jerryking + mens'_health   171

Too Little Sleep, or Too Much, May Raise Heart Attack Risk
Sept. 9, 2019 | The New York Times | By Nicholas Bakalar.

Getting less than six hours of sleep a night, or more than nine hours, might increase the risk for heart attack......The effects of sleep could have a significant impact on health and mortality, because while genes cannot be changed, sleep patterns are modifiable.

“I want to tell people that if they prioritize sleep, they can actually do something for heart health,”
cardiovascular  health_risks  heart_attacks  mens'_health  sleep 
5 weeks ago by jerryking
Opinion | How Artificial Intelligence Can Save Your Life
June 24, 2019 | The New York Times | By David Brooks.
Opinion Columnist

In his book “Deep Medicine,” which is about how A.I. is changing medicine across all fields, Eric Topol describes a study in which a learning algorithm was given medical records to predict who was likely to attempt suicide. It accurately predicted attempts nearly 80 percent of the time. By incorporating data of real-world interactions such as laughter and anger, an algorithm in a similar study was able to reach 93 percent accuracy.....
algorithms  artificial_intelligence  books  David_Brooks  depression  diagnostic  doctors  medical  mens'_health  mental_health  op-ed  pattern_recognition  predictive_analytics  tools  visual_cues 
june 2019 by jerryking
How to Get the Best From Your Immune System - Smarter Living Guides
2019 | The New York Times | By Matt Richtel.

**“An Elegant Defense: The Extraordinary New Science of the Immune System.”"

The immune system is much less about exercising power than it is about finding balance. You can help train and maintain it. Here’s how:
(A) What Is the Immune System?
Our great defense system helps ward off the most dangerous of invaders......It is a common misconception that the immune system goes to war with every foreign organism. That would lead to scorched earth, nuclear winter. Instead, the job of the immune system is to take stock, monitor, assess and judge potential threats...if an invader is deemed a threat, the immune system has a narrow job: destroy the threat while doing as little collateral damage as possible. This response from the immune system is called “inflammation.” .....inflammation can feel like a stuffy nose, sore throat, tummy ache, fever, fatigue or headache. Yes, the symptoms of an immune response feel lousy, but you must suffer a little to keep the rest of your body healthy over the long term. And for your health and daily well-being, the key is to keep your immune system from underperforming or getting out of hand.
(B) IT’S ABOUT BALANCE
The immune system, often seen as a ruthless defender, seeks a steady state, not a police state.....a fiercely delicate combination of a bouncer and a ballet dancer. In fact, many molecules in this complex system are designed to send a signal that it should withdraw, pause an attack and stand down. Without these molecules, the state of inflammation that helps destroy threats would lay your body to waste..... Instead of boosting your immune system, you should be supporting it. And you should try to never undermine its delicate structures.
(C) The Immune System and the Beast
Let's take a moment to understand how (and why) our immune system acts in the face of a threat.....Our immune system took shape roughly 480 million years ago. All jawed vertebrates going back to the shark share its key properties. One property is priority setting.....an acute threat, e.g. a lion attack, the body’s network focuses wholly on that threat....the body goes into an emergency state known colloquially as “fight or flight.” During these periods, the body fires off powerful chemicals, including:

Epinephrine, which creates a kind of high for the body to subvert fatigue.
Norepinephrine, which also helps to subvert fatigue.
Cortisol, which helps the body maintain essential functions, like blood flow.

When these hormones are at work, we can feel generally O.K.,but .... the release of these fight-or-flight hormones dampens our immune response. ...it causes the immune system to withdraw.
(D) WHY THE IMMUNE SYSTEM WITHDRAWS
During times of real, acute stress — like threat of being eaten by a lion — our bodies can ill afford to waste resources dealing with illness. Viruses and bacteria, while dangerous, pale in comparison to the gigantic beast with razor-sharp teeth chasing us across the savannah. In that moment, our body needs all our energy, non-essential functions be damned. Step one: survive lion. Step two: deal with head cold.
(E) Sleep Is a Magic Bullet
Both you and your immune system need rest. ...If you don’t sleep, you will die — sooner. Studies show that lack of sleep leads to premature death through diseases like cancer and heart disease, and the reasons have everything to do with the immune system,
(F) SLEEP KEEPS YOUR SYSTEM IN BALANCE
This might sound contradictory. How can sleep can weaken the immune system, but also lead to inflammation?

