jerryking + infographics   75

Meet Amanda Cox, Who Brings Life to Data on Our Pages
Feb. 28, 2019 | The New York Times | By Jake Lucas

Ms. Cox was stepping into a new role: data editor. She will help coordinate data work across departments, in interactive news, computer-assisted reporting, graphics and The Upshot, and pave the way for journalism using data to play a bigger role throughout the newsroom. She will also act as an adviser when big questions arise about how to think about and use data thoughtfully, without overstating what it supports.
charts  Communicating_&_Connecting  data  data_journalism  infographics  NYT  quantitative  visualization 
march 2019 by jerryking
Dump the PowerPoints and do data properly — or lose money
APRIL 15, 2018 | FT| Alan Smith.

So what can data analysts in organisations do to get their messages heard?

Board members and senior managers certainly need to consider new ways of thinking that give primacy to data. But reasoning with data requires what psychologist Daniel Kahneman describes as “System 2 thinking” — the rational, reasoning self — and a move away from the “gut intuition” of System 1. That’s not an easy culture change to achieve overnight.

Freelance consultant, author and data visualisation expert Andy Kirk believes there is a duty of care on both analysts and their audiences to develop skills, particularly in relation to how data is communicated through an organisation.......many senior managers “neither have the visual literacy nor the confidence to be exposed to [data presentations] they don't understand — and they just don't like change”. Mr Kirk describes it as a kind of “Stockholm syndrome” in data form — “I’ve always had my report designed like this, I don't want anything different”.......data analysts need to nurture their communication skills, taking a responsibility for encouraging change and critical thinking, not just being “the data people”. Acting as agents of change, they need to be effective marketers of their skills and sensitive educators that show a nuanced appreciation of the needs of the business. Organisations that bind data to the business model — and data literacy to the board — will inevitably stand a better chance of achieving long-term change.....The truth is that data in the boardroom enjoys a patchy reputation, typified by dull, overlong PowerPoint presentations. A cynic might suggest that even the most recent addition to boardroom structures — the chief data officer — is used by many boards simply as a device to prevent other members needing to worry about the numbers.

Here are 3 techniques that can be used to encourage progressive change in the boardroom.
(1) Use KPIs that are meaningful and appropriate for answering the central questions about the business and the market it operates in. Try to eliminate “inertia metrics” — i.e. “we report this because we always do”.

(2) Rework boardroom materials so that they encourage board members to read data, preferably in advance of meetings, rather than glance at it during one. This might mean transforming the dreaded PowerPoint deck into something a little more journalistic, a move that will help engage “System 2” thinking.

(3) Above all, be aware of unconscious bias in the boardroom and focus on debunking it. Most of us are poor intuitive statisticians with biases that lurk deep in our “System 1” view of the world. There is insight, value and memorability in the surprise that comes with highlighting our own ignorance — so use data to shine a light on surprising trends, not to simply reinforce that which is already known.
absenteeism  boards_&_directors_&_governance  change  change_agents  Communicating_&_Connecting  Daniel_Kahneman  data  data_driven  gut_feelings  infographics  insights  KPIs  PowerPoint  psychologists  storytelling  surprises  visualization 
april 2018 by jerryking
Whites Have Huge Wealth Edge Over Blacks (but Don’t Know It) - The New York Times
By EMILY BADGER SEPT. 18, 2017

Americans believe that blacks and whites are more equal today than they truly are on measures of income, wealth, wages and health benefits. And they believe more historical progress has occurred than is the case, suggesting “a profound misperception of and unfounded optimism” regarding racial equality......we also overgeneralize from other markers of racial progress: the election of a black president, the passage of civil rights laws, the sea change in public opinion around issues like segregation. If society has progressed in these ways, we assume there’s been great economic progress, too.

We’re inclined, as well, to believe that society is fairer than it really is. The reality that it’s not — that even college-educated black workers earn about 20 percent less than college-educated white ones, for example — is uncomfortable for both blacks who’ve been harmed by that unfairness and whites who’ve benefited from it......If we want people to have a better understanding of racial inequality, this implies that the solution isn’t simply to parrot these statistics more widely. It’s to get Americans thinking more about the forces that underlie them, like continued discrimination in hiring, or disparities in mortgage lending.

