jerryking + multinationals   36

Globalised business is a US security issue | Financial Times
Rana Foroohar YESTERDAY

there is a much broader group of people in both the public and the private sector who would like to reverse the economic integration of China and the US for strategic reasons..... a two-day event sponsored late last month by the National Defense University, which brings together military and civilian leaders to discuss the big challenges of the day. Dozens of experts, government officials, and business leaders gathered to talk about the decline in the post-second world war order, the rise of China, and how the US could strengthen its manufacturing and defence industries. The goal would be to create resilient supply chains that could withstand not just a trade war, but an actual war......“If you accept as your starting point that we are in a great power struggle [with China and Russia], then you have to think about securing the innovation base, making viable the industrial base, and scaling it all,”....Included on the event’s reading list was Freedom’s Forge, which outlines the role that US business — notably carmakers — played in gearing up the US for war in the early 1940s. At that time, because of the depth and breadth of the auto industry’s manufacturing and logistical might, the sector was viewed as being just as important to national security as steel and aluminium.

That is not to say the US security community is pro-tariffs or trade war .... But there is a growing group of thoughtful people who believe that American national security interests will require a forcible untangling of the investment and supply chain links between the US and China. They point to high-tech areas like artificial intelligence, robotics, autonomous vehicles, virtual reality, financial technology and biotech as important not only to the military but also for private sector growth.....While America’s military is still figuring out how make sure its supply chains are not controlled by strategic adversaries, the Chinese have played a much more sophisticated long game. The difference can be summed up in two words: industrial policy. China has one. The US doesn’t. The US has always steered away from a formal policy because critics see it as the government “picking winners”. But the Chinese don’t so much pick winners as use a co-ordinated approach to harnessing the technologies they need. They do it not only through investments and acquisitions but also through forced joint ventures, industrial espionage, and cybertheft [jk: predatory practices].....many multinationals were shortening their supply chains even before the current trade conflicts.

It is a trend that will probably speed up. Multinational companies, much more than domestically focused ones, will suffer collateral damage from tariffs. They will also be a major target of Chinese backlash. Anecdotally, this is already leading some groups to shift production from China to other countries, like Vietnam. If the military-industrial complex in the US has its way, those supply chains might move even closer to home.
adversaries  anecdotal  automotive_industry  books  China  China_rising  collateral_damage  cybertheft  economic_integration  industrial_espionage  industrial_policies  military-industrial_complex  multinationals  predatory_practices  Rana_Foroohar  WWII  security_&_intelligence  supply_chains  trade_wars  U.S.  U.S.-China_relations 
july 2018 by jerryking
Global brands — FT.com
JUNE 29, 2017 by Scheherazade Daneshkhu and Chris Campbell
best_of  rankings  brands  Fortune_500  multinationals  globalization 
july 2017 by jerryking
GE’s CEO choice pushes the boundaries – Breakingviews
12 June 2017 By Rob Cox

Despite the worldwide upheaval confronting chieftains of multinational companies, Flannery has been dealt a better hand. Immelt took over a GE addicted to finance, willing to prostitute the stellar credit ratings of its world-class manufacturing and engineering capabilities for a quick buck. Over his tenure, which started ominously on Sept. 11, 2001, Immelt did wean the company off $260 billion of financial assets, but only after the crisis forced his hand. He also divested appliances, plastics and media.

For all this reimagining of GE, which included moving the headquarters to Boston and a plunge into the industrial internet, Immelt has been dogged by a poorly performing stock. GE returned $143 billion in dividends to shareholders under his stewardship, but the shares also have tumbled by some 30 percent.

Although Flannery most recently has been running the company’s subscale healthcare division, he has pranced across GE’s landscape. His corporate bio begins in evaluating risk for leveraged buyouts. Since then, it has been a global grand tour, running businesses across Asia and in India and Argentina. This is evidence of how GE’s growth resides in places where thirst for power, transportation, energy and healthcare – all of which GE’s products aim to sate – will be in greater demand, even as Immelt professed last year that protectionist tendencies worldwide means “companies must navigate the world on their own.”
GE  John_Flannery  appointments  CEOs  Jeffrey_Immelt  dislocations  multinationals 
june 2017 by jerryking
St-Hubert, Rona and new fears of a hollowed-out Quebec Inc. - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
MONTREAL — The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Apr. 07, 2016

Existing institutions, starting with the Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec, are increasingly seen as being unable or unwilling to play the gatekeeper role that prevented key businesses from falling into outside hands in the past. The Caisse, which manages investments for the Quebec Pension Plan and other provincial retirement regimes, is much more focused on global opportunities as it seeks the returns it needs to prepare for an onslaught of pensioners.

