jerryking + lawyers   140

Business Development Not-to-Do #5: Live In the Past | JD Supra Perspectives -
April 21, 2017 | JDSupra | by Mike O'Horo, co-founder of RainmakerVT. O'Horo has trained 7000 lawyers in firms of all sizes and types, in virtually every practice type. They attribute $1.5 billion in additional business to their collaboration. His latest innovation, Dezurve, reduces firms’ business development training investment risks by identifying which lawyers are serious about learning BD.]

If you’re seeing more competition for each engagement, greater pressure on rates, more involvement by professional buyers in the Purchasing Dept., and perhaps worst of all, longtime clients putting out RFPs for “your” work, your work has reached the Maturity stage of its Product Cycle. If you fail to change, you’ll ride a downward spiral until you can no longer make money on that work.

What is the product cycle?  Introduction ->Growth -> Maturity -> Decline. Revenue and profit follow a fairly predictable path through this cycle. Most buyers understand that, among the three forms of value -- Good, Fast, Cheap -- they can only have two. During the Introduction and Growth phases, they opt for Good and Fast. At Maturity, they favor Good and Cheap. At Decline, they may demand all three......

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Defending market share becomes the chief concern.
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At the maturity stage, sales growth has started to slow and is approaching the point where the inevitable decline will begin. Defending market share becomes the chief concern. Most lawyers don’t know how to do that other than by reducing their price to try to hold on to the work. Additionally, more competitors have stepped forward to challenge you for every engagement, and offer a lower price. This can touch off price wars. Lower prices mean lower profits, which will cause some wise lawyers to discontinue offering that service altogether. The maturity stage is usually the longest of the four life cycle stages, and it is not uncommon for a service to be in the mature stage for several decades. Whatever you’re experiencing now is also the future.

For quite awhile, lawyers who thought about this at all could be forgiven for believing that legal services were immune from this. After all, for more than 20 years, buyers and work were plentiful, and clients accepted annual rate increases of 6-10%. All that meant, though, was that legal services had a longer Growth phase than is normal. Even during that 20-year boom, many legal services declined in value and pricing power, to the point that many lawyers lost that business to lower-cost competitors, off-shoring, or to in-house legal staffs.
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You can’t justify investing in a declining asset.
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The symptoms cited in the opening paragraph are reliable indicators that it’s time to begin reducing your dependence on that work. You can’t justify investing in a declining asset.......One of the big factors causing price pressure in mature categories is decreased risk. The first time a company tackles a type of legal matter, the perceived risk is high. They want to get it done right, and quickly, so they’re less sensitive to cost and place greater value on expertise as a way to reduce risk.

After something has been done a number of times, the risk of getting it done right goes way down, so the perceived value of the service declines, and they no longer feel the need to pay the top lawyer in the game.......

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When risk and business impact declines, so does your access...
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Once the recipe is known, the risk declines and, along with it, the buyer’s willingness to pay a premium for the wizard practitioner.

When risk and business impact declines, so does your access. While the top people pay attention to unfamiliar matters with potentially high stakes, once the risk goes down, they delegate downward and move on to emerging issues that have greater risk and impact.
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associate yourself with a business problem that triggers demand for your expertise, and opens doors to those experiencing that problem.
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Just as it’s imprudent to invest in declining categories of legal matters, it’s a bad idea to hitch your wagon to a declining industry (unless you do Bankruptcy or Restructuring). Clients in mature industries experience the same increased competition, price pressure, and shrinking margins as you do. They’ll opt for Good and Cheap.

To avoid suddenly realizing that you’re in a tough spot such as described in the opening paragraph, focus on an industry. Become an industry expert, knowledgeable about their challenges and opportunities, and keep yourself well informed so you can recognize the early signs that your Door-Opener (the problem that drives demand for your service) is maturing and declining in significance. If you know what’s going on in the industry, you’ll know which problems to shift your association toward.

Always invest in emerging issues, preferably in robust, growing industries
cash_cows  decline  industry_analysis  law_firms  lawyers  life_cycle  industry_expertise  professional_service_firms  product_cycles  obsolescence  price_wars 
15 days ago by jerryking
Lina Khan: ‘This isn’t just about antitrust. It’s about values’
March 29, 2019 | Financial Times | by Rana Foroohar.

Lina Khan is the legal wunderkind reshaping the global debate over competition and corporate power......While still a student at Yale Law School, she wrote a paper, “Amazon’s Antitrust Paradox”, which was published in the school’s influential journal..... hit a nerve at a time when the overweening power of the Big Tech companies, from Facebook to Google to Amazon, is rising up the agenda......For roughly four decades, antitrust scholars — taking their lead from Robert Bork’s 1978 book The Antitrust Paradox — have pegged their definitions of monopoly power to short-term price effects; so if Amazon is making prices lower for consumers, the market must be working effectively.....Khan made the case that this interpretation of US antitrust law, meant to regulate competition and curb monopolistic practices, is utterly unsuited to the architecture of the modern economy.....Khan's counterargument: that it doesn’t matter if companies such as Amazon are making things cheaper in dollars if they are using predatory pricing strategies to dominate multiple industries and choke off competition and choice.....Speaking to hedge funds and banks during her research, Khan found that they were valuing Amazon and its growth potential in a way that signified monopoly power..." I’m interested in imbalances in market power and how they manifest. That’s something you can see not just in tech but across many industries,” says Khan, who has written sharp pieces on monopoly power in areas as diverse as airlines and agriculture. " Khan, like many in her cohort, believes otherwise. “If markets are leading us in directions that we, as a democratic society, decide are not compatible with our vision of liberty or democracy, it is incumbent upon government to do something.” Lina Khan has had a stint as a legal fellow at the Federal Trade Commission, consulted with EU officials, influenced competition policy in India, brainstormed ideas with presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren and — recently joined the House Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law. The 2008 financial crisis she thinks “about markets, and the government’s response to them, and certain forms of intervention that they do take, and that they don’t take”.....Khan, Lynn and others including the Columbia academic Tim Wu have developed and popularised the “new Brandeis” school of antitrust regulation, hearkening back to the era in which Louis Brandeis, the “people’s lawyer”, took on oligarchs such as John D Rockefeller and JP Morgan.....Lina sees Amazon as not just a discount retailer but as a marketing platform, delivery and logistics network, a payment service, a credit lender, auction house, publisher and so on, and to understand just how ill-equipped current antitrust law was to deal with such a multi-faceted entity......a Columbia Law Review paper out in May 2019 will explores the case for separating the ownership of technology platforms from the commercial activity they host, so that Big Tech firms cannot both run a dominant marketplace and compete on it. via a host of old cases — from railroad antitrust suits to the separation of merchant banking and the ownership of commodities — to argue that “if you are a form of infrastructure, then you shouldn’t be able to compete with all the businesses dependent on your infrastructure”....“The new Brandeis movement isn’t just about antitrust,” .... Rather, it is about values. “Laws reflect values,” she says. “Antitrust laws used to reflect one set of values, and then there was a change in values that led us to a very different place.”