It’s a myth that racial progress is inevitable, Ms. Richeson said. “But it’s also dangerous insofar as it keeps us blind to considerable inequality in our nation that’s quite foundational,” she said. “Of course we can’t address it if we’re not even willing to acknowledge it.”

And if we’re not willing to acknowledge it, she adds, that has direct consequences for whether Americans are willing to support affirmative action policies, or continued enforcement of the Voting Rights Act, or renewed efforts at school desegregation......
achievement_gaps  generational_wealth  misperceptions  African-Americans  optimism  whites  racial_disparities  infographics  white_privilege 
september 2017 by jerryking
40 Acres and a Mule Would Be at Least $6.4 Trillion Today—What the U.S. Really Owes Black America by Tracy Loeffelholz Dunn and Jeff Neumann — YES! Magazine
Slavery made America wealthy, and racist policies since have blocked African American wealth-building. Can we calculate the economic damage?

Tracy Loeffelholz DunnJeff Neumann posted May 14, 2015
reparations  race  slavery  African-Americans  generational_wealth  racism  racial_disparities  infographics 
march 2017 by jerryking
Edward Tufte: Courses
"Edward Tufte's one-day course on "Presenting Data and Information" is the best value-for-money that you can spend if you are involved in any way in presentation of information to users. When I receive this new schedule of these courses each year I get to thinking whom do I know whose career might change for the better if they take this course. I've taken it twice (the content is always up to date with the latest examples of both good and bad information design). Every attendee gets copies of Tufte's four major works on visual display of information. Tufte offers a group discount so your company can send a whole department or product team. And there's a steep discount for full-time students, faculty members, and postdocs.
training  design  classes  Edward_Tufte  presentations  data  infographics  visualization 
january 2017 by jerryking
How the Democrats Can Avoid Going Down in the 2014 Midterm Election
APRIL 27, 2014 | New Republic | By Sasha Issenberg.

How the Democrats Can Avoid Going Down This November
The new science of Democratic survival.
Democrats  elections  midterms  infographics  Newt_Gingrich 
august 2014 by jerryking
A Makeover for Maps - NYTimes.com
January 6, 2014| NYT | By QUENTIN HARDY.

Eric Rodenbeck is rethinking how data is presented.

“It doesn’t work if it’s not moving,” said Mr. Rodenbeck, the head of Stamen Design, a San Francisco studio that Google, Facebook and Microsoft have all used for help in turning fast-paced digital information into easily understood images. “It doesn’t work if you can’t touch it.”....Nowadays, devices and people are unceasingly uploading all kinds of information about the economy, locations, weather and even what sweater makes them happy. With this flood of data, some believe traditional ways of displaying information do not work well anymore. So there is a demand for Mr. Rodenbeck’s sort of creative thinking about the humble pie chart....charts of fast-changing data reports can provide a clearer idea of the information gathered. The animated changes may be shapes on a map growing and shrinking, colors of bar charts changing or positions of lines rising or fading.
animation  charts  ClearStory  Communicating_&_Connecting  data  design  fast-changing  fast-paced  GE  infographics  mapping  visualization 
january 2014 by jerryking
Advice to Start-ups: Stack the Deck | Inc.com
October 2013 | Inc. Magazine | BY Eric Paley.

As for entrepreneurs, my advice is to discourage your team from writing prose whenever possible. If you want to tell a story, tell it in a compelling and concise narrative slide deck
Communicating_&_Connecting  presentations  howto  start_ups  visualization  infographics  concision  storytelling 
october 2013 by jerryking
Working With Big Data: The New Math - WSJ.com
March 8, 2013| WSJ | By DEBORAH GAGE.

Researchers turn to esoteric mathematics to help make sense of it all.

New views [of old data are arriving] came courtesy of software that uses topology, a branch of math that compresses relationships in complex data into shapes researchers can manipulate and probe....