Your immune system does not work as a binary system. It is not either on or off. It is made up of many molecules that send different signals, some urging inflammation and others restraining it. Your goal is to create an environment that doesn’t require your immune system to lose its natural balance.

Sleeplessness tips your immune system out of balance, hinders homeostasis, and turns the once elegant system into reckless pinballs of powerful molecules bouncing off your body’s bumper rails, and sometimes through them.

More concretely, it is a hard pill to swallow knowing there is no pill to swallow. The most important steps to support your immune system require discipline and habit.
(G) Exercise, Food and Meditation
Ward off illness with these three staples of a healthy body. ...the best things you can do for yourself when you’re sick are rest, eat well, don’t turn little things into lions, and remember that your immune system, if given your support, will likely do a darn good job of keeping you at harmony with the world.
allergies  bacteria  books  defensive_tactics  exercise  food  habits  homeostasis  howto  immune_system  inflammation  meditation  mens'_health  mindfulness  priorities  self-discipline  sleep  sleeplessness  steady-state  threats  viruses 
june 2019 by jerryking
Gut feelings: How microbes may affect your mental health
MAY 24, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | PAUL TAYLOR.

......A growing body of research suggests that what’s happening in the gut may also have an impact on the brain.....In a study published in February, for instance, Belgian scientists reported that two types of gut bacteria tend to be depleted in people with depression. The significance of this study is still open to debate. Although the scientists found “an association” between the absence of certain gut microbes and depression, they didn’t actually prove one thing causes the other......adds support to earlier studies that demonstrated mood and behaviour could be altered by manipulating the gut’s microbial contents.......It was once thought that depression resulted from a “chemical imbalance” in the brain. Based on this theory, patients should feel better by simply taking medications that restore the brain’s correct chemical balance.

But now researchers believe that there may be many different causes of depression, which is characterized by both structural and activity changes in the brain. Some evidence also suggests inflammation may play a role. “There are probably multiple types of depression that all masquerade as a single entity,” Sinyor explains. “And that’s the reason why we have many treatments that work, but certain treatments work for some people while other treatments work for others.”

Both Collins and Sinyor think it’s possible that research may eventually lead to new bacterial-based treatments for depression and other mental-health disorders.
bacteria  digestive_systems  gastrointestinal  guts  mens'_health  mental_health  microbes  microbiome 
may 2019 by jerryking
No, Night Owls Aren’t Doomed to Die Early
May 23, 2019 | The New York Times | By Bryan Clark.

Dr. Knutson, an associate professor at Northwestern University who studies neurology and sleep medicine, told The Los Angeles Times that issues arise for night owls who try to live in a morning lark world, staying up late while adding to their sleep debt each morning.

Dr. Knutson’s study noted a number of other behaviors that could contribute to increased health risks, mostly relating to diet and exercise. While 24-hour gyms exist, opportunities to take part in classes or athletics are practically unheard-of late at night and overnight. Food options for those who eat while others are typically sleeping are often limited to fast food and greasy-spoon fare.

These factors suggest there is more to consider than just sleep.

None of the experts we spoke with suggested that people with owl schedules who get restful sleep each night, eat a healthy diet, exercise, form meaningful social connections and get some sunlight each day were at significant risk of an overall decline in their general health, or an early death, based solely on their sleep schedule.
dying  health_risks  mens'_health  sleep 
may 2019 by jerryking
Sitting for More Than 13 Hours a Day May Sabotage the Benefits of Exercise
April 10, 2019 |The New York Times | By Gretchen Reynolds.

Regular exercise reduces the risk of heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and many other chronic conditions. Even a single workout can improve our metabolisms, studies show, so that we burn fat more efficiently after meals and keep our blood sugar and insulin levels steady.

Inactivity, meanwhile, has almost the opposite physiological effects. People who spend most of their waking hours sitting face heightened risks for many chronic diseases. They often also experience metabolic problems that raise the risk of diabetes and heart disease, including insulin resistance, poor blood sugar control and high levels of triglycerides, the fatty acids from food that linger in the blood if they are not metabolized.
inactivity  sedentariness  mens'_health  disease  exercise  fitness 
april 2019 by jerryking
Night time urination could mean your blood pressure's up
Posted: Apr 01, 2019 | CBC Radio | Dr. Brian Goldman · CBC Radio ·
aging  blood_pressure  diets  mens'_health  nocturnal  salt  sleep  urination 
april 2019 by jerryking
A Guide to Your Knees - Well Guides - The New York Times
By Dr. Jordan Metzl

Never had knee pain? Excellent. Let’s keep it that way. And while not all knee problems are preventable, you can prevent many issues and also improve knee function with strength and flexibility training.

