jerryking + influence   34

Canada must not be naive when dealing with China’s authoritarian regime
March 4, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by HUGH SEGAL, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Claws of the Panda, Jonathan Manthorpe’s new best-selling book, a meticulous and well-researched highly readable history of decades of Canada-China relations, is important because it's a primer on the central challenge of our era – how democracies address the scope and depth of an authoritarian wave now picking up momentum.....The Communist Party of China, its presumption of sovereignty not only at home, but also over ethnic Chinese worldwide, is not about to relinquish or dilute its central and presumptive power and control. It certainly won’t do this as a result of peaceful entreaties from middle powers, however respectful or well-meaning.....while the People’s Republic of China has every right to manage its internal affairs without interference, we also have the right to pursue our own national interest without undue Chinese influence......Manthorpe’s work clearly underlines is the economic, social and political equation at China’s core: Prosperity is the result of central control, focus and a clearly defined Communist Party and state-driven purpose. Qualities we hold as important – the right of dissent, democratic pluralism, freedom from fear – are seen by the Chinese government as weaknesses in our democratic societies to be exploited in the new great game of global trade and diplomatic competition.......Our challenge, in terms of diplomatic, trade and strategic policy, is with the Communist Party and the government and forces it controls, not with the Chinese people.........In assessing the intent of any global competitor, contextual awareness is one of the first requirements for tactical understanding and strategic planning. The revelations of Claws of the Panda offer a clear set of contextual conclusions for a well meaning middle power like Canada......We need new rules of the road.

Our engagement with China must set aside the temptations of presuming fair minded universal intent on the part of Chinese state-controlled instruments, economic, diplomatic or military. We must be more focused on the protection of our own security and freedoms from Chinese subversion, including the freedoms of our fellow Canadians of Chinese extraction. Countries that wish access to our resources, technology and investment on normative terms do not get to launch cyber attacks against us, from military and intelligence units controlled by the state. We must invest more with our allies in counter-intelligence and joint naval, air and cyber capacity in the Asian Pacific, not to threaten China’s legitimate regional dominance, or peaceful global economic aspirations, but to preclude illegitimate adventurism which a Chinese communist authoritarian regime might well pursue if costs and risks to them are unclear.
====================================================================
Claws of the Panda gives a detailed description of the CCP's campaign to embed agents of influence in Canadian business, politics, media and academia. The party's aims are to be able to turn Canadian public policy to China's advantage, to acquire useful technology and intellectual property, to influence Canada's international diplomacy, and, most important, to be able to monitor and intimidate Chinese Canadians and others it considers dissidents.
authoritarian  alliances  Asia_Pacific  authoritarianism  books  Canada  Canada-China_relations  centralized_control  China  China_rising  Chinese  Chinese-Canadians  Chinese_Communist_Party  counterintelligence  cyberattacks  economic_protectionism  history  Hugh_Segal  maritime  mercantilism  middle-powers  naivete  new_rules  primers  rules_of_the_game  situational_awareness  worldviews  influence  influence_peddling  intimidation  security_&_intelligence 
march 2019 by jerryking
US abdication in Africa hands political opportunities to China
Save to myFT
David Pilling 13 HOURS AGOAmerica’s shrinking influence in Africa, the second-largest continent geographically and epicentre of a gathering population explosion, did not begin under Mr Trump. The commitment of Barack Obama, his Kenyan roots notwithstanding, fell short of that shown by George W Bush, whose conversion to African causes — particularly the fight against HIV — made him a hero on the continent.

The sense of US withdrawal has accelerated with this administration. Mr Trump’s threat to cut the US aid budget by 30 per cent signals a massive scaling down of its commitment to a health and poverty-reduction agenda that has enjoyed bipartisan support in Washington for decades. A year into the US president’s administration, he is still without an ambassador to Pretoria or an assistant secretary of state for Africa. ....The US business relationship with Africa is almost exclusively extractive. Oil majors, such as Chevron and ExxonMobil, secretary of state Rex Tillerson’s old company, are the biggest investors....GE, Google and Citigroup are among a handful of non-extractives.....there are non-commercial reasons to think harder about Africa. By 2050, the number of Africans will have doubled to more than 2bn and may double again by the end of the century. Within a generation or so, Nigeria is expected to surpass the US to become the world’s third-most populous country.