Better Tools
Seeking better tools than traditional statistical methods to analyze the vast amounts of data newly available to companies and organizations, researchers increasingly are scouring scientific papers and esoteric branches of mathematics like topology to make sense of complex data sets. The developer of the software used by Dr. Lum, Ayasdi, is just one of a small but growing number of companies working in this field.

So much data is now available, in such vast scope and minute detail, it is no longer useful to look at numbers neatly laid out in two-dimensional columns and rows,.....The research that inspired Ayasdi was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or Darpa, and the National Science Foundation.......Data is so complex that using the same old methods, asking the same old questions, doesn't make sense....What is useful, he says, is to look at data arranged in shapes, using topology.

Topology is a form of geometry that relies on the way humans perceive shapes. We can see that an A is an A even when the letters are squashed or written in different fonts. Topology helps researchers look at a set of data and think about its similarities, even when some of the underlying details may be different....But topology is just one of the new methods being explored. Chris Kemp, former chief technology officer for IT at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and now the chief executive of cloud computing company Nebula Inc., says he expects to see a renaissance in advanced mathematics and algorithms as companies increasingly realize how valuable data is and how cheaply they can store it.......Using graph theory, a tool similar to topology, IBM is mapping interactions of people on social networks, including its own. In diagrams based on the communications traffic, each person is a node, and communications between people are links. Graph-theory algorithms help discover the shortest path between the nodes, and thus reveal social cliques—or subcommunities—which show up because the cliques are more tightly interconnected than the community around them.......Tellagence's algorithms, for example, predicts how information will travel as it moves through social networks, but assumes that the network will change constantly, like the weather, and that what's most important about the data is the context in which it appears.

These techniques helped Tellagence do a bit of detective work for a Silicon Valley company that wanted to track down the source of some influential ideas being discussed online about the kind of integrated circuits it makes, known as field programmable gate arrays. Tellagence identified a group of more than 100 Japanese engineers involved in online discussions about the circuits. It then pinpointed two or three people whom traffic patterns showed were at the center of the conversation.

Tellagence's customer then devised a strategy to approach the engineers and potentially benefit from their ideas.

Says Tellagence CEO Matt Hixson, "We love to talk about people who have followers or friends, but these engineers were none of that—they had the right set of relationships because the right people listened to them."
algorithms  Ayasdi  DARPA  esoteric  IBM  infographics  massive_data_sets  mapping  mathematics  Nebula  networks  patterns  sense-making  Tellagence  the_right_people  tools  topology  visualization 
march 2013 by jerryking
Profile of the Data Journalist: The Storyteller and The Teacher
Around the globe, the bond between data and journalism is growing stronger. In an age of big data, the growing importance of data journalism lies in the ability of its practitioners to provide context, clarity and, perhaps most important, find truth in the expanding amount of digital content in the world. In that context, data journalism has profound importance for society.

To learn more about the people who are doing this work and, in some cases, building the newsroom stack for the 21st century, I conducted in-person and email interviews during the 2012 NICAR Conference and published a series of data journalist profiles here at Radar.

Sarah Cohen (@sarahduke), the Knight professor of the practice of journalism and public policy at Duke University, and Anthony DeBarros (@AnthonyDB), the senior database editor at USA Today, were both important sources of historical perspective for my feature on how data journalism is evolving from "computer-assisted reporting" (CAR) to a powerful Web-enabled practice that uses cloud computing, machine learning and algorithms to make sense of unstructured data.

The latter halves of our interviews, which focused upon their personal and professional experience, follow.

What data journalism project are you the most proud of working on or creating?

DeBarros: "In 2006, my USA TODAY colleague Robert Davis and I built a database of 620 students killed on or near college campuses and mined it to show how freshmen were uniquely vulnerable. It was a heart-breaking but vitally important story to tell. We won the 2007 Missouri Lifestyle Journalism Awards for the piece, and followed it with an equally wrenching look at student deaths from fires."

