not existed in the southern United States. What some Southerners euphemistically called the “peculiar institution” was at the very core of the war.

In Hamilton, a two-location barbecue restaurant called Hillbilly Heaven displays the Confederate flag, giving offence to many in an area that was a leading destination for escaped slaves on the Underground Railroad. And in Sutton, Ont., on Lake Simcoe, the local high school has banned the use of the same flag on its premises; many students had adopted it by association with country and western music.

Hillbilly Heaven should be allowed to use the Confederate flag, just as people should be free not to eat there. The school is another matter; a public institution should not condone an expression of racism and human bondage on its grounds.
the_South  slavery  Ontario  high_schools  restaurants  Confederacy  symbolism  Civil_War 
march 2013 by jerryking
Ontarians' dream is over: Power bills are going up - The Globe and Mail
MURRAY CAMPBELL

From Monday's Globe and Mail

Published Monday, Aug. 18 2003
Ontario  debt  electric_power  NDP  politics 
march 2013 by jerryking
True innovation doesn’t flow from a pipeline
Feb. 22 2013 | The Globe and Mail |Konrad Yakabuski.

... If the oil companies can’t ship raw Canadian resources using that 150-year-old technology, they will rely on an even older one – rail. And if not rail, they might just float their bitumen on barges down the Mississippi.

Huckleberry Finn might have marvelled at this inventiveness, but it doesn’t quite cut it as a 21st-century national strategy for wealth creation. Yet our frantic obsession with exporting minimally processed bitumen is sucking up all the oxygen in the national conversation. Getting Alberta’s oil to market is “the most important economic issue” facing the country, says former federal cabinet minister Jim Prentice. There is “no more critical issue facing Canada today,” adds Enbridge chief executive Al Monaco.

In fact, the most critical issue facing Canada today may just be figuring out why we find ourselves in this situation. Raw resources can be a tremendous source of income, but they are volatile, and we’ve always known that overreliance on them is a recipe for economic stuntedness. As Bank of Canada Governor Mark Carney says: “Real wealth is built through innovation.”

Innovation is not wholly absent from Canada’s oil patch. But it’s hardly a first line of business. You’d think it would be a top priority, given the vexatious characteristics of Alberta bitumen, the oil sands’ distressing environmental footprint and the Canadian industry’s growing global image problem. Even in boom times, however, the Canadian oil and gas industry spends a piddling proportion of its revenues on research and development......Last week, PricewaterhouseCoopers predicted that the coming boom in global shale oil production could slash the price of crude by $50 (U.S.) a barrel over the next two decades. “One effect will be to cut the need for expensive, environmentally destructive extraction techniques like the Arctic and tar sands,” the head of PwC’s oil and gas team told Reuters.... the real issue facing Ontario is its failure to make the shift from making low-tech goods to advanced manufacturing, the only kind that can support middle-class wages. Governments have showered the industry with tens of billions of dollars trying to make Canadian firms more innovative, to little avail. Cash-strapped and fed up, federal Finance Minister Jim Flaherty slashed R&D tax credits in last year’s budget. The result will be even less innovation, as domestic companies cut back and foreign-owned firms shift R&D elsewhere.

“Canada’s problem,” says Robert Atkinson, the author of Innovation Economics, “is that it’s not Germany, which has a much better engineering innovation system, and it’s not the U.S., which has a very good system of science-based entrepreneurship. You’re mediocre in both.”
Keystone_XL  pipelines  crossborder  oil_industry  Mark_Carney  Ontario  innovation  oil_patch  wealth_creation  books  natural_gas  natural_resources  fracking  shale_oil  hydraulic_fracturing  Konrad_Yakabuski  oil_sands  complacency  mediocrity  commodities  volatility  cash-strapped  national_strategies  environmental_footprint 
march 2013 by jerryking
A look into the future
| Greenhouse Canada | Written by Dave Harrison

Shalin Khosla, the greenhouse vegetable specialist with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, says most of the construction last year was in glass. Much of the new acreage was in peppers, followed by tomatoes and cucumbers.

“The sector is continuing to move forward,” he notes. “We will have about 2,200 acres in the province once the dust settles this year.”

The renewed interest in glass is due to the fact glass prices have dropped in recent years, while plastic prices has risen. “The price difference isn’t as large as it used to be.”
greenhouses  future  trends  Ontario  Canada  fresh_produce  OGVG 
february 2013 by jerryking
Mid-sized Canadian manufacturing, up in smoke
Feb. 15 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Jeffrey Simpson.

From 2006 to 2010, the BDC found, “the number of Canadian mid-sized firms decreased by 17 per cent (from 9,370 to 7,814).” Manufacturing suffered the biggest losses: From 2001 to 2010, more than half of the mid-sized manufacturing firms disappeared (the number falling from 2,807 to 1,381).

Maybe they disappeared because they got bigger? No such luck. Only 1.4 per cent grew to become firms with more than 500 employees, whereas 14 per cent went from mid-sized to having fewer than 100 employees. Not surprisingly, Ontario suffered the most from the downdraft of mid-sized manufacturing firms.

Why is all this happening? The BDC offers three plausible reasons: the parity of the Canadian dollar with the U.S. greenback, competition from China (and other places) and the brutal recession of 2008-2009.

Other reasons could be added: spotty innovation and research, inadequate access to financing for growth, an uneven record of searching for foreign (read: non-U.S.) markets.
manufacturers  Ontario  Jeffrey_Simpson  Mittelstand  Germany  BDC  mid-sized  mid-market  beyondtheU.S.  loonie  parity 
february 2013 by jerryking
Global Fruit founder plans apple revolution
Dec. 24th, 2009 | The Western Producer | by Jeffrey Carter
apples  entrepreneur  Ontario  innovation 
january 2013 by jerryking
Teachers’ unions are obsolete
Jan. 12 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Margaret Wente.
Wherever you live in Canada, whatever party your provincial government happens to belong to, strife in the schools is about to become a way of life. The public-sector pie is shrinking, and everybody on the public payroll will have to take a hit. That’s why Ontario’s education-friendly government cracked down on the teachers. If they’re not reined in, everybody else will fight back, too. More than 1.1-million people in Ontario – civil servants, social workers, nurses, teachers, police, garbage collectors – are on the public payroll; their collective paycheque amounts to around $58-billion a year.

The case for public-sector unions is arguable at the best of times. Public employees are supposed to behave in the public interest. But the more entrenched and powerful their unions become, the more money they are able to extract in the form of raises, bankable sick days, job security, generous pensions, rigid work rules, and the like. The unions’ job is to act in the interest of their members, which is inevitably contrary to the broader interests of the public. Politicians are happy to comply because the public purse is bottomless (until it’s not). Politicians are supposed to bargain on behalf of all the citizens. But the citizens don’t have unions.
Margaret_Wente  unions  Ontario  teachers  public_sector  Salman_Khan  Khan_Academy  Queen’s_Park 
january 2013 by jerryking
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