For former Rona chief executive officer Robert Dutton, that became painfully clear in 2012 when Lowe’s first tabled a hostile bid for the Quebec chain. Speaking out for the first time last week, Mr. Dutton told Radio-Canada that Caisse chief Michael Sabia had always favoured Rona’s sale, but was forced by then Liberal finance minister Raymond Bachand to block the Lowe’s bid in 2012. Mr. Dutton’s ouster and subsequent board changes, he said, were engineered by the Caisse to pave the way for a much richer bid by Lowe’s, a premium made possible by a weak Canadian dollar.

Mr. Sabia has offered a different version of events. In 2012, the Caisse, which owned about 17 per cent of Rona, believed that the Quebec chain could still be a consolidator in the North American home-renovation sector if it boosted its competitiveness. By early 2016, that plan no longer seemed feasible. “Rona was improving, but it was still not well-positioned,” Mr. Sabia said in February.
CDPQ  competitiveness  consolidation  economic_nationalism  gatekeepers  generational_change  hollowing_out  Konrad_Yakabuski  Quebec  M&A  mergers_&_acquisitions  multinationals  weak_dollar 
april 2016 by jerryking
Steering Clear of Sanctions - The CFO Report - WSJ
July 8, 2014 | WSJ | By RACHEL LOUISE ENSIGN, SAMUEL RUBENFELD and MAXWELL MURPHY.

The U.S. blacklist names nearly 6,000 entities and individuals that are off-limits to U.S. companies and—in some cases—their foreign subsidiaries.

The list changes often: the Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control added almost 500 names last year, and this year has added nearly 240, including Igor Sechin, chief of Rosneft. More than 350 names were crossed off this year, largely due to the removal of most remaining sanctions on Colombia’s Cali drug cartel.

Treasury penalties for violating sanctions this year have totaled about $1.2 billion, largely because of the department’s share of the BNP penalties.

“We call them Powerball penalties now,” said Judith Lee, a sanctions specialist and partner at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP, referring to their size.

As the U.S. tries to exert more geopolitical influence with financial levers, rather than military might, multinational companies are at risk of running afoul of its sanctions. Many sanctions programs have different rules for different countries. Individuals on the list often are reputed to operate networks of companies with little transparency. And the penalties can be extracted by a range of U.S. authorities.

When it comes to sanctions, “the U.S. government is effectively deputizing all of these companies to be their own policemen,” said Ms. Lee.
sanctions  U.S.Treasury_Department  geopolitics  multinationals  blacklists  penalties  economic_warfare 
august 2014 by jerryking
The decline and fall of Canada’s global corporate superstars - The Globe and Mail
Aug. 16 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Eric Reguly.

Here’s a depressing exercise: Scan the upper reaches of the Top 1000 companies in the July-August issue of Report on Business magazine and try to spot Canada’s global winners.

You could call them Canada’s corporate ambassadors, if they existed.

The short list is exceedingly short:
...Why does Canada, a Group of Seven country that encourages open markets, celebrates innovation and risk-taking, pumps fortunes into R&D, votes in business-friendly governments, is blessed with skilled workers and globally competitive tax rates and sits on the doorstep of the world’s largest market produce so pathetically few global corporate superstars?....It can take decades, a century even, to build a company like Inco or Dofasco. Don Argus, the former chairman of BHP Billiton of Australia, the world’s largest mining group, was right to denounce Canada’s sellout culture. “Canada has lost more head offices than any other country,” he said in 2008, at the height of the resources’ buying and selling spree. “Canada has already been reduced to an industry branch office and is largely irrelevant to the global mining stage.”

Of course, BlackBerry doesn’t really play into the hollowing out story. In retrospect, it should have foisted itself on Microsoft, Nokia or Amazon shortly after it became apparent to investors and tech geeks, if not to the deluded executives at BlackBerry itself, that the iPhone was here to stay. BlackBerry’s value destruction since then has been awe-inspiring. Mr. Lazaridis and Mr. Balsillie were superb entrepreneurs, but failed at keeping the company competitive.