Cohen: "I'd have to say the Pulitzer-winning series on child deaths in DC, in which we documented that children were dying in predictable circumstances after key mistakes by people who knew that their
agencies had specific flaws that could let them fall through the cracks.

I liked working on the Post's POTUS Tracker and Head Count. Those were Web projects that were geared at accumulating lots of little bits about Obama's schedule and his appointees, respectively, that we could share with our readers while simultaneously building an important dataset for use down the road. Some of the Post's Solyndra and related stories, I have heard, came partly from studying the president's trips in POTUS Tracker.

There was one story, called "Misplaced Trust," on DC's guardianship
system, that created immediate change in Superior Court, which was
gratifying. "Harvesting Cash," our 18-month project on farm subsidies, also helped point out important problems in that system.

The last one, I'll note, is a piece of a project I worked on,
in which the DC water authority refused to release the results of a
massive lead testing effort, which in turn had shown widespread
contamination. We got the survey from a source, but it was on paper.

After scanning, parsing, and geocoding, we sent out a team of reporters to
neighborhoods to spot check the data, and also do some reporting on the
neighborhoods. We ended up with a story about people who didn't know what
was near them.

We also had an interesting experience: the water
authority called our editor to complain that we were going to put all of
the addresses online -- they felt that it was violating peoples' privacy,
even though we weren't identifyng the owners or the residents. It was more
important to them that we keep people in the dark about their blocks. Our
editor at the time, Len Downie, said, "you're right. We shouldn't just put
it on the Web." He also ordered up a special section to put them all in
print.

Where do you turn to keep your skills updated or learn new things?

Cohen: "It's actually a little harder now that I'm out of the newsroom,
surprisingly. Before, I would just dive into learning something when I'd
heard it was possible and I wanted to use it to get to a story. Now I'm
less driven, and I have to force myself a little more. I'm hoping to start
doing more reporting again soon, and that the Reporters' Lab will help
there too.

Lately, I've been spending more time with people from other
disciplines to understand better what's possible, like machine learning
and speech recognition at Carnegie Mellon and MIT, or natural language
processing at Stanford. I can't DO them, but getting a chance to
understand what's out there is useful. NewsFoo, SparkCamp and NICAR are
the three places that had the best bang this year. I wish I could have
gone to Strata, even if I didn't understand it all."

DeBarros: For surveillance, I follow really smart people on Twitter and have several key Google Reader subscriptions.

To learn, I spend a lot of time training after work hours. I've really been pushing myself in the last couple of years to up my game and stay relevant, particularly by learning Python, Linux and web development. Then I bring it back to the office and use it for web scraping and app building.

Why are data journalism and "news apps" important, in the context of the contemporary digital environment for information?

Cohen: "I think anything that gets more leverage out of fewer people is
important in this age, because fewer people are working full time holding
government accountable. The news apps help get more eyes on what the
government is doing by getting more of what we work with and let them see
it. I also think it helps with credibility -- the 'show your work' ethos --
because it forces newsrooms to be more transparent with readers / viewers.

For instance, now, when I'm judging an investigative prize, I am quite
suspicious of any project that doesn't let you see each item, I.e., when
they say, "there were 300 cases that followed this pattern," I want to see
all 300 cases, or all cases with the 300 marked, so I can see whether I
agree.

DeBarros: "They're important because we're living in a data-driven culture. A data-savvy journalist can use the Twitter API or a spreadsheet to find news as readily as he or she can use the telephone to call a source. Not only that, we serve many readers who are accustomed to dealing with data every day -- accountants, educators, researchers, marketers. If we're going to capture their attention, we need to speak the language of data with authority. And they are smart enough to know whether we've done our research correctly or not.

As for news apps, they're important because -- when done right -- they can make large amounts of data easily understood and relevant to each person using them."