The danger is that Africa will become home to a restless, jobless urban youth tempted to join the swelling flow of emigrants to Europe or prone to radicalisation at home. The persistence of Africa-based militant Islamist groups, from Boko Haram in north-east Nigeria to al-Shabaab in Somalia, is a worrying omen.

As the US presence fades, that of China — and, to a lesser extent, of India, Turkey and Morocco — has grown. China’s influence is everywhere: in roads, rail, telecoms, infrastructure and in Djibouti, in a naval base.
China  Africa  U.S.foreign_policy  South_Africa  Zimbabwe  China_rising  influence  epicenters  benign_neglect 
february 2018 by jerryking
Paying Professors: Inside Google’s Academic Influence Campaign - WSJ
By Brody Mullins and Jack Nicas

Paying for favorable academic research has long been a tool of influence by U.S. corporations in food, drug and oil industries. Scandals involving conflicts of interest in medical research have spurred many medical schools, scientific researchers and journals to require disclosure of corporate funding and to prohibit corporate sponsors from meddling with findings......Google’s strategic recruitment of like-minded professors is one of the tech industry’s most sophisticated programs, and includes funding of conferences and research by trade groups, think tanks and consulting firms, according to documents and interviews with academics and lobbyists.
Colleges_&_Universities  education  research  influence  lobbying  campaign  academic  professors 
july 2017 by jerryking
Russia Looks to Exploit White House ‘Turbulence,’ Analysts Say - The New York Times
FEB. 27, 2017 | The New York Times | By NEIL MacFARQUHAR.

The Kremlin, increasingly convinced that President Trump will not fundamentally change relations with Russia, is instead seeking to bolster its global influence by exploiting what it considers weakness in Washington, according to political advisers, diplomats, journalists and other analysts.

Russia has continued to test the United States on the military front, with fighter jets flying close to an American warship in the Black Sea this month and a Russian naval vessel steaming conspicuously in the Atlantic off the coast of Delaware.....“They are all telling each other that this is great, he created this turbulence inside, as we wanted, and now he is focused on his domestic problems and we have more freedom to maneuver,” Mr. Venediktov said. “Let them deal with their own problems. There, not in Ukraine. There, not in the Middle East. There, not in NATO. This is the state of mind right now.”...“The main hope is that the U.S. will be preoccupied with itself and will stop pressuring Russia.”....Any turbulence that Russia foments also gives the Kremlin leverage that it can try to trade in the global arena at a time when it does not have much that others want....Analysts say the Kremlin is keenly aware that the tactic of creating and exploiting disarray can become self-defeating, in that prolonged instability in the world order could allow threats like the extremist group Islamic State to flourish.....The Middle East provides examples of both vectors, analysts say, a moment of chaos to exploit and concerns about achieving stability for the long-term future.
Russia  White_House  Kremlin  Vladimir_Putin  chaos  power  influence  statecraft  rogue_actors  geopolitics  Ukraine  improvisation 
february 2017 by jerryking
One Firm Getting What It Wants in Washington: BlackRock - WSJ
By RYAN TRACY and SARAH KROUSE
Updated April 20, 2016

The Problem: BlackRock believed that the U.S. Federal Reserve was leaning towards designating it as a source of financial system risk, like other big banks, and as such, be “too big to fail”.

What Was At Stake: the designation “systemically important” would draw BlackRock in for greater oversight by the Federal Reserve which would mean tougher rules and potentially higher capital requirements from U.S. regulators.