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21st._century  Amazon  antitrust  Big_Tech  digital_economy  financial_crises  FTC  lawyers  Lina_Khan  monopolies  multifaceted  paradoxes  platforms  policymakers  predatory_practices  Rana_Foroohar  regulators  Robert_Bork  Tim_Wu  wunderkind  Yale  values  value_judgements 
march 2019 by jerryking
Think Like a Libel Lawyer
March 9, 2019 | The New York Times | By David McCraw, deputy general counsel of The New York Times.

It's the best way to keep an open mind in our “pick your side and stay on it” era.

My job, when I am doing it right, is to please no one. I’m a press lawyer. I’m paid by this newspaper to vet stories before publication.

Think of me as a story’s first and worst reader: doubtful, questioning, blind to subtlety, skeptical of the facts, regularly prodding editors and reporters to do something more or different. And if I have done my job well, many of the subjects of those same stories will be unhappy as well, but for all the reasons we want them to be: We got it right.

The basic idea of libel law is simple. A publisher can get sued for making a factual statement that proves to be false and hurts a person’s reputation.......I am all about the villains in many pieces — the doctor who botched the surgery, the insurance company that shafted its customers, the professor who hit on the student, the greedy industrialist who ground up workers to make a fortune. I try to look for the counternarrative that they could (and their lawyers will) build from the same set of facts. It’s a counterintuitive form of reading. It’s looking for the innocent explanation or the possibility that what appears to all the rest of the world to be nefarious may in fact just be a mistake made in good faith. It’s a tricky skill to take into the real world....for a libel lawyer, a little sympathy for the villain is almost an occupational requirement. And maybe it wouldn’t be a bad idea for all of us in the tribalized “pick your side and stay on it” era we are living in......Libel lawyers don’t serve as the fairness police. If anything, they are more like fact cops. Coverage can be wildly unfair and still be true. .....Over the past half-decade, The Times and others had reoriented themselves to reader-centered journalism. The shift in attitude has been like opening a window after a long winter. Journalism should be done as if the readers mattered.

But in a divided America there was a risk, too — the risk that we would set our compass by what people wanted rather than giving them the journalism they needed.......It was discouraging that so many people apparently believed that the time-honored journalistic act of telling a story straight had become a problem and that The Times needed instead to take sides and coach readers on what to think.

Journalism is hard when people feel the failure to take sides is in and of itself a surrender....The great risk we face comes not in giving them (the alt-right) voice but in taking their worst instincts and making them our own.

The First Amendment gives a lot of protection to even nasty speakers.....we write about people in the news, not just the people we agree with.....that is how the First Amendment works — thanks to our “profound national commitment to the principle that debate on public issues should be uninhibited, robust and wide open,......Speakers are allowed to be provocative, colorful, contradictory and wrong.

....
counternarratives  counterintuitive  dark_side  facts  First_Amendment  free-press  journalism  lawyers  libel  NYT  skepticism  open_mind  villains 
march 2019 by jerryking
Big data: legal firms play ‘Moneyball’
February 6, 2019 | Financial Times | Barney Thompson.

Is the hunt for data-driven justice a gimmick or a powerful tool to give lawyers an advantage and predict court outcomes?

In Philip K Dick’s short story The Minority Report, a trio of “precogs” plugged into a machine are used to foretell all crimes so potential felons could be arrested before they were able to strike. In real life, a growing number of legal experts and computer scientists are developing tools they believe will give lawyers an edge in lawsuits and trials. 

Having made an impact in patent cases these legal analytics companies are now expanding into a broad range of areas of commercial law. This is not about replacing judges,” says Daniel Lewis, co-founder of Ravel Law, a San Francisco lawtech company that built the database of judicial behaviour. “It is about showing how they make decisions, what they find persuasive and the patterns of how they rule.” 
analytics  data_driven  judges  law  law_firms  lawtech  lawyers  Lex_Machina  massive_data_sets  Moneyball  predictive_modeling  quantitative  tools 
february 2019 by jerryking
Big Tech in hiring spree for looming antitrust battles | Financial Times
Kiran Stacey in Washington DECEMBER 23, 2018 Print this page6
Big technology and telecoms companies have embarked on a hiring spree of former antitrust officials as their industries gear up for what experts warn could be an “existential” battle over whether they should be broken up.

In the last few months, Facebook, Amazon and AT&T have all hired senior antitrust officials from the US Department of Justice as they confront a new generation of regulators who are interested in preventing concentrations of economic power......Many of the biggest US technology companies have endured a difficult year, facing allegations of not protecting customer data, failing to prevent Russian interference in American democracy and showing political bias.

