jerryking + marketing + mistakes   3

Bubbling Up
January 2005 | Worth | Sergio Zyman.

We changed the formula we had been using for 100 years to give our customers what we thought they wanted: New Coke. We orchestrated a huge launch, received abundant media coverage and were delighted with ourselves until the sales figures rolled in. Within weeks. we realized that we had blundered. Sales tanked and the media turned against us. Seventy-seven days New Coke was born. We made the second-hardest decision in company history: We pulled the plug. What went wrong? The answer was embarrassingly simple: We did not know enough about our customers. We did not even know what motivated them to buy Coke in the first place. Based on that, we fell into the trap of imagining that innovation—abandoning our existing product for a new one would cure our ills. After the debacle, we reached out to consumers, and found that they wanted more than taste when they made purchase. Drinking Coke enabled them to tap into the Coca-Cola experience, to be part of Coke's history and to feel the continuity and stability of the brand. Instead of innovating. we should have renovated. Instead of making a product and hoping people would buy it, we should have asked customers what they wanted and given it to them. As soon as we started listening to them, consumers respondcd, increasing our sales 9 billion to 15 billion cases a year.
contra-innovation  Coca-Cola  Pepsi  market_research  marketing  renovations  growth  CMOs  product_launches  kill_rates  brands  customer_expectations  customer_insights  culling  mistakes  beverages  innovations 
may 2012 by jerryking
Create a Software Demo Presentation That Wows Prospects: 5 Mistakes to Avoid | MarketingSherpa
6 Feb 2007 | Marketing Sherpa | by Peter Cohan

"Most demos take 20 minutes or 40 minutes or -- God help you -- longer to get to the point," says Peter Cohan, Founder and Principal of The Second Derivative, a company that helps organizations such as Ariba and Business Objects improve the success of their business software demos.

Whether you're creating a demo to teach your sales force about a new product or for their use in the field, most marketers fall into the pit of five worst practices that leave viewers snoring.

1. Presenting a linear demo from beginning to end
2. Failing to focus on customer needs
3. Showing feature after feature
4. The one-demo-fits-all practice
5. Death by corporate overview

So, how do you put together a demo that works? Here are some presentation notes from Cohan.
presentations  Communicating_&_Connecting  linearity  marketing  mistakes  one-size-fits-all  sales  salesmanship  salespeople  sales_presentations  William_Cohan 
january 2012 by jerryking

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