With increased muscular strength and flexibility surrounding your knees, the better they bear their load. Muscles are shock absorbers; the stronger they are, the better they can offload the hips and knees and the better your joints will feel — no matter your age.

STRENGTH
Lower extremity strength training includes anything that builds muscle around the hips and knees. Stationary biking is the easiest way to start and has the added benefit of aiding knee and hip mobility. Biking can be done several times per week on a stationary or recumbent bike; we recommend biking for 20 to 30 minutes per session.

Functional strength exercises are designed to strengthen multiple muscle groups simultaneously. Unlike a single muscle exercise such as a bicep curl, functional strength exercises like as a push-up, strengthen all of the muscles in a body area simultaneously. When you move normally, muscles work together, so it makes more sense to exercise them together as well........
Bodyweight Split Squat
Single Leg Hip Raise
Single Leg Toe Touch

FLEXIBILITY
As sore knees stiffen, the muscles around the knees tighten as well. This soft tissue tightening often amplifies knee pain. A foam roller is a terrific, low-cost option that can be used at home to improve flexibility and reduce pain through a process known as myofascial release.

HOW TO ROLL YOUR KNEE
The Hamstrings Roll

Place a foam roller under your right knee, with your leg straight. Cross your left leg over your right ankle. Please your hands flat on the floor behind you.
Roll your body forward until the roller reaches your glutes. Then roll back and forth over the roller.
Repeat with the other side.
Note: You can also do this with both legs on the roller.

Glutes Roll

Sit on a foam roller with it positioned on the back of your right thigh, just below your glutes. Cross your right leg over the front of your left thigh. Put your hands behind you for support.
Roll your body forward until the roller reaches your lower back. Then roll back and forth.
Repeat on the other side.
exercise  fitness  functional_strength  injuries  primers  knees  mens'_health  legs  glutes  injury_prevention 
march 2019 by jerryking
Is Eating Deli Meats Really That Bad for You?
Dec. 14, 2018 | The New York Times | By Roni Caryn Rabin.

Q. Is eating deli meats really that bad? Does it make a difference if it’s organic, nitrate-free or uncured? Yes, it's bad, no it doesn't make much of a difference.

A. Meat and poultry are excellent sources of protein, B vitamins and certain minerals, but consuming even small amounts of processed meat increases the risk of colorectal cancer.

“We see a 4 percent increase in the risk of cancer even at 15 grams a day, which is a single slice of ham on a sandwich,” ......Eating a more typical serving of 50 grams of processed meat a day would increase the risk of colorectal cancer by 18 percent, a 2011 review of studies found.

Unprocessed red meat, by comparison, increases cancer risk only at amounts greater than 100 grams a day, and the evidence for that link is limited, ..... people should “limit” red meat but “avoid” processed meat.

There is some evidence suggesting an association between processed meat and stomach cancer. And a recent study found an increased risk of breast cancer among women who ate the most processed meats.

Processed meat refers to any meat, including pork, poultry, lamb, goat or others, that has been salted, smoked, cured, fermented or otherwise processed for preservation or to enhance the flavor. The category includes hot dogs, ham, bacon and turkey bacon, corned beef, pepperoni, salami, smoked turkey, bologna and other luncheon and deli meats, sausages, corned beef, biltong or beef jerky, canned meat and meat-based preparations and sauces, among others.
cancers  colorectal  cured_and_smoked  delicatessens  meat  mens'_health 
december 2018 by jerryking
The Top Reader Advice for Surviving Extra-Long Flights - WSJ
By Adam Thompson
Aug. 21, 2018
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
I would also add that taking Melatonin - particularly when flying eastwards - can be very helpful in reseting your internal clock.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Always do serious exercise before a long flight, for me, 1.5 mile swim. Could be a big run for you, or walk, whatever is your thing. To get tired. to help sleep on plane. all other points good, limit alcohol, take a melatonin for sleep; time your meals to new time zone; you should skip a meal, better to arrive hungry. Get in sun as long as possible in new locale, and serious exercise again. and just know you're gonna be physically bad until you can recover. And last, business class or better if possible.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
advice  airline_industry  airports  exercise  long-haul  melatonin  mens'_health  tips  travel 
august 2018 by jerryking
Gut Feeling: To Stay Healthy, Keep Your Body’s Microbes in Line - WSJ
By Jo Craven McGinty
Aug. 17, 2018