In response, several have beefed up their lobbying operations in Washington as they look to engage more with politicians, having previously preferred to operate under the radar. .....Experts say the hirings reflect a growing belief that competition policy could become the next significant political battleground....The European Commission has investigated US technology companies for alleged anti-competitive behaviour. Margrethe Vestager, the European Commissioner for Competition, is bringing cases against Google and is looking into Amazon.

Such cases have been more difficult to pursue in the US, where the law is focused more on whether anti-competitive behaviour is keeping prices artificially high.

A group of younger progressive regulators and politicians have argued in recent years, however, that technology companies that give their services away for free but dominate their markets should come in for as much attention.....Rohit Chopra, a Federal Trade Commissioner in his mid-30s, for example, recently hired Lina Khan, a 29-year-old policy thinker who has argued that large technology companies can both bring prices down and be harmful to society in general.
Amazon  antitrust  AT&T  Big_Tech  competition_policy  corporate_concentration  Department_of_Justice  FAANG  Facebook  FTC  hiring  Lina_Khan  lawyers  lobbying  market_power  market_concentration  monopolies  platforms  regulation  regulators  revolving_door  under_the_radar 
december 2018 by jerryking
Sandra Day O’Connor, first female justice on U.S. Supreme Court, reveals she has dementia - The Globe and Mail
OCTOBER 23, 2018 | THE NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | MATTHEW HAAG.

Ms. O’Connor was born in El Paso, Texas, and grew up in Arizona on the Lazy B Ranch, 250 square miles of high desert along the state’s border with New Mexico. Her upbringing has remained a point of pride, and she has often referred to herself as a cowgirl.

“It is possible to survive and even make a living in that formidable terrain,” she wrote in her memoir of her childhood, “Lazy B,” in 2002. “The Day family did it for years; but it was never easy. It takes planning, patience, skill and endurance.”

She left Arizona for Stanford Law School, where she finished third in her class in 1952. It was also where she met her future husband, a fellow law-review editor at the university.

The top graduate in her class was William H. Rehnquist, the future chief justice, who received a clerkship on the Supreme Court.
cancers  civics  dementia  judges  lawyers  Sandra_Day_O'Connor  trailblazers  U.S._Supreme_Court  women  Alzheimer’s_disease 
october 2018 by jerryking
Amazon’s Antitrust Antagonist Has a Breakthrough Idea - The New York Times
By David Streitfeld
Sept. 7, 2018

....... Ms. Khan wrote, that once-robust monopoly laws have been marginalized, Amazon is consequently able to amass so much structural power that let it exert increasing control over many parts of the economy. Amazon has so much data on so many customers, it is so willing to forgo profits, it is so aggressive and has so many advantages from its shipping and warehouse infrastructure that it exerts an influence much broader than its market share. It resembles the all-powerful railroads of the Progressive Era, .......The F.T.C. is holding a series of hearings this fall, the first of their type since 1995, on whether a changing economy requires changing enforcement attitudes.

The hearings will begin on Sept. 13 at Georgetown University Law Center. Two panels will debate whether antitrust should keep its narrow focus or, as Ms. Khan urges, expand its range.

“Ideas and assumptions that it was heretical to question are now openly being contested,” she said. “We’re finally beginning to examine how antitrust laws, which were rooted in deep suspicion of concentrated private power, now often promote it.”........Her Yale Law Journal paper argued that monopoly regulators who focus on consumer prices are thinking too short-term. In Ms. Khan’s view, a company like Amazon — one that sells things, competes against others selling things, and owns the platform where the deals are done — has an inherent advantage that undermines fair competition. “The long-term interests of consumers include product quality, variety and innovation — factors best promoted through both a robust competitive process and open markets,” she wrote.

The issue Ms. Khan’s article really brought to the fore is this: Do we trust Amazon, or any large company, to create our future?........ “It’s so much easier to teach public policy to people who already know how to write than teach writing to public policy experts,” said Mr. Lynn, a former journalist.

Ms. Khan wrote about industry consolidation and monopolistic practices for Washington publications that specialize in policy, went to Yale Law School, published her Amazon paper and then came back to Washington last year, just as interest was starting to swell in her work.... the F.T.C. needs to bring back a tool buried in its toolbox: its ability to make rules......“Amazon is not the problem — the state of the law is the problem, and Amazon depicts that in an elegant way,” she said......“could make sense” to treat Amazon’s e-commerce operation like a bridge, highway, port, power grid or telephone network — all of which are required to allow access to their infrastructure on a nondiscriminatory basis.
Amazon  antitrust  breakthroughs  FTC  heretical  ideas  lawyers  Lina_Khan  monopolies  platforms  retailers  regulators  reframing  Yale 
september 2018 by jerryking
Trailblazing judge George Ethelbert Carter embodied ethics - The Globe and Mail
JOHN LORINC
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL

become not only one of Toronto’s first black lawyers, but also this country’s first Canadian-born black judge. A member of the Order of Ontario and a Queen’s Counsel, he died in Toronto on June 7 at the age of 96.

Justice Carter loomed large among black lawyers and judges, and also in Canada’s legal profession generally, observes Toronto criminal lawyer Selwyn Pieters. “He exuded the ethical principles and professionalism lawyers strive to live by. He was a role model and a trailblazer.”
African_Canadians  John_Lorinc  judges  lawyers  obituaries  trailblazers 
june 2018 by jerryking
Steven Brill's "Tailspin": How My Generation Broke America
May 17, 2018 | | Time | By STEVEN BRILL.

