jerryking + marketing + google   6

‘Math men’ not mad men rule advertising’s data age, says Lévy
May 5, 2019 | Financial Times | by Anna Nicolaou.

Maurice Levy: 'The future [of advertising] is based on data. It is not based on any mass media.' We know that mass media is [declining] every day,” “And if an advertising agency wants to have a future, data is absolutely indispensable.”

the advertising industry was undergoing a “metamorphosis” that required big bets.......As consumers shift attention away from pricey television commercials and towards the internet, where Facebook and Google dominate, the industry is more “math men” than mad men......In light of digital disruption Publicis, the world’s third-largest advertising agency by revenues, has made a big bet on data. In April the company made its largest acquisition with the purchase of Epsilon, a digital marketing company owned by Alliance Data Systems......Like its rivals WPP and Omnicom, Publicis is under pressure as Facebook and Google have disintermediated the traditional agency model. The two tech groups account for two-thirds of digital advertising sales in the US.....The industry has been consolidating as traditional agencies look to position themselves as data analytics gurus who can help brands target shoppers online. Last year Interpublic bought data business Acxiom for $2bn, while just last month buzzy agency Droga5 sold itself to Accenture......Despite lingering fears that an economic slowdown is looming, “the situation is much better now,”.... making the Epsilon decision easier. “The fastest-growing segment in our industry is data, technology, internet. Period. All the rest is suffering.”
advertising  advertising_agencies  analytics  big_bets  data  decline  disruption  disintermediation  Epsilon  Facebook  Google  Interpublic  Mad_Men  marketing  mass_media  mathematics  Maurice_Lévy  Omnicom  Publicis  WPP 
may 2019 by jerryking
Technology has upended the world’s advertising giants - Mad men adrift
March 31st, 2018 | The Economist |

The world’s advertising giants are struggling to adapt to a landscape suddenly dominated by the duopoly of Google and Facebook. Some of their biggest clients, such as Procter & Gamble (P&G) and Unilever, are also being disrupted, in their case by smaller online brands and by Amazon. They are cutting spending on advertising services, and also building more capabilities in-house. Consultancies with digital expertise such as Deloitte and Accenture are competing with agencies, arguing that they know how to connect with consumers better, and more cheaply, using data, machine learning and app design.......This month Marc Pritchard, chief brand officer of P&G, criticised their (i.e. the ad giants) model as a “Mad Men” operation that is “archaic” and overly complex in an era when campaigns and ads need to be designed and refined quickly across lots of platforms.

Technological forces are buffeting this model.

(1) The first big challenge is disintermediation. Despite the growing backlash against the tech giants, Google and Facebook make it easy for firms big and small to advertise on their platforms and across the internet via their powerful ad networks.
(2) The second headache is the rise of ad-free content for consumers, especially on Netflix, and the corresponding disruption of ad-supported television, which has declining viewership globally.
(3) Third, Amazon’s e-commerce might, and the growing clout of internet-era direct-to-consumer upstarts, have weakened the distribution muscle and pricing power of the advertising giants’ biggest clients.....cost discipline among clients is driven partly by the influence of thrifty private-equity investors like 3G, the Brazilian owner of AB InBev, the world’s largest brewer......Sir Martin argues that the budgetary pressures that have forced his clients to cut back on advertising are a cyclical problem, not like the structural challenges posed by technological disruption.

In private, however, a senior executive at a rival ad-holding firm rejects much of this optimism. Technological disruption and disintermediation, he says, will only deepen. The efficiency of targeted digital ads means companies can spend less for the same outcome in branding. ....The advertising firms are responding by hiring away talent, acquiring businesses (in 2015 Publicis bought Sapient, a digital consultancy, for $3.7bn) and gradually changing how they make money. Their plans mostly boil down to two things: investing in digital services and consolidating their collections of businesses so that they can provide a range of services to one client more cheaply under one account.
advertising  economics  marketing  advertising_agencies  Martin_Sorrell  digital_strategies  WPP  Google  Facebook  Amazon  competitive_landscape  P&G  Unilever  disruption  Deloitte  Accenture  Publicis  Omnicom  via:sparkey  ad-tech  programmatic  direct-to-consumer 
april 2018 by jerryking
Loblaw targets food-savvy Canadians in major marketing overhaul - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Sep. 17 2014

Loblaw has partnered with Google Inc. to build a “food pulse index,” which will track online conversations about food across Canada. It will publish the results on a regularly updated map on the corporate website, which will show food trends by region.

And the content on the site and on Loblaw’s social media channels will be determined by what people are talking about. If beets are a hot topic, for example, the retailer will serve up images, recipes, polls and information about the root vegetable. If people are wondering about gluten-free Thanksgiving meals, Loblaw will respond.

