jerryking + millennials   99

A millennial’s hymn to Generation X
October 25, 2019 | Financial Times | by Janan Ganesh

Thought-provoking article by Janan Ganesh arguing that the Gen X cohort are passing through life without having left anywhere near the kind of societal impact of either their larger numbered predecessors, the baby boomers, or their larger numbered successors, the millennials.  Generation X have avoided embracing big ideas,  or embracing nobel causes or political zeal.  lack of passion, big vision, no protest movements, no electoral shocks, etc.  Ganesh argues that Generation X's unpretentiousness--their unwillingness to  made a big splash--is standing them in good stead...."No living generation has shown less interest in changing the world. As a result, no living generation looks wiser today." This is because those who are wildly engaged in causes today (e.g. populism, climate activism, etc.) look like utopian true believers.  By contrast, Generation X'ers look like healthy, sober, sceptics....representing a certain hardheadedness or tough-mindedness or prudence.  Even Generation X' popular cultural touch points, movies like Pulp Fiction and Fargo are really more about the  particular and personal rather the evincing a larger societal message.
Ganan concludes by arguing that it is a category error to misinterpret Generation X's circumspection for mediocrity or ineffectiveness. Many tech company founders are Generation X members. " It is just that these gifts were seldom deployed in public life. The cream of the generation chose business and the arts over politics," Janan
mistrusts vision. Sometimes, vision results in blameless people having to pack their things in the night and flee their own country to survive. I like caution. I like moderately countercyclical fiscal policy with a view to 2.25 per cent annual growth over the period, thanks.
'90s  baby_boomers  demographic_changes  generations  Generation_X  Janan_Ganesh  millennials  popular_culture 
19 days ago by jerryking
The last days of the middle-class world citizen
October 3, 2019 | Financial Times | Janan Ganesh.
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what I think Janan Ganesh is talking about; the divide between the globally mobile elite and the locally restricted peasantry is getting increasingly stark, and the middle class is being hollowed out.
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'10s  Big_Tech  climate_change  decline  deglobalization  disposable_income  downward_mobility  dystopian_futures  frictions  future  globalization  Janan_Ganesh  lifestyles  middle_class  millennials  pessimism  societal_choices  subtractive  The_One_Percent  thought-provoking  travel 
5 weeks ago by jerryking
Looking Ahead After a Quarter Century Into the Digital Age - CIO Journal
Aug 16, 2019 | WSJ | By Irving Wladawsky-Berger.

* Large economic potential is linked to digitization—and much of it is yet to be captured
* Digital superstars are rising far beyond the U.S. big four and China’s big three
* Digital natives are calling the shots
* Digital changes everything—even industry boundaries
* Agile is the new way to compete
* Playing the platform economy can boost earnings
* Self-cannibalization and innovation are a necessity for digital reinvention
* Going after the right M&A is key
* Effective management of digital transformation is vital—but challenging
* Leveraging and transitioning from digital to new frontier technologies is an imperative


Effective management of digital transformation is vital—but challenging. High incidences of failure can be found across industries and countries regardless of the objectives of the digital transformation, including customer experience, the most common type of transformation.

The report recommends five key actions to improve the odds of a successful digital transformation: shared responsibility and accountability; clarity of objectives and commitment; sufficient resources; investments in digital talent; and flexibility and agility.
artificial_intelligence  digital_economy  digital_natives  digitalization  industry_boundaries  insights  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger  McKinsey  M&A  millennials  platforms  self-cannibalization 
12 weeks ago by jerryking
How to Pursue a Side Hustle or Startup While Working Full Time
July 31, 2019, 4:00 AM EDT Updated on August 1, 2019, - Bloomberg By Arianne Cohen
millennials  side_hustles  start_ups 
12 weeks ago by jerryking
Toronto’s tech boom is transforming the city
July 26, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | MARCUS GEE.

the tech industry that is transforming Toronto. The city is in the midst of a spectacular tech boom. Big firms such as Microsoft, Twitter, Uber, Google and Netflix are setting up shop or expanding here. Thousands of workers are coming to live and work in the city. Thousands of startup companies are revving their engines.

The pell-mell growth of the city comes in part from the rise of tech. Patrick Fejér of B+H Architects says 10 million square feet of new office space is due to open by 2024, more than was built from 1992 to the present. Toronto, he says, has more than 120 construction cranes in the air, compared with 65 in Seattle and 35 in New York.

CBRE, a real estate consultancy, says that Toronto is the fastest-growing market for tech talent in North America, “adding an eye-popping 80,100 tech jobs in the past five years, a 54-per-cent increase.” It now ranks third, just behind San Francisco’s Bay Area and Seattle.
Big_Tech  creative_class  downtown_core  housing  King-Spadina  Kitchener-Waterloo  livability  Marcus_Gee  millennials  neighbourhoods  Port_Lands  property_development  Sidewalk_Labs  talent  Toronto  transformational  transit  walkability  technology 
july 2019 by jerryking
For Sephora, the store is core to its beauty
July 24 2019 | | Financial Times | by Harriet Agnew and Hannah Copeland in Paris.

**Sephora stores focus on experience, allowing consumers to test products digitally on a virtual mirror for instance or personalise products **

Like its stores in New York’s Times Square and Dubai Mall in the Middle East, Sephora in La Défense has recently reopened after an extensive refurbishment. The investment reflects how bricks and mortar and experiential retail are key to Sephora’s growth. The LVMH-owned group, which stocks about 300 brands alongside its own label, has increased sales fourfold in the past eight years, fuelled by a booming beauty market........“A lot of people are scared of the retail apocalypse so they’re not investing in stores, and that becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy,” said chief executive Chris de Lapuente in an interview on the shop floor. “We’re investing in our stores, taking our top 100 stores in the world and renovating them to the best possible standard.”....Mr de Lapuente says one attraction of Sephora is that consumers “discover brands they can’t find anywhere else”, noting that about a third of its offerings are exclusive to Sephora, and it acts as an incubator for upcoming or niche brands....Exclusivity might be with Huda, which began selling false eyelashes in Dubai and subsequently developed a collaboration with Sephora; pop star Rihanna’s cosmetics brand Fenty, which is on track for €500m sales this year; or an exclusive collaboration with Dior for the Dior Backstage range of make-up.

Pointing to the beauty bar where customers can get a free makeover, Mr de Lapuente added: “Experiential retail is crucial to our success. Sephora is a place where people come for advice, they come to listen. We teach, inspire and play . . . You’re not going to get this online. Online you can do your research . . . here you can come and experiment.”

Mr Fujimori agrees, saying Sephora “successfully combines experiential retail with a leading ecommerce presence, leveraging digital technology to enhance the shopping experience in-store and online”......
Please use the sharing tools found via the share button at the top or side of articles. The challenge now for Sephora is to stay ahead in a world where there are more make-up and beauty brands than ever, and social media has lowered barriers to entry and boosted the speed to market. Meanwhile, Amazon last month announced the launch of its professional beauty stores, aimed at the mass market.

“Amazon is just another one of the many choices out there,” said Mr de Lapuente. “They have a strong e-commerce offering. They don’t have stores. We love that consumers love to shop online and in store.” He says that customers who buy both on- and offline tend to purchase three times more than those who buy using just one channel. Ecommerce represents an average of 20 per cent of sales in each country for Sephora, which uses influencers to build its community. “Amazon just forces us to raise our game.”....

The pressure is on to keep on innovating. “Beauty is so fast-moving, you can’t cruise,” said Mr de Lapuente. He says innovation will come both from new products (citing untapped potential in haircare and wellness), and from the way in which brands reach consumers. He sees opportunities in areas like voice-activated ordering through home assistants such as Amazon’s Alexa, and social commerce through platforms like China’s WeChat.

But despite such technological developments, for Mr de Lapuente, the store has a robust future.

At La Défense, customers are returning to work with Sephora’s distinctive striped bags modelled on the black and white stripes of Italy’s Siena Cathedral. “Is physical retail alive or dead?” mused Mr de Lapuente among the throng of shoppers. “It looks pretty alive to me. The store is where the magic happens.”
Amazon  beauty  brands  bricks-and-mortar  customer_experience  cosmetics  digital_influencers  e-commerce  experimentation  experiential_marketing  high-end  in-store  incubators  innovation  LVMH  makeup  millennials  omnichannel  refurbished  renovations  Sephora  women 
july 2019 by jerryking
Business leaders are blinded by industry boundaries
April 22, 2019 | Financial Times | Rita McGrath.

Why is it so hard for executives to anticipate the major shifts that can determine the destiny of their organisations? Andy Grove called these moments “strategic inflection points”. For some, he wrote, “That change can mean an opportunity to rise to new heights. But it may just as likely signal the beginning of the end.”