These interviews were edited and condensed for clarity.
Data  Gov_2.0  Publishing  dataproduct  datascience  nicarinterview  via:rahuldave  show_your_work  narratives  sense-making  unstructured_data  data_driven  data_journalism  visualization  infographics 
february 2013 by jerryking
Marketing: Why Data Visualization Is Important for a Brand | DigitalNext: A Blog on Emerging Media and Technology - Advertising Age
Oren Frank
Published: August 11, 2010

consider evolving your next brief to also answer the following questions:

Can data itself become an asset of my brand and a pillar to visually enhance our story?
Have we enhanced our product, or broke through communication barriers using DaViz?
Is there a new product idea for my brand which can stem from data visualization?
data  visualization  branding  data_driven  massive_data_sets  infographics 
february 2013 by jerryking
Hairball
Winter 2013 | | University of Toronto Magazine | | By Scott Anderson.
Hairball
visualization  networks  infographics 
january 2013 by jerryking
The Environmental Impact Of Wasted Food | Co.Exist: World changing ideas and innovation
October 2012 |Fast Company |Ben Schiller,
Ben Schiller is a staff writer for Co.Exist, and also contributes to the FT, and Yale e360.

An infographic from U.K. food industry magazine Next Generation Food that illustrates the environmental impact of wasted food...The infographic includes some remarkable statistics taken from a peer-reviewed study about food waste in the U.S. Waste has increased by about 50% since 1974, and now accounts for nearly 40% of all food produced in the U.S. Across the supply chain, we lose 1,400 kilocalories per head per day, or 150 trillion kilocalories each year (kilocalories are the "calories" you see on the back of food packs). Food waste accounts for a quarter of the freshwater supply, and 300 million gallons of oil a year. That’s a lot of wasted resources at a time of water shortages and higher gas prices. The U.S. consumed 6.9 billion barrels of oil last year, according to the Energy Information Administration. ...It wouldn’t be so bad if we did something with the waste other than throwing it in landfills, where it produces methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. Food accounts for 25% of methane produced from landfills, which emit 20% of methane overall.
food  waste  environment  infographics  visualization  statistics 
january 2013 by jerryking
Visual Analytics
static data - basic information about ports of entry such as locations, hours of operation, and phone numbers.
historical data - tracking vehicles entering Canada by type, length of stay and port of origin.
real-time data - border wait times, road conditions, weather alerts, Amber alerts, social media postings, information from video cameras at border points
visualization  massive_data_sets  CBSA  crossborder  data  borders  infographics  real-time 
december 2012 by jerryking
Seeing data in a whole new light
October 4, 2012 | MaRS News & Insights | MaRS | By Neha Khera
visualization  massive_data_sets  infographics 
october 2012 by jerryking
RARE EARTH ELEMENTS SET TO BECOME RARER
RARE EARTH ELEMENTS SET TO BECOME RARER

China's exports of rare earth elements fell 9.3 per cent in 2010, deepening fears among Western governments of a coming shortage of the highly sought-after metals. China produces 97 per cent of the world's supply of rare earths.
rare_earth_metals  scarcity  China  Geoffrey_York  infographics 
october 2012 by jerryking
The Art of Data Visualization | Marvels - WSJ.com
April 6, 2012, 6:36 p.m. ET

Making Data Beautiful
The most inspiring new art is visualized information

By HOLLY FINN
infographics  visualization  data 
april 2012 by jerryking
An Infographic about the Online Advertising Landscape
Sep.28, 2010 |in Online Advertising|by Terence Kawaja

An infographic about the internet advertising landscape has been created
by Terence Kawaja of LUMA Partners. The graphic is showing the
value-added chain of advertising starting with ad agencies and adserver
providers followed by various value added service providers like ad
optimization companies and ad exchanges to the end of the chain reaching
the audience. It is a nice overview illustrating both the market
participants and the processes within the online advertising market. You
may download the infographic here or access it by the following
article, which includes an interview with the creator.
advertising  value_chains  infographics  digital_media  ecosystems  competitive_landscape  online_advertising 
september 2011 by jerryking
Reinventing business research | timetric.com
Great research deserves to be presented well

If you're in the business of publishing research — whether you're making
it available for free to as wide an audience as possible, selling
subscriptions, or selling reports and datasets on a one-off basis —
Timetric can help you do it faster, cheaper and more effectively.