The Solution: BlackRock didn't take any chances. The company began spending heavily on lobbying and engaging policymakers. Executives at the firm began preparing for greater federal scrutiny of their business in the months following the 2008 financial crisis. BlackRock aggressively prepared a counter-narrative upon discovered a Treasury Department’s Office of Financial Research report that asset-management firms and the funds they run were “vulnerable to shocks” and may engage in “herding” behavior that could amplify a shock to the financial system. The response took the form of a 40-plus-page paper rebutting the report. The firm suggested that instead of focusing on the size of a manager or fund, regulators should look at what specific practices, such as the use of leverage, might be the source of risks. While other money managers such as Fidelity and Vanguard sought to evade being labeled systemically important, BlackRock’s strategy stood out.
BlackRock  crony_capitalism  Washington_D.C.  risks  lobbying  too_big_to_fail  asset_management  advocacy  government_relations  influence  political_advocacy  policy  U.S._Federal_Reserve  systemic_risks  Communicating_&_Connecting  U.S.Treasury_Department  counternarratives  oversight  financial_system  leverage  debt  creating_valuable_content  think_differently  policymakers  policymaking 
april 2016 by jerryking
Dear MPs not picked for cabinet: Get over it - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 04, 2015 | The Globe and Mail | BARRY CAMPBELL.

The political arena is not for the meek. There is much to learn and some of that is hard: how to create distance between brain and mouth so you are not the subject of an unfortunate headline and a nasty call from the Prime Minister’s Office; how to make everyone still like you even when you couldn’t do much to help; and how to be patient knowing that you can’t fix everything. Victories may be few and small, but still worth it.

You will learn from your caucus colleagues (each of whom thinks he or she is as smart and deserving as you) and learn how to give credit when it is due and when to keep your own counsel. Learn how to live to fight another day, how to speak at caucus meetings and be noticed (humour helps) and how to be a partisan loyalist and a relentless self-promoter without losing your soul and the still be the person who came to Ottawa to serve their country.

My advice is this: Your power will come through how well you develop and manage relationships – with the cabinet, your colleagues, Hill staff, civil servants and even the opposition. Your lack of an official portfolio means that you can be more objective and provide cabinet ministers with an unvarnished perspective they’ll appreciate (mostly).

Pick both your battles and causes carefully. Most important, pick an issue and be its voice. Make it yours. (or...use your political_capital wisely)
advice  appointments  Justin_Trudeau  politics  politicians  serving_others  political_capital  wisdom  humility  self-promotion  self-starters  House_of_Commons  influence  PMO  relationships  speaking_up  the_Cabinet 
november 2015 by jerryking
The new game | The Economist
Oct 17th 2015 |

America still has resources other powers lack. Foremost is its web of alliances, including NATO. Whereas Mr Obama sometimes behaves as if alliances are transactional, they need solid foundations. America’s military power is unmatched, but it is hindered by pork-barrel politics and automatic cuts mandated by Congress. These spring from the biggest brake on American leadership: dysfunctional politics in Washington. That is not just a poor advertisement for democracy; it also stymies America’s interest. In the new game it is something that the United States—and the world—can ill afford.
U.S.foreign_policy  politics  China  Russia  gridlocked_politics  network_density  Vladimir_Putin  Syria  Asia_Pacific  South_China_Sea  networks  power  NATO  influence  superpowers  indispensable  international_system  transactional_relationships  alliances  Obama 
october 2015 by jerryking
The murky world of Chinese influence - The Globe and Mail
CHARLES BURTON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jun. 17, 2015

Indeed, it’s worth noting that Canadian officials and politicians who favour closer economic relations with China – playing down concerns about human rights, espionage, unfair trade practices, support for repressive Third World regimes and so on – have generally not been of Chinese origin. It’s troubling that many of these same people, after they leave politics, end up making serious money in China-related trade or lucrative China-related board of directors’ appointments. This most recently applies to Mr. Baird himself and very much so to his predecessor David Emerson, but also to former prime ministers, former Canadian ambassadors to China and many others, of all political stripes. Chinese money is seemingly welcomed almost everywhere in Canada, but it inevitably comes with strings attached: expectations of reciprocal “friendship” that lead back to the Chinese Communists and their ever-more influential global business conglomerates headquartered in Beijing.

This is not a reciprocal relationship. It is unlikely that there are many telephone calls going on between any of our consuls-general in China and influential Chinese political actors comparable in rank to our Michael Chan.