Industry leaders would do well to focus on productive opportunities, even when they lie outside a fairly well-bounded industry. Want to survive a strategic inflection point? Stop focusing on traditional metrics and find new customer needs that your organisation can uniquely address.

Why do business leaders so often miss these shifts? Successful companies such as BlackBerry maker Research In Motion and Nokia did not heed the early signs of a move to app-based smartphones. Video rental chain Blockbuster failed to acquire Netflix when it had the chance, in 2000.

Senior people rise to the top by mastering management of the KPIs in that sector. This, in turn, shapes how they look at the world. The problem is a strategic inflection point can occur and render the reference points they have developed obsolete. Take traditional retail. Its key metrics have to do with limited real estate, such as sales per square metre. Introduce the internet and those measures are useless. And yet traditional systems, rewards and measures are all built around them.....British economist Edith Penrose grasped this crucial link, she asked, “What is an industry?” In her studies, executives did not confine themselves to single industries, they expanded into any market where their business might find profitable growth.

Consider the energy sector: Historically, most power generators and utilities were heavily regulated...The sector’s suppliers likewise expected steady demand and a quiet life....that business has been rocked by slow-moving shifts many players talked about, but did not act upon. The rise of distributed energy generation, the maturing of renewable technology, increased conservation and new rules have eroded the traditional model. Many failed to heed the warnings. In 2015, General Electric spent about $10bn to acquire Alstom’s power business. Finance chief Jeff Bornstein crowed at the time that it could be GE’s best acquisition ever. Blinded by traditional metrics, GE doubled down on fossil-fuel-fired turbines just as renewables were becoming cost competitive.

Consider razor blades: Procter & Gamble’s Gillette brand of razors had long enjoyed a competitive advantage. For decades, the company had invested in developing premium products, charged premium prices, invested heavily in marketing and used its clout to get those razors into every traditional retail outlet. A new breed of online rivals such as Dollar Shave Club and Harry’s have upended that model, reselling outsourced razors that were “good enough” and cheaper, online via a subscription model that attracted younger, economically pressured customers...... Rather than fork out for elaborate marketing, the upstarts enlisted YouTube and Facebook influencers to get the word out.
Andy_Grove  BlackBerry  blindsided  Blockbuster  brands  cost-consciousness  customer_insights  Dollar_Shave_Club  executive_management  GE  Gillette  good_enough  Harry's  industries  industry_boundaries  inflection_points  Intel  irrelevance  KPIs  metrics  millennials  movingonup  myopic  obsolescence  out-of-the-box  P&G  power_generation  retailers  reward_systems  sales_per_square_foot  shifting_tastes  slowly_moving  warning_signs 
april 2019 by jerryking
America’s Biggest Supermarket Company Struggles With Online Grocery Upheaval
April 21, 2019 | WSJ | By Heather Haddon.

Kroger adjusts operations and invests in technology to hang on to customers who avoid stores; ‘we’ve got to get our butts in gear
Amazon  bricks-and-mortar  BOPIS  CDO  cultural_clash  delivery_services  digital_strategies  disruption  e-commerce  e-grocery  grocery  IBM  Instacart  Jet  Kroger  Microsoft  millennials  Ocado  Oracle  pilot_programs  post-deal_integration  retailers  same-day  Shipt  start_ups  supermarkets  Vitacost  Wal-Mart  Whole_Foods 
april 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | The Best Year of Our Lives
April 6, 2019 | The New York Times | By Ross Douthat.

There’s a theory of human psychology that holds that the time you enter maturity becomes fixed in your mind as a civilizational peak — with everything since a falling-off that conveniently matches your own stagger toward the grave. Thus it doesn’t matter if you came of age in the Great Depression or some other nadir; because you were 18 then, it must have been a golden age......I’ve been thinking about how good we had it lately because we’re 20 years out from 1999, and the cultural press is thick with reminders that it was a pop-culture annus mirabilis — from the premiere of “The Sopranos” that defined a golden age of television, to the yearlong cascade of brilliant movies .....from a Hollywood not yet captive to the superhero era......Widen the aperture a little, so that the “Xennial” cultural era covers 1995 to 2005, and you get everything from the perfection of the sitcom (late “Seinfeld,” season one of “Friends,” the silver age of “The Simpsons,” “Arrested Development”) to the peak of HBO (when “The Wire” and “The Sopranos” and “Deadwood” and “Sex and the City” were all airing). Oh, and those were also the days when George R.R. Martin could publish three “Game of Thrones” novels in five years, inventing all the good parts of the TV show’s plot in an end-of-millennium rush.....cold hard economic data also suggest that ours was a uniquely blessed coming-of-age: a time of low unemployment, surging productivity, strong working-class wage growth — and all without a huge overhang of public and private debt.......a statement about generational experiences, Alter was basically right. If you were born around 1980, you grew up in a space happily between — between eras of existential threat (Cold War/War on Terror, or Cold War/climate change), between foreign policy debacles (Vietnam/Iraq), between epidemics (crack and AIDS/opioids and suicide), and between two different periods of economic stagnation (the ’70s and early Aughts).
'90s  op-ed  Alexandria_Ocasio-Cortez  annus_mirabilis  coming-of-age  cultural_gatekeepers  films  generational_touchstones  golden_age  millennials  movies  noughties  popular_culture  Ross_Douthat  television  shared_consciousness  shared_experiences  The_Wire 
april 2019 by jerryking
New York’s business elite decamps to millennial-friendly Hudson Yards
March 11, 2019 | | Financial Times | by Joshua Chaffin.

The $25bn Hudson Yards, the site of KKR’s new office and one of the most ambitious New York developments since Rockefeller Center, officially opens its doors this week after more than a decade in the works. It is big, boasting as much new office space as all of central Pittsburgh.

It is an engineering feat. Its towers are constructed on top of a platform that sits above a working rail yard. Its builders crafted 90-tonne columns to support the weight. They also devised a custom cooling system for the soil within the platform so that tree roots would not overheat.

As KKR can attest, Hudson Yards represents another extreme: it is the boldest expression of a new fashion in corporate real estate that buildings and “space” should be potent weapons in a fight to recruit and retain talented young workers.

The Related Companies and its partner, Oxford Properties, have made that a central element of a sales pitch that has persuaded KKR and other power brokers to quit Manhattan’s corporate strongholds in midtown and downtown and move west.

Joining Mr Kravis in his new home are Larry Fink, who is moving BlackRock, the world’s largest asset manager, to Hudson Yards; attorney David Boies and his law firm Boies Schiller Flexner, and hedge fund managers Daniel Loeb and Steven A Cohen, among others.
elitism  Hudson_Yards  KKR  Manhattan  millennials  New_York_City  Oxford_Properties  property_development  vitality 
march 2019 by jerryking
Skeuomorphs: our little digital helpers
February 27, 2019 | Financial Times | by Lucy Watson.

Skeuomorphs are design elements that mimic older, precursor objects. They crop up everywhere, but especially in software interfaces: consider the shutter-release sound of a digital camera or the original yellow legal pad of an iPhone Notes app, or the Windows MP3 player that looked like an amp and speakers. Interactive icons that are shaded to look like 3D buttons, floating above your home screen, are a minimalist species of skeuomorph......On the iPhone, skeuomorphs acted as a guide for users unfamiliar with touchscreens: the bulbous shading of an icon meant it could be pressed, a representation of a leather-bound Filofax was where phone numbers were kept, and so on. These visual elements act as little markers of a shift in our development: they were designed to make the devices that they populated look as if they had one foot in the pre-digital era (i.e. analog). Which is almost a lifetime ago.....Yet for all Apple’s efforts to fetishise the immaculately virtual, the smartphone is still a physical object that demands some haptic interaction — even if it’s just a swipe.....In order to create a more watertight device, the home button had been replaced by a dimple. It cannot be depressed as a button would, but a vibrating motor within the phone called a “taptic engine” recreates the physical feedback a button would provide. It’s another type of skeuomorph: an electronic interface given the familiar feel of a mechanical component
skeuomorphs  design  GUI  icons  iPhone  millennials  software  analogies  haptics  senses  prompts  cues  digital_cameras 
february 2019 by jerryking
Put Down the Kombucha and Pick Up a Crossbow: Hipsters Are the New Hunters - WSJ
By Cameron McWhirter and Zusha Elinson
Jan. 9, 2019 11:55 a.m. ET

An older generation of hunters is trying to lure recruits to the sport by pitching it as a good way to ensure meat is local, sustainable and probably organic.

