jerryking + marketing + hbr   8

Technology Questions Every CMO Must Ask
Will the technology advance a critical marketing priority?
questions  CMOs  technology  marketing  HBR  LBMA 
september 2015 by jerryking
To Keep Your Customers, Keep It Simple -
May 2012 | Harvard Business Review |by Patrick Spenner and Karen Freeman
marketing  information_overload  decision_making  brands  branding  simplicity  HBR 
september 2014 by jerryking
Bark with bite
January 30, 2012 | FT | By John Quelch.

Academics succeed if their names are linked to one important idea that outlives them. Professor Theodore Levitt’s name is linked to many. The first was a blockbuster. “Marketing myopia” was published by Harvard Business Review (HBR) in 1960, one year after Harvard Business School plucked Prof Levitt, the son of a German immigrant cobbler, from the University of North Dakota.

The article famously asked: “What business are you in?” It critiqued railroads for “letting their customers get away from them because they assumed themselves to be in the railroad business rather than the transportation business”. They were product-orientated rather than market-orientated....the importance of tangible evidence to reassure customers choosing among suppliers of intangible services (the impressive bank building, the authoritative logo)....I gave him a wide berth until it was time for feedback on my thesis proposal after three months of hard labour. The meeting lasted five minutes, barely long enough for Prof Levitt, whose mentoring style was more tough love than hand-holding, to dismiss me with: “Throw this out, start again and come back in a week with something important!” Fortunately, I did.

Prof Levitt’s advice was always to work on important problems that are important to important people in important companies. It spurred me to get out into the field, talk to business people, write case studies and understand the messy complexity of the world, rather than work behind my desk on mathematical models based on unrealistic assumptions.
advice  discernment  feedback  hand-holding  HBR  HBS  John_Quelch  marketing  market-orientated  messiness  myopic  primary_field_research  product-orientated  reminiscing  sophisticated  Theodore_Levitt  tough_love  worthiness  worthwhile_problems 
december 2013 by jerryking
Listening Begins at Home
November 2003 | HBR | by James R. Stengel, Andrea L Dixon,and Chris T.Allen
listening  P&G  HBR  marketing  career_paths  employee_engagement 
august 2012 by jerryking
Marketing is Everything
January-February 1991 | HBR | Regis McKenna.

The relationships are the key, the basis of customer choice and company adaptation. After all, what is a successful brand but a special relationship?
marketing  HBR  product_extensions  fragmentation  product_strategy 
june 2012 by jerryking
Marketing Myopia
July-August 2004 (Reprint from 1960) | Harvard Business Review | by Theodore Levitt.

Marketing Myopia suggests that businesses will do better in the end if they concentrate on meeting customers’ needs rather than on selling products......

Fundamental idea
The Myopic cultures, Levitt postulated, would pave the way for a business to fall, due to the short-sighted mindset and illusion that a firm is in a so-called 'growth industry'. This belief leads to complacency and a loss of sight of what customers want. It is said that these people focus more on the original product and refuse to adapt directly to the needs and wants of the consumer.

To continue growing, companies must ascertain and act on their customers’ needs and desires, not bank on the presumptive longevity of their products. In every case the reason growth is threatened, slowed or stopped is not because the market is saturated. It is because there has been a failure of management.

Some commentators have suggested that its publication marked the beginning of the modern marketing movement.[2] Its theme is that the vision of most organizations is too constricted by a narrow understanding of what business they are in. .....Organizations found that they had been missing opportunities which were plain to see once they adopted the wider view. ....There is no such a thing as a growth industry. There are only companies organized and operated to create and capitalize on growth opportunities.......There is a greater scope of opportunities as the industry changes. It trains managers to look beyond their current business activities and think "outside the box". . If a buggy whip manufacturer in 1910 defined its business as the "transportation starter business," they might have been able to make the creative leap necessary to move into the automobile business when technological change demanded it.....People who focus on marketing strategy, various predictive techniques, and the customer's lifetime value can rise above myopia to a certain extent.
HBR  marketing  management  filetype:pdf  media:document  Theodore_Levitt  myopic  out-of-the-box  short-sightedness 
february 2010 by jerryking

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