From matters small – there are an average of 657 water-main breaks a day, for example – to large, it is clear that the country has gone into a tailspin over the last half-century, when John F. Kennedy’s New Frontier was about seizing the future, not trying to survive the present..............The Meritocracy’s ascent was about more than personal profit. As my generation of achievers graduated from elite universities and moved into the professional world, their personal successes often had serious societal consequences. They upended corporate America and Wall Street with inventions in law and finance that created an economy built on deals that moved assets around instead of building new ones. They created exotic, and risky, financial instruments, including derivatives and credit default swaps, that produced sugar highs of immediate profits but separated those taking the risk from those who would bear the consequences. They organized hedge funds that turned owning stock into a minute-by-minute bet rather than a long-term investment. They invented proxy fights, leveraged buyouts and stock buybacks that gave lawyers and bankers a bonanza of new fees and maximized short-term profits for increasingly unsentimental shareholders, but deadened incentives for the long-term growth of the rest of the economy.....[We need 'guardrails' against legal and financial excesses.]......Forty-eight years after Inky Clark gave me my ticket on the meritocracy express in 1967, a professor at Yale Law School jarred the school’s graduation celebration. Daniel Markovits, who specializes in the intersection of law and behavioral economics, told the class of 2015 that their success getting accepted into, and getting a degree from, the country’s most selective law school actually marked their entry into a newly entrenched aristocracy that had been snuffing out the American Dream for almost everyone else. Elites, he explained, can spend what they need to in order to send their children to the best schools, provide tutors for standardized testing and otherwise ensure that their kids can outcompete their peers to secure the same spots at the top that their parents achieved.

“American meritocracy has thus become precisely what it was invented to combat,” Markovits concluded, “a mechanism for the dynastic transmission of wealth and privilege across generations. Meritocracy now constitutes a modern-day aristocracy.”.....
Daniel_Markovits  baby_boomers  entrepreneur  income_inequality  politics  revenge_effects  Steven_Brill  political_polarization  fractured_internally  books  meritocratic  America_in_Decline?  elitism  lawyers  self-perpetuation  upper-income  inequality  privilege  the_best_and_brightest  tailspins  guardrails  the_American_dream  cultural_transmission  wealth_transfers  partisan_politics 
may 2018 by jerryking
We need to talk about the boys -
MAY 5, 2018 | The Globe and Mail | MARGARET WENTE.

It’s girls who get all the attention these days. But it’s the boys we should be worried about. Boys lag girls in school at every level. They drop out, get in trouble with the law, and become disconnected from the mainstream – sometimes for good.

Jamil Jivani was heading there himself. He grew up in Brampton, Ont....At age 16, he couldn’t read – or didn’t care enough to. He was convinced the system was rigged against him. His role models were gansta rappers. Police officers gave him a hard time. His dad wasn’t in the picture.....Mr. Jivani is now 30. He is a law professor, a graduate of Yale, and an activist for disadvantaged communities. His personal story is the powerful thread running through his new book, Why Young Men: Rage, Race and the Crisis of Identity......He aims to change the conversation from “either/or” to “and also.” “If you’re trying to change the conditions young men grow up in,” he says, “you need to talk about both law enforcement and families.”

He gets pushback saying things like that. “People are used to hearing a certain kind of narrative – the world is unfair, racist, biased, and the primary concern we should have is that these are systems that oppress us – systemic racism, sexism, and so on. It’s amazing how much this passes as a truth.”

Mr. Jivani believes that we can’t address the crisis of young men without talking about families and culture. For boys, fathers are their first line of defence. Without fathers, they may have no positive role models for how to be a man.

“A lot of people in the black community want to talk about fatherlessness,” he says. But we seldom hear from them. The voices you hear are all from one side, and the media seldom seek out any other perspectives.

People censor themselves too. “..... Black Lives Matter makes things worse. “It’s a style of activism that tries to define people – to tell them this is what you’re supposed to think and do because of your identity.” ....“BLM’s approach to activism focuses on having an enemy that must be defeated,” he writes. “It is accusatory at its core.”
Margaret_Wente  fatherhood  parenting  dysfunction  Black_Lives_Matter  African_Canadians  books  crisis  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  lawyers  Osgoode  family_breakdown  values  dropouts  achievement_gaps  Yale  activism  economically_disadvantaged  victimhood 
may 2018 by jerryking
The dawn of the superstar lawyer
April 9, 2018 | Financial TImes | James Fontanella-Khan, Sujeet Indap in New York and Barney Thompson in London YESTERDAY Print this page140
law_firms  Big_Law  law  lawyers  compensation  winner-take-all  superstars  eat_what_you_kill  organizational_culture 
april 2018 by jerryking
Merck C.E.O. Ken Frazier on Death Row Cases and the Corporate Soul - The New York Times
By David Gelles

March 9, 2018

How do you prioritize your time?

There are three things that the C.E.O. should be focused on. Number one is that sense of purpose and direction that the company needs, making sure that that’s always clear and people know what we’re all about. The second thing is capital allocation. We only have so many resources. Making sure that you’re putting those resources where you have the greatest opportunity. And the third, which I think by far is the most important, is to make sure that you have the right people in the most important jobs inside the company.
African-Americans  capital_allocation  CEOs  death_row  Kenneth_Frazier  HLS  lawyers  Merck  new_graduates  pharmaceutical_industry  priorities  purpose  resource_allocation  talent_acquisition  think_threes  the_right_people 
march 2018 by jerryking
Stanley Hartt, 80, was ‘an articulate advocate for Canada’ - The Globe and Mail
DAVE GORDON
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED 1 HOUR AGO

What prompted Mr. Mulroney to choose Mr. Hartt over other candidates for the chief-of-staff job was that he "was the most brilliant young man of our generation. He had a remarkable mind, with a great capacity to look at complex issues and crunch them into coherent options for anyone with whom he was associated."

As deputy minister of finance, Mr. Hartt was so respected by Mr. Mulroney that he was the only public servant to sit with cabinet at all times, Mr. Mulroney said.