the human body hosts a variety of microbes.....they helps digest our food, regulate our immune system and feed the cells that line the gut. But if its mix of microbes gets out of whack, the same organisms that ensure our health can make us sick.....“Not only irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease, but cardiovascular disease, even Parkinson’s, autism and multiple sclerosis,”.... illnesses—as well as obesity—have been transferred to mice by implanting (i.e. fecal transplants) the rodents with samples of the microbiomes of humans who suffer from the disorders.....The first step in understanding the microbiome is to document the assembly of microbes, and each person’s appears to be unique......Not all of the organisms in the human microbiome have been identified, but one of the better known is E. coli, a sometimes deadly bacteria that provided early evidence that microbes could be beneficial in treating human disease.

In World War I, a special kind of E. coli was found in a German soldier who, unlike his comrades, didn’t develop infectious diarrhea while stationed in an area of Europe where the disease was endemic.

E. coli Nissle, named for the professor who isolated the strain in 1917, became the active ingredient in a drug used to treat diarrhea, ulcerative colitis and other gastrointestinal disorders.
autism  bacteria  digestive_systems  E._coli  germs  gut_feelings  guts  microbes  microbiome  pathogens  mens'_health  gastrointestinal  human_anatomy 
august 2018 by jerryking
Adopt 5 Healthy Habits, Live 12 to 14 Years Longer -
MAY 1, 2018 The New York Times By NICHOLAS BAKALAR.

The study, in Circulation, looked at five behaviors: eating a healthy diet, not smoking, getting regular physical activity, moderate alcohol consumption and maintaining a normal weight.

The scientists calculated that, on average, a 50-year-old man who adopted all of these would live 12 years longer than a man who took on none.
aging  habits  healthy_lifestyles  longevity  mens'_health 
may 2018 by jerryking
What Causes Canker Sores? - The New York Times
In the spice section of the grocery store you can find Alum:
https://www.mccormick.com/spices-and-flavors/herbs-and-spices/spices/alum
It is used for to prepare pickles made from vegetables and watermelon rind.

Wash your hands first. With a damp finger touch the Alum (it will stick to it.) Now place the powder on the canker sore. The sore will go away soon.

This helps with one canker sore. If you have many, see a doctor.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Try Sensodyne toothpaste
mens'_health  dental 
march 2018 by jerryking
Nabokov, Ozil and the uses of insomnia
FEBRUARY 9, 2018 | FT | Janan Ganesh.

Why We Sleep, by Matthew Walker, a professor of neuroscience and psychology at the University of California, Berkeley.

The plain title belies a harrowing study of sleeplessness, which Walker persuasively links to cancer, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, mental health problems and immune deficiencies....Doctors have agreed for some time on the physical penalties of inadequate sleep, a threshold they set at seven hours or less per night.....Apparently, whether you are a “morning lark” or a “night owl” is to a large extent a genetic given. Camomile tea and eye masks can only do so much against hard-wired circadian rhythms. It gives you a sense of the book’s bleakness that this counts as one of its consolations.....In dystopic fiction, the future is all resource wars and extreme climates. A more bland but equally plausible dread is what Walker calls an “epidemic” of sleeplessness, with humans paradoxically locked into a trance of exhaustion even as technology makes their physical burdens easier and ever easier.
aging  books  circadian_rhythms  exhaustion  Janan_Ganesh  mens'_health  sleep  sleeplessness 
february 2018 by jerryking
Accurate blood pressure measurement is real core message of new guidelines - The Globe and Mail
ANDRÉ PICARD

Normal blood pressure remains 120/80.

(The top number, systolic, measures pressure on the blood vessels when the heart contracts; the bottom number, diastolic, measures pressure when the heart relaxes between beats.)

The guidelines, a dense 481-page document, are detailed and nuanced but, from a public perspective, the key element is that they say that people with blood pressure of 130/80 millimetres of mercury or more should now be considered hypertensive.

Previously, the cutoff point was 140/90.

What is interesting and potentially positive is that the new guidelines do not say the newly classified should be treated with drugs, unless they have other risk factors such as diabetes.

Rather, they are a loud call for preventing and managing blood pressure with lifestyle modifications.

Practically, that means reducing salt intake, being more physically active, moderating alcohol consumption, not smoking, watch the scales, getting more sleep, eating more fruits and vegetables and all that other healthy stuff that most people don't do........there is very little evidence that beginning treatment at 130/80 rather than 140/90 reduces mortality, or actually prevents heart attacks or strokes, especially in younger individuals. (And most of the newly labelled are under 45.)