“Earthy crunchy aligns very well with deer hunting,” says Charles Evans, 29, who works in hunter recruitment for the Georgia Wildlife Federation......The trainees use crossbows, which are quieter than guns and let them train and hunt on properties closer to civilization. For some first-time hunters, the equipment is more palatable than firearms......Once a staple of American life, hunting has declined as the percentage of people living in rural areas shrinks and fewer people have the time or need for a pastime requiring patience and the willingness to kill an animal. There aren’t enough interested people to replace those over 45 who make up the bulk of active hunters, says Loren Chase, a former Arizona Game and Fish Department official who heads a statistical consulting firm specializing in natural resources.
hunting  outdoors  outreach  wild_game  millennials  sustainability 
january 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | The American Dream Isn’t for Black Millennials
Jan. 5, 2019 | The New York Times | By Reniqua Allen. Ms. Allen is the author of “It Was All a Dream.”

....I marched up to my new, small, one-bedroom apartment on the Hill, satisfied. It felt as if I’d broken barriers.

But when I got a notice in the mail about five years after I closed, I felt dizzy. It was not long after the financial crisis. The letter said that my mortgage company had been charged with giving subprime loans to black and Hispanic people around the country and asked if I wanted to join a class-action suit. I had most likely been the target of predatory lending. I had known from the start that my income could make me a target. I’d heard the words of the broker. But because of my race? It hadn’t crossed my mind. I was devastated......How much room is there in anyone’s life for a mistake or the perception of a mistake if you’re young and black in America? How much of the American dream hangs in the balance? For the dozens of people I talked to, the reality is that if we want our dreams to come true, all too often we have to be almost perfect, making the right decisions all the time. Not getting that ticket. Not listening to that mortgage broker. Not speaking up.....I know the history of this country, know the history of redlining, know how my grandparents were locked out of neighborhoods because of their skin color. But for some reason I was still surprised. I would say I was mad, but more than that, I was hurt that I had been lulled into some kind of false bourgeois comfort that had made me think that my life was different from my predecessors’ lives. Sure, I had made it up that Hill, but at what cost?
African-Americans  downward_mobility  economic_downturn  millennials  the_American_dream  subprime  predatory_practices  racial_disparities  redlining  home_ownership 
january 2019 by jerryking
Hedge funds fight back against tech in the war for talent
August 3, 2018 | | Financial Times | by Lindsay Fortado in London.

Like other industries competing for the top computer science talent, hedge funds are projecting an image that appeals to a new generation. The development is forcing a traditionally secretive industry into an unusual position: having to promote itself, and become cool.

The office revamp is all part of that plan, as hedge funds vie with technology companies for recruits who have expertise in machine learning, artificial intelligence and big data analytics, many of whom are garnering salaries of $150,000 or more straight out of university.

“A lot have gone down the Google route to offer more perks,” said Mr Roussanov, who works for the recruitment firm Selby Jennings in New York. “They’re trying to rebrand themselves as tech firms.”...While quantitative investing funds, which trade using computer algorithms, have been on the forefront of hiring these types of candidates, other hedge funds that rely on humans to make trading decisions are increasingly upping their quantitative capabilities in order to analyze reams of data faster.

The casual work atmosphere and flexible hours at tech firms such as Google have long been a strong draw, and hedge funds are making an effort to 'rebrand themselves' Besides the increasing amount of perks funds are trying to offer, like revamping their workplace and offering services such as free dry-cleaning, they are emphasizing the amount of money they are willing to spend on technology and the complexity of the problems in financial markets to entice recruits.

“The pitch is . . . this is a very data-rich environment, and it’s a phenomenally well-resourced environment,” said Matthew Granade, the chief market intelligence officer at Point72, Steve Cohen’s $13bn hedge fund.

For the people Mr Granade calls “data learning, quant types”, the harder the problem, the better. “The benefit for us is that the markets are one of the hardest problems in the world. You think you’ve found a solution and then everyone else catches up. The markets are always adapting. So you are constantly being presented with new challenges, and the problem is constantly getting harder.”
hedge_funds  recruiting  uWaterloo  war_for_talent  millennials  finance  perks  quantitative  hard_questions  new_graduates  data_scientists 
august 2018 by jerryking
How business is capitalising on the millennial Instagram obsession
July 13, 2018 | Financial Times | Leo Lewis in Tokyo and Emma Jacobs in London 12 HOURS AGO.

Japan's 21st century’s burgeoning experience economy, which is being driven by millennial consumers and transforming the landscape for businesses everywhere. Japan is not only an innovator in this economy but is also seen as a bellwether for​​ the likely tastes of ​China and south-east Asia’s swelling middle-class consumers......it is not just the quality of the food that attracts crowds to these cafés, but also the quality of the encounter. “That is why the tables are made to wobble,” she explains. “It’s designed so that when you have your pancake in front of you, you can see how fuwa-fuwa it is by how much it jiggles on the plate when the table moves. It is extremely, extremely satisfying to watch,” she adds. “It is what makes it an experience.”.....In Mori’s opinion — a view evidently shared by the customers currently queueing in the stairwell — it is not just the quality of the food that attracts crowds to these cafés, but also the quality of the encounter. “That is why the tables are made to wobble,” she explains. “It’s designed so that when you have your pancake in front of you, you can see how fuwa-fuwa it is by how much it jiggles on the plate when the table moves. It is extremely, extremely satisfying to watch,” she adds. “It is what makes it an experience.”.......In their influential 1998 article “Welcome to the Experience Economy”, American consultants Joseph Pine and James Gilmore argued that a marketable experience occurs “when a company intentionally uses services as the stage, and goods as props, to engage individual customers in a way that creates a memorable event . . . ” These experiences were, they went on, “inherently personal, existing only in the mind of an individual who has been engaged on an emotional, physical, intellectual or even spiritual level”.

This was seen as the logical next step from the service economy, itself an evolution from the industrial economy and, prior to that, the agrarian economy....In Japan, notoriously long working hours have made time-poverty one of the defining features of the country’s leisure sector. The market has responded, over many decades, by refining and packaging experience in the most efficient, deliverable way......The millennial generation — and the growth of social media — has taken this economy in some unexpected directions. Instagram is to thank for the birth of “Oshapiku” — a compound of “oshare” (fancy) and “picnic”, where the emphasis is on meeting up, dressing up and engaging in the most photogenic picnic imaginable......“Experiences are king,” the consultancy McKinsey stated last year in a report arguing that, “in recent years, faced with the choice of buying a trendy designer jacket or a shiny new appliance or of attending a show, consumers increasingly opt for the show and, more broadly, for experiences with their friends and families.”.......Japan’s experience economy has evolved along two distinct avenues. On one side an already fully fledged leisure, dining and hospitality sector has sought ever more inventive ways of packaging experience — from hotels staffed by robots and limited-edition Shinkansen bullet trains fitted out with Hello Kitty decor to many of the country’s aquariums offering the opportunity to camp overnight surrounded by the relaxing pulsations of bioluminescent jellyfish.

The other side, says Mori, has to an extent developed as a branch of Japan’s “otaku” culture. This originally referred to the obsessive focus on particular areas of popular culture such as animation, video games or comics but is now more generally applied to a tendency to single-minded connoisseurship......“There are actually three sides to the experience economy in cosplay,” says Eri Nakashima, the manager of the Polka Polka second-hand cosplay costume store in central Tokyo. “There is the basic passion for becoming a different character from the one you are in everyday life; there is the participation in a community that shares that; and there is the creativity of making the costume perfect.”

This notion of community has become a pattern of growth for the experience economy. .......Shopping remains a huge draw for these tourists: the country’s retailers continue to thrive on the high average spending (£1,000) of middle-class visitors from China, Taiwan, Vietnam and elsewhere. But, by the end of 2017, when the government’s target was obliterated and 28 million tourists arrived during one year, it was clear that Japan’s long history of perfecting short, sharp experiential offerings — from onsen springs to pancakes — had won a new generation of admirers from overseas....Japan’s tendency towards connoisseurship — part of the reason that queueing for an experience is often regarded as a necessary ingredient to enjoyment — continues to be a powerful part of its appeal. The country’s manufacturers have long made a fetish of monozukuri — the quality of “thing-making” artisanship — to actively encourage people to own more stuff. But today the instinct to collect and accumulate things has, she says, been replaced by a desire to collect and accumulate experiences — and, in time-honoured Japanese fashion, to building ever larger libraries of images......Japanese companies Canon, Olympus, Konica, Minolta and Nikon were some of the most successful camera makers on the planet: the passion behind them was not just about the physical machinery but about a recognition that picture-taking dramatically enhances the consumption of experience....Insta-bae became not just a description of something you had seen but an explicit target to seek out. The experience economy, says Harada, is increasingly built around people going in search of experiences that are insta-bae.
bellwethers  cosplay  experiential_marketing  experience_economy  image-driven  Instagram  Japan  Japanese  millennials  obsessions  novelty  self-absorbed  visual_culture  connoisseurship  end_of_ownership  Joseph_Pine  James_Gilmore  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts 
july 2018 by jerryking
The joy of boring business ideas
April 11, 2018 | Financial Times | by JONATHAN MARGOLIS
Slippers, razors and even gas boilers offer ripe pickings for profit and disruption.

