jerryking + knowledge_economy   17

Scaling Success Lazaridis Institute Whitepaper
March 2016

Building a prosperous Canadian knowledge-economy depends in no small part on the creation of
a next generation of high-growth, globally competitive Canadian technology companies. These
high-growth companies contribute disproportionately to the creation of employment and economic
growth. However, compared to other mature economies, Canada has so far underperformed on the
creation of these firms.
As part of the development of the Lazaridis Institute at Wilfrid Laurier University, this white paper
is designed to shed light on the relative scarcity of high-growth Canadian technology firms. We
began by asking 125 of Canada’s most well-informed and best-placed industry stakeholders—in
particular the founders of, and investors in, high-growth technology firms—to talk about the major
impediments facing these firms. Their comments indicated a significant knowledge gap related
to the role management and executive skills play among these growth challenges. Their feedback
also demonstrated a shared understanding that scaling a technology company in today’s global
marketplace is radically different than in previous eras.
The analysis of this data reveals the following key findings:
• While science, technology, engineering and mathematics-related (STEM) talent is
abundant, the talent pool in general lacks business and management knowledge.
• Shortages of experienced management and/or executive talent are the primary inhibitors
to scaling up.
• Canadian technology firms lack key management competencies in specific areas including
sales, marketing, organizational design and product management.
• The talent shortage is linked to the lack of existing and/or exited growth firms in
Canada’s technology sector.
These findings underscore the importance of building a well-rounded cadre of managers and
executives in Canada’s technology sector. Doing so must take into consideration the fact that
today’s technology markets are distinguished by far shorter time-to-market and product life cycles,
as well as a generally more complex global operating environment.
This white paper presents an in-depth review of the challenges facing Canadian high-tech firms and
develops a strong evidence base upon which to build future initiatives designed to address them.
The work represents an important first step by the Lazaridis Institute to help a next generation of
Canadian technology companies scale into global leaders.
Canada  Canadian  gazelles  high-growth  investors  scaling  start_ups  talent  technology  Colleges_&_Universities  Kitchener-Waterloo  knowledge_economy  WLU  Mike_Lazaridis  team_risk 
7 weeks ago by jerryking
Cake shop management cannot suffice for a modern economy.
Feb 28, 2019 | Kaieteur News | Columnists, Peeping Tom.

Cake shop management cannot suffice for a modern economy.

The style of governance since political Independence has not been conducive to development. It is ill-suited for modernization. Given the expansive nature of relations and issues which governments have to address, there is a need for greater devolution of power. Centralized government can no longer cope with the multiple, overlapping and multilayered aspects of governance.......Guyana, however, is going in the opposite direction. The more modern the bureaucracy, the more swollen and overstaffed it becomes. The more complex government becomes, the more centralized is decision-making. The greater demands on resources, the bigger the bureaucracy.
The public bureaucracy is now a cancer. It is sucking the life out of public administration. Merely keeping this inefficient and revenue-guzzling monstrosity alive is costing taxpayers in excess of 500 million dollars per day. This is wanton wastage. That money could have been put to help boost private sector development to create jobs for the thousands of young people who are unemployed. The more the government implements technology, the more inefficient it becomes. It is all part of what is known as cake shop management........Guyana is going to continue to be left behind the rest of the world. It has seen Guyana retrogress and we will always be in a fire fighting mode rather than ensuring forward thinking and planning. A country today simply cannot be run like a cake shop. The world is too modern, and too many things are taking place to allow for such a style of governance. Once the policy is made by the government, the mechanics should be left to lower level officials who should be held accountable for ensuring its implementation and who should be held responsible for any failures........What is required is for faster decision-making so as to allow for the multitasking.........Plantain chips and breadfruit chips and other small businesses cannot make the economy grow. It cannot generate the massive jobs needed to impact on unemployment. It will not lift large numbers out of poverty. This is catch-hand approach to helping poor people.
Cake shop management cannot run a modern economy. Never has; never will.
bureaucracies  centralization  complexity  decision_making  devolution  Guyana  inefficiencies  modernization  policymaking  public_sector  public_servants  technology  traffic_congestion  forward-thinking  multitasking  decentralization  digital_economy  governance  knowledge_economy  centralized_control  implementation  unsophisticated 
march 2019 by jerryking
Jim Balsillie: Dragging Canada into the 21st Century | TVO.org
Technological innovation at the outset of this millennium has been nothing short of revolutionary. And it shows no signs of slowing down. Jim Balsillie, the former co-CEO of Research In Motion, says Canada is not keeping up. Worse, that policymakers and businesses still don't seem to fully appreciate the scope of the change underway. He's now chair of the Council of Canadian innovators, and he joins The Agenda to discuss his ideas.