There is, however, clear evidence of a direct correlation between rising blood pressure and increased risk of illness over time.

In fact, hypertension, while not an illness per se, is a leading cause of a host of illnesses, including heart attack, stroke, heart failure, kidney disease, erectile dysfunction and more.

The good news is that when drugs are used properly, they are relatively effective. First-line blood pressure meds, diuretics, are also cheap, costing just pennies.

As treatment escalates with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, calcium channel blockers (CCBs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), so do costs.
mens'_health  André_Picard  blood_pressure  baselines  heart_attacks 
november 2017 by jerryking
No Excuses, People: Get the New Shingles Vaccine - The New York Times
Paula Span
THE NEW OLD AGE NOV. 10, 2017
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aging  mens'_health  vaccines  immune_system  immunization  shingles 
november 2017 by jerryking
The Older You Are, the Worse You Sleep
Oct. 13, 2017 | WSJ | By Dr. Matthew Walker, director of the Center for Human Sleep Science at the University of California, Berkeley, and author of a new book, “Why We Sleep” (Scribner)

As we age, bodily changes degrade the quantity and quality of our sleep—which affects our health more than we realize....Sleep gets more difficult the older you get. Older adults are less able, on average, to obtain as much sleep, or as restorative a sleep, as young adults. The problem gets so bad that by our 80s, the lack of sleep can have major health ramifications, though we don’t always notice.

Older adults face a number of challenges. The first is a reduction in the quantity and quality of deep sleep—the stage that beneficially overhauls your cardiovascular, immune and metabolic systems and refreshes learning and memory abilities. As you enter your 30s and 40s, your deep-sleep brain waves become smaller, less powerful and fewer in number. Reductions in deep-sleep quality increase your risk of heart attacks, obesity and stroke, as well as the buildup of a toxic brain protein—called beta amyloid—that is linked​to Alzheimer’s disease.

Passing into your mid- to late-40s, age will have stripped you of 60% to 70% of the deep sleep you were enjoying as a teen. By the time you reach age 70, you will have lost 80% to 90% of your youthful, restorative deep sleep....The second hallmark of altered sleep as we age is fragmentation. The older we get, the more frequently we wake up throughout the night. Causes include body pain and a weakened bladder. Reducing fluid intake in the evening can help the latter, but it isn’t a cure-all.

Because of sleep fragmentation, older people will suffer a reduction in sleep efficiency, defined as the percent of time you were asleep while in bed.The third sleep change with advanced age is that of circadian timing—the body’s internal clock that times our sleep-wake rhythms. Seniors commonly experience a regression in circadian timing, leading to earlier bedtimes. The cause is an early release and peak of melatonin in older adults in the evening, instructing an earlier start time for sleep, in part because of an early drop in core body temperature.
sleep  aging  mens'_health  circadian_rhythms  books  melatonin  heart_attacks  health_risks  cardiovascular  immune_system 
october 2017 by jerryking
Well-Done Steak Without Shame - WSJ
By HILARY POTKEWITZ
April 1, 2017

Here is how I cook my steaks without pink on the inside but still tender.
Salt it at least an hour before and bring it to room temperature before cooking. Optional: I marinate my steaks some times for 4 hours in soy sauce, wine, some sugar, touch of oyster sauce and garlic.
Cook as you would cook medium rare in a hot cast iron pan 3-5 minutes each side.
While you are cooking in hot pan, heat the oven to 350.
Take the steak out of the pan and slice it across appx 3/4 inch to one inch thick.
Return to cast iron pan and put in the oven for 5-7 minutes or more so that you do not see pink. If marinated, you can put the sliced steak in the oven with marinade leftover on top of steak and leave in the oven till the marinade is boiling hot.
meat  steaks  cancers  BBQ  grilling  mens'_health  rubs_sauces_marinades 
april 2017 by jerryking
Is your liver too fat? Time to put it on a diet - The Globe and Mail
LESLIE BECK
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Mar. 03, 2017

How can you get rid of a fatty liver?

Lifestyle modification is the cornerstone to treating – and preventing – non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Gradual weight loss, dietary modification and exercise are required to effectively remove fat deposits in the liver.