Simon Phelan and his online gas boiler installation company, Hometree, are “aiming to replicate the success of online estate agent Purplebricks in an equally large, albeit more boring market: boiler installations.”......Start-ups doing anything new, cute or plain off-the-wall often struggle. .....Boring may be the new interesting.......Mahabis, a carpet slippers start-up, has sold close to a million pairs of its £79 product....another boring domestic product, razors, have proved to be a lucrative market for what are essentially tech companies, such as Dollar Shave Club (bought by Unilever for $1bn) and Harry’s.....It is not just products: dull-sounding online services also seem to pay off. London start-up ClearScore, a millennial-focused fintech company which offers users free credit scoring and personal finance guides, sold to Experian last month for £275m, after just three years in business......Phelan is pursuing gas boilers, not because he was interested in them, but because he was looking for a way into the growing smart-home sector. He wants to build a slick way to modernise boiler installation, so that by the time newer, more eco-friendly home heating technologies become standard he will already have a loyal customer base. This is why Hometree has more in common with tech companies than with local plumbers.

“Where I think people go wrong in entrepreneurship is building a product, rather than a business for the future,” says Mr Phelan....Making a neglected category simple and elegant is attractive.”

“All you have to do,” he concluded, “is not to see it as a gas boiler business, but a much bigger play......Phelan’s idea that new businesses need to be strategic rather than excitable about this or that gimmicky new product is one that other entrepreneurs would do well to follow.
disruption  unglamorous  smart_homes  eco-friendly  reinvention  home_based  new_businesses  new_products  millennials  fin-tech  credit_scoring  personal_finance  boring  buying_a_business  Dollar_Shave_Club  Harry’s 
april 2018 by jerryking
Millennials shouldn’t treat their careers like lottery tickets - The Globe and Mail
MARCH 20, 2018 | THE GLOBE AND MAIL | by BRAM BELZBERG.

If you're in your early 20s and just starting your career, you probably shouldn't take a job with a start-up.....joining a startup is attractive. They can be exciting, and the pay can be pretty good. A small percentage of people will pick the right opportunity, collect stock options, and become millionaires before they're 30. It's like winning the lottery.

But, like the real lottery, most people don't win, and they end up worse off than they were before....The majority of startups are going to go bust.....Large companies – such as banks and consulting firms and established tech outfits – understand how to bring along new graduates. They've been developing the best way to do so for decades. They have full-time employees who only think about developing young staff into future managers. Their programs work. They teach you important skills, they teach you how the professional world operates, and they teach you how to network. It takes a lot of time, energy, and focus to create these programs.....Generally, successful startups need three things: a great idea, a reliable funding network, and strong leadership. Most startups don't have a full management team, and the managers they do have probably won't have time to mentor you. You also won't be building a network of peers who can help finance your startup one day. If you have a great idea, it will still be there when you've learned how to develop it into a business. If you really want to get the experience of working at a startup, do it when you've developed your career and built a safety net in case it fails....Work hard, put in your time, and achieve your goals. But there aren't any shortcuts in building a career. When you're ready to move on from your first job, you should have a clear idea of what you want to do next, with a foundation of skills and experience in place. You don't want to be left holding only a losing lottery ticket.
millennials  Managing_Your_Career  Jason_Isaacs  career_paths  start_ups  large_companies  advice  new_graduates  high-risk 
march 2018 by jerryking
The dumb-bell economy: inside the booming business of exercise
FEBRUARY 9, 2018 | FT | Jo Ellison.

Where once consumers looked for acquisitions to express their status, our spending habits are shifting towards more holistic expenditures. In the past 20 years, the leisure industry has emerged as one of the most dynamic, disruptive and fashionable of forces. It’s all part of a new focus on the “lifestyle experience”, a trend that has possessed consumers and found luxury brands spiking with sporty new offerings — sneakers, leggings, apps and accessories — designed to harness the burgeoning market. As Harvey Spevak, the executive chairman and managing partner of the Equinox group, likes to say: “Health is the new wealth.”
.....2019 will see the first Equinox hotel opening in New York’s Hudson Yards, the first in a rollout of Equinox hotels earmarked for billions more in investment. The hotels will be founded on the same full-service ideal as the clubs. “Our vision for the hotels is to cater to the high-performance traveller,” says Spevak, “and we think about it as we do, historically, from a science perspective. We call it MNR — movement, nutrition and recovery — where a high-performance lifestyle and a healthy lifestyle is a three-legged stool.”.....as our lives have become busier, atomised and more urban, the gym has emerged as the new place in which to gather: to be part of a community....not only are millennials more likely to buy gym memberships, they’re driving the boutique business as well. The rise of the group workout, club membership and all of the attendant accessories that come with it have become part of the new language of “wellness”......Where you work out, who you work out with, and what you wear to work out in have become totems of fashionability. Spevak traces the first shoots of the wellness trend to 9/11, when he saw a jump in the number of people becoming focused on holistic health and taking care of themselves.
....But more than anything, the fitness boom must be a corollary of a digital revolution in which working out has become a ubiquitous feature of our online life; ....Minton agrees that a gym’s success depends on cultivating this tribal loyalty, delivering a unique experience and then selling product that marks its members out. “Some of the most interesting clubs are those that are expanding into less obvious areas,” he says. “We now have over 600 boutiques across the UK and they are growing faster than traditional gyms as they have a smaller footprint and can take pop-up spaces.......The experiential market is throwing a lifeline to retailers, as well. “The fashion link is growing,” adds Minton. “Fitness apparel brands like Lululemon, Sweaty Betty, Reebok, Nike all now offer free in-store workouts, which provide them with an opportunity to market their brand lifestyles more directly and forge a connection with the consumer.”.......“The demise of retail is a permanent shift,” says Spevak. “It doesn’t mean retail’s going to go away, but it’s going to look very different. The consumer, in my opinion, will continue to buy nice things for themselves, but I think in the scheme of priorities the experience is more important than the handbag.”
fitness  exercise  London  United_Kingdom  gyms  wellness  rollouts  strength_training  boutiques  leisure  Equinox  millennials  experiential_marketing  small_spaces  pop-ups  non-obvious  upscale  retailers  in-store  digital_revolution 
february 2018 by jerryking
Globish just doesn’t cut it any more
January 10th| FT | by Simon Kuper.

12 HOURS AGO

Globish: a simple, dull, idiom-free, cripplingly accented version of English with a small vocabulary. .....“What is well articulated in English on the internet becomes ‘truth,’” says Japanese writer Minae Mizumura in The Fall of Language in the Age of English.
millennials  English-speaking  machine_translation  English  Simon_Kuper 
january 2018 by jerryking
Italian luxury group Zegna tailors its cloth to suit millennials
NOVEMBER 19, 2017 | FT | by Rachel Sanderson in Milan.

Casual wear has become the fastest-growing luxury segment as tech savvy consumers want a high-end iteration of the “hoodie and sneakers look” favoured by tech entrepreneurs from Silicon Valley to China.....The response of Mr Zegna, who together with his sister Anna and cousin Paolo run Zegna, has been to “reinvent ourselves in the casualisation world”.
.....So-called casualisation of luxury is one of the biggest trends in the €250bn industry, according to consultant Bain. Luxury brands invested €500m on developing “rubber slides” (a type of flip-flop) last year alone and €3.5bn on sneakers in an effort to attract millennial and Generation Z consumers, estimated to make up nearly half of the luxury market by 2025.

Failure to spot the trend can prove costly. Patrizio Bertelli, co-chief executive of family firm Prada, last month blamed a failure to spot the trend for luxury sneakers behind a tumble in revenues in its first half.

The luxury industry invested €3.5bn on sneakers last year as they tap the trend for upmarket casualisation © Bloomberg
“If there is one product today that is impulse driven and creates emotions [among consumers] it is the sneaker,”
..Zegna’s strength is that it controls its entire supply chain. ....Zegna three years ago bought a 6,300 acre farm with 10,000 sheep in Australia. Last year, it bought 60 per cent of a textile factory in Italy. Mr Zegna likes to say that Zegna goes from “sheep to shop to screen”, the latter in a nod to the rise of online shopping for luxury. Of its 7,000 employees half work in the industry and half in distribution.
.......Zegna says having raw materials and manufacturing at its fingertips has surprisingly proven a boon. “In this day in which the suit, like the tie, is not so popular, people are going for personalisation,”
.....In the world of men’s luxury — like other disrupted industries — consumers either want things “very fast” luxury or “very slow”, he argues.