The Google trends will influence not just marketing, but also product development at the retail giant.
Susan_Krashinsky  Loblaws  marketing  branding  brands  Google  product_development  trends 
october 2014 by jerryking
Digital rethink: Google's new high-tech pitch to marketers - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, May. 05 2014,

The former chief marketing officer of L’Oreal Canada is just a few weeks into her new role at Google Canada as the liaison with marketing executives like her. She’ll be selling marketers on how Google can play a bigger role in their communication with customers. Her role – director of consumer packaged goods and branding for Canada – did not exist before. (She is also marketing director for Quebec.)...Within the past year, Google has been making a greater effort to woo both advertisers and their agencies on its technology. At its root is an attempt to get a bigger slice of ad budgets by persuading clients and agencies to think about digital as a more central part of their advertising....“In old marketing it used to be, if we had the right price, the right communication in the marketing, the right [point of purchase strategy] and the right TV ad, we were great,” she said. “The brand ecosystem has enlarged. It’s not about when the brand wants to talk to the consumer; it’s when the consumer feels like hearing it … it’s the consumer coming to the brand where it’s relevant – assuming the brand is there.”...But Google wants to show marketers how others have used its APIs – the coding that can enable digital campaigns – so that they can see what already exists without needing to build a campaign from scratch.

“Marketers understand they need to talk the way consumers talk,” Ms. Lamothe said. “… They don’t see it as, ‘Here’s a campaign from this brand, and then three months later there’s another campaign.’ They just think of the brand. If it’s always on, it always exists, and I find the brand where they’re relevant. The consumer is way ahead of the industry in the way they consume digital, because they make it part of their everyday life … and yet we don’t market that way.”
APIs  brands  campaigns  Susan_Krashinsky  marketing  Google  L'Oreal  CMOs  digital_media  advertising_agencies  advertising  LBMA  CPG 
june 2014 by jerryking
Six habits of successful digital firms - The Globe and Mail
Jan. 07 2014, The Globe and Mail HARVEY SCHACHTER

Strategic Digital Marketing
By Eric Greenberg and Alexander Kates
(McGraw-Hill Education, 352 pages, $31.95).

the Amazon Price Check app on their mobile device, they can be in a store and, by scanning the bar code, see whether that item can be obtained more cheaply from Amazon, which offers lures like free shipping.......a phrase Google uses, "Zero moments of truth," to describe the critical times when consumers use the Internet to evaluate your offering. It might be the Amazon Price Check. It might be a consumer visiting your website and then plugging into social feedback from Facebook and Twitter. Prospects might scan reviews by recent purchasers. This information can be accessed quickly and could determine whether they will deal with you – now, or forever...... little attention is paid to return on investment when digital marketing strategies are developed. They believe that less than 10 per cent of large organizations base their digital initiatives on some measure of financial return on investment (ROI). Instead, the talk is of "likes" that might be generated by a Facebook campaign, or the followers and awareness a Twitter initiative might spark.

"If increasing sales is the ultimate goal, shouldn't we always evaluate digital marketing, and all marketing for that matter, through an ROI lens?"

1. Platform convergence, not product conformity. Companies such as Google, Amazon and Facebook are knocking heads, not operating in the separate niches where they started, but fighting to be the go-to platforms for online denizens.
2. Big data, not blind deductions.These companies rely heavily on data to drive their decisions, rather than guessing. They also run tests to see what might work, learning early from interaction with real customers.
3. Customer experiences, not conventional expectations. The best companies are fiercely focused on customers, relentlessly looking for new ways to refine and improve the customer experience.
4. Networks, not bulwarks.
These firms understand the importance of their networks, such as customers and corporate partners.
5. Top talent, not hired hands. These companies realize the importance of talent, and actively seek the best people they can find.
6. Innovation, not immediate gratification
Amazon  books  conformity  customer_experience  data_driven  delayed_gratification  digital_economy  digital_strategies  FAANG  Facebook  Google  Harvey_Schachter  habits  innovation  marketing  massive_data_sets  mobile_applications  moments_of_truth  networks  platforms  ROI  talent 
january 2014 by jerryking
The Tech Profile: How a Small Retailer Handles I.T. - NYTimes.com
May 17, 2011 | NYT |By DAVID H. FREEDMAN
The business: JetPens, based in San Jose, Calif., is a 14-person online
retailer of mostly Japanese pens and pen-related paraphernalia. The
slick, slightly edgy Web site is packed with stuff that you won’t find
just anywhere, including pens designed specifically for drawing Japanese
Manga-style cartoon art and a five-function eraser. As a result,
JetPens has drawn a cult following and fills about 100,000 orders a
year.
running_a_business  marketing  retailers  e-commerce  David_Freedman  google  PayPal  Quickbooks  facebook  handwritten  analog  writing  artifacts  IT  owners  small_business  Japanese  premium  brands  Stanford  alumni 
may 2011 by jerryking

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