Canada could be managing these concerns much better. The Chinese money is there, but not the Canadian political will.
China  security_&_intelligence  influence  influence_peddling  intimidation  naivete  political_power  Chinese  politicians  CSIS  lobbying  revolving_door  Canada-China_relations  Charles_Burton 
june 2015 by jerryking
Want to land a big client? Here are four important tips - The Globe and Mail
MATTHIJS KEIJ
Young Entrepreneur Council
Published Tuesday, Aug. 12 2014

Study them

Landing a big client isn’t about you. Let me say that again: It is not about you.... remember that to succeed, you must help your client succeed. How do you do that? Study everything you can about the client until you fully understand the business, strategies and objectives.

Next, clearly define how your product or service will help the company achieve its goals. If you can identify a problem or isolate areas for improvement, then you can clearly illustrate your ability to provide a unique solution.

Make the connection. to land that enterprise client, try to identify your Norgay or Hillary. Talking to the wrong people wastes valuable time. However, if you can create a relationship with a strategic partner, that person can help get you in front of the right people and into the necessary meetings – all the more quickly than you could do on your own. Your target client is Mount Everest. Start climbing.
Gain influence

“An enterprise client needs to be convinced that working with your company is the best decision they could ever make,” says Karthik Manimozh, president and COO of 1-Page. “One of the most effective ways to help them arrive at this conclusion is to let your reputation precede you.”

The leadership, prestige and visibility that your company wields in the marketplace are all key factors that influence buying decisions. The answers your potential enterprise client seeks rest on your ability to shape your story. Good PR and marketing is the foundation. Strategic networking and social proof are pillars.

Remember, influence is something that comes with hard work...Be everywhere; talk with everyone (but ensure your conversations are informative and upbeat, never desperate).

Persevere through tough times

It can take months or even more than a year to land an enterprise client. Nothing worth having comes easy.

During that time, you’re bound to find yourself in countless meetings, possibly caught up in the middle of office politics, or jumping through hoops as the legal and procurement departments vet your company. Don’t dismay. This is par for the course when trying to land an enterprise client.
solutions  solution-finders  marketing  business_development  tips  indispensable  influence  networking  JCK  due_diligence  large_companies  perseverance  Communicating_&_Connecting  value_propositions  serving_others  strategic_thinking  client_development  hard_work  enterprise_clients  hard_times  office_politics  Michael_McDerment  the_right_people 
august 2014 by jerryking
China will keep spying. Canada must respond with skill, not rhetoric - The Globe and Mail
DAVID MULRONEY
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jul. 31 2014

China uses its long reach for objectives other than espionage. It feels free to confront any Canadian who shows undue interest in “sensitive” topics. Members of Parliaments, mayors, academics and community leaders have been bullied for displaying interest in the Dalai Lama, conditions in China’s restive Xinjiang region, or the plight of Falun Gong practitioners.

This is unacceptable, but here’s the hard part: we can expect more of the same. A rising but insecure China will not shrink from clandestine and downright unfriendly tactics to advance its interests.

We need to be clear-eyed in facing up to this. But we also need to recognize that our future prosperity, security and well-being depend on maintaining our own intelligently self-interested relationship with China.

So let’s start by banishing the rhetoric. China is not our best friend, any more than it is the sum of all fears. We do need to acknowledge and address the real threat China poses to our security.

Government needs to lead the way, but Canadian companies also need to step up their game. Enhanced security consciousness starts at the top. There are all too many anecdotes about security minded employees being over-ruled by senior executives who are worried about offending inquisitive Chinese visitors. That exquisite sensitivity is never reciprocated when it is the turn of the Chinese to host foreign guests....The one thing that we should avoid doing is closing doors to co-operation. Unfortunately, that’s already happening, and companies on both sides of the Pacific are paying a price. The Chinese media are portraying the U.S. technology sector as a major security threat. This makes it fair game for overly zealous regulators, and plays into the longstanding Chinese inclination to make life tougher for foreign firms. This week, investigators descended on Microsoft offices in China. Meanwhile the China operations of U.S.-based chip maker Qualcomm are also under review. Firms like Apple and Google have felt a similar chill.