For those willing and able to pay upwards of €5,000 for a bespoke suit, “It will take at least three months for you to have your beautiful garment,” says Mr Zegna with an evident satisfaction.
luxury  Italian  mens'_clothing  suits  millennials  CEOs  sneakers  family-owned_businesses  Zegna  digital_savvy 
november 2017 by jerryking
Nestlé aims to bottle appeal of artisan coffee
SEPTEMBER 29, 2017 | FT| Arash Massoudi, Tim Bradshaw, Scheherazade Daneshkhu and Ralph Atkins
artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  Nestlé  coffee  millennials  cafés  Big_Food  niches 
november 2017 by jerryking
America’s Retailers Have a New Target Customer: The 26-Year-Old Millennial - WSJ
By Ellen Byron
Oct. 9, 2017

Companies such as Scotts, Home Depot Inc., Procter & Gamble Co. , Williams-Sonoma Inc.’s West Elm and the Sherwin-Williams Co. are hosting classes and online tutorials to teach such basic skills as how to mow the lawn, use a tape measure, mop a floor, hammer a nail and pick a paint color.
retailers  millennials  Home_Depot 
october 2017 by jerryking
Helping Bosses Decode Millennials—for $20,000 an Hour - WSJ
By Lindsay Gellman
Updated May 18, 2016

Millennial issues also have become a source of income for a host of self-anointed experts who say they can interpret young workers’ whims and aspirations—sometimes for as much as $20,000 an hour. Oracle, Red Robin Gourmet Burgers Inc. and Time Warner Inc.’s HBO have retained millennial advisers to stem turnover, market to young people and ensure their happiness at work......
generational_change  generations  millennials  turnover  Communicating_&_Connecting 
october 2017 by jerryking
Racism Is Everywhere, So Why Not Move South? - The New York Times
By RENIQUA ALLENJULY 8, 2017
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African-Americans  millennials  the_South  racism  black_flight 
july 2017 by jerryking
How Sephora Is Thriving Amid a Retail Crisis - The New York Times
By LAURA M. HOLSONMAY 11, 2017

Much has been written about the crisis in retail, with shoppers deserting department stores for e-tailers and fast fashion, if they shop at all. The beauty business, though, has not had the same fate. Prestige beauty sales in the United States rose 6 percent in the 12 months ending in February, tallying $15.9 billion, according to the market research company NPD Group. Makeup alone is up 11 percent, totaling $7.3 billion. But that industry, too, is in the midst of its own upheaval, driven in part by the success of stores such as Sephora, the No. 1 specialty beauty retailer in the world....Bloggers and YouTube stars, Instagram videos and virtual assistants are replacing department store sales clerks, whose customers now know as much as they do (or more) about mermaid eyes and ombré lips. Brand loyalty is out, replaced by Sephora’s try-more-buy-more ethos. Friends hold as much sway these days as trained experts....two out of five women between ages 18 and 54 wear five or more makeup products every day. “It defines the selfie-obsessed, image-driven culture of our time,” .... There are more voices. And we are trying to cut through the confusion,” in part by allowing customers to try before they buy.....“It is easy to kill time, play around with things and then spend more money than I should,” ...“I am experimenting a lot, trying to figure out what I like.” She doesn’t shop at department stores. “I don’t associate [Sephora] with makeup,”....In 2015, Sephora opened its Innovation Lab in a converted warehouse in San Francisco to experiment with ways to combine mobile apps and in-store shopping into a cohesive experience. As a result of their efforts, customers can have as little or as much personal contact they want in stores ...Now department stores are scrambling to follow suit.
Sephora  beauty  retailers  crisis  LVMH  Instagram  brands  millennials  social_media  digital_influencers  experimentation  time_sink  play  Macy’s  Bloomingdale’s  cosmetics  makeup  customer_experience  experiential_marketing  image-driven  self-absorbed  fast_fashion  in-store 
may 2017 by jerryking
At Luxury Stores, It Isn’t Shopping, It’s an Experience - WSJ
By Christina Binkley
April 16, 2017

What do luxury retailers in urban areas do when they face heavy pressure from the internet? Make their stores an experience. The high-end stores of tomorrow won’t try to compete with online retailers on price or convenience. Instead, they’ll do what many luxe shops are experimenting with now—turning themselves into destinations that customers go to visit instead of simply shop.....Stores will offer human connections, entertaining discoveries and dining options. And instead of being designed to feature one kind of inventory, the stores will function like pop-ups—completely changing what they offer from time to time, or even sweeping products aside to host community events......digital-native shoppers will determine how stores look and function, particularly in cities, where online alternatives with two-hour delivery windows are already plentiful.....

“Selling things isn’t going to be obvious. It’s going to be about selling experiences,” says John Bricker, creative director for Gensler, one of the world’s largest architectural firms with a global retail design practice......In some cases, retailers go so far to create destinations that they don’t even try to sell their signature products. The Gensler-designed Cadillac House in the lobby of the car maker’s New York headquarters is an art gallery and coffeehouse, with luxe white sedans on display by the entrance. People wander in for free Wi-Fi, then get familiar with the car brand by examining the vehicles, says Mr. Bricker. (The cars can’t be purchased there; legally, one must buy from a dealer.)....The strategy of providing a total experience is also spreading to independent retailers that aren’t aiming solely at high-end customers......These shifts are being followed by mass retailers as well. The idea: to move beyond the big-box strategy of the past—where companies built giant stores that people would go out of their way to visit—and build specially tailored stores in urban areas where customers live......Target recently decided to invest $7 billion in renovating its huge suburban stores and building new small-format urban stores, in a strategy to use the large stores as distribution centers for digital orders while creating a network of small city stores that will be located within easy reach of urban dwellers, both for offline shopping and picking up or returning online orders.

Brian Cornell, Target’s chief executive officer, says products will be selected for local populations by store managers who place orders from a catalog—less pet food and more snacks and notebooks for a store near a college campus, for instance.

Target looked at stores like Story in forming the strategy. “We learned a lot about agility,” from Story,
retailers  e-commerce  luxury  customer_experience  millennials  experiential_marketing  localization  merchandising  pop-ups  digital_natives  galleries  coffeehouses  brands  personal_connections  Target  agility  small_spaces  big-box  BOPIS  distribution_centres 
april 2017 by jerryking
Brandy Melville and the rise of the Instabrand
March 17, 2017 | FT via | Evernote Web | by Jo Ellison.

its place in the broader fashion landscape has remained deliberately low-profile. It has never placed an advertisement. It keeps its store numbers low — although it has a busy online business. And, unlike the showy founders of comparable youth-centric fashion brands, such as the now-defunct American Apparel, its executives rarely do press.
Instead, Brandy Melville is an entirely millennial phenomenon, propagated and fed by its mostly pubescent patrons, for whom it holds a cult-like appeal. Most discover it on Instagram, where its 3.9m followers can admire a seemingly never-ending feed (pictured below) of honey-blonde, tawny-limbed beauties skipping around piers, beachfronts, cafés and libraries in teeny-tiny shorts and cute slogan cropped tops.....The social media site launched in 2011 and has been tagging, sharing and enrolling followers ever since: many of its stars are professional models; others are just fangirls who have been picked up as brand ambassadors, picking up hundreds of thousands of their own acolytes in the process.....What’s interesting is how efficiently the brand has communicated its message. While labels have traditionally depended on print campaigns, bricks-and-mortar visibility and custom-built marketing, Brandy Melville’s success has been built on shares and likes alone.
And parents, like me, have been complicit in its success.....quite thrilling to have discovered a brand about which I knew nothing at all, and which never wanted my attention, either. Although it will happily use me as a conduit for cash. Instabrands like this are now popping up all over the retail landscape, and there’ll be more to come as the culture becomes ever more evolved. As a lesson in millennial shopping habits
fashion  brands  girls  retailers  California  millennials  Instagram  social_media  teenagers  bricks-and-mortar  shopping_habits 
march 2017 by jerryking
Bumble founder Whitney Wolfe on millennial matchmaking | Evernote Web
18 March / 19 March 2017 | FT| by Alice Fishburn.