So why does Canada lack global champions? Don’t blame government policies. Blame the sellout culture, nice-guy directors with a propensity to protect the wrong executives at the wrong time and Canada’s classic lack of corporate self-confidence. The upshot is a country that turned into a one-trick pony – oil sands – with a few decent, protected banks and insurers at its side. If Switzerland, the Netherlands and Sweden can churn out global champions, Canada should be able to at least double the rate. The next BlackBerry is not just around the corner.
Blackberry  boards_&_directors_&_governance  brands  branch_plants  competitiveness_of_nations  decline  Eric_Reguly  G-7  global_champions  head_offices  hollowing_out  large_companies  multinationals  oil_sands  sellout_culture  superstars  value_destruction 
august 2013 by jerryking
3 global revolutions that make it tough for states and corporations to stay on top
Mar. 16 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Kate Taylor.

Journalist and scholar Moises Naim argues that three global revolutions are eroding traditional bastions of political, economic and social power in his new book, The End of Power: From Boardrooms to Battlefields and Churches to States, Why Being In Charge Isn’t What It Used to Be. Together, he says, the three shifts are making it easier to gain power but more difficult to use and maintain it....

The “more revolution” – there are more of us, and we have more resources – overwhelms power. The “mobility revolution” circumvents power by moving people and information further and faster. And the “mentality revolution” undermines it by making people less deferential....Governments are hobbled giants where you have a lot of political actors who have just enough power to block, but no one has the power to move forward. The American “fiscal cliff” and the sequester, climate change – you see everyone worried but incapable of acting. The massacre in Syria continues but no one seems to have the power to do anything. Or the European economic crisis, we have a situation where no one has the power to contain it.
books  multinationals  constraints  Moises_Naim  think_threes  political_power  journalists  power_to_obstruct  gridlocked_politics 
march 2013 by jerryking
Big Changes Drive Small Carpet Firm - WSJ.com
October 30, 2006 | WSJ | By PHRED DVORAK
Theory & Practice
Big Changes Drive Small Carpet Firm
Hong Kong's Tai Ping Sets Global Growth on Overhaul In Management, Marketing

The small Hong Kong carpet maker hired an American chief executive who had never been to Asia and installed him in New York. It revamped its executive team, centralized marketing and acquired a high-end carpet maker in the U.S...."We're trying to create a minimultinational," says director John Ying, who helped push Tai Ping in its new direction.... small companies can -- and sometimes must -- globalize as much as big ones....
globalization  CEOs  Hong_Kong  small_business  howto  carpets  multinationals  microproducers  tips  marketing  strategy  management  turnarounds  metrics  managing_change 
february 2013 by jerryking
At Davos, Leaders are Debating Whether Corporations are More Powerful Than Governments
January 27, 2012 | TIME.com | By Rana Foroohar.

The top companies seem to exist in a world apart — they are booming, and their executives are prospering. If there is a meta theme to this year’s World Economic Forum in Davos, it is that the world’s largest companies are moving on and moving ahead of governments and countries that they perceive to be inept and anemic. They are flying above them, operating in a space that is increasingly disconnected from local concerns, and the problems of their home markets. And if the conversations here are any indication, they may soon take over much of what government itself does....The problem was nicely captured in this week’s New York Times piece on Apple, looking at why the iPhone is mostly made outside America. As one of the company’s executives put it, “We don’t have an obligation to solve America’s problems.” It’s a sentiment that was echoed on Time’s Board of Economists’ panel, where business leaders blamed for not sharing the $2 trillion in wealth sitting on corporate balance sheets argued that they did create jobs and prosperity — just not in this country.....Labor economist Clyde Prestowitz pointed out as much in an article in Foreign Policy this week where he noted that while Apple may not think American economic issues are it’s “problem,” it certainly depends on the Seventh Fleet to keep Asian waterways safe and clear so that it can deliver it’s products.....A lot of people here in Davos — people like Nobel laureate Chris Pissarides, and a number of high level investors I spoke with — say that we can’t innovate or educate our way out of this problem. It’s only going to get worse, particularly as a coming automation revolution starts to hollow out white collar jobs in rich countries.
Davos  multinationals  Apple  globalization  cash_reserves  job_destruction  job_displacement  downward_mobility  automation  hollowing_out  white-collar  developed_countries  Nobel_Prizes  large_companies  statelessness 
august 2012 by jerryking
Tear down those mountains of cash
Jul. 21 2012 | The Globe and Mail | Doug Saunders.