#1 job. Accumulate valuable intangible assets. which you then commercialize. You acquire a lot of IP and data assets.
Jim_Balsillie  Canada  Steve_Paikin  policymakers  priorities  digital_economy  innovation  knowledge_economy  ideas  intangibles  intellectual_property  competitiveness  protocols  Sun_Tzu  under-performing  under_appreciated  21st._century 
february 2019 by jerryking
The Rise of Global, Superstar Firms, Sectors and Cities - CIO Journal.
Jan 18, 2019 | WSJ | By Irving Wladawsky-Berger.

Scale increases a platform’s value. The more products or services a platform offers, the more consumers it will attract, helping it then attract more offerings, which in turn brings in more consumers, which then makes the platform even more valuable. Moreover, the larger the network, the more data available to customize offerings and better match supply and demand, further increasing the platform’s value. The result is that a small number of companies have become category kings dominating the rest of their competitors in their particular markets.

Network dynamics also apply to metropolitan areas. For the past few decades, the demands for high-skill jobs have significantly expanded, with the earnings of the college educated workers needed to fill such jobs rising steadily. Talent has become the linchpin asset of the knowledge economy, making capital highly dependent on talented experts to navigate our increasingly complex business environment.

“Just as the economy confers disproportionate rewards to superstar talent, superstar cities… similarly tower above the rest,” wrote urban studies professor and author Richard Florida. “They are not just the places where the most ambitious and most talented people want to be - they are where such people feel they need to be.”
cities  clusters  geographic_concentration  hyper-concentrations  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger  knowledge_economy  network_effects  platforms  Richard_Florida  start_ups  superstars  talent  winner-take-all 
january 2019 by jerryking
‘Hyper-concentration’ of jobs occurring in Toronto’s downtown, report says
December 3, 2018 | The Globe and Mail | by JEFF GRAY TORONTO CITY HALL REPORTER.

A fundamental economic shift is “hyper-concentrating” new knowledge-economy jobs in Toronto’s downtown as traditional manufacturing employment evaporates across much of southern Ontario, a new report warns, and the trend has major ramifications for public transit and land-use planning......lopsided job growth is a permanent change, not a cyclical pattern. It warns Toronto’s transit system will be placed under further strain. The report also argues smaller communities outside the city should seek to attract the jobs of the future, rather than cling to dying industries.....Overall, the number of jobs in the region has grown. But from 2006 to 2016, Toronto’s downtown gained 67,000 of what the study calls “core” jobs, or jobs that bring income into the region and drive growth, as opposed to jobs such as those in retail that largely serve local residents. Many of those downtown jobs are “knowledge-based,” in industries such as finance or technology or “higher-order business services” such as accounting or law, which tend to cluster together......“It’s not this kind of gentle evolution towards the knowledge economy that’s we’ve seen previously. This is a definite shift.” The GM news appears tailor-made to illustrate that shift. While closing the Oshawa plant, the company has pointed to its new investment in Markham – one of a handful of suburban centres for knowledge jobs identified in the report – where GM plans to hire 700 engineers to work on its designs for driverless cars. GM has also announced plans for an “urban innovation lab” on the east side of central Toronto.....Dr. Blais’s report suggests the Toronto region should look to plan for a “second downtown,” which would need good transit to attract knowledge-intensive jobs.....Richard Florida .....said the numbers demonstrate the clustering of knowledge jobs means places outside Toronto’s downtown core, such as Oshawa, will inevitably become “more of a bedroom community than an economic generator.”
downtown_core  GM  Jeff_Gray  knowledge_economy  manufacturers  Oshawa  public_transit  Toronto  layoffs  Golden_Horseshoe  land_uses  hyper-concentrations 
december 2018 by jerryking
The digital economy is disrupting our old models
Diane Coyle 14 HOURS AGO