+++++++++

A diet plan for fatty liver disease:

Lose excess weight:

Restrict refined grains: Limit intake of high glycemic foods such as white breads and crackers, refined breakfast cereals and white rice which spike glucose and insulin levels. Choose fibre-rich whole grains such as brown rice, quinoa, whole wheat pasta, 100-per-cent whole grain breads and cereals and oatmeal, foods that raise blood glucose gradually, not quickly.

As a source of prebiotics (fibrous carbohydrates), whole grains also help feed beneficial gut bacteria. Some evidence suggests that an altered gut microbiome plays a role in fatty liver disease.

Reduce sugars: Avoid sugar-sweetened beverages, whether they’re made with high-fructose corn syrup (fructose-glucose) or not.

Choose healthy fats: Emphasize monounsaturated fat, the type found in olive oil, peanut oil, canola oil, avocado, almonds, cashews and pecans. Monounsaturated fat has been shown to increase fat breakdown and it may have anti-inflammatory benefits.

Eat fatty fish (e.g., salmon, trout, sardines) twice a week to get anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids.

Boost antioxidant foods: Eat foods rich in dietary antioxidants such as citrus fruit, berries, mango, leafy green vegetables, carrots, sweet potato and nuts and seeds.

Avoid alcohol: If you have NAFLD or NASH, avoid drinking alcohol as it puts extra stress on your liver.

Increase exercise: Include at least 30 minutes of aerobic exercise five times a week and resistance training twice weekly.
aerobic  diets  exercise  fats  Leslie_Beck  liver  mens'_health  nutrition  weight_loss 
march 2017 by jerryking
Informed Patient? Don’t Bet On It
MARCH 1, 2017 | The New York Times | By MIKKAEL A. SEKERES, M.D. and TIMOTHY D. GILLIGAN, M.D.

■ Ask us to use common words and terms. If your doctor says that you’ll end up with a “simple iliac ileal conduit” or a “urostomy,” feel free to say “I don’t understand those words. Can you explain what that means?”

■ Summarize back what you heard. “So I should split my birth control pills in half and take half myself and give the other half to my boyfriend?” That way, if you’ve misunderstood what we did a poor job of explaining, there will be a chance to straighten it out: “No, that’s not right. You should take the whole pill yourself.”

■ Request written materials, or even pictures or videos. We all learn in different ways and at different paces, and “hard copies” of information that you can take time to absorb at home may be more helpful than the few minutes in our offices.

■ Ask for best-case, worst-case, and most likely scenarios, along with the chance of each one occurring.

■ Ask if you can talk to someone who has undergone the surgery, or received the chemotherapy. That person will have a different kind of understanding of what the experience was like than we do.

■ Explore alternative treatment options, along with the advantages and disadvantages of each. “If I saw 10 different experts in my condition, how many would recommend the same treatment you are recommending?”
■ Take notes, and bring someone else to your appointments to be your advocate, ask the questions you may be reluctant to, and be your “accessory brain,” to help process the information we are trying to convey.
Communicating_&_Connecting  clarity  doctor's_visits  questions  mens'_health  learning_journeys  medical  probabilities  plain_English  referrals  note_taking  appointments  advocacy  worst-case  best-case  medical_communication 
march 2017 by jerryking
Cold Hands May Signal Raynaud’s Phenomenon - The New York Times
Personal Health
By JANE E. BRODY DEC. 5, 2016
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mens'_health 
december 2016 by jerryking
What I Learned From a Stroke at 26: Make Time to Untangle - The New York Times
Preoccupations
By JONAS KOFFLER SEPT. 24, 2016
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september 2016 by jerryking
Prostate cancer? Relax, and don’t rush your treatment - The Globe and Mail
ANDRÉ PICARD
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Sep. 20, 2016

a landmark study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, has provided some stark data on the benefits, risks and necessity of treatment for men with low- or medium-risk prostate cancer (meaning they have a Gleason score of 6-7).

Related: What's the best method of screening for prostate cancer?

The uplifting news is that, a decade after diagnosis, 99 per cent of men with early prostate cancer are still alive. The sort-of-surprising news is that mortality rates don’t really vary depending on type of treatment, or whether a man is treated at all. .....The other element of this story, which is not part of the new research, is about the effectiveness and appropriateness of testing. Another study published recently showed that digital rectal examination is a poor way of detecting prostate cancer and shouldn’t be done because it provides “maximal pain for minimal gain.”

PSA testing, for its part, is one of the most controversial issues in the cancer field. It doesn’t actually detect cancer, but elevated PSA levels trigger biopsies and often lead to a cascade of overtreatment. In Canada, routine PSA tests are not recommended.