Corporations/multinationals are hoarding cash, which is strange, because this should be a great time for companies to invest: low prices, low interest rates, cheaper labour costs. A sensible company would build up cash during boom times – when investments are more expensive – and spend it during recessions, when consumer demand is weak and capital is cheap....Saunders argues for taxing those cash reserves.
Doug_Saunders  debt  cash_reserves  multinationals  interest_rates  idle_funds 
july 2012 by jerryking
Private Equity Giants Use Size to Lean on Suppliers - NYTimes.com
July 11, 2012 | NYT |By KEVIN ROOSE.

Private equity firms like Blackstone are emerging as a powerful new force in the marketplace. The big investors, which collectively oversee thousands of companies, are using their size and scope to pressure suppliers, set their own prices and exert their influence in a range of industries, including health care, construction and consumer goods...with the financial crisis, the decline of stocks markets and the sputtering recovery, private equity has been adapting its ways. While profit remains central and layoffs can still be part of the private equity equation, buyout firms are now stuck holding on to companies longer than expected.

As a result, the firms cannot operate at arm’s length anymore and instead have had to roll up their sleeves and become full-fledged operators....Blackstone and others are taking the cues from the likes of General Electric. Decades ago, G.E. started buying in bulk for its various businesses units, including aerospace, energy, consumer and finance.

Despite the disparate industries spread across dozens of countries, G.E. decided to make buying decisions at the corporate level, as a way to save money and bolster profits. Today, most large multinational companies adhere to a similar strategy for their supply chain, buying computers, office supplies and all types of products at a discount.
private_equity  size  large_companies  KKR  procurement  purchase_decisions  grouping  purchasing  Carlyle_Group  multinationals  supply_chain_squeeze 
july 2012 by jerryking
POWER INC - David Rothkopf - Penguin Books
Only about thirty countries possess the powers usually associated with sovereign nations. The rest can’t actually defend their borders, govern their finances independently, or meet the basic needs of their people. In this provocative and persuasive new book, David Rothkopf calls these others semistates and argues that they’re much less powerful than hundreds of corporate supercitizens.

A multitude of facts demonstrates the reach of the modern corporation. Walmart has revenues greater than the GDP of all but twenty-five nations. The world’s largest asset manager, BlackRock, controls $3.3 trillion, almost as much as the currency reserves held by China and Japan combined. Corporations in Third World countries routinely hire mercenary armies to enforce their will, and in some cases (such as Shell in Nigeria), they control the politicians as well.

Striking a balance between public and private power has become the defining challenge for all societies. In Power, Inc., Rothkopf argues that the decline of the state is irreversible. The way forward is to harness corporate resources in the service of individual nations to forge a radically new relationship between the individual and the institutions that govern our lives.

David Rothkopf

David Rothkopf is the author of Running the World: The Inside Story of the National Security Council and the Architects of American Power. He is the president and chief executive officer of Garten Rothkopf, an international advisory firm. He teaches international affairs at Columbia University.
books  NSC  Wal-Mart  BlackRock  asset_management  multinationals  David_Rothkopf  decline  statelessness 
july 2012 by jerryking
globeadvisor.com: FEEDBACK
BIG TROUBLE WITH BIG AG

Eric Reguly's column criticizing Bill Gates's recent advocacy of high-tech, genetically modified crops to combat food shortages generated much discussion among readers. One who's worked as a food and nutrition consultant with UNICEF, the World Health Organization and the World Bank said: On one of my trips to the wheat growing areas of Egypt, I found that the farmers use growing and storage practices which can best be described as medieval. A local official has estimated that between 30%-50% of the wheat and maize crops are wasted because of poor harvesting and storage techniques. If Egypt were able to have decent post-harvest handling systems, they would reduce their imports of wheat by about 30%. Another suggested that Bill Gates needs to talk to the small farmers who practise cheap, low-tech approaches to farming and not just the big agro-chemical multinationals.
agriculture  billgates  Egypt  Eric_Reguly  farming  genetically_modified  multinationals  smallholders 
may 2012 by jerryking
U.S. needs to try harder on the global stage - The Globe and Mail
CHRYSTIA FREELAND | Columnist profile
From Friday's Globe and Mail
Oct. 20, 2011

