jerryking + new_industries   6

How do hedge funds learn new industries quickly? - Quora
Quickly' is very subjective and remember funds(hedge,mutual,pension,etc) do not need to know everything about a industry only to understand the drivers of what moves the stock. That is a massive difference between how a student approaches learning and a analyst, analysts aren't trying to know everything only what can make them money.

Exceptional People
They are used to covering certain sectors some may come from the sell side and covered maybe 15-30 stocks or the buy side and covered 40-60 stocks. Regardless of where they came from they are used to tracking and getting alot of information very efficiently. They are also willing to put in long hours and read/study anything that is needed. After a while(if they don't burn out) they become masters are managing huge information bandwidth.

Tools/Data
For accounting and raw data there are plenty of tools. Bloomberg is quite widely used and with a few commands/clicks you can have a excel sheet with all the data you can want about a companies financials.

Sell side
If you have a large enough fund and relationships on the sell side then they'll do all they can to get you up to speed very quickly. The sell side will have a team of analysts covering a industry/sector your intrested in and if your a good client then they'll spend time and teach you want you want to know.

Reduce noise/Very focused:
Great analysts are masters are reducing the amount of noise that comes there way. They filter emails and calls like crazy so there are less distractions. If your ideas don't make them money they will ignore you(regardless of how smart you are). If they are really good they won't even open your emails if you have not proven you add value to them.
hedge_funds  ideas  discernment  filtering  learning_curves  noise  signals  Quora  new_industries  sell_side 
november 2018 by jerryking
A new industry has sprung up selling “indoor-location” services to retailers
Dec 24th 2016 | Economist

Tracking technologies are ingenious. Some flash out a code to smartphone cameras by means of LED lighting; others, such as IndoorAtlas, a startup with headquarters in California and Finland, monitor how devices disrupt a store’s geomagnetic field. With smartphone ownership rising, the market for tracking phones indoors could grow fivefold between now and 2021, to a total of $23bn, says Research and Markets, a market-research firm.

What do retailers hope to gain? The answer depends on how far they push the technology. On the most basic level, a store might notice that people often walk from “frozen goods” to “alcohol”, and then bring the two closer together. A retailer could also gain more insight into which departments are best at promoting goods—all without knowing anything about shoppers beyond where their legs take them.

If stores can persuade clients to reveal personal information, too, they stand to profit more......Apple and Google are beginning to offer indoor-location services to retailers that use the motion sensors already in handsets. These can see where their owners are, and where they are moving to, using a map of existing Wi-Fi or radio-frequency signals. Shops would not need to set up systems to follow their customers’ phones.
location_based_services  mapping  new_industries  tracking  shopping_malls  retailers  Walkbase  LBMA  IndoorAtlas  foot_traffic  Wi-Fi  Aisle411  Apple  Google  indoors 
september 2017 by jerryking
Wilbur Ross brings art of restructuring to Team Trump
JANUARY 21, 2017 | FT| by: Philip Delves Broughton.

“When you start out with your adversary understanding that he or she is going to have to make concessions, that’s a pretty good background to begin.”

So all this stuff about tariffs and walls and protectionism turns out to be pure gamesmanship.......In his career as an investment banker at NM Rothschild and then running his own business, WL Ross & Co, he has shown repeatedly how he can dive into an industrial dung heap and emerge with a fistful of dollars and not a speck on his silk tie......... Working on his own account, Mr Ross’s most famous deal was his purchase of an ailing group of US steelmakers in 2002, shortly before President George W Bush imposed tariffs on imports of steel. Mr Ross used the protection to fix the operations, cut debt and draft new contracts with workers. He was able to take the company public in 2003 and sell it two years later to the Indian steel mogul Lakshmi Mittal.

He has pulled off similar tricks, mostly successfully in coal mining, textiles and banking, immersing himself again and again in new industries and the minutiae of the laws, trade rules and contracts that govern them.

As a student at Harvard Business School, Mr Ross was mentored by Georges Doriot, a pioneering advocate for venture capital, who said: “People who do well in life understand things that other people don’t understand.”
For bothering to understand things that most people don’t, Mr Ross deserves more credit than he gets. He is often easily dismissed as a vulture or someone who buys low and sells high. But what he has done is hard. The devil in restructuring is in the grinding detail of voluminous contracts and difficult, often highly emotional negotiations.
Wilbur_Ross  negotiations  steel  Georges_Doriot  HBS  vulture_investing  new_industries  sophisticated  bankruptcy  messiness  thinking_tragically  dispassion  preparation  leverage  emotions  Lakshmi_Mittal  moguls  restructurings  tariffs  imports  gamesmanship  unsentimental  hard_work  minutiae  protectionism  arcane_knowledge  inequality_of_information  Philip_Delves_Broughton  vulttion 
january 2017 by jerryking
Disruptors are just pirates on the high seas of capitalism - The Globe and Mail
DAINA LAWRENCE
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Nov. 05 2014

Often portrayed as criminal pursuers of riches, pirates don't have the best of reputations. But is there something that can be learned from them?

Jean-Philippe Vergne thinks so.

Last January, the assistant professor at the University of Western Ontario's Ivey Business School introduced a course entitled Lessons From The Dark Side Of Capitalism: How Pirates Help To Shape New Industry. The course aims to help his students see the innovative impacts these fringe-dwellers have on the marketplace.
piracy  disruption  Ivey  Uber  Bitcoin  Airbnb  ride_sharing  new_industries  sharing_economy  mobile_applications  dark_side 
november 2014 by jerryking
Weighing a New Industry For a New Job Outlook - WSJ.com
Sept. 23, 2008 article by Chandlee Bryan offering tips on targeting a new industry.
career  Managing_Your_Career  tips  UFSC  career_paths  new_industries 
january 2009 by jerryking

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