What we really need is a test that shows if prostate cancer, once detected, will prove aggressive and deadly or not, and we don’t have that. Prostate cancer kills 4,100 Canadian men a year, but it’s not by doing more and earlier testing and more aggressive treatment that we will necessarily reduce that number. That’s a hard message to digest, and deliver.
cancers  mens'_health  André_Picard  health  PSA  prostate  overtreatment  thinking_deliberatively  reflections  contextual  timeouts  latency 
september 2016 by jerryking
Protecting your aging brain with vitamin B12 - The Globe and Mail
JANE E. BRODY
The New York Times News Service
Published Friday, Sep. 09, 2016
vitamins  mens'_health 
september 2016 by jerryking
You Probably Don’t Need Dental X-Rays Every Year - The New York Times
THE NEW HEALTH CARE JULY 25, 2016
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dental  mens'_health 
september 2016 by jerryking
Internet Porn Nearly Ruined His Life. Now He Wants to Help. - The New York Times
JULY 6, 2016 | NYT | By SRIDHAR PAPPU.

As the session continued, he spoke less about pornography than about the need to take care of oneself, both physically and emotionally. He talked about developing good habits and routines, about changing one’s life in general.

When a health care worker asked about fatigue and how he believed it often led him to pornography, Mr. Rhodes told the man that he needed to take care of his own health as well.

“It’s like if you’re on an airplane flight,” Mr. Rhodes said, “and they say, ‘Oh, you have to put your oxygen mask on before assisting others with theirs.’ It’s because you’ll pass out trying to get a mask on to somebody else. You have to make sure you’re in a balanced spot in order to best serve other people, in order to best serve the world.”
pornography  addictions  mens'_health  habits  ruination 
july 2016 by jerryking
The Healing Power of Forgiveness - WSJ
By DIANE COLE
March 20, 2016

Begin to let go of the need for validation. Don’t be motivated by the opinions or others or the desire for recognition. Be driven by what is important to you and what you value.

Trust your instincts and allow for experimentation. Get to know yourself and discover what you enjoy and find exciting, even if you have to fail a few times.

Accept others as they are. Begin letting go of judgments and criticism of others. Focus on people’s strengths rather than their faults. Learn to deal with difficult people without diminishing yourself.

Really hear people. Go beyond just listening and understanding. Let people know that you really get them.

Take care of unresolved matters in your life. Restore your integrity. Forgive and ask for forgiveness where necessary. Reclaim the energy you have given to these matters
affirmations  foregiveness  inner-directed  mens'_health  validation 
march 2016 by jerryking
Bacteria to the rescue: Indiscriminately killing germs eliminates the ones that are helping us - The Globe and Mail
WENCY LEUNG
The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jan. 31, 2016

Toronto microbiologist Jason Tetro in his new book, The Germ Files: The Surprising Ways Microbes Can Improve Your Health and Life (And How to Protect Yourself from the Bad Ones).

As Tetro explains, antibiotics and antimicrobial products kill germs indiscriminately, destroying the ones that keep us healthy along with those that cause harm. Rather than wipe out entire populations of bacteria, yeasts and fungi, scientists are now searching for ways to bring them into better balance, allowing them to live among us, and within us, harmoniously.
germs  bacteria  mens'_health  digestive_systems  colons  books  TPL  antimicrobial_resistance  immune_system  antibiotics  self-protection 
february 2016 by jerryking
7 Myths (and Truths) About Olive Oil - WSJ
By NANCY HARMON JENKINS
Updated May 15, 2015

The only olive oil worthy of consideration is extra-virgin. Anything else, whether labeled pure, light or just plain olive oil, has been heavily refined into a pallid, flavorless substance to which a little extra-virgin oil is added for color and flavor. It’s an industrial product, made to industrial standards. If that’s all your supermarket offers, opt for one of the other oils on the shelf.

Extra-virgin olive oil should simply be the oily juice of the olive, minus the water also contained within the fruit. It may have been filtered, but it has not been refined. Because it is not standardized, extra-virgin varies enormously in aroma and flavor from bottle to bottle, producer to producer. The taste depends on many factors, from the variety of the olives pressed to their state of maturity to the speed and care with which they’ve been processed.
fats  olives  oilseeds  cooking  best_of  mens'_health  myths 
may 2015 by jerryking
Midlife fitness may lower risk of some cancers later
Mar 26, 2015 | Reuters | BY KATHRYN DOYLE.
Midlife fitness may lower risk of some cancers later
cancers  midlife  fitness  mens'_health  colorectal  exercise 
april 2015 by jerryking
Ask Well: Whiter Teeth - NYTimes.com
MARCH 20, 2015 | NYT | By CATHERINE SAINT LOUIS.