I had breakfast this week with Jeffrey Immelt, chief executive officer of GE, and the main dish on the menu was tough love. In an Americans can still win in the global economy – but that they need to fight harder...The competition Mr. Immelt and Ms. Clinton want U.S. companies to win is the battle for dominance in the global marketplace and for the chequebook of the growing global middle class....As a cautionary counterexample, he cited Japan. “When I was a young guy, when I first started with GE, Jack Welch sent us all to Japan because in those days Japan was gonna crush us,” he said. “And we learned a lot about Japan when we were there. But over the subsequent 30 years, the Japanese companies all fell behind. And the reason why they fell behind is because they didn’t globalize. They didn’t have to go out and sing for their dinner in every corner of the world. That’s not the case with GE. It’s not the case with other American multinationals.”...Smart businesses have figured out how to globalize. We don’t yet know if countries can do the same.
globalization  GE  Jeffrey_Immelt  Chrystia_Freeland  multinationals  exporting  national_identity  tough_love  global_economy 
october 2011 by jerryking
Africa's Growing Consumer Class Lures Multinationals - WSJ.com
JANUARY 13, 2011 | | By PETER WONACOTT

A Continent of New Consumers Beckons
As Disposable Incomes Continue to Climb, Multinationals Shift Focus From Resources to Retail
consumer_goods  disposable_income  Africa  multinationals 
january 2011 by jerryking
China Squeezes Foreigners for Share of Global Riches - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 29, 2010 | WSJ | By SHAI OSTER, NORIHIKO SHIROUZU
And PAUL GLADER. China's big government-backed companies now have
enormous financial resources and growing political clout, making them
attractive partners outside China. In addition, the Chinese market has
become so important to the success of multinational companies that
Beijing has the ability to drive harder bargains.