Here in North America, China’s telecom giant Huawei is our bête noir, accused of being a proxy for the Chinese security apparatus. These allegations find a ready audience among a Canadian public that, as recent polling has shown, is increasingly wary of China.

It’s hard to argue against caution when it comes to China. But we’re jumping from naive acceptance to complete risk avoidance. There is an intermediate step – risk mitigation. Although its approach is not without controversy, the U.K. has opted for a partnership with Huawei that sees the Chinese company funding an inspection process in Britain designed to reduce security risks.

Complete risk avoidance, or shutting our door to China, comes at a cost that falls on consumers, on smaller companies seeking access to global markets, and on communities seeking investment....China is at the heart of changes that expose us to new levels of threat and uncertainty. We need to respond with skill, purpose and confidence. The only thing more dangerous than engaging China is not engaging it.
espionage  China  security_&_intelligence  Canada  risk-management  influence  influence_peddling  intimidation  purpose  self-confidence  frenemies  Huawei  threats  risk-aversion  uncertainty  risk-mitigation  security_consciousness  inquisitiveness  risk-avoidance  Canada-China_relations  cyberespionage  anecdotal 
july 2014 by jerryking
Josef Joffe: Dear Vladimir: Congratulations. You Read My Book - WSJ.com
By
Josef Joffe
March 6, 2014 | WSJ |

Be both ruthless and prudent—just what I prescribed in "The Prince." You Russians have distilled my wisdom into a pithy phrase: Kto kovo—who dominates whom? And you have beautifully executed my central idea. I never preached violence to the max, but the "economy of force"—how to get more with less. The Crimean caper was a masterpiece of smart power politics.

Grab opportunities when you saw them. First, you calculated the "correlation of forces," to use a Soviet term....Then, you assessed political geography correctly. The rule is never to take on a superior enemy like the West on his own turf. You test his mettle on his periphery...Next, factor in geography proper. Globally, the West is far superior to Russia, but regionally, you were the Man. You had the "interior lines," as the great Prussian strategist Carl von Clausewitz put it; the West was a thousand miles away. And your troops were already in place in Crimea—tanks, planes and all....Now to the balance of interests, a more subtle concept. The EU has been contesting you over Ukraine, but more as a confused afterthought. Your country had more compelling fish to fry: Ukraine as former Russian heartland plus an ethnic majority in Crimea, a strategic gem that Khrushchev had absentmindedly given away to Ukraine 60 years ago.

So you also held the psychological advantage that comes with having more skin in the game. Khrushchev blithely ignored the balance of interests in the Caribbean. Otherwise he would not have moved his missiles into Cuba in 1962, 90 miles off the U.S. coast.....Best of all, you are a true Machiavellian when it comes to the economy of violence. Just enough, never too much, and with minimal risks. So you didn't grab eastern Ukraine, which might have really riled the West and triggered a costly insurgency. You merely harvested the low-hanging fruit of Crimea, and with a fabulous profit. ....Here, my pupil, beckons the biggest payoff. You need not fear the democratic contagion of the Maidan spilling over into your own country. Not for a long time.

What a boost to your "street cred" in the rivalry of nations! With a small investment, you have amassed what Mr. Obama no longer has and what the Europeans lost long ago: a reputation for ruthlessness and the readiness to use force.

Power is when you don't have to wield it—when you don't have to threaten, let alone execute, to get your way.....We live in a split world. In Asia and Africa, mayhem is as present or possible as ever. Call this the "Damascus-Pyongyang Belt." Yet in the "Berlin-Berkeley Belt," force as a tool of statecraft has virtually disappeared....the U.S.—is now loath to resort to the ultima ratio. And that offers you wondrous opportunities. When the supply of force contracts, even a little bit goes a long way, as you have proved in Crimea.
Niccolò_Machiavelli  Vladimir_Putin  Crimea  Russia  hard_power  power  influence  statecraft  geopolitics  Ukraine  improvisation  rogue_actors  skin_in_the_game  political_geography  ruthlessness  large_payoffs  Carl_von_Clausewitz  strategic_geography 
march 2014 by jerryking
The New Style Influencers Are Digital - WSJ.com
September 10, 2013 | WSJ | ByELIZABETH HOLMES.