Mr. Hartt played a major role in some vital areas of economic policy, Mr. Mulroney said, including the privatizations of Petro Canada and Air Canada, "along with 29 other Crown corporations," according to the former prime minister....Air Canada CEO Calin Rovinescu became acquainted with Mr. Hartt in 1979, when Mr. Rovinescu was articling at Stikeman Elliott in Montreal.

"[Mr. Hartt] encouraged us to think on our feet, in front of the most difficult situations," he said. "Typically, you were expected to deliver your work with excellence, and your bonus would be the hope of getting a more interesting and complicated assignment afterward."

As senior counsel, Mr. Hartt would engage with junior colleagues as though they were family, regularly inviting them for meals at his home and allowing them to babysit his children, Mr. Rovinescu said.

Mr. Hartt, as a mentor, taught Mr. Rovinescu such life lessons as "Embrace curiosity. Think big. Think on your feet," as well as "Don't be afraid of crazy ideas; the crazier the better. Throw stuff against the wall and see what sticks."
chief_of_staff  Brian_Mulroney  obituaries  '90s  lawyers  radical_ideas  curiosity  thinking_big  Calin_Rovinescu  life_lessons 
january 2018 by jerryking
David Boies: the super-lawyer who fell to earth
NOVEMBER 10, 2017 | Financial Times | by Gary Silverman in New York.

David Boies is a representative of a rare breed. He is a New York super-lawyer: one of a small group of residents, typically men, who parse the fine print, seal the deals, battle in the courts and, in the process, define their commercially minded city just as surely as the skyscrapers, the pastrami and the bull outside the stock exchange.

His résumé testifies to his status as perhaps the leading litigator of his day. He has fought in court for causes as near and dear to liberal hearts as same-sex marriage and the presidential campaign of Democrat Al Gore. He has aided fallen financiers including AIG’s Hank Greenberg and Enron’s Andy Fastow. He fought off a libel suit filed against CBS by William Westmoreland, commander of US forces in Vietnam, and was recruited by the federal government to press its antitrust case against Microsoft.

His reputation, however, has just taken a major blow. Mr Boies, a product of the New York legal star system, has been ensnared in the scandal involving a long-time client, producer Harvey Weinstein, who has been accused of abusing his power in the Hollywood star system to harass and assault numerous women over many years.

Mr Boies, 76, is a wealthy man noted for his philanthropy and his popularity, along with his third wife, Mary, on the Manhattan social circuit. But he is also an inveterate risk taker — a lover of the action in Las Vegas as well as at his firm Boies Schiller & Flexner — who goes the extra mile for clients. He did a favour for Mr Weinstein, and it is costing him in the court of public opinion.

His courtroom style is notoriously disarming. His attire — typically, a Lands’ End jacket and trousers — comes straight from the heartland. But his questions are hard

Mr Boies signed a contract on July 11 hiring a business intelligence firm called Black Cube to spy on Mr Weinstein’s accusers, The New Yorker magazine reported. Run by former Israeli intelligence agents, its operatives used false identities to gain the trust of the people in the case and collect information about them. Its objectives included helping Mr Weinstein “stop the publication of a negative article in a leading NY newspaper”.
lawyers  law_firms  profile  David_Boies  superstars  Harvey_Weinstein 
november 2017 by jerryking
William Coleman Fought Civil-Rights Battles From the Inside - WSJ
William T. Coleman Jr. graduated at the top of his Harvard Law School class, served in President Gerald Ford’s cabinet as transportation secretary, argued 19 cases before the Supreme Court and was a director of companies including International Business Machines Corp. and PepsiCo Inc. He was one of the few blacks of his generation to become a top-level insider in business and government.

In his later years, he also was frustrated that American schools and neighborhoods remained largely segregated. “We underestimated the complexity of achieving sustained integration,” he wrote in his 2010 memoir, “Counsel for the Situation.”

He shunned extreme language. “You accomplish things by being in the room when the deal is made, and it’s just not in your interest to take positions where you’re not going to get in the room,” he said in an oral history.....He relished legal problem-solving, and it allowed him to live well. Blue-chip companies “pay me a hell of a lot of money to tell them what to do and what not to do,” he said in an interview with the National Visionary Leadership Project. He also remained active in civil rights.
African-Americans  lawyers  Harvard  '70s  NAACP  memoirs  books  obituaries  civil_rights  segregation  desegregation  problem_solving  cabinets  HLS  blue-chips 
april 2017 by jerryking
A.I. Is Doing Legal Work. But It Won’t Replace Lawyers, Yet. - The New York Times
By STEVE LOHR MARCH 19, 2017

An artificial intelligence technique called natural language processing has proved useful in scanning and predicting what documents will be relevant to a case, for example. Yet other lawyers’ tasks, like advising clients, writing legal briefs, negotiating and appearing in court, seem beyond the reach of computerization, for a while......Highly paid lawyers will spend their time on work on the upper rungs of the legal task ladder. Other legal services will be performed by nonlawyers — the legal equivalent of nurse practitioners — or by technology.

Corporate clients often are no longer willing to pay high hourly rates to law firms for junior lawyers to do routine work. Those tasks are already being automated and outsourced, both by the firms themselves and by outside suppliers like Axiom, Thomson Reuters, Elevate and the Big Four accounting firms.....So major law firms, sensing the long-term risk, are undertaking initiatives to understand the emerging technology and adapt and exploit it.

Dentons, a global law firm with more than 7,000 lawyers, established an innovation and venture arm, Nextlaw Labs, in 2015. Besides monitoring the latest technology, the unit has invested in seven legal technology start-ups.