There is no shortage of ways to treat tooth discoloration: strips, rinses, brush-on gels and toothpastes sold at pharmacies; bleaching treatments at the dentist; trays bought at the dentist’s office for home use. The bottom line is all these methods work, but some require patience, and others a tolerance for painful sensitivity. And results will be only temporary.

Higher concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a bleaching agent used in many whiteners, can be delivered in a dentist’s office, so those procedures tend to be quicker than drugstore aids. But tooth sensitivity and gum irritation can occur, and the higher the concentration of the peroxide used, the more severe these side effects are likely to be.
dental  gums  mens'_health 
march 2015 by jerryking
Why the man who brought us the glycemic index wants us to go vegan -
Feb. 22 2015 | The Globe and Mail |LESLIE BECK

If it were up to Dr. David Jenkins, he would have us all give up meat, fish and dairy and embrace veganism. And not just for our individual health...A properly planned plant-based diet – one that avoids all animal products, including meat, poultry, fish, eggs and dairy – is incredibly good for your health. Studies have shown plant-based eaters are thinner and have lower cholesterol and blood-pressure levels, a reduced risk of coronary heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and lower cancer rates – especially colorectal cancer. Foods such as beans and lentils, nuts, whole grains, fruits and vegetables offer a wealth of nutrients, fibre and phytochemicals that have favourable health effects. And vegan diets are usually higher in fibre, magnesium, folate, vitamins C and E, iron and phytochemicals, while tending to be lower in calories, saturated fat and cholesterol.
Leslie_Beck  glycemic_index  diets  vegetarian  mens'_health  plant-based 
february 2015 by jerryking
Skip Your Annual Physical - NYTimes.com
JAN. 8, 2015|NYT | Ezekiel J. Emanuel

My New Year’s resolution does not mean I won’t get my annual flu shot or a colonoscopy every 10 years — or eat a balanced diet and get regular exercise. These are proven to reduce morbidity and mortality. Those who preach the gospel of the routine physical have to produce the data to show why these physician visits are beneficial
mens'_health  medical  appointments  doctor's_visits 
january 2015 by jerryking
Ask Well: Fatty Liver and Diet - NYTimes.com
By ANAHAD O'CONNOR JUNE 27, 2014

Dr. Kathleen Corey, the director of the Fatty Liver Clinic at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, advises her patients to exercise at least three times a week for 45 minutes.

Studies suggest that sugar consumption contributes to liver fat accumulation. And there is some data indicating that people who carry genetic variants associated with fatty liver are particularly sensitive to increased fat accumulation in response to sugar and refined carbohydrates.

One of the first pieces of dietary advice that clinicians who treat fatty liver give to their patients is to eliminate sugary drinks from their diets. But doctors say that patients with the disease are typically consuming too many calories of all kinds, not just sugar.

Often, patients are told to avoid eating heavily processed foods, which are easy to consume in large quantities and usually stripped of their fiber and other naturally occurring nutrients. Preliminary studies have found so far that fatty liver patients respond well to the Mediterranean diet, which includes plenty of fresh produce, nuts, olive oil, poultry and fish.
liver  diets  mens'_health  nutrition  Mediterranean 
december 2014 by jerryking
Regular checks, early detection key to treating glaucoma - The Globe and Mail
Glaucoma usually – but not always – results from a buildup of pressure within the eye, which occurs when the aqueous fluid cannot drain properly. Left untreated, the condition can lead to damage of the optic nerve, which transmits visual information from the retina to the sight centres of the brain.
glaucoma  mens'_health  risk_factors 
october 2014 by jerryking
The teetotaller's liver disease - The Globe and Mail
LESLIE BECK
lesliebeck.com
Published Wednesday, Mar. 05 2008
Leslie_Beck  diets  mens'_health 
october 2014 by jerryking
Go to bed earlier
Adults optimally need 7 to 9 hours of sleep a night. Most of us are lucky if we get the low end of that range. Proper amounts of sleep help reduce stress, helps keep your heart healthy, reduces inflammation, makes you more alert during the day, bolsters your memory, helps you lose weight, and reduces your risk for depression. You will feel better, think better, and look better with a good night’s sleep.
sleep  mens'_health  Quora 
june 2014 by jerryking
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