To put it in economic jargon, we are in the territory of externalities and public goods. Information once shared cannot be unshared.

The digital economy is one of externalities and public goods to a far greater degree than in the past. We have not begun to get to grips with how to analyse it, still less to develop policies for the common good. There are two questions at the heart of the challenge: what norms and laws about property rights over intangibles such as data or ideas or algorithms are going to be needed? And what will the best balance between collective and individual actions be or, to put it another way, between government and market?
mydata  personal_data  digital_economy  Facebook  externalities  knowledge_economy  public_goods  algorithms  data  ideas  intangibles  property_rights  protocols 
april 2018 by jerryking
The Coming Productivity Boom: Transforming the Physical Economy with Information
March 2017 | Michael Mandel and Bret Swanson.

DIGITAL INDUSTRIES VERSUS PHYSICAL INDUSTRIES

Physical Industries
Where the main output of the industry is
predominantly provided in physical form
All other industries, including agriculture;
mining; construction; manufacturing
(except computers and electronics); transportation
and warehousing; wholesale and
retail trade*; real estate; education; healthcare;
accommodations and food services;
recreation.

Digital Industries
Where the main output of the industry
can be easily provided in digital form
Computer and electronics production;
publishing; movies, music, television, and
other entertainment; telecom; Internet
search and social media; professional
and technical services (legal, accounting,
computer programming, scientific research,
management consulting, design, advertising);
finance and insurance; management of
companies and enterprises; administrative
and support services
atoms_&_bits  booming  digital_artifacts  digital_economy  e-commerce  knowledge_economy  paradoxes  physical_economy  productivity  productivity_payoffs  value_migration 
august 2017 by jerryking
Tyler Cowen on inequality, Canada, and the state of global superpowers
Eva Salinas | May 1, 2015.

Tyler Cowen is an economist, academic and writer. His popular blog, Marginal Revolution, co-written with Alex Tabarrok, a colleague at George Mason University, turned Cowen into “an economics celebrity,” in the words of one LA Times writer. More recently, Cowen and Tabarrok ventured into the world of online education with their creation of Marginal Revolution University in 2012.
The author of ‘Average is Over: Powering America Beyond the Age of the Great Stagnation’ was in Toronto earlier this year as the keynote speaker at the University of Toronto’s conference on Inequality.
Tyler_Cowen  economists  income_inequality  Canada  innovation  Silicon_Valley  averages  digital_economy  knowledge_economy  economic_stagnation  clusters  polymaths  the_Great_Decoupling 
may 2015 by jerryking
Strong intellectual property rights are key to prosperity - The Globe and Mail
BRIAN LEE CROWLEY
Strong intellectual property rights are key to prosperity
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Feb. 10 2015,

