jerryking + marketing + market_segmentation   11

Marketers develop a taste for aspiring foodies
Dec. 27 2012 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER.

Loblaw's President’s Choice Black Label Collection targets a growing consumer population: foodies.

The Black Label products launched late last year, but in limited distribution at first in select parts of Ontario. With the nationwide rollout now complete, there has been a bigger push to advertise the products this holiday season.
marketing  grocery  Loblaws  private_labels  brands  branding  gourmands  gourmet  food  foodies  market_segmentation  product_launches  rollouts 
december 2012 by jerryking
Segmentation - Back to School: Connecting With College Students :
September 28, 2004 | Marketing Profs | by Robert F. Hogeboom |

here are seven strategies that reflect the unique culture of college students:

Communicate lifestyle, not age relevance: Speaking to college students' age ("You're in college, obtain your first credit card") is ineffective, because it does not inspire them or grab their attention. Marketers must create a link between their brand and students' lifestyle, which includes attending concerts and movies, snowboarding on weekends, eating at off-campus restaurants, traveling and more. Remember: college students don't just study and attend class all day—they are extremely active.

Attach your brand name to current trends: Snowboarding, surfing, skateboarding, underground rock bands, rock concert festivals and the ESPN XGames are considered "cool" among the college student market. Businesses can attach their brand name to these activities, events, products and associations that have earned "street-cred" among the student market, and thus share in their emotional appeal.

Tap into students' emotional needs for empowerment, privilege, and status: College students are attracted to goods and services that empower them as consumers and individuals. Examples include the Internet, mobile phones, MP3 players, online file sharing and credit cards. Additionally, products and services that enhance social status are successful at winning students over.

Don't try too hard to win students over: College students greet most product claims with skepticism. Students are aware that they are a highly desirable market. They don't want to be overtly sold or pitched. Instead, they simply want to be educated about products and services and told how the offering matches their unique needs.

Reach students at key transitional periods: At certain transitional periods, college students exhibit a need for certain products and services. It's a marketer's job to reach students at these points of need. Key transitional periods for college students include the beginning of freshman year, summer breaks, moving to off-campus living, studying abroad and graduation.

Become an authentic brand: Ad-weary and marketing-savvy college students value authentic brands. Authentic brands exhibit the following characteristics:

• They develop trust among potential customers—trust is the foundation of brand authenticity.

• They are perceived as not trying too hard to sell or actively win customers over.

• They continually deliver value and convince students that they have students' best interests at heart.

Play-it-straight: College students immediately sense hype and do not accept brands that they consider fake.

Read more: http://www.marketingprofs.com/4/hogeboom1.asp#ixzz203iwNgRt
market_segmentation  Colleges_&_Universities  students  lifestyles  branding  leisure  marketing  tips  target_marketing  authenticity  transitions 
july 2012 by jerryking
Market Segmentation
Jim, I believe you can best help your sister in her market segmentation challenge by taking a hard look at the behavioural approach to market research popularized by folks like Clayton Christensen, and his disciples, Mike Raynor at Deloitte Research and Scott Anthony at Innosight. Here is the short introduction to the approach (http://www.forbes.com/forbes/2003/1013/082_print.html). The slightly longer, but more detailed version can easily be found online in the Spring 2007 MIT Sloan Management Review article, “ Finding the Right Job For Your Product”. Once you’re on top of it, you might share it with your sister as she thinks about the print market in Halifax.

The course you’re contemplating recommending, segmenting by target attributes (i.e. using D&B data and looking at size of company), seems straightforward and easy but that’s because that’s the data--the only data--to which you readily have access. The danger of recommending this traditional approach to segmentation is that if your sister pursues it, it will surely lead her into to zero-sum competition with other print & ad agencies in the Halifax. She will be hard-pressed to find sustainable new opportunities this way.
market_segmentation  market_research  marketing  Michael_Raynor  Clayton_Christensen  advice 
november 2011 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: The circles (no more strangers)
Posted by Seth Godin on May 17, 2010

Consider this hierarchy: Strangers, Friends, Listeners, Customers,
Sneezers, Fans and True Fans. One true fan is worth perhaps 10,000 times
as much as a stranger. And yet if you're in search of strangers, odds
are you're going to mistreat a true fan in order to seduce yet another
stranger who probably won't reward you much.
Seth_Godin  customer_loyalty  segmentation  market_segmentation  marketing  superfans  customer_segmentation 
june 2010 by jerryking
Why a Product’s Job Matters
April 18, 2007 | - The Informed Reader - WSJ | by Robin
Moroney. A basic principle of business–knowing what consumers want from
a particular product–is often ignored by corporations. Many businesses
focus on qualities that are largely irrelevant to the consumers’ buying
decisions, such as product prices, or data on customer age, gender and
marital status. Some business-to-business companies slice their markets
by industry; others by size of business. The problem with such
segmentation schemes is that they are static. Customers’ buying
behaviors change far more often than their demographics, psychographics
or attitudes. This leads to situations in which, in the words of the
late business guru Peter Drucker, “the customer rarely buys what the
business thinks it sells him.”
Peter_Drucker  Clayton_Christensen  Scott_Anthony  segmentation  marketing  market_segmentation  static  dynamic  purchase_decisions  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  B2B  demographics  psychographics  attitudes  demographic_information  relevance  consumer_behavior  behavioral_change  irrelevance 
january 2010 by jerryking

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