But such deals also carry risk. Several earlier joint ventures inside
China have soured over concerns that Chinese partners, after gaining
access to Western technology and know-how, have gone on to become potent
new rivals to their partners.
Beijing  China  deception  economic_clout  GE  joint_ventures  multinationals  political_clout  predatory_practices  rivalries  SOEs 
december 2010 by jerryking
Selling Health Food to China - WSJ.com
DEC. 13, 2010 | WSJ | By LAURIE BURKITT . MNCs Use
Traditional Ingredients in Market Battle. ...In China, where diabetes,
cancer and other chronic illnesses are on the rise, people are growing
more health conscious, creating a fast-growing market for companies
selling health foods. Food-product giants such as Nestlé SA and PepsiCo
Inc. have begun introducing foods that have a traditional Chinese
folk-medicine twist. Among the ingredients the MNC's are using:
wolfberry plants, chrysanthemum teas and tremella, a fungus commonly
thought in China to help improve the skin, strengthen bones and control
weight. In 2009, sales of wellness foods and beverages in China
increased 28% from 5 yrs. earlier to $1.5 billion, driven by the elderly
and women, according to Euromonitor International, a mkt-research firm.
The figure is small compared with the category's $162 billion in U.S.
sales last year, but the world's biggest food companies are eager to
cash in on the growing Chinese market.
health_foods  China  multinationals  Nestlé  Pepsi  wellness 
december 2010 by jerryking
What Knockoffs Can Teach Companies About Chinese Markets | Co.Design
Sep 8, 2010 | Fast Company | by Makiko Taniguchi & Eddie
Wu. Fakes and knockoffs often express unmet desires that big firms miss.
Learn from them...Countries, from the U.S. to Japan, regularly accuse
China of copying designs. Indeed,MNCs in these countries spend an
inordinate amount of time and money trying to prevent their products
from being copied. But Shanzhai -- "copycat" design --represents a vast
business opportunity. Shanzhai is an open platform for grassroots
innovation: Apple, Nokia, and Samsung smartphones get copied, but the
knockoffs adapt the original designs in ways that appeal to Chinese
customers. E.g., Shanzhai designers might add a flashlight, key in areas
with unstable electricity. The effect is to make products accessible to
common folks in terms of price, aesthetics, values, and needs. Shanzhai
designs are an opportunity for international companies to introduce
Chinese consumers to their brands, and then observe how local Chinese
culture adapts their offerings.
counterfeits  China  customer_insights  discoveries  pattern_recognition  ideo  opportunities  innovation  design  adaptability  patterns  copycats  unarticulated_desires  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  emerging_markets  brands  multinationals  aesthetics  knockoffs  creative_appropriation  cost-consciousness  low-income  affordability 
september 2010 by jerryking
There's a New Silk Road, and It Doesn't Lead to the U.S.
August 5, 2010 | BusinessWeek | By Simon Kennedy, Matthew
Bristow and Shamim Adam
Trade routes ("the new Silk Road"—a 21st-century version of the trade
routes that crisscrossed Asia almost 2,000 years ago, linking merchants
in China to their counterparts in India, Arabia, and the Roman Empire)
bring Brazilian buses to Egypt and Chinese trains to the Mideast
emerging_markets  multinationals  state_capitalism  South-South  China  India  Brazil  Embraer  BRIC 
august 2010 by jerryking
Danone Expands Its Pantry to Woo the World's Poor - WSJ.com
JUNE 29, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By CHRISTINA PASSARIELLO. Danone Expands Its Pantry to Woo the World's Poor.
Danone  multinationals  yogurt  consumer_goods  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  dairy 
june 2010 by jerryking
Business Books: Why Russia and China will eat your lunch
May 28, 2010 | Reuters | by Herbert Lash. The Western
multinationals that have dominated global trade for decades are going to
have their lunch eaten in China and elsewhere, and many are unaware
it's about to happen. That's the warning in "The End of the Free
Market" (Portfolio, $26.95), a new book by political risk expert Ian
Bremmer. Bremmer, known for showing the effect of political turmoil on
financial markets, argues that China, Russia and other emerging markets
have developed a new economic model -- state capitalism -- that clashes
with the free-market system of the West.
book_reviews  China  Russia  multinationals  free_markets  state_capitalism  SOEs  Ian_Bremmer 
may 2010 by jerryking
A special report on innovation in emerging markets: The world turned upside down
Apr 15th 2010 | From The Economist print edition. The United
Nations World Investment Report calculates that there are now around
21,500 multinationals based in the emerging world. The best of these,
such as India’s Bharat Forge in forging, China’s BYD in batteries and
Brazil’s Embraer in jet aircraft, are as good as anybody in the world.
The number of companies from Brazil, India, China or Russia on the
Financial Times 500 list more than quadrupled in 2006-08, from 15 to 62.
Brazilian top 20 multinationals more than doubled their foreign assets
in a single year, 2006.
innovation  emerging_markets  reverse_innovation  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  BRIC  multinationals 
april 2010 by jerryking
America's Invisible Export
August/September 2000 | Civilization Online | By Bernard Avishai
U.S.  exporting  multinationals  soft_power 
april 2010 by jerryking
"Outsmarting China's Start-Arounds"
07/07/06 | Far Eastern Economic Review | by Steve Ellis and
Orit Gadiesh. The best way for global firms to defend core markets,
then, is to focus on areas where Chinese firms still have a lot to
learn. (1) Most important, of course, is building customer loyalty. (2)
Second is innovation. (3) Third, multinationals need strategies for
developing talent that optimize diversity in skills and experience.
Bain  China  competitive_strategy  multinationals  weaknesses  customer_loyalty 
march 2010 by jerryking
China Toughens Rules for Foreign Companies - WSJ.com
MARCH 17, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by ANDREW BROWNE And
JASON DEAN. Business Sours on China. Foreign Executives Say Beijing
Creates Fresh Barriers; Broadsides, Patent Rules. China's relationship
with foreign companies is starting to sour, as tougher government
policies and intensifying domestic competition combine to make one of
the world's most important markets less friendly to
multinationals....Signs of nationalism are evident in the grooming of
state-owned companies (SOEs) to dominate their industries as "national
champions," often at the expense of private Chinese companies as well as
foreign firms. From airlines to coal mining to dairy products,
government policies are expanding the state's role.
China  protectionism  multinationals  patent_law  economic_nationalism  SOEs  global_champions  state-as-facilitator 
march 2010 by jerryking
Emerging Markets, Emerging Giants
April 22, 2007 | New York Times | By WILLIAM J. HOLSTEIN. A
NEW wave of foreign competitive pressure is beginning to ripple through
the United States economy, from companies in emerging markets like
Brazil, Russia, India and China. “We are seeing a rebalancing of the
global economy back to where it was before the Industrial Revolution,
when China and India were major powers in the world.” says Antoine van
Agtmael, author of a new book, “The Emerging Markets Century: How a New
Breed of World-Class Companies Is Overtaking the World.” The emerging
multinationals haven’t had time to establish brand names, as Sony or LG
have done, but they will compensate for that. “They are either going to
buy American companies and use their brands or develop their own brand
names."
BRIC  globalization  KPMG  publishing  ripple_effects  Gadi_Prager  books  emerging_markets  multinationals  China  market_entry  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  brands  Industrial_Revolution  history  global_economy 
december 2009 by jerryking

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