Faster: Timetric's library of public data, gallery of visualizations
and API let you get going right away.

Cheaper: Timetric's software-as-a-service; that means low (often
zero) setup cost and very competitive ongoing pricing. We're so
confident that Timetric will make you more effective that we're happy to
work on a revenue-share basis.

More effectively: There's a reason we're one of the ten best places
to see 'sexy' data online; not only do services built on Timetric look
(and work) great, because the graphs are sharable and social they get
into the media, bringing you more (and more engaged) readers.
DaaS  visualization  infographics  statistics  data  tools  charts  analytics  web  analysis  Freshbooks  value_propositions  JCK 
july 2011 by jerryking
The Art of Economic Complexity
May 11, 2011

A new way to visualize a country’s development.
By TIM HARFORD
Graphic by CÉSAR A. HIDALGO and ALEX SIMOES.

These diagrams are the early fruits of a new approach to the most important unsolved problem of the last century: how to make a rich country out of a poor one. Development economists have many theories about how the trick is done but few proven answers. A compelling solution would be useful closer to home, too: understanding the process of economic development would help us work out whether it matters that service jobs are replacing manufacturing ones or whether there is anything the government can and should do to stimulate new industries like biotechnology or green energy.......Economies produce "stuff," and if you want more stuff to come out of the process, put more stuff in (like human capital, say). Yet economies do not produce stuff so much as billions of distinct types of goods — perhaps 10 billion.....ranging from size 34 dark stonewash bootcut jeans to beauty therapies involving avocado. The difference between China's economy and that of the United States is not simply that China's is smaller; it has a different structure entirely......we can now visualize the differences between national economies in new ways....... think of economies as collections of "capabilities" that can be combined in different ways like an Erector set to produce different products. ...Economies that export many types of products are more likely to be sophisticated; products exported only by sophisticated economies are more likely to be complex. ............Products are closely connected on the underlying network if they tend to be exported by the same economies. .............At the fringes of the product space are development dead ends. Better-connected nodes represent industries that offer promising prospects for growth..........economies change in structure over time, moving from simpler goods to scarcer, more valuable ones. Countries rarely make radical structural changes. Instead, they generate capabilities gradually, and new industries usually develop from existing ones. Unfortunately, some industries — oil extraction, say, or fishing — do not naturally lead to anything new without a huge leap.
capabilities  complexity  data  digital_economy  economics  infographics  kaleidoscopic  Tim_Harford  visualization 
may 2011 by jerryking
Slipstream: When the Data Struts Its Stuff | Forex Mentor
April 2, 2011

They are computer scientists, statisticians, graphic designers,
producers and cartographers who map entire oceans of data and turn them
into innovative visual displays, like rich graphs and charts, that help
both companies and consumers cut through the clutter. These gurus of
visual analytics are making interactive data synonymous with attractive
data.

“Statistics,” says Dr. Hans Rosling, “is now the sexiest subject
around.” ...the goal of information visualization is not simply to
represent millions of bits of data as illustrations. It is to prompt
visceral comprehension, moments of insight that make viewers want to
learn more....“The purpose of visualization,” says Ben Shneiderman,
founding director of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory at the
University of Maryland, “is insight, not pictures.”
Hans_Rosling  visualization  infographics  data  information_overload  statistics  Freshbooks  data_scientists  insights 
april 2011 by jerryking
Obama signals new reliance on oil sands
Mar. 30, 2011| The Globe and Mail | SHAWN McCARTHY — GLOBAL ENERGY REPORTER,
energy  consumption  U.S.  infographics  oil_sands  Obama 
april 2011 by jerryking
Digital Humanities Boots Up on Some Campuses - NYTimes.com
March 21, 2011| NYT | By PATRICIA COHEN. Humanities courses
are being deeply influenced by a new array of powerful digital tools and
vast online archives allowing for the digital visualization of historic
library collections, allowing virtual re-creation of the historic
events .... examine how cyberspace reflects and shapes the portrayal of
minorities.

“Until you get Shakespeare on its feet, you’re doing it an injustice,”
Ms. Cook said. “The plays are in 3-D, not 2-D.”

Many teachers and administrators are only beginning to figure out the
contours of this emerging field of digital humanities, and how it should
be taught. In the classroom, however, digitally savvy undergraduates
are not just ready to adapt to the tools but also to explore how new
media may alter the very process of reading, interpretation and
analysis.
humanities  literature  William_Shakespeare  3-D  Colleges_&_Universities  tools  digital_media  visualization  infographics  liberal_arts  digital_archives  digital_humanities  digital_savvy 
march 2011 by jerryking
Link by Link - Advising Recovery Board on Offering Clear Data - NYTimes.com
March 21, 2010 | New York Times | By NOAM COHEN. It was just
announced that Mr. Tufte (pronounced tuff-TEE) would be going to
Washington. Though often cast as a free-floating information guru, Mr.
Tufte has a highly specific mission: on March 5, he was appointed by
President Obama to a panel to advise the Recovery Accountability and
Transparency Board, which monitors the way the $787 billion in the
stimulus package is being spent....Rather than define himself on the
conservative-liberal political continuum, Mr. Tufte, a professor
emeritus of political science, statistics and computer science at Yale,
said that he longed for cause-and-effect reasoning to take hold in
Washington.
Edward_Tufte  profile  design  websites  infographics  visualization 
march 2010 by jerryking
Show me;
Feb 27, 2010 | The Economist. Vol. 394, Iss. 8671; pg. 14 |
Anonymous. Displaying information can make a difference by enabling
people to understand complex matters and find creative solutions. In
recent years there have been big advances in displaying massive amounts
of data to make them easily accessible. This is emerging as a vibrant
and creative field melding the skills of computer science, statistics,
artistic design and storytelling. Today's infographics experts are
pioneering a new medium that presents meaty information in a compelling
narrative: "Something in-between the textbook and the novel", writes
Nathan Yau of UCLA in a recent book, "Beautiful Data". It's only natural
ProQuest  visualization  infographics  storytelling  Communicating_&_Connecting 
march 2010 by jerryking
Look out for well-informed shoppers in 2010
January 4, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | by Harvey Schachter.
Searching for stability; Reading the fine print; Maximum disclosure; The
devil wears packaging; Pay attention to emerging giants; Trickle-up
innovation; Retooling for an aging world; Life in real time;
Location-based everything; Visual fluency.
The continuing shift from words to images will accelerate. Communicators
across all sectors will need to find innovative visual ways to convey
information.
Harvey_Schachter  JWT  trends  location_based_services  aging  BRIC  luxury  visualization  infographics  Communicating_&_Connecting  jugaad  innovation  visual_culture  trickle-up  pay_attention 
january 2010 by jerryking
PearlTrees: Swing Between Related Content Like Tarzan | Design & Innovation
Dec 4, 2009 | Fast Company | BY Cliff Kuang. Social
bookmarking 2.0: The new tool lets you create network maps from your
links.
social_bookmarking  infographics  visualization  Cliff_Kuang  content 
december 2009 by jerryking
How Different Groups Spend Their Day - Interactive Graphic - NYTimes.com
July 31, 2009 | New York Times | By AMANDA COX, SHAN CARTER,
KEVIN QUEALY and AMY SCHOENFELD. The American Time Use Survey asks
thousands of American residents to recall every minute of a day. Here is
how people over age 15 spent their time in 2008.
time-management  time-based  infographics  visualization 
august 2009 by jerryking
Document View
Computer-savvy retailers plot your habits:; [National Edition]
Danny Bradbury. National Post. Don Mills, Ont.: Jun 10, 2005. pg. FP.7
GIS  retailers  data  infographics 
may 2009 by jerryking
The Napkin Sketch
Terrific article reinforcing the notion that the right picture
or image can convey concepts in a heartbeat whilst conveying emotion and
replace text.
sketches  visualization  information_overload  graphics  infographics  Communicating_&_Connecting 
march 2008 by jerryking

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