The stability of property and its transference by consent were thus rightly deemed by the great Scottish philosopher David Hume as two of the three rules that underpinned truly civilized societies (the third was the keeping of promises). Strong, reliable and consistent property rights unlock prosperity because they reduce conflict, promote stewardship and reward investment..... A strong IP regime therefore unlocks creativity, surely one of the keys to prosperity in a society increasingly dependent on intangible services for its wealth creation. Ultimately, all wealth is created by human knowledge, and increasingly the wealth of societies such as Canada takes the form of the fruits of our fertile minds, in software, design, film, fashion, engineering, disease control and more.
capitalism  intellectual_property  rule_of_law  Congo  Zaire  property_rights  abuses  impunity  intangibles  patents  wealth_creation  think_tanks  counterfeits  creativity  digital_economy  protocols  David_Hume  knowledge_economy  prosperity 
february 2015 by jerryking
What’s an Idea Worth? - NYTimes.com
By ADAM DAVIDSON
Published: July 29, 2013 (think about this for WaudWare)

Companies like G.E., Nike and Apple learned early on that the real money was in the creative ideas that can transform simple physical products far beyond their generic or commodity value....we have no idea how to measure the financial value of ideas and the people who come up with them.
fees_&_commissions  invoicing  intangibles  billing  transformational  GE  Nike  Apple  fees  goodwill  professional_service_firms  branding  metrics  time-management  productivity  knowledge_economy  creativity  pricing  value_creation  ideas 
august 2013 by jerryking
Book Review: Why Philanthropy Matters - WSJ.com
March 27, 2013 | WSJ | By LESLIE LENKOWSKY

A Buffett Rule Worth Following
WHY PHILANTHROPY MATTERS
By Zoltan J. Acs
(Princeton, 249 pages, $29.95).

entrepreneurs were as philanthropic as those born into wealth, if not more.

This surprising fact propels "Why Philanthropy Matters," by Zoltan J. Acs, a professor at George Mason University. Mr. Acs has spent his career studying how entrepreneurs operate and what role their business ventures play in the economy. In his new book, he focuses on another kind of contribution they make, one that, he argues, is as essential for prosperity as the products and services they create.

Successful entrepreneurship, he writes, requires a steady stream of innovations. The best places to develop them are privately funded research universities, medical centers and other kinds of institutions—like libraries and laboratories—that are insulated from competitive and political pressure. He cites, among other examples of nurtured innovation, the agricultural advances developed in land-grant universities during the 19th and 20th centuries and the contributions made to the information age by the students and faculty of Stanford University. As important as industrial research may be, the university has become, since the 1980s, "the source of new knowledge to be transferred to the private sector."

But there is more to the logic of entrepreneurial charity than hatching innovative ideas. As Mr. Acs notes, the success that certain entrepreneurs achieve when they disrupt old industries and establish new ones can bring big rewards, resulting in disparities of income and wealth. Without the philanthropy that would underwrite scholarships or other sources of opportunity, the public might not long tolerate such differences.

In "The Gospel of Wealth" (1889), Andrew Carnegie urged his prosperous contemporaries to avoid "hoarding great sums" and to give their "surplus" wealth away during their lifetimes, to strengthen an economic system that might thereby produce some riches for all. In the more measured tones of an economist, Mr. Acs is making much the same point: A capitalist economy not only enables but requires philanthropy. Through it, entrepreneurs can support the kinds of institutions that generate discoveries and that provide pathways for other people to make their own fortunes.

Mr. Acs buttresses his argument with a variety of examples, including those of billionaires—among them, Michael Milken and David Rubenstein —who have followed Bill Gates and Warren Buffett by committing themselves to giving at least half of their wealth to charity and whose charitable enterprises are aimed at creating opportunity for others. (Eli Broad, for instance, subsidizes charter schools and management reforms to improve urban education.) In Mr. Acs's view, America's ability to combine entrepreneurial capitalism and philanthropic uplift is rare among developed nations.
Andrew_Carnegie  billgates  book_reviews  books  capitalism  Colleges_&_Universities  creating_opportunities  David_Rubenstein  disequilibriums  disruption  Eli_Broad  entrepreneurship  innovation  knowledge_economy  moguls  Michael_Milken  philanthropy  society  Stanford  symbiosis  technology_transfers  Warren_Buffett 
march 2013 by jerryking
Building Wealth - 99.06
J U N E 1 9 9 9 |The Atlantic | by Lester C. Thurow. The new rules for individuals, companies, and nations.