Brands Court Stars With Active Audiences to Try Turning Followers Into Shoppers
brands  WoM  influence  Word-of-mouth  fashion  apparel  bloggers  digital_influencers  stylish 
september 2013 by jerryking
HOW OUTSIDE FORCES IMPACT FOOD INDUSTRY INSIDERS
Jul. 24, 2006 | Supermarket News | by David Orgel.

Who holds power and influence in the supermarket industry today? That's usually an easy answer: Wal-Mart, Kroger, Kraft, Coke and the like.

But food industry clout is also shifting to players that aren't retailers, suppliers or other members of the establishment. These outside participants are gaining more influence over everything from consumer behavior to industry mergers.

Who are these people? A number of them are highlighted in the SN Power 50 rankings in this issue (see Page 24 for the full list). The ones I will point out appear under the category of "Other Players" because they don't neatly fit into the rest of the segments.

Consider the case of "The New Private Investor" (No. 45 on the list), which is our umbrella name for all the private equity investors now heating up the merger and acquisitions landscape.
consumer_behavior  food  grocery  influence  investors  Oprah_Winfrey  outsiders  power  power_brokers  private_equity  supermarkets 
march 2013 by jerryking
Want To Be Taken Seriously? Become a Better Writer | LinkedIn
Dave Kerpen
CEO, Likeable Local, NY Times Best-Selling Author & Keynote Speaker
Want To Be Taken Seriously? Become a Better Writer
writing  reading  influence 
february 2013 by jerryking
John Rau Learns From Staff, Then Guides Them Well
May 6, 1997 | WSJ | By HAL LANCASTER.

life lessons picked up in his high-level career:

Lesson #1: Learn the defining issues of your time.

"There are issues that define every generation, and companies will select as leaders the people who can best handle those issues,"
Lesson #2: Attach yourself to the right people.
Lesson #3: Learn to manage people who know more than you do.
Lesson #4: Look for positions where you can make a difference.
Lesson #5: Don't hire managers to run the organization you have; hire those who can run the organization you want to create.
Lesson #6: Some time off can help you define what you really want out of life.
Lesson #7: To promote change, win the hearts and minds of those you want to change.
movingonup  lessons_learned  influence  Managing_Your_Career  Hal_Lancaster  CEOs  howto  timeouts  sabbaticals  change  high-impact  the_right_people 
december 2012 by jerryking
Some Preliminary Thoughts on Action Planning and Implementation
??| |??| John J. Gabarro and Leonard A. Schlesinger.

Establish credibility amongst co-workers by repeated sharing clean, coherent vision and plan of action. Convert vision to strategy.
first90days  execution  implementation  listening  contingency_planning  anticipating  influence  action_plans 
july 2012 by jerryking
The New Cold War
May 14, 2008 | New York Times | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN.

The next president is going to be a cold-war president — but this cold war is with Iran...As the May 11 editorial in the Iranian daily Kayhan put it, “In the power struggle in the Middle East, there are only two sides: Iran and the U.S.”

For now, Team America is losing on just about every front. How come? The short answer is that Iran is smart and ruthless, America is dumb and weak, and the Sunni Arab world is feckless and divided...Ehud Yaari, one of Israel’s best Middle East watchers, calls “Pax Iranica.” In his April 28 column in The Jerusalem Report, Mr. Yaari pointed out the web of influence that Iran has built around the Middle East — from the sway it has over Iraq’s prime minister, Nuri al-Maliki, to its ability to manipulate virtually all the Shiite militias in Iraq, to its building up of Hezbollah into a force — with 40,000 rockets — that can control Lebanon and threaten Israel should it think of striking Tehran, to its ability to strengthen Hamas in Gaza and block any U.S.-sponsored Israeli-Palestinian peace.

“Simply put,” noted Mr. Yaari, “Tehran has created a situation in which anyone who wants to attack its atomic facilities will have to take into account that this will lead to bitter fighting” on the Lebanese, Palestinian, Iraqi and Persian Gulf fronts. That is a sophisticated strategy of deterrence...Alas, the right question for the next president isn’t whether we talk or don’t talk. It’s whether we have leverage or don’t have leverage.