“Our industry is being disrupted, and we should do some of that ourselves, not just be a victim of it,” John Fernandez, chief innovation officer of Dentons, said.....Artificial intelligence has stirred great interest, but law firms today are using it mainly in “search-and-find type tasks” in electronic discovery, due diligence and contract review,
artificial_intelligence  automation  contracts  corporate_investors  Dentons  e-discovery  IBM_Watson  law  lawtech  lawyers  legal  NLP  start_ups  Steve_Lohr  technology 
march 2017 by jerryking
After High-Profile Shootings, Blacks Seek Prosecutor Seats - The New York Times
By YAMICHE ALCINDORNOV. 5, 2016

African-American lawyers, racial justice groups and the liberal hedge fund billionaire George Soros are combining forces to try to elect more black prosecutors in response to what they see as an insufficient response by incumbent district attorneys to the killings of black people by the police.

The effort faces steep demographic and institutional obstacles that have kept the offices of elected prosecutors — those deciding whether to seek criminal charges against the officers responsible — among the whitest reserves in American politics.
African-Americans  strategic_thinking  law  lawyers  George_Soros  Benjamin_Crump  justice_system  police_shootings  elections  prosecutors  district_attorneys  race  prosecutorial_bias 
november 2016 by jerryking
Jim Prentice was the man at the helm as the Alberta PC dynasty ended - The Globe and Mail
IAN BAILEY AND BARRIE MCKENNA
VANCOUVER/OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Oct. 14, 2016
Jim_Prentice  obituaries  Alberta  politicians  lawyers 
october 2016 by jerryking
The Disrupters: Making New York’s Cultural Boards More Diverse
JULY 30, 2016 | The New York Times| By JACOB BERNSTEIN.

But Dr. Muhammad, the former director of the Schomburg center, cautioned against seeing Mr. Smith’s entry into New York cultural life as a sign that things will change in a meaningful way.

“White people are going to be wealthier on average, wealthier people are going to be in leadership positions more often, and in those positions they’re likely to be part of a network of people in the same social milieu,” Dr. Muhammad said. “There’ll continue to be people like Robert Smith, who happen to be African-American and do wonderful things, but there’s a giant wealth gap between blacks and whites, and it’s only widened in the wake of the great recession. Is this a sign of a trend that black people will be the heads of boards all over the country? I doubt it.”
Darren_Walker  glass_ceilings  African-Americans  high_net_worth  cultural_institutions  boards_&_directors_&_governance  diversity  New_York_City  museums  lawyers  investment_banking  Wall_Street  Harvard  Robert_Smith  racial_disparities 
august 2016 by jerryking
Your Lawyer May Soon Ask This AI-Powered App for Legal Help | WIRED
DAVEY ALBA BUSINESS DATE OF PUBLICATION: 08.07.15.
08.07.15

ROSS Intelligence is a voice recognition app powered by IBM Watson, the machine learning service based on the company’s Jeopardy-playing cognitive system, that doles out legal assistance.

The app is yet another example of the ways machine learning is infiltrating our everyday lives. These days, it’s not just AI algorithms themselves that have improved, but the ability to deliver them across the Internet that has made so many new applications possible.....Asking Natural Questions
Ross works much like Siri. Users can ask it any question the same way a client might—for instance, “If an employee has not been meeting sales targets and has not been able to complete the essentials of their employment, can they be terminated without notice?” The system sifts through its database of legal documents and spits out an answer paired with a confidence rating. Below the answer, a user can see the source documents from which Ross has pulled the information; if the response is accurate, you can hit a “thumbs up” button to save the source. Select “thumbs down” and Ross come up with another response.
technology  law  lawtech  lawyers  law_firms  machine_learning  voice_recognition  voice_interfaces  virtual_assistants  artificial_intelligence  Siri  IBM_Watson 
june 2016 by jerryking
Black Kudos • Claude Brown Claude Brown (February 23, 1937 -...
Claude Brown

Claude Brown (February 23, 1937 - February 2, 2002) is the author of Manchild in the Promised Land, published to critical acclaim in 1965, which tells the story of his coming of age during the 1940s and 1950s in Harlem. He also published Children of Ham (1976).
writers  nostalgia  African-Americans  Harlem  New_York_City  '50s  lawyers  '40s  coming-of-age 
october 2015 by jerryking
Hollywood Talent Agency’s New Division to Manage Visual Artists’ Careers - WSJ
By KELLY CROW
Feb. 10, 2015
Should painters and sculptors be treated like movie stars? United Talent Agency thinks so.

The Beverly Hills, Calif., agency known for representing actors like Johnny Depp and Angelina Jolie said Tuesday it has launched a division called UTA Fine Arts to manage the careers of contemporary visual artists.

The move marks the first time a Hollywood talent agency has stepped into a role traditionally played by art galleries, and it underscores the growing commercial appeal that top artists wield in the global, multibillion-dollar art market.

Jim Berkus, chairman, said the agency won’t broker art sales or show the art as galleries do, but he said the art division will help contemporary artists amass financing for their creative projects and sign potentially lucrative corporate sponsorships and merchandising deals. Mr. Berkus said the firm will also assist artists who want to get more involved in the moviemaking business....The agency’s arrival is likely to rattle the art establishment, particularly the growing list of mega-dealers who have opened gallery branches around the world and are known for transforming artists into museum-ready superstars.

Marc Glimcher, who oversees the New York powerhouse Pace Gallery, said he thinks talent agents could drive a divisive wedge between artists and their dealers, who have historically guided artists toward commissions or relationships that may secure them a lasting place in art history.

“It sounds like an interesting idea, but it’s going to be super hard to pull off,” Mr. Glimcher said. “If you’re going to be an artist’s agent, you need to know more about their work, their prices and their collectors than their own dealer does—and no dealer will be induced to share that kind of information.”