Rule 1 No one ever becomes very rich by saving money.
Rule 2 Sometimes successful businesses have to cannibalize themselves to save themselves.
Rule 3 Two routes other than radical technological change can lead to high-growth, high-rate-of-return opportunities: sociological disequilibriums and developmental disequilibriums.
Rule 4 Making capitalism work in a deflationary environment is much harder than making it work in an inflationary environment.
Rule 5 There are no institutional substitutes for individual entrepreneurial change agents.
Rule 6 No society that values order above all else will be creative; but without some degree of order (institutional integrity??), creativity disappears.
Rule 7 A successful knowledge-based economy requires large public investments in education, infrastructure, and research and development.
Rule 8 The biggest unknown for the individual in a knowledge-based economy is how to have a career in a system where there are no careers.
Lester_Thurow  wealth_creation  entrepreneurship  rules_of_the_game  deflation  career_paths  Managing_Your_Career  cannibalization  disequilibriums  anomalies  JCK  unknowns  high-growth  change_agents  individual_initiative  technological_change  digital_economy  messiness  constraints  knowledge_economy  public_education  new_rules  capitalism  personal_enrichment  ROI  institutional_integrity 
november 2011 by jerryking
Western Alumni Gazette - What’s the price of attracting great minds?
Winter 2011
Back Page - The Final Say
RSS
What’s the price of attracting great minds?
by Paul Wells, BA'89

Ontario is in a global battle to attract the best minds. It’s all very sweet of Hudak’s education critic, Jim Wilson, to claim that McGuinty “could find the best and brightest already on our own soil,” but what are the odds? Ontario has one-fifth of one percent of the world’s population. I’m going to bet that most of the best and brightest are somewhere else. Some of them work at the Committee on Science, Engineering and Public Policy at the U.S. National Academies of Science, which wrote in 2009, “The issue for the United States, as for other nations, is that a knowledge-driven economy is more productive if it has access to the best talent regardless of national origin.” Attracting international students has been a pillar of U.S. economic policy for longer than Jim Wilson has been alive. “Talented international graduate students and postdoctoral scholars are drawn to the United States because of the high quality of our research universities [and] the availability of stipends and research funding,” the committee wrote in the same report.
immigration_policies  Paul_Wells  Dalton_McGuinty  Colleges_&_Universities  UWO  Ontario  students  scholarships  talent  knowledge_economy  foreign_scholarships  brainpower  talent_acquisition  the_best_and_brightest  scholars 
october 2011 by jerryking
American Dream is Changing | Nye - Gateway to Nevada's Rurals
Oct. 31, 2010 | Nye Gateway | by Fareed Zakaria. What can
you do to make yourself thrive in this new global economy? (1) Be
unique. Try to do something that is a specialized craft or art,
something that is as much art as craft, something that feels more like
artisanship than routine work, things that are custom & custom-made
still survive. (2) Go local. Do something that can’t be outsourced,
jobs involving personal face-to-face contact will never go to India. (3)
Be indispensable. Can everyone become indispensable? Well, no, but if
you learn a difficult craft and are good at it, if you can collaborate
well, synthesize well, put things together, work with others and work
well across countries and cultures, you will have a leg-up. (4) Learn a
foreign language (e.g. Spanish or Mandarin or Hindi). (5) Excel at
mathematics, able to manipulate data, algorithms, symbols, graphs,
balance sheets and all of these skills are the essential skills for a
knowledge-based economy.
Fareed_Zakaria  21st._century  ksfs  indispensable  specialization  local  languages  mathematics  organizing_data  advice  new_graduates  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  bespoke  quantitative  global_economy  digital_economy  knowledge_economy  the_American_dream  in-person  face2face  uniqueness 
october 2010 by jerryking

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