When you have leverage, talk. When you don’t have leverage, get some — by creating economic, diplomatic or military incentives and pressures that the other side finds too tempting or frightening to ignore.
Lebanon  Iran  U.S.foreign_policy  Tom_Friedman  nuclear  Hezbollah  incentives  deterrence  Middle_East  Mideast_Peace  Cold_War  leverage  ruthlessness  influence  Palestinian  Iraq  Persian_Gulf  multiple_stressors  grand_strategy 
january 2012 by jerryking
The most influential people in business
June 15, 2009 | CanadianBusiness.com | By Joe Castaldo, Calvin Leung, Sharda Prashad, Jeff Sanford, Andrew Wahl, Thomas Watson |
Canadian  influence  CEOs  best_of  Prem_Watsa  Roger_Martin  Jim_Balsillie  Peter_Munk 
october 2011 by jerryking
America's Edge: Power in the Networked Century
Jan/Feb 2009 | Foreign Affairs | Anne-Marie Slaughter. The
power that flows from networked connectivity is not the power to impose
outcomes. Netwks are not directed & controlled as much as they are
managed & orchestrated. Multiple players are integrated into a whole
greater than the sum of its parts--an orchestra that plays differently
according to the vision of its conductor & talent of individual
musicians. ...Most important, netwk. power flows from the ability to
make the maximum number of valuable connections. The next requirement is
to have the knowledge & skills to harness that power to achieve a
common purpose.... If, in a networked world, measure of a state's power
is its ability to turn connectivity into innovation and growth... Thanks
to demography, geography, and culture, the 21st century looks
increasingly like an “Americas” century.
ProQuest  globalization  immigrants  21st._century  networks  network_power  heterogeneity  Communicating_&_Connecting  power  influence  orchestration  Anne-Marie_Slaughter 
january 2011 by jerryking
In praise of power seeker
Oct. 19, 2010 | G& M | Harvey Schachter. 7 qualities
build power: ambition, energy, focus, self-knowledge, confidence,
empathy, & capacity to tolerate conflict. Unlisted is intelligence
(overrated).Power must start somewhere,“People err in choosing where to
start accruing their power base.The common mistake is to locate it in
the dept. dealing with an org.’s core activity/skill/product – the unit
that is the most powerful at the moment,” The problem is that’s where
one encounters the most talented competition, well-established career
paths & processes. Further, what’s vital to an org. today might not
be in future. To move up, seek unexploited niches where one can develop
leverage with less resistance & build a power base in activities
that will be important in future. e.g., Robert McNamara & the whiz
kids at Ford built their power base in finance, acctg. & control
functions, rather than eng. allowing McNamara to become the 1st non-Ford
president. Wherever you start – stand out!
ambition  conflict_toleration  core_businesses  empathy  focus  Ford  Harvey_Schachter  influence  leadership  movingonup  Niccolò_Machiavelli  overrated  Pablo_Picasso  personal_energy  power  Robert_McNamara  SecDef  self-confidence  self-knowledge  unexploited_resources  whiz_kids 
october 2010 by jerryking
LEADERS WITHOUT TITLES
Mar. 31, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | by HARVEY SCHACHTER.
Reviews The Leader Who Had No Title: A Modern Fable on Real Success in
Business and in Life By Robin SharmaFree Press, 224 pages, $26.99
book_reviews  Harvey_Schachter  Robin_Sharma  leaders  leadership  influence 
april 2010 by jerryking
MASTERING THE ART OF GIVING ADVICE
Fall 2008 | Leader to Leader. : Vol. Iss. 50; pg. 45 | by
James E Lukaszewski. Having influence means being remembered, being
asked in on decisions and strategy well before the strategies are
selected and the decisions need to be made. Those with influence make an
impact on their organizations and the larger world and can advance more
rapidly in their careers. Your advice may be perceptive, even wise, but
if it falls on deaf ears, it helps no one. Beyond the actual quality of
your advice, how you communicate that advice plays a major role in
ensuring that others can and will listen to it and act on it. The six
approaches suggested can help achieve this goal: 1. Be positive. 2.
Eliminate criticism as a coaching and advising practice. 3. Urge prompt
action. 4. Focus on outcomes. 5. Be an incrementalist. 6. Be pragmatic.
howto  advice  ProQuest  indispensable  guidelines  influence  leadership  managing_people  Managing_Your_Career  pragmatism  incrementalism  outcomes  action-oriented  coaching  upbeat 
march 2010 by jerryking
Rummy's war
Apr 5, 2003 | The Globe & Mail. pg. F.1 | Barrie McKenna & Doug Saunders. "In the highest reaches of power, the people who have
influence are the ones who bring the president solutions, not problems,"
the former White House insider explained. "When Rumsfeld says we are
going to overthrow the Taliban and I don't need 100,000 troops to do it,
and it happens, that adds to your influence."
Donald_Rumsfeld  profile  rules_of_the_game  Doug_Saunders  Iraq  indispensable  influence  problem_solving  generating_strategic_options  solutions  solution-finders 
december 2009 by jerryking
How does U.S. democracy survive without its newspapers?
Tuesday, Jun. 16, 2009 | The Globe & Mail | by John Ibbotson.

The Globe has also still been spared the savage budget cuts that eviscerated so many once-great American newspapers as the recession accelerated chronic declines in readership and advertising revenue.

But in the U.S., it's time to ask: How will the seemingly inevitable extinction of many metropolitan daily newspapers influence politics and political culture there?

The answer isn't entirely grim. Some newspapers are bound to survive in print form, at least for a few more years, as competition thins and enlightened corporate owners recognize that laying off half their reporters is the surest way to destroy the only thing of value a newspaper has: the reputation behind its name.....there is another, very disturbing, trend. A recent survey by The Pew Center for the People and the Press reported that "a new Washington media have evolved, but they are far from the more egalitarian or citizen-based media that advocates of the digital age might imagine. Instead, this new Washington media cohort is one substantially aimed at elites, often organized by industry, by corporate client, or by niche political interest."

These publications may have an audience of a few thousand, or even a few hundred, willing to pay thousands of dollars in subscription fees for specialized coverage. "These are publications with names like ClimateWire, Energy Trader, Traffic World, Government Executive and Food and Chemical News," the Pew study says. They are proliferating, and hoovering up reporters and editors who have lost their jobs in mainstream media. "Today, it is the niche, not the mainstream, media that [provide]blanket coverage of Congress and other important arms of the federal government," the Pew report concludes.

The collapse of print journalism - network newscasts are also in terrible shape - threatens to bifurcate the public square. Those who know the power of information will pay to obtain it, and use that knowledge to influence the agenda.

Those who lack the means or interest will depend on blogs, social networking and whatever information they choose to look for online. How does democracy survive on that?
brands  budget_cuts  commonwealth  decline  democracy  engaged_citizenry  influence  information_sources  Inside_the_Beltway  John_Ibbitson  local_journalism  magazines  mass_media  market_intelligence  newsletters  newspapers  niches  political_culture  politics  print_journalism  reputation  sophisticated  Washington_D.C. 
june 2009 by jerryking

related tags

21st._century  academic  action-oriented  action_plans  advertising  advice  advocacy  Africa  African-Americans  aging  agriculture  alliances  Amazon  ambition  Amex  anecdotal  Anne-Marie_Slaughter  anticipating  apparel  appointments  Asia_Pacific  asset_management  authoritarian  authoritarianism  benign_neglect  best_of  BlackRock  bloggers  books  book_reviews  brands  budget_cuts  business_development  campaign  Canada  Canada-China_relations  Canadian  Carl_von_Clausewitz  censorship  centralized_control  CEOs  change  chaos  Charles_Burton  chefs  China  China_rising  Chinese  Chinese-Canadians  Chinese_Communist_Party  client_development  coaching  Cold_War  Colleges_&_Universities  commonwealth  Communicating_&_Connecting  community_engagement  conflicts_of_interest  conