jerryking + journalists   103

Bagehot by James Grant — an engaging biography of a purveyor of punditry
August 2, 2019 | Financial Times | by John Plender

Bagehot: The Life and Times of the Greatest Victorian, by James Grant, WW Norton, RRP£19.99/$28.95, 368 pages
19th_century  biographies  books  book_reviews  economics  financial_crises  financial_history  journalists  magazines  paradoxes  politicaleconomy  pundits  Victorian  Walter_Bagehot 
11 weeks ago by jerryking
Opinion: George Brown, the futurist
July 1, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by MOIRA DANN, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

Memories of the people present for Canada’s beginnings can teach us a great deal. Sometimes looking back helps you reconsider and reframe the present, so you can see different possibilities for the future.....George Brown often gets short shrift as a Father of Confederation.....know he was the founder of The Globe, let alone a founder of the country.....Brown wasn’t the charismatic lightning rod his confrère and rival John A. Macdonald was, nor was he as ready to dance and sing and flirt and play his own compositions on the piano, as was his Quebec frenemy, George-Étienne Cartier..... he was the most forward-looking of the lot......Brown came to Toronto from Scotland in 1843 via a short, five-year sojourn in New York working in dry goods and publishing.......It wasn’t long before Brown, defending the principle of the government’s responsibility to Parliament, was haranguing Governor-General Charles Metcalfe about public-service appointments made without the approval of the elected representatives. Brown soon enough made the leap from journalism to politics. ...... he was back wearing his journalist’s hat in 1867, writing a 9,000-word front-page editorial for The Globe’s July 1 edition when Canada’s Confederation became a political reality......While still publishing and writing for political-reform-minded Presbyterian church publication The Banner, Brown had foreseen a market trend: He anticipated the desire for (and the money-making potential of) a good newspaper directed less toward partisan believers and more at a general reader, a paper with a strong point of view and attempting a national perspective. He started The Globe on March 5, 1844.......After Brown started The Globe – it merged, in 1936, with the Mail and Empire, to become the newspaper that you are reading today – he was able to print and distribute it widely to extol Confederation because of some forethought: He had started investing in new technology. Just two months after starting The Globe using a hand press that printed 200 copies an hour, he went to New York and purchased a Hoe rotary press that could produce 1,250 copies an hour. His was the first one used in Upper Canada. He also made a deal with a rival publication, the British Colonist, to share the cost of using the telegraph to bring news from New York and Montreal......One thing Brown never allowed to lapse was his dedication to religious liberty, civil rights and the abolition of slavery. .....Brown was also a vocal advocate of prison reform...... the work he most loved: being husband to Anne and father to Margaret (Maggie), Catherine Edith (Oda) and George.
abolitionists  ahead_of_the_curve  Confederation  forethought  futurists  George_Brown  George-Étienne_Cartier  Globe_&_Mail  history  journalists  nation_builders  newspapers  politicians  prison_reform  Sir_John_A._MacDonald  technology 
july 2019 by jerryking
Anthony Price, British author of thrillers with deep links to history, dies at 90 - The Washington Post
By Matt Schudel June 15

Add to my reading list saved on the Toronto Public Library (TPL)'s website.

his favourite Le Carré novel, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, was pipped to the 1974 Gold Dagger award by his own Other Paths to Glory.

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For two decades Price juggled careers as a newspaper editor, book reviewer and author, with his wife Ann acting as his unofficial business manager. The success of his first novel resulted in rapid election in 1971 to the Detection Club, where he met and befriended many of the authors he admired, including Eric Ambler, and gained international recognition with the Martin Beck award from the Swedish Crime Writers’ Academy in 1978.

All his novels reflected his deep interest in military history, and sub-plots and background settings could contain elements of Roman legions on Hadrian’s Wall, the Camelot of King Arthur, Napoleonic warships and the battlegrounds of the American civil war and the first world war. In his research for Other Paths to Glory he visited western front battle sites well before there was an established visitor trail there, and taped interviews with survivors in the Oxford area.

The second world war got the Price treatment in two thrillers: The Hour of the Donkey (1980, Dunkirk) and Here Be Monsters (1985, D-day).

Price also used military history in his cold war spy thrillers as, in effect, long diversions, – almost “shaggy dog stories” – providing red herrings for the characters, and for readers. The actual espionage in his plots, which Price always insisted were straightforward and simple, would be resolved in last-minute flurries of action and recrimination. It was a technique which, as one reviewer pointed out, put him “in the upper IQ spy story bracket”. With such praise, and the constant use of the adjectives “ingenious” and “intelligent” by the critics, Price’s books were never likely to appeal to a mass readership, which preferred more blood with their thunder.
books  Cold_War  espionage  fiction  journalists  military_history  obituaries 
june 2019 by jerryking
Tom Wolfe, journalism’s great anti-elitist
Janan Ganesh MAY 18, 2018

Wolfe was the first anti-elitist in the modern style. Or at least, the first of real stature.

He exposed the credulity of the rich for artistic fads. He made fun of their recreational left-wingery,... their “radical chic”. Among the vanities that went into his bonfire was the idea of America as classless. At the risk of tainting him with politics, there was something Trumpian about his ability to define himself against Manhattan’s grandest burghers while living among them.

If all Wolfe did was lampoon the urban rich, it would have made for a sour body of work. But he did the inverse, too. He heroised the other kind of American: physical, duty-doing, heartland-based. His only uncynical book is his best. The Right Stuff, an extended prose poem to fighter pilots and astronauts, has all the velocity of its subject, even as it pauses to linger over these men, with their utilitarian hair cuts, their blend of arrogance and asceticism......Wolfe’s great coup was to sense before anyone else that counter-culture was becoming the culture. Its capture of universities, media and the arts amounted to a new establishment that deserved as much irreverent scrutiny as the old kind.....Before South Park, before Bill Burr, before PJ O’Rourke, there was Wolfe, more or less alone in his testing of liberal certainties, and happy to bear a certain amount of ostracism for it. .....But it says something of his importance that he changed fiction and non-fiction and yet neither achievement ranks as his highest. It is his prescience about elites, and the inevitability of a reaction against them, that defines his reputation.

One test of a writer’s influence is how often people quote them unknowingly. .....Wolfe scores better than anyone of his generation, what with “good ol’ boy” and the “right stuff” and “Mau-Mauing”. What sets him apart, though, is that millions also unknowingly think his thoughts. When? Whenever they resent the cloistered rich. Whenever they fear for free speech in a hyper-sensitive culture.

The mutation of these thoughts into a brute populism in western democracies cannot be pinned on Wolfe, who was civility incarnate. Like a good reporter, he wrote what he saw and left it to the world to interpret. What he saw were people who had wealth, refinement and so much of the wrong stuff.
anti-elitist  counter_culture  Janan_Ganesh  journalists  legacies  obituaries  Tom_Wolfe  tributes  writers  enfant_terrible  New_York_City  novels  social_classes  the_One_Percent  elitism  worldviews 
may 2018 by jerryking
Lerone Bennett Jr., Historian of Black America, Dies at 89 - The New York Times
By NEIL GENZLINGERFEB. 16, 2018

Lerone Bennett Jr., a historian and journalist who wrote extensively on race relations and black history and was a top editor at Ebony magazine for decades, died on Wednesday in Chicago. He was 89......His best-known book was “Before the Mayflower,” drawn from a series of articles for Ebony and first published in 1962..... “Forced Into Glory: Abraham Lincoln’s White Dream.” “What Manner of Man: A Biography of Martin Luther King Jr.” (1964), “Black Power U.S.A.: The Human Side of Reconstruction, 1867-1877” (1967) and “The Shaping of Black America” (1975)..... Mr. Bennett talked about a three-part approach to affecting change.

“Every black person is obligated,” he said, “to try to do what he does as well as any person who ever lived can do it, or any person who ever lives can do it; then, to try to save one — just one — person if you can. And then to struggle to destroy a system which is multiplying black victims faster than all the black intellectuals and the black leaders in America can talk about. I see those three things connected.”
African-Americans  historians  obituaries  Ebony  magazines  journalists  books  writers  think_threes  Black_Power 
february 2018 by jerryking
Peter Mansbridge anchors his final edition of CBC’s The National - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 30, 2017

Last September, when Mansbridge announced his retirement, I wrote a column with the headline It’s About Time: We’ve Put Up With Mansbridge And His Pompous Ilk For Too Long. It acknowledged at the start that it might seem ungracious and harsh.

It argued against the traditional anchor position, which Mansbridge has embodied, and declared that the reverence for the job is outdated and, essentially, redundant.

About half the readers thought it too harsh and about half applauded the content. It caused some hurt feelings. Sometimes a critic does that, expressing the unsentimental view.

Oddly enough, CBC seems to be agreeing with the views expressed about the traditional anchor role and is moving away, post-Mansbridge, to a multihost format rather than anchoring The National in one middle-aged man who delivers the news.

Whatever the new format might be, Peter Mansbridge will be missed by many. Understandably, given his skills and achievements.

Cheers, Pastor, and may the retirement be pleasant and fruitful.
Peter_Mansbridge  farewells  retirement  CBC  unsentimental  television  journalists  Canada150  John_Doyle 
july 2017 by jerryking
Remembering David Livingstone: The man who knew outfits and interviews inside out - The Globe and Mail
BERNADETTE MORRA
Special to The Globe and Mail (includes correction)
Published Friday, Apr. 21, 2017

Many times we would be watching an outfit come down the runway and he would lean over and say something like, “those shoes remind me of that song …” and then he would quote the lyrics of a jazz tune sung by someone I’d never heard of. Long before there was an Internet or easy access to databases, Livingstone was salting his copy with obscure references from films and literature.

Photographers and publicists who sat in on his interviews with designers, actors and models all have stories of the depth and breadth of his knowledge, and how he applied it to the seemingly trite world of fashion.....“He was a massive fan of cinema – he would see one film by a Hungarian director then hunt down their entire library. He was always so well-prepared at interviews, he would form an instant, genuine connection. He put his heart and soul into everything he did.”

Livingstone’s dedication to editorial excellence was both staggering and maddening.....his prose was unbeatable. A diamond cuff bracelet was “as wide as a crosswalk.” The lighting in his overpriced European hotel was so bad, reading his laptop was “like trying to read the marks left by a stick in dirty water.”...“He asked questions no one else asked,” notes Dawn Bellini, senior director of marketing and public relations for Hugo Boss Canada. “Often it was about the button stance or why you had to have something on a lapel. Interviews went way over time. He took much longer than anyone else. But to him details and the back story mattered.”....“He didn’t want to talk about skirt lengths. The conversation was about books and movies. He always made us think. And afterward, we would reflect and grow from that.”....The lack of accuracy and context in today’s 140-character world irked my friend and colleague to no end. But that didn’t stop him from mentoring young talent when he saw potential.
tributes  obituaries  fashion  journalists  journalism  detail_oriented  questions  mentoring  industry_expertise  inside_out 
april 2017 by jerryking
When local news outlets shutter due to cuts, we all lose - The Globe and Mail
ELIZABETH RENZETTI
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Apr. 01, 2017

Local journalism, whether it’s at a city paper or a weekly, a radio or TV station, keeps its community entertained and informed. The National isn’t going to send a camera crew to cover the profoundly annoying pothole on Main Street, or the feud between the dress-shop owners, or the cozy relationship between the mayor and the developers. The Globe and Mail is not likely to, either: This is where the country’s 1,060 community papers come in – or where they used to. According to a recent report, those papers lost $400-million, or one-third of their revenue, between 2012 and 2015. The Public Policy Forum’s recent report on media in Canada, called The Shattered Mirror, contains an even more alarming statistic: “Since 2010, there have been 225 weekly and 27 daily newspapers lost to closure or merger in more than 200 federal ridings.” Local television coverage has contracted as well.

“Well, so what?” you might ask. Your neighbourhood has a Facebook page. The mayor has a Twitter account. Except that none of your neighbours is going to sit through a long and boring zoning meeting and report back (unless he is particularly weird). And the mayor’s Twitter feed? Undeniably good if you’re looking for sunshine and kittens. Not so good for anything she doesn’t want you to see. When provincial legislatures and city councils are left unwatched, it also means no one is keeping an eye on the sausage-making machine of democracy......The problem of fleeing ad dollars and subscribers won’t be settled so easily, either: The industry has struggled with these pains for years. Not-for-profit foundations that run news outlets might be one idea, or hyper-local websites that are crowdsourced by neighbours.....In his farewell column, Kevin Diakiw wrote, “Moving forward, you will likely receive your information from the Internet, or newsrooms pared to the bone. Be sure to read not only information that fits your own narrative, but opposing views as well.

“The weighty responsibility of hunting for balance and accuracy now lands largely on your shoulders.”
newspapers  rural  community  journalism  opposing_actions  journalists  provincial_legislatures  engaged_citizenry  city_councils  local  print_journalism  subscriptions  dual-consciousness  Postmedia  consolidation  local_journalism 
april 2017 by jerryking
The Grace of Gwen Ifill - The New York Times
By BRENT STAPLESNOV. 14, 2016
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Gwen_Ifill  tributes  journalists  African-Americans  women 
november 2016 by jerryking
The Life and Example of Gwen Ifill - The New York Times
David Brooks NOV. 15, 2016
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David_Brooks  Gwen_Ifill  tributes  obituaries  African-Americans  women  journalists  PBS 
november 2016 by jerryking
Is Solomon scandal the latest sign of a CBC celebrity culture? - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jun. 10, 2015

Like so many other journalists in the tiny Ottawa bubble, Mr. Solomon seems to have confused what is ultimately a transactional relationship with friendship. But only a naive or egotistical reporter could think “people of great power” want to be their friend for their intellect or sense of humour.
celebrities  scandals  CBC  Konrad_Yakabuski  Evan_Solomon  politics  journalism  journalists 
june 2015 by jerryking
Desmond Cole’s feature on carding lit a fuse under the city’s elite, but why did it take so long? - The Globe and Mail
SIMON HOUPT
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jun. 11, 2015

While Cole is elated with Tory’s change of heart, his feelings are tempered by the way it came about. “It’s very sad, and should concern people. Because not everyone will get a feature in Toronto Life to air their story,” he noted. After all, Cole had been there during a Police Services Board meeting, when John Tory sat and listened impassively to testimony from lower- and middle-income black people who were living in fear of random police stops.

“It’s not a good sign, when you can have that direct contact with leaders and they won’t listen to you. But they will listen to essentially their peers, who might not experience this issue in the same way at all, who might not know a lot about it.”
Desmond_Cole  Simon_Houpt  Toronto  Toronto_Life  writers  randomness  journalists  African_Canadians  John_Tory 
june 2015 by jerryking
Kelly: Why do we think Mike Babcock is the NHL's best coach? - The Globe and Mail
CATHAL KELLY
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, May. 11 2015, 6:29 PM EDT
Last updated Tuesday, May. 12 2015
sports  journalists  NHL  Cathal_Kelly  best_of  coaching 
may 2015 by jerryking
Isabel Wilkerson Reflects on the Black Lives Matter Movement
January 05, 2015 | Essence.com | Essay by Isabel Wilkerson.
Where Do We Go From Here?:

The outcomes in Staten Island and Ferguson and elsewhere signal, as in the time of Jim Crow, that the loss of Black life at the hands of authorities does not so much as merit further inquiry and that the caste system has only mutated with the times.From this, we have learned that the journey is far from over and that we must know our history to gain strength for the days ahead. We must love ourselves even if—and perhaps especially if—others do not. We must keep our faith even as we work to make our country live up to its creed. And we must know deep in our bones and in our hearts that if the ancestors could survive the Middle Passage, we can survive anything.
African-Americans  authors  Black_Lives_Matter  digital_advocacy  feedback_loops  Great_Migration  internal_migration  Isabel_Wilkerson  Jim_Crow  journalists  protests  protest_movements  Reconstruction  the_South  women 
may 2015 by jerryking
David Carr, journalist, 1956-2015 - FT.com
February 13, 2015 3:34 pm
David Carr, journalist, 1956-2015
John Gapper and Matthew Garrahan
David_Carr  obituaries  NYT  journalists 
february 2015 by jerryking
David Carr, a Journalist at the Center of the Sweet Spot - NYTimes.com
By A. O. SCOTTFEB. 13, 2015

David’s public contribution to the profession — his columns and feature stories, his interviews and investigations — is part of the record, and part of the glory of this newspaper. He covered every corner of the media business (including, sometimes, his own employer) with analytical acumen, ethical rigor and gumshoe tenacity.

He managed to see the complexities of digital-age journalism from every angle, and to write about it with unparalleled clarity and wit.

....“What else?” was the question that would punctuate every conversation with him. What were you working on? What did you think of this or that political event, show-business caper or piece of office gossip? How was your family? What were you thinking? This was sincere, friendly curiosity, the expression of a naturally gregarious temperament. But it was also the operation of a tireless journalistic instinct. David was always hungry for stories. He was a collector of personalities and anecdotes, a shrewd and compassionate judge of character. A warrior for the truth.
David_Carr  journalists  journalism  tributes  business_acumen  obituaries  digital_media  NYT  newspapers  curiosity  questions  memoirists  anecdotal 
february 2015 by jerryking
Kelly: Sports scribes take themselves seriously at their own peril - The Globe and Mail
CATHAL KELLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jul. 28 2014

Hitchens was a very good writer, but he was a truly great debater. He thought in logical arcs. He was ruthless. Most of all, he was preternaturally articulate.

Regardless of whether you were his target, it was very nearly a physical pleasure listening to him talk....There is a species of this debate that can be fun to take part in or listen to. Reasoned, friendly, inflected with humour and – crucially – the knowledge that none of this is actually very important. A good sports argument is the sort you have with a friend and, eventually, agree to disagree over.