Beyond market intelligence, Mr. Glimcher said talent agents will need to discern how many commercial deals an artist can shoulder without looking like a sellout to art-world insiders: “Do too much, and you’re just not cool anymore,” he added.
Hollywood  talent_management  career  contemporary_art  artists  product_launches  galleries  lawyers  entertainment_industry  market_intelligence  talent_representation  superstars  art_market 
february 2015 by jerryking
Lives Lived: Stewart Saxe, 67 - The Globe and Mail
DIANNE SAXE
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 30 2015,
obituaries  lawyers 
february 2015 by jerryking
Lawyer Austin Cooper had a ‘commanding’ courtroom presence - The Globe and Mail
SEAN FINE
JUSTICE WRITER — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Oct. 18 2013
obituaries  tributes  lawyers  best_of 
september 2014 by jerryking
Respected businessman Purdy Crawford dies at 82 - The Globe and Mail
JANET MCFARLAND
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Aug. 12 2014,
obituaries  lawyers  CEOs  '80s 
august 2014 by jerryking
Sandra Day O'Connor and Jeff J. Curley: Founding Principles in the Digital Age - WSJ.com
April 21, 2014 | WSJ | By SANDRA DAY O'CONNOR And JEFF J. CURLEY

The College Board and Khan Academy—a nonprofit digital education platform—will partner to provide "free, world-class test prep" for the new exam.

These changes may sound unrelated, but they represent a fascinating paradox in education today: What is old in education has never been more important, but it may take what is new in education to truly prepare students for success in college, career and civic life.

Teaching the Constitution and the nation's other foundational texts is as old as public education itself. America's public schools were founded on the idea that education is vital to the success of democracy. But these texts are demanding and complex. Understanding them takes hard work and concentration. The effort is invaluable, though, not least because it instills the discipline that will equip young people with the knowledge and the habits of mind necessary to become powerful actors in civic life.

Millions of students taking the SAT will now encounter texts like the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, as well as the writings of individuals from James Madison to Martin Luther King Jr. But old test-prep methods like flashcards and rote memorization will not be sufficient. Students will need more sophisticated tools to help them understand the material and engage with it. Digital technology will be essential to achieving that goal.
civics  SAT  Khan_Academy  high_schools  students  tools  digital_media  standardized_testing  engaged_citizenry  public_education  constitutions  hard_work  foundational  education  paradoxes  platforms  judges  lawyers  Sandra_Day_O'Connor 
april 2014 by jerryking
SO LONG, BIG LAW / HELLO, NEW LAW
March 28, 2014 | Report on Business Magazine | Alec Scott.
The collapse of Heenan Blaikie was bad news. But what's coming is good news - even for lawyers
Big_Law  Bay_Street  law_firms  disruption  Heenan_Blaikie  dissolutions  Outsourcing  New_Law  Cognition  Axiom  lawyers  bad_news 
march 2014 by jerryking
Life’s Work: Sandra Day O’Connor
December 2013 | Harvard Business Review |Interviewed by Alison Beard .
HBR  U.S._Supreme_Court  women  lawyers  mentoring  interviews  civics  judges  Sandra_Day_O'Connor 
december 2013 by jerryking
Lincoln Alexander Becomes Canada's First Black Lt.-Governor
September 20, 2013 | Globe & Mail | Karen Howlett

As the first black to hold a vice-regal post in Canada, he was a symbol of society’s growing intolerance for racial prejudice. Lincoln Alexander, the son of a railway porter and a maid, was sworn in as Ontario’s 24th lieutenant-governor at the age of 63. He had grown up in an era when blacks were denied the basic rights and opportunities enjoyed by whites, something he experienced firsthand when he could not get a sales job at Stelco - he was told customers would not want to deal with a black man. His appointment as the Queen’s representative capped a distinguished career for the first black member of Parliament and the first black federal cabinet minister. “I want to believe it served as a beacon of hope for the black community," Alexander wrote in his memoir. He died last year, his beacon still bright.
Lincoln_Alexander  African_Canadians  trailblazers  anniversaries  lawyers  politicians 
november 2013 by jerryking
Ronald H. Coase, a Law Professor and Leading Economist, Dies at 102 - NYTimes.com
By PATRICK J. LYONS
Published: September 3, 2013

At the University of London, he was on his way to becoming an industrial lawyer when a seminar with Sir Arnold Plant, a well-known economist of the time, changed his focus again, this time for good. After graduating from the London School of Economics, he taught there and at other British universities, and married Marion Ruth Hartung in 1937. The couple immigrated to the United States in 1951, when he joined the faculty of the State University of New York at Buffalo. He left for the University of Virginia in 1958.

While teaching at Virginia, Professor Coase submitted his essay about the F.C.C. to The Journal of Law and Economics, a new periodical at the University of Chicago. The astonished faculty there wondered, according to one of their number, George J. Stigler, “how so fine an economist could make such an obvious mistake.” They invited Professor Coase to dine at the home of Aaron Director, the founder of the journal, and explain his views to a group that included Milton Friedman and several other Nobel laureates-to-be.

“In the course of two hours of argument, the vote went from 20 against and one for Coase, to 21 for Coase,” Professor Stigler later wrote. “What an exhilarating event! I lamented afterward that we had not had the clairvoyance to tape it.” Professor Coase was asked to expand on the ideas in that essay for the journal. The result was “The Problem of Social Cost.”

Professor Coase was soon invited to become editor of the journal, and to join the Chicago faculty, where he stayed the rest of his life, disdaining the equation-heavy approach of what he called “blackboard economics” in favor of insights grounded in real markets and human behavior.

By identifying transaction costs and explaining their effects, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences wrote in announcing his prize in 1991, “Coase may be said to have identified a new set of ‘elementary particles’ in the economic system.”
obituaries  economists  lawyers  NPSIA  regulation  property_rights  human_behavior  transaction_costs  FCC  broadcasting  Ronald_Coase  Nobel_Prizes  Coase's_Law  behaviours  frictions  social_costs 
september 2013 by jerryking
On Anthony Lewis (1927–2013)
May 9, 2013 | The New York Review of Books| by David Cole.
obituaries  journalists  lawyers 
may 2013 by jerryking
Texas Firm Highlights Struggle for Black Professionals - NYTimes.com
May 27, 2013 | NYT | By NELSON D. SCHWARTZ and
MICHAEL COOPER.

Somewhat lost in the legal arguments over affirmative action are the less tangible, more subtle forces that can determine professional success, more than a dozen black lawyers here, in San Antonio and elsewhere in Texas said in interviews. Social rituals can play a big role in determining who makes it on to the partnership track in the exclusive world of white-shoe firms, and whether those partners can bring in business as rainmakers.

Gerald Roberts, an African-American lawyer who was a partner at Thompson & Knight before leaving in 2010, said that social relationships left some black lawyers at a distance from their white colleagues and potential clients. “For the most part, they don’t go to church together on Sunday enough, they don’t have dinner together enough, and they don’t play enough golf together to develop sufficiently strong relationships of trust and confidence,”
diversity  African-Americans  lawyers  law_firms  law  professional_service_firms  Texas  relationships  rituals  social_exclusion  social_barriers  cultural_signifiers 
may 2013 by jerryking
Bernard Roy was Brian Mulroney's right-hand man - The Globe and Mail
Konrad Yakabuski

The Globe and Mail

Published
Monday, Apr. 15 2013,

“Thank you enormously, but I am going to decline your generous offer,” Mr. Roy wrote. “In accepting your invitation to become the prime minister’s chief of staff, it was to help you and serve Canada. I did my best.”
chief_of_staff  Brian_Mulroney  obituaries  Quebec  lawyers  friendships  Konrad_Yakabuski  politicians 
april 2013 by jerryking
Meet Bay St.'s new breed of deal makers
April 4, 2007 | G&M pg. B10 | by Jacquie McNish.

Days after Ottawa's Halloween clampdown on income trusts, a team of Bay Street dealmakers flew to New York to alert a handful of private equity funds to potential Canadian trust takeovers.

Investment bankers pitch deals to ravenous private equity buyers all the time, but this group was unique because they were lawyers.

Canadian firms can no longer be complacent about private equity deals. As traditional Canadian corporate clients fall on the takeover battleground, Canada’s major firms are moving quickly to grab their share of private equity deals.

Some law firms are wooing private equity funds by aggressively promoting deals, while most are starting to share risks by taking fee cuts on unsuccessful takeovers and pocketing fee premiums on deal victories.

A few are so eager to represent the powerful acquirers that a single firm will act for multiple buyers vying for the same target.

The deal frenzy is shifting legal M&A away from long-term relationships to a more transaction-oriented practice that is seeing firms hop in and out of deals with an ever-changing group of buyers and sellers.

Stephen Donovan, co-head of Torys’ Private Equity Group, adds, "It is no longer enough to just know the law. There is a much more deliberate effort to bring deals to clients."
deal-making  dealmakers  lawyers  law_firms  Bay_Street  private_equity  prospectuses  complacency  crossborder  M&A  risk-sharing  transactions  relationships  transactional_relationships  rescue_investing  pitches  proactivity  entrepreneurial  opportunistic 
january 2013 by jerryking
Practicing Law Should Not Mean Living in Bankruptcy - NYTimes.com
By DANIEL B. RODRIGUEZ and SAMUEL ESTREICHER
Published: January 17, 2013
law_schools  lawyers  reform 
january 2013 by jerryking
How to Use a Lawyer in Buying or Selling a Company
December 1982 | The Journal of Buyouts & Acquisitions | By Betram K. Massing.

The lawyer for the buyer or seller in a private buyout or corporate acquisition is an important participant in the transaction. The lawyer's functions include: 1, counseling the client about the transaction. 2. advocating the client‘s position with the opposite party or in ancillary proceedings such as with government agencies. and 3. documenting and implementing the closing of the transaction. In counseling, the lawyer should call attention to potential risks and problems and suggest means of dealing with them. Tax implications, disposition of assets or shares, lenders' requirements, and the risk of latent liabilities are among the issues that arise early in an acquisitionA It is the cIient‘s responsibility to make decisions after being advised by the lawyer and to decide which points to compromise and which should be insisted upon. Clear communications between clients and lawyers and between buyers and sellers will make for a smoother transaction.
buying_a_business  selling_a_business  lawyers  howto  LBOs  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A 
january 2013 by jerryking
From power to prayer
By Sharon Boase, Hamilton Spectator
Friday, November 25, 2005
career_paths  alumni  Ivey  CEOs  lawyers 
september 2012 by jerryking
Top Lawyer Fights Back After a Skiing Accident - WSJ.com
August 31, 2012 | WSJ | By RYAN DEZEMBER.

Ordeal to Deals: A Lawyer Returns
Deal Maker Back on Top 5 Years After Accident
dealmakers  lawyers  women  inspiration 
september 2012 by jerryking
Did You Check With Counsel? Attorneys Growing Role In VC
January 1, 2003 | Venture Capital Journal | Interview of John Delaney and Jay Rand by Danielle Fugazy
lawyers  vc  venture_capital  start_ups  funding  interviews  boards_&_directors_&_governance  insurance 
september 2012 by jerryking
How Apple Got Its Case Across - WSJ.com
August 26, 2012 | WSJ | By JENNIFER SMITH and STEVE EDER.
Lawyers Presented a Clear Story Line for Technology Giant; Samsung Argument Was Harder to Explain.
Apple  patent_law  law_firms  lawyers  Samsung 
august 2012 by jerryking
A family’s candid friend - FT.com
December 8 | FT | By Edward Luce. A look at uber lawyer Jim Baker
Iraq  éminence_grise  lawyers  dealmakers  Edward_Luce 
august 2012 by jerryking
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