. . . Half a year in tech-app time, it’s like a normal-world five years.” What’s the solution? “You just have to run faster than it does.’’
Wolfe has surfed an extraordinary sea-change in how we approach relationships. Our phones now allow us to identify potential life companions through location, ethnic origin or hatred of the same thing and reject them just as quickly. Such opportunities come with a healthy serving of ethical and personal dilemmas.....Bumble’s USP — “truly not a gimmick”, Wolfe stresses, and timely for a feminist age — is that the woman has all the power (while both sexes swipe to show interest, only she can start a conversation). Wolfe may be firmly on-brand but she laughs wickedly at the ambitions of many tech evangelists. “So many entrepreneurs approach me and say, ‘I want to start the next big thing’, and I say, ‘Well, what are you solving?’ And oftentimes they say, ‘Oh, I’m not sure. I want to start something big.’ ” Sigh. “You can never start something big without solving something small, right? And for me, that was not being allowed to text guys first.”.....What has all this time with the data taught her about humans? “You understand when people are the happiest, the most busy, the most detached, most involved.” Sunday nights and Mondays are the busiest times on the site: “I think that’s probably really telling because that’s usually people’s downtime, when they are relaxing or when they’re feeling bummed out . . . a little bit lonely.”
Our view on the idea of technology running our love lives unsurprisingly depends on our culture. One transatlantic dater tells me that, in the US, Bumble is strongly associated with empowered women. In the UK, some moan that it just caters to lazy men.
women  entrepreneur  Tinder  Austin  dating  mobile_applications  relationships  feminism  millennials  match-making  sexism  Silicon_Valley  accelerated_lifecycles  algorithms  gestures  online_dating  downtime 
march 2017 by jerryking
McDonald’s is going to play SXSW this year — Quartz
Svati Kirsten Narula
March 03, 2015

McDonald’s will host three “pitch sessions” at SXSW on March 13, offering an audience for tech startups with ideas for innovation in three categories:
Reinventing the Restaurant Experience: “This is not about tweeting, ordering online or Wi-Fi connectivity…. We are talking about multiple screens, proximity technology, personalization and even smart packaging.”
Content Creation: “Brands have to co-create content with communities, curate daily content to stay relevant, and create content with social in mind. How can brands tap into new content partners and models that can tackle these objectives?”
Transportation and Delivery: “Our existing idea of door-to-door delivery and drive-thru will soon be obsolete. Imagine a world where drones could deliver you food while you’re driving down the highway.”
The best pitch will earn the presenter a trip to McDonald’s corporate headquarters, where he or she will be invited to pitch directly to the company’s C-suite. McDonald’s says pitches will be evaluated based on “current traction and milestones,” “market potential,” “customer value proposition and service offering,” and “overall brand fit.”
brands  CAMEX  co-creation  McDonald's  SXSW  digital_strategies  sponsorships  millennials  Fortune_500  creating_valuable_content  content_creators  metrics  proximity  personalization  home-delivery  drones  Michael_McDerment  pitches  C-suite 
march 2017 by jerryking
Why McDonald's Shouldn't Rush Its Digital Platform -- The Motley Fool
Asit Sharma (TMFfinosus) Mar 23, 2016

McDonald's has been late to join quick-service operators in offering a mobile app. Consumers in the U.S. are developing an expectation that they can order, receive affinity (loyalty) points, and interact socially with a brand simultaneously on a mobile device, and McDonald's risks losing millennial customers if it doesn't gradually build its own system.... some risk in relation to a mobile-based affinity program. McDonald's already uses extensive national and regional promotions, through its evolving value menu and limited-time offers. Affinity programs, if not properly implemented, can become simply another discounting mechanism, and McDonald's doesn't need yet another window for passing on discounts. The point of a well-run affinity program is to mine data collected on customers to improve sales or profits, or both. ...an interesting problem that's delaying the introduction of an "order ahead and pay" component to the McDonald's app. Roughly two-thirds of McDonald's U.S. business is transacted at the drive-through. Theoretically, if a customer orders ahead on McDonald's mobile app to pick up food at the drive-through, it's self-defeating for that customer to wait behind other cars in the line.

The company is experimenting with solutions such as designated parking for drive-through customers who order ahead. In this scenario, a customer would wait in his or her car while an employee hand-delivers the order. This is functional, but you can see the implications for McDonald's throughput at peak hours, as employees leave their posts to wade out and make parking-lot deliveries.

McDonald's executives would be loath to admit it, but I'll wager that quandaries like this make them wonder if they really need to inject a digital platform into an operation that's been optimally refined over the course of decades.
McDonald's  digital_strategies  platforms  fast-food  operations  mobile_applications  QSR  drive-throughs  restaurants  millennials  self-defeating 
january 2017 by jerryking
Digital Generation: Is this the beginning of paradigm shift in ownership? : ACM - Computers in Entertainment
By Robert Niewiadomski, Dennis Anderson

Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums (GLAMs) are already grappling with the migration of content (records, correspondence) from paper to digital, including challenges of scale and readability. Now we face an additional complication: increasingly people don’t even own their digital collections of music, books or video content—they rent, borrow or pay to play.

Content that used to be contained in physical objects (books, records, photos, DVDs) is increasing being leased to us via digital devices. What does that mean for the legacy people can (or can’t) leave to document their life and work? Instead of an historic figures’ beloved book collection, will we be able to preserve her Kindle library? Would that collection even be stable over time? Will it contain (digital) marginalia? Photo collections increasingly live on the cloud, and if a service unexpectedly disappears, years of documentation can simply disappear. The podcast Reply All recently devoted a sobering episode to one such story, about a mom named Rachel who panicked when PictureLife folded, erasing her visual record of her daughters’ childhoods. What if one of those girls grows up to be president?
millennials  ownership  sharing_economy  paradigm_shifts  experience  decluttering  minimalism  physical_assets  content  artifacts  digital_artifacts 
november 2016 by jerryking
Why Millennials Swipe Right On ‘Swiping’ - WSJ
By BEN ZIMMER
Nov. 3, 2016

Tinder’s massive success, with users making more than a billion swipes a day, has led to an array of other apps adopting the swipe-to-like approach. “Swiping” has even permeated the language, with “swipe left” used as a general metaphor for rejection and “swipe right” for acceptance and openness.
gestures  millennials  Tinder  metaphors  online_dating 
november 2016 by jerryking
5 Ideas for CEOs Looking for an Edge - WSJ
1 AUG 2016

1 Three Reasons to Befriend Your Competition
(c) You can’t steal our real advantage: Business professors Adam M. Brandenburger of Harvard and Barry J. Nalebuff of Yale have comprehensively explored this idea in their book, Co-Opetition. They build the case that a smart business will leverage the strengths of another to go far beyond what can be done alone.

Here’s the key: I don’t worry about sharing with my competitors because I know that our greatest strength is the execution of our ideas, not the ideas themselves.
2 Why Companies Should Make Their Pay Transparent
leaders have a choice: Be open about pay, or leave a pay-information vacuum that staff will want to – and can – fill. Distrust is toxic within organizations, and employers who choose to hide information about compensation run the risk of staff thinking they are being deceptive – or worse.
3 CEOs, Your Employees Watch Your Every Move.
The CEO’s values trickle down through the organization and those messages flow through the entire organization. We give permission to everyone in the organization based on our behavior, much more than anything we ever say.
4 The New Tech Tools That Can Give All Employees a Voice
Social-enterprise tools can, as social era expert Nilfer Merchant once said, make “the 800-pound corporate gorilla act more like 800 gazelles – fast, nimble and collaborative.” She said that four years ago. Now it’s essential for corporations to finally buy in, whether they use services like Slack, HipChat, or create their own platforms to foster transparency and a better way to communicate. And, just as importantly, as a way to build purpose, community and put the entire company on the same page.
5. Why a Boss’s Appreciation Is So Crucial
Leaders who want to succeed and groom future leaders of the organization need to emphasize–and model–the importance of appreciation within the organization. While there are many ways to show appreciation, it can be as simple as saying thank you often–and meaning it.
ideas  CEOs  slight_edge  workplaces  appreciation  toxic_behaviors  transparency  millennials  gazelles  Slack  Adam_Brandenburger  Barry_Nalebuff 
august 2016 by jerryking
The Agony of the Digital Tease
JULY 8, 2016 | The New York Times | By JESSICA BENNETT.

For anyone who’s ever dated, or maintained any kind of relationship, in the digital age, you have probably known a breadcrumber. They communicate via sporadic noncommittal, but repeated messages — or breadcrumbs — that are just enough to keep you wondering but not enough to seal the deal (whatever that deal may be).

Breadcrumbers check in consistently with a romantic prospect, but never set up a date. They pique your interest, of that prospective job, perhaps, by reminding you repeatedly that it exists, but never set up the interview.

Continue reading the main story

Breadcrumbers are one step shy of ghosters, who disappear without a trace, but are in more frequent contact than a person giving you the fade. On the hierarchy of digital communication, the breadcrumber is the lowest form.
millennials  Communicating_&_Connecting  relationships  breadcrumbing  etiquette 
july 2016 by jerryking
Stadiums race to digitize: How sports teams are scrambling to keep Millennials coming to games - TechRepublic
There are three reasons that stadiums are pushing to improve connectivity:

1. Changing demographics
2. Luring fans away from their big-screen TV at home
3. Boosting revenues

Whether by building from scratch or retrofitting existing facilities, stadiums are in a fierce competition with each other to add the latest technologies.
millennials  sports  LBMA  technology  stadiums  arenas 
may 2016 by jerryking
TV broadcasters look for a happy medium to keep sports fans engaged - The Globe and Mail
DAVID SHOALTS
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Mar. 18, 2016

Many of these fans would have little to no memory of the Blue Jays’ World Series runs in 1992 and 1993, so it is an encouraging sign for both broadcasters and sports teams – laggards, such as the Edmonton Oilers and Toronto Maple Leafs, can count on their fans being there when they finally get back into contention.

But that is small consolation for Rogers, which has to find a way to break even on its 12-year, $5.2-billion deal with the NHL for the Canadian broadcast rights. The bad news is that, since the Leafs have the largest fan base of the seven Canadian NHL teams, their plummeting TV ratings over the past two seasons have caused much pain for Rogers. Worse still, going into what ought to be a postseason ratings and advertising-revenue bonanza, the media company is facing the prospect of a playoff season without a single Canadian franchise. That is devastating to its budget projections and reportedly is already having an effect on staffing levels.

Kaan Yigit, president of Solutions Research Group in Toronto, says the NHL has gained consumers who have started to follow the league on digital and social media in recent years. But the communications and technology consultant adds that the gains did not offset the losses of conventional TV viewers. By December of 2015, an SRG survey of 500 Canadians showed, the number of Canadians aged 12 and above who consume the NHL on digital and social media increased 9 per cent, but in the same period, the number watching on television dropped 22 per cent. Over all, there was an 11-per-cent decline in Canadians who watch the NHL on any platform.
sports  broadcasting  fans  engagement  fan_engagement  LBMA  millennials  viewers  NHL  bad_news 
march 2016 by jerryking
The Future of Fashion Journalism Education | Stephan Rabimov
Stephan Rabimov Become a fan
Director, Social Media & Fashion Journalism, Academy of Art University
Email
The Future of Fashion Journalism Education
Posted: 09/09/2015
future  fashion  journalism  digital_media  millennials 
october 2015 by jerryking
All hail the hashtag: How retailers are drawing you in, one Facebook post at a time - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Sep. 29, 2015

Welcome to Retail 3.0, in which retailers use social media in a bid to draw young shoppers such as Campos back to bricks-and-mortar outlets.

Just a few years ago trendy shops lured consumers with an in-store coffee bar or barber shop. But today a hot brew or hair trim isn’t enough: Retailers increasingly feel the pressure to attract cyber-savvy shoppers to their physical outlets with eye-catching social media experiences that can be shared multiple times.

The social-media initiatives range from fitting rooms in Kate Spade stores that provide a backdrop for selfies with “like?” in a speech bubble to luxury parka purveyor Nobis installing photo booths at its store launch parties; and department store Nordstrom, whose roots are in shoes, encouraging shoppers to “shoefie” (take a selfie of their footwear) next to the store’s name. The images, uploaded on social media, put a spotlight on the brands.....social-media posts can pump up sales during an event as much as 20 per cent. About 60 per cent of Canadian consumers say they’ve come into contact with different products and brands through social media and, of those, 46 per cent say the interactions resulted in them making more purchases, up from 32 per cent in 2014, according to a survey this year by consultancy PwC.
digital_influencers  event-driven  social_media  Retail_3.0  imagery  Marina_Strauss  product_launches  selfies  retailers  millennials  Instagram  Facebook  e-commerce  bricks-and-mortar  in-store  footwear 
october 2015 by jerryking
In Charleston, a Millennial Race Terrorist - The New York Times
JUNE 21, 2015| NYT | Charles Blow.

Who radicalized Roof? Who passed along the poison? We must never be lulled into a false belief that racism is dying off with older people. As I’ve written in this space before, Spencer Piston, an assistant professor of political science at Syracuse University, has found that “younger (under-30) whites are just as likely as older ones to view whites as more intelligent and harder-working than African-Americans.”..... there is a widely published photo of Roof sitting on his car with an ornamental license plate with Confederate flags on it. That is the same Confederate flag that flies on the grounds of the state Capitol. What signal is South Carolina sending?

There is the thread of couching his cowardice as chivalry, framing his selfish hatred as noble altruism in defense of white femininity from the black brute. So much black blood has been spilled and so many black necks noosed in the name of protecting white femininity, and by extension, white purity. Roof is only this trope’s latest instrument.
Charleston_shootings  Charles_Blow  racism  South_Carolina  terrorism  Confederacy  white_supremacy  millennials 
june 2015 by jerryking
How the Civil Rights Movement has gained relevance for a new generation - The Globe and Mail
DAVID SHRIBMAN
How the Civil Rights Movement has gained relevance for a new generation
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Mar. 10 2015
civil_rights  millennials  African-Americans 
march 2015 by jerryking
Capital Journal: Republicans Grapple With the Rand Paul Conundrum - WSJ
By GERALD F. SEIB
Updated June 2, 2014

Rand Paul is, of course, the junior senator from Kentucky and a rising star in his party. He mixes tea-party appeal with the libertarian instincts he inherited from his father, former Rep. Ron Paul .

He attracts some constituencies other Republicans have a hard time reaching—college-age voters, in particular—and is diligently trying to reach out to minority groups that have slipped further from the grasp of others in his party. Indeed, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, an organization not known for its close relations with Republicans, invited him to appear at its July annual meeting, Mr. Paul's office says, though a scheduling conflict likely will prevent him from appearing....Mr. Paul doesn't consider himself an isolationist, of course. In fact, in an op-ed written earlier this year for the Washington Post, he essentially described the debate between isolationism and interventionism as a phony one: "False choices between being everywhere all of the time and nowhere any of the time are fodder for debate on Sunday morning shows or newspaper columns. Real foreign policy is made in the middle...."
Gerald_Seib  Rand_Paul  GOP  U.S.foreign_policy  millennials  NAACP  isolationism  false_choices  constituencies  conundrums 
march 2015 by jerryking
Mobile’s Rise Poses a Riddle for Banks - WSJ
By DANIEL HUANG
Updated Dec. 18, 2014

for bigger and more-complex transactions, which often require fees, Ms. Bueno prefers to visit a bank teller in person. That means her digital devotion to the bank doesn’t actually generate much revenue, a puzzle firms across the industry still are trying to solve.

VOTE

Do You Use Your Mobile Phone for Banking?
This year, for the first time, U.S. customers interacted with their banks more through mobile devices than any other means, according to a new study by consultancy Bain & Co. Mobile interactions are now 35% of the total, more than any other type, including traditional online channels, automated-teller machines and branch visits, the report showed.
millennials  banking  banks  mobile_applications  financial_services 
december 2014 by jerryking
Maybe it’s time to rewire and unplug the next generation - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 30 2014 |Special to The Globe and Mail | GWYN MORGAN.

How can people who’ve spent almost every waking minute moment fixated on their gadgets learn thinking skills such as problem solving, strategic planning and disciplined time management? Psychological studies don’t paint an encouraging picture....It’s dangerous from a social standpoint because constantly distracted people who are incapable of long-form thinking will have difficulty managing their lives. And it’s dangerous economically because business success in a globally competitive world requires undivided focus, analytical accuracy, creative problem solving, innovative thinking and team-working skills.

The Internet brain seeks to fill all “gap” time tweeting, texting, e-mailing, following Facebook “friends” and, if there’s any spare minutes left, playing video games. Is it possible to rewire the Internet-addicted brain? I wouldn’t be surprised to see “Internet withdrawal” retreat centres emerge as a new business opportunity. And businesses should be adding “long-form thinking” to employee development programs. The survival of their enterprises may depend upon it.
millennials  smartphones  Gwyn_Morgan  slack_time  strategic_thinking  monotasking  long-term  digital_natives  timeouts 
december 2014 by jerryking
Livable, booming core stirs envy, but raises infrastructure worries - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, May. 14 2014

Young people are flocking to inhabit the lively, walkable neighbourhoods springing up downtown. In some, such as King-Spadina and Waterfront West, seven out of 10 residents are ‘echo boomers,’ 20 to 39 years old.

The number of people working downtown has been soaring, too. Downtown gained more than 43,000 office jobs in the five years to 2011. A host of big companies, from Google to Telus to Coca-Cola, have moved into new downtown offices. Although downtown contains just 3 per cent of the city’s land area, it accounts for half of its GDP, a third of its jobs and a quarter of its tax base. More than a quarter of a million people commute into downtown each morning by public transit.
Marcus_Gee  Toronto  urban  urbanization  urban_intensification  urban_planning  downtown_core  Big_Tech  millennials  neighbourhoods  King-Spadina  Port_Lands  livability  walkability 
june 2014 by jerryking
What does the future hold for the CBC? - The Globe and Mail
SIMON HOUPT

The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Apr. 11 2014,

you have to create an infrastructure of an organization that can adapt to whatever it is. And that’s a challenge around how do we think about ourselves, and our role, and how do we make ourselves as agile as we can?” In big-picture terms, she said, the CBC “is going to be smaller, it’s going to be faster, it’s going to be engaging.”...Under Ms. Conway, the CBC will strike more partnerships with private Canadian broadcasters and its foreign counterparts. It will also work more with marketers to create so-called branded entertainment (a.k.a. product placement) shows.
CBC_Radio  CBC_TV  Simon_Houpt  millennials  Vice_Media  the_big_picture  partnerships 
april 2014 by jerryking
Tech startups: A Cambrian moment | The Economist
Jan 18th 2014

the world of startups today offers a preview of how large swathes of the economy will be organised tomorrow. The prevailing model will be platforms with small, innovative firms operating on top of them. This pattern is already emerging in such sectors as banking, telecommunications, electricity and even government. As Archimedes, the leading scientist of classical antiquity, once said: “Give me a place to stand on, and I will move the Earth.”....yet another dotcom bubble that is bound to pop. Indeed, the number of pure software startups may have peaked already.... warns Mr Andreessen, who as co-founder of Netscape saw the bubble from close by: “When things popped last time it took ten years to reset the psychology.” And even without another internet bust, more than 90% of startups will crash and burn.

But this time is also different, in an important way.

the basic building blocks for digital services and products—the “technologies of startup production”,...Some of these building blocks are snippets of code that can be copied free from the internet, along with easy-to-learn programming frameworks (such as Ruby on Rails). Others are services for finding developers (eLance, oDesk), sharing code (GitHub) and testing usability (UserTesting.com). Yet others are “application programming interfaces” (APIs), digital plugs that are multiplying rapidly....Startups are best thought of as experiments on top of such platforms, testing what can be automated in business and other walks of life. Some will work out, many will not. Hal Varian, Google’s chief economist, calls this “combinatorial innovation”. In a way, these startups are doing what humans have always done: apply known techniques to new problems. The late Claude Lévi-Strauss, a French anthropologist, described the process as bricolage (tinkering)..... software (which is at the heart of these startups) is eating away at the structures established in the analogue age....this special report will explain how start-ups operate, how they are nurtured in accelerators and other such organisations, how they are financed and how they collaborate with others. It is a story of technological change creating a set of new institutions which governments around the world are increasingly supporting.
anthropologists  Archimedes  bubbles  Cambrian_explosion  dotcom  entrepreneurship  Greek  Hal_Varian  innovation  innovation_policies  Marc_Andreessen  millennials  platforms  software_is_eating_the_world  start_ups  taxonomy  technological_change  urban 
february 2014 by jerryking
Why can’t today’s graduates get hired? -
Dec. 05 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by Margaret Wente.

“Everywhere, employers are looking to recruit young people with a strong complement of soft skills, such as the ability to communicate, think critically and work in teams,” John Manley, president of the Canadian Council of Chief Executives, said in a recent speech.

The real skills gap, business leaders say, is not the shortage of oil-field engineers and the glut of history BAs. It’s about the shortage of young people who are good at problem-solving, communication, teamwork, time management, persistence, loyalty and dedication. Survey after survey reports that businesses can’t find enough workers who are motivated, flexible and organized. As a recent piece in Time magazine declared, “The entry-level candidates who are on tap to join the ranks of full-time work are clueless about the fundamentals of office life. ”...“As recently as 10 years ago, organizations would hire for potential,” Ms. Moses told me. “But now they want people who can hit the ground running.” Employers have also become extremely risk-averse about new hires – another factor that stacks the deck against the twentysomethings. It’s hard to prove that you can do the job if nobody will give you the first one. As for the soft-skills gap, she thinks it’s overblown. For starters, today’s young adults have collaborated and worked in teams all their lives.

The trouble is that few companies do training any more, even the kind of informal short-term training that can break in someone new.
Barbara_Moses  Communicating_&_Connecting  critical_thinking  grit  hiring  job_search  John_Manley  loyalty  millennials  Margaret_Wente  new_graduates  persistence  problem_solving  skills  short-sightedness  skills_gap  teams  time-management  young_people 
december 2013 by jerryking
Yes, Healthful Fast Food Is Possible. But Edible?
April 3, 2013 |- NYTimes.com | By MARK BITTMAN

After the success of companies like Whole Foods, and healthful (or theoretically healthful) brands like Annie’s and Kashi, there’s now a market for a fast-food chain that’s not only healthful itself, but vegetarian-friendly, sustainable and even humane. And, this being fast food: cheap. “It is significant, and I do believe it is coming from consumer desire to have choices and more balance,” says Andy Barish, a restaurant analyst at Jefferies LLC, the investment bank. “And it’s not just the coasts anymore.” ...What I’d like is a place that serves only good options, where you don’t have to resist the junk food to order well, and where the food is real — by which I mean dishes that generally contain few ingredients and are recognizable to everyone, not just food technologists....In recent years, the fast-food industry has started to heed these new demands. Billions of dollars have been invested in more healthful fast-food options, and the financial incentives justify these expenditures. About half of all the money spent on food in the United States is for meals eaten outside the home. And last year McDonald’s earned $5.5 billion in profits on $88 billion in sales. If a competitor offered a more healthful option that was able to capture just a single percent of that market share, it would make $55 million. Chipotle, the best newcomer of the last generation, has beaten that 1 percent handily. Last year, sales approached $3 billion. In the fourth quarter, they grew by 17 percent over the same period in the previous year.

Numbers are tricky to pin down for more healthful options because the fast food industry doesn’t yet have a category for “healthful.”...Chipotle combines the best aspects of Nouveau Junk to create a new category that we might call Improved Fast Food. At Chipotle, the food is fresher and tastes much better than traditional fast food. The sourcing, production and cooking is generally of a higher level; and the overall experience is more pleasant. The guacamole really is made on premises, and the chicken (however tasteless) is cooked before your eyes. It’s fairly easy to eat vegan there, but those burritos can pack on the calories. As a competitor told me, “Several brands had a head start on [the Chipotle founder Steve] Ells, but he kicked their [expletive] with culture and quality. It’s not shabby for assembly-line steam-table Mexican food. It might be worth $10 billion right now.” (It is.)

Chipotle no longer stands alone in the Improved Fast Food world: Chop’t, Maoz, Freshii, Zoës Kitchen and several others all have their strong points. And — like Chipotle — they all have their limitations, starting with calories and fat.
...Veggie Grill, Lyfe Kitchen, Tender Greens and others have solved the challenge of bringing formerly upscale, plant-based foods to more of a mass audience. But the industry seems to be focused on a niche group that you might call the health-aware sector of the population. (If you’re reading this article, you’re probably in it.) Whole Foods has proved that you can build a publicly traded business, with $16 billion in market capitalization, by appealing to this niche. But fast food is, at its core, a class issue. Many people rely on that Tendercrisp because they need to, and our country’s fast-food problem won’t be solved — no matter how much innovation in vegan options or high-tech ovens — until the prices come down and this niche sector is no longer niche. ...Soda consumption is down; meat consumption is down; sales of organic foods are up; more people are expressing concern about G.M.O.s, additives, pesticides and animal welfare. The lines out the door — first at Chipotle and now at Maoz, Chop’t, Tender Greens and Veggie Grill — don’t lie. According to a report in Advertising Age, McDonald’s no longer ranks in the top 10 favorite restaurants of Millennials, a group that comprises as many as 80 million people.
Lyfe_Kitchen  Mark_Bittman  fast-food  Burger_King  Chipotle  plant-based  vegetables  fresh_produce  vegan  McDonald's  social_classes  perishables  Whole_Foods  millennials  fast-casual  new_categories 
april 2013 by jerryking
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