A while ago, someone on the broadcast side of this business asked me how I would change sports radio if I could. I said I’d make it a little more thoughtful and a lot less angry. I think I mentioned This American Life. He looked at me with the sad solicitousness we reserve for the simple-minded....This is the ne plus ultra of where we’ve been heading – a culture of sports argumentation so divisive and compulsively contrarian, it no longer has anything to do with sports. It has no idea what it’s about. Its only requirements are brute force and volume.
agreeably_disagree  Christopher_Hitchens  sports  journalists  journalism  Cathal_Kelly  disagreements  argumentation  divisiveness  sports_journalism 
july 2014 by jerryking
Between Barack Obama and the Press - Robert Gibbs - Profile - NYTimes.com
By MARK LEIBOVICH
Published: December 17, 2008

Gibbs is not shy about nagging Obama or inflicting tough-love feedback. Early in the campaign, Obama was averse to making courtesy calls to local officials. He was not great about “calling the former state rep in Wapello County for the fourth time,” Plouffe said. So Gibbs took it upon himself to make sure a certain number of calls got done every day. He could be very insistent. “You said you were going to do 35 calls today,” Gibbs would tell Obama, according to Plouffe. “Eventually he just did them.”
Obama  Robert_Gibbs  journalists  Communicating_&_Connecting  Campaign_2008  retail_politics  tough_love 
september 2013 by jerryking
Inside the D.C. bubble – stupid, slimy, savvy
Aug. 10 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by Konrad Yakabuski.

Mark Leibovich’s This Town betrays just about everything despicable about Washington’s political culture.

Politico’s business model lies not in pursuing high-minded Watergate-style journalism or even beating the Post in circulation or unique Web visitors. Fewer than 40,000 copies of its free print edition are distributed on the streets of Washington. Its content is aimed squarely at “The Club.”

In a new insider account of Washington, Mark Leibovich explains how The Club consists of the “spinning cabal of people in politics and media and the supporting sectors that never get voted out or term-limited or, God forbid, decide on their own that it is time to return home to the farm.”

The journalists, lobbyists, political consultants, White House aides, Capitol Hill staffers, socialites and persons-of-no-fixed-profession Mr. Leibovich profiles in This Town embody just about everything despicable about the D.C. bubble.....Playbook is the daily D.C. cheat sheet. Compiled by Politico’s Mike Allen, it summarizes the top news stories, parties, lobbying and book deals, staff changes, birthdays and nuptials of interest to The Club. And no one solicits mentions in Playbook – whose main corporate sponsor of late has been Keystone XL pipeline proponent TransCanada – as covetously as Robert Barnett.
Washington_D.C.  WaPo  Konrad_Yakabuski  sophisticated  start_ups  newspapers  business_models  politics  journalists  lobbyists  political_consultants  political_culture  books  Inside_the_Beltway  White_House  market_intelligence  newsstand_circulation  playbooks 
august 2013 by jerryking
On Anthony Lewis (1927–2013)
May 9, 2013 | The New York Review of Books| by David Cole.
obituaries  journalists  lawyers 
may 2013 by jerryking
Editor Neil Reynolds fought for free speech and liberty - The Globe and Mail
GEORGE FETHERLING


Special to The Globe and Mail

Published
Tuesday, May. 21 2013,
obituaries  journalists  newspapers 
may 2013 by jerryking
Anthony Lewis, Who Transformed Coverage of the Supreme Court, Dies at 85 - NYTimes.com
By ADAM LIPTAK
Published: March 25, 2013

“Gideon’s Trumpet,”
“Portrait of a Decade: The Second American Revolution,” about the civil rights movement.
“Make No Law,”
obituaries  NYT  U.S._Supreme_Court  journalists  books  editorials  writers 
march 2013 by jerryking
3 global revolutions that make it tough for states and corporations to stay on top
Mar. 16 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Kate Taylor.

Journalist and scholar Moises Naim argues that three global revolutions are eroding traditional bastions of political, economic and social power in his new book, The End of Power: From Boardrooms to Battlefields and Churches to States, Why Being In Charge Isn’t What It Used to Be. Together, he says, the three shifts are making it easier to gain power but more difficult to use and maintain it....

The “more revolution” – there are more of us, and we have more resources – overwhelms power. The “mobility revolution” circumvents power by moving people and information further and faster. And the “mentality revolution” undermines it by making people less deferential....Governments are hobbled giants where you have a lot of political actors who have just enough power to block, but no one has the power to move forward. The American “fiscal cliff” and the sequester, climate change – you see everyone worried but incapable of acting. The massacre in Syria continues but no one seems to have the power to do anything. Or the European economic crisis, we have a situation where no one has the power to contain it.
books  multinationals  constraints  Moises_Naim  think_threes  political_power  journalists  power_to_obstruct  gridlocked_politics 
march 2013 by jerryking
How to Pitch a Story to a Reporter (Without Being Annoying)
11 December 2012 | | Communication Breakdown | by Matt Shipman.
howto  pitches  journalists 
february 2013 by jerryking
Listen to the heartbeat, not the elite
June 21, 1991 | The Globe & Mail | Sylvia Stead.

From the spring issue of Glory, a magazine that focuses on the achievements of black Canadians, comes this editorial: “If we want to change the message, we must change the messenger . . . Simply put, there are far too few visible minorities in the media today. Students and career seekers must seriously consider journalism as a career option. Otherwise, we will be excluded from decision-making positions in . . . the media. Some might argue that newsrooms discriminate against Blacks getting jobs in the media. But I believe the onus is also squarely on us. When I was in journalism school in Edmonton, there were just two Black students out of 40 in my class. And
the other Black student dropped out at mid-semester. Journalism is a very noble profession with enormous possibilities for career satisfaction.
journalism  journalists  African_Canadians  under-representation  career_paths 
december 2012 by jerryking
A Tribute to Hugh Cholmondeley
Aug.13,2012 | RJR News - Jamaican News Online | Sir Ron Sanders.
tributes  obituaries  Afro-Guyanese  journalists  radio 
august 2012 by jerryking
The ‘new cold war’ is an information war -
Aug. 25 2012 | The Globe and Mail | Anne-Marie Slaughter.
In the many manifestations of the ongoing and growing information war(s), the pro-freedom-of-information forces need a new weapon. A government’s banning of journalists or blocking of news and social-media sites that were previously allowed should be regarded as an early warning sign of a crisis meriting international scrutiny. The presumption should be that governments with nothing to hide have nothing to lose by allowing their citizens and internationally recognized media to report on their actions.

To give this presumption teeth, it should be included in international trade and investment agreements. Imagine if the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and regional development banks suspended financing as soon as a government pulled down an information curtain. Suppose foreign investors wrote contracts providing that the expulsion and banning of foreign journalists or widespread blocking of access to international news sources and social media constituted a sign of political risk sufficient to suspend investor obligations.

Americans say that sunlight is the best disinfectant. Citizens’ access to information is an essential tool to hold governments accountable. Government efforts to manipulate or block information should be presumed to be an abuse of power – one intended to mask many other abuses.
accountability  information_flows  information  journalists  censorship  political_risk  warning_signs  freedom_of_information  information_warfare  IMF  World_Bank  Anne-Marie_Slaughter  presumptions  transparency 
august 2012 by jerryking
History Doesn't Follow the Rules
200X | TIME | Jeff Greenfield
The world can change in a day, all right, but not always the way we think it will. LOOKING FOR A LESSON IN HUMILITY? STAND AT A MAJOR historical marker, and try drawing a perfectly reasonable, prudent conclusion about where that marker is pointing.

...revised views of history are what keep successive generations of historians in business, continuously updating where the latest dominoes have fallen. Eighty years from now, scholars will still be debating the meaning of what happened 80—or even 800—years ago. We journalists like to say that journalism is the first rough draft of history—a mere acknowledgment, perhaps that there is a Higher Authority in whose hands rests the final draft.
history  unpredictability  humility  seminal_moments  historians  worthiness  journalists  journalism 
august 2012 by jerryking
All he is saying is give war a chance: Democracy and world peace are really not such great ideas. Just ask author Robert Kaplan
11 Mar 2000| National Post pg B5 |Alexander Rose.

Whatever else journalist Robert D. Kaplan picked up during his sojourn in the Great Back of Beyond, it wasn't universal love, touch-feely harmony and a We-Are-The-World attitude. In this newspaper last weekend, reviewing The Coming Anarchy -- a collection of his recent assays he was in Canada to promote this week — Misha Glenny aptly remarked: "If you want to feel uplifted about the human condition, you should steer clear of Kaplan's work as a general rule." An example; The way to make this world a better place Kaplan casually proposes in his new collection of essays (named after his famous 1994 article in The Atlantic Monthly predicting cultural clashes, tribal and widespread environmental meltdown), is for Congress to reauthorize assassination as a political instrument to grasp that democracy is not suitable for everyone; and that world peace would actually make war likelier.

"I've spent a great deal of my life covering wars," he says. Moreover, "unlike a lot of journalists, I read -- I read a lot, a lot of history, a lot of philosophy.

Look at Livy (the ancient Roman historian)...'Drew him to classical philosophy. ''If you read the ancient Chinese, or Cicero, Machiavelli or Herodotus, these a strain running through them - which is that if you always think about might go wrong, things might start going right and you can avoid tragedy.'' Thus, ''tragedy is avoidable if you always maintain a sense of it.''

The problem, however, is that "the times we live in are so prosperous for us that it's hard to think tragically." And, most alarmingly, "Revolutions and upheavals happen when things are getting better, not worse."

...When Mr. Kaplan speaks of "realists" he is describing the Hobbesian view that man has a rapacious, brutal, selfish nature. On the world stage, this translates as furiously competing sovereign states battling over their respective interests, many of which are intractable. Realists therefore believe eternal and armed vigilance, not highfalutin UN declarations, are the key to ensuring "human security". ...Kaplan believes that there are three strands of "realism" battle for supremacy...."You don't have to believe in global warming, but we're entering a world in which there will be six billion of us and you have to realize that there are now enough of us living in urbanized conditions that we're occupying zones which are climatically and tectonically fragile. "Now, we've got 70% of the Chinese population producing two-thirds of the industrial output living in flood zones. Forget about Mozambique -- that's a sideshow."...So what advice would he give our Department of Foreign Affairs so that Canada could punch above its weight in the world?

Says Kaplan, without skipping a beat: "It's hard for a country of 30 million to have a pivotal impact. So the way to do it is to get behind an idea everyone knows is smart but nobody has the time or the inclination to push."

Is Foreign Affairs Minister Lloyd Axworthy's position on human rights and human security one such "smart idea"? Mr. Kaplan gives it short shrift (actually, no shrift at all). "It's far too flaccid and formless to be taken seriously because all he's really stating is a kind of easy truth. Tough truths, on the other hand, are things like when and where you intervene and under what circumstances.

"So, I would say Canada needs to go on fast forward to a Global Constabulary Force. NATO, with all its problems, worked well in Kosovo and Bosnia. So, we [i.e., Canada] will create an out-of-area military branch of NATO with some non-European members -- such as Japan, Australia, India, Brazil -- to form the core of the GCF." Then "we'll have a wider range of options during the next Rwanda, or next time something happens in a place with no strategic interest to anyone but where there's an overwhelming sense that we should 'do something.' But just talking about human security ... The minute you have something that everyone agrees with you know it's useless."

A lesson from the master himself.
Robert_Kaplan  journalists  realism  realpolitik  political_theory  floodplains  history  worst-case  Niccolò_Machiavelli  middle-powers  thinking_tragically  human_rights  human_security  Romans  Greek  the_human_condition  punch-above-its-weight  world_stage 
july 2012 by jerryking
What's Next for Newsmagazines? - WSJ.com
April 4, 2008 | WSJ | By REBECCA DANA.
Fading Publications Try to Reinvent Themselves Yet Again

"Like any managers anywhere, we looked at a revenue picture that could be more thrilling and said, 'How can we accomplish two or three things?,' " Mr. Meacham said in an interview. " 'How can we control costs? How can we have money to rebuild and hire new voices and new reporting talent? And how can we do that in the service of what we've been trying to do with the magazine of the last year-and-a-half, which is make it more serious and try to make ourselves indispensable to the conversation?' "....."My whole view was there's more information out there than any time in human history. What people don't need more of is information," Mr. Stengel said. "They need a guide through the chaos."..."What's happened in the business as a whole is talk is cheap and reporting is expensive," said Newsweek writer Jonathan Alter, a 25-year veteran at the magazine who qualified for the buyout but declined it. But he adds, some of the change in culture is welcome. "In general, the office politics are at a much lower volume than in the past because the old fight of space is different than it was. If there's not room in the magazine for something, you can just do it online," he said.....At a recent speech at Columbia University, Mr. Meacham delivered a blistering response after he asked who reads Newsweek and none of the 100-odd students in attendance raised their hands.

"It's an incredible frustration that I've got some of the most decent, hard-working, honest, passionate, straight-shooting, non-ideological people who just want to tell the damn truth, and how to get this past this image that we're just middlebrow, you know, a magazine that your grandparents get, or something, that's the challenge," Mr. Meacham said. "And I just don't know how to do it, so if you've got any ideas, tell me."
chaos  commoditization_of_information  cost-controls  cost-cutting  curation  indispensable  information_overload  Jon_Meacham  journalists  journalism  magazines  multiple_targets  newsstand_circulation  office_politics  print_journalism  questions  reinvention  talent_acquisition  think_threes 
june 2012 by jerryking
A First Draft of History? - WSJ.com
March 12, 2005 | WSJ | By BRET STEPHENS

The cliché is that journalism is the first draft of history. Yet a historian searching for clues about the origins of many of the great stories of recent decades--the collapse of the Soviet empire; the rise of Osama bin Laden; the declining American crime rate; the economic eclipse of Japan and Germany--would find most contemporary journalism useless. Perhaps a story here or there might, in retrospect, seem illuminating. But chances are it would have been nearly invisible at the time of publication: eight column inches, page A12.

The problem is not that journalists can't get their facts straight: They can and usually do. Nor is it that the facts are obscure: Often, the most essential facts are also the most obvious ones. The problem is that journalists have a difficult time distinguishing significant facts--facts with consequences--from insignificant ones. That, in turn, comes from not thinking very hard about just which stories are most worth telling....As for the media, it shouldn't be too difficult to do better. Look for the countervailing data. Broaden your list of sources. Beware of exoticizing your subject:
Bret_Stephens  journalism  journalists  critical_thinking  history  signals  noise  frictions  pain_points  worthiness  countervailing  storytelling  seminal_moments  wide-framing  discernment  origin_story  historians  consequential  clichés  worthwhile_problems 
may 2012 by jerryking
Crovitz: Before 'Watergate' Could be Googled - WSJ.com
April 17, 2012 | WSJ | By L. GORDON CROVITZ.
Before 'Watergate' Could be Googled
The Internet is no substitute for hands-on reporting.

"Watergate 4.0: How Would the Story Unfold in the Digital Age?" Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein gave their assessment at the annual American Society of News Editors conference this month by referring to how Yale students answer a similar question assigned in an advanced journalism class.

Mr. Woodward said he was shocked by how otherwise savvy students thought technology would have changed everything....Bob Woodward contrasted the reporting goal of "advancing the story and providing new information" with using the Web to find or distribute already-known facts.

He also doubted that "tweeting and blogging would have created an immediate avalanche of public opinion." It took more than two years between the Watergate break-in and Richard Nixon's resignation, including special prosecutors, Senate hearings and a Supreme Court order to the White House to turn over secret tapes.

Mr. Woodward concludes that the Internet is "not that magic and it doesn't always shine that bright." It's a great tool for research, including for linking data that before might have been public but was hard to put together.


Like this columnist
Watergate  scandals  scuttlebutt  due_diligence  journalists  hands-on  legwork  journalism  Bob_Woodward  Carl_Bernstein  digital_media  public_opinion  Yale  Colleges_&_Universities  investigative_journalism  students  technology  digital_savvy 
april 2012 by jerryking
Agri 007
Jim Romahn is a Journalist who has been reporting on agriculture since 1963; winner of more than 100 awards, including two Govenor- General Awards for Public Service in Journalism.
agriculture  blogs  agribusiness  journalists  farming 
april 2012 by jerryking
13 simple journalist techniques for effective interviews | Matador Network
13 simple journalist techniques for effective interviews
By Sarah Stuteville On March 26, 2007
journalists  questions  interviews 
april 2012 by jerryking
Dorothy Townsend dies at 88; L.A. Times city room's first female reporter - Los Angeles Times
http://www.cbc.ca/video/news/audioplayer.html?clipid=2213904035
Dorothy Townsend dies at 88; L.A. Times reporter broke newsroom barrier
Dorothy Townsend insisted on being transferred from the Women section to cover local news. She was on the team that won the Los Angeles Times a Pulitzer Prize for coverage of the Watts riots.

Pat Morrison's impressions

She took advantage of LA Watts riots to get assigned to better, more challenging reporting assignments...when women go out to a tell a story that men have been covering before.there's a sense that you're going to get different take.expect that they are going to bring you a different perspective.

She made stories that might not have been front page stories into front page stories. Meat prices going up.

Dorothy Townsend with fellow members of the Los Angeles Times team that won a 1966 Pulitzer Prize for coverage of the Watts riots. Bill Thomas, who oversaw the coverage, is at center left with hands clasped.

Dorothy Townsend with fellow members of the Los Angeles Times team that… (Los Angeles Times)
March 21, 2012|By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
journalists  obituaries  women  Pulitzer_Prize 
march 2012 by jerryking
Remembering Colin Rickards
February 27, 2012 | Stabroek News | Alissa Trotz & Ron Fanfair.
Alissa_Trotz  Ron_Fanfair  obituaries  Caribbean  journalists 
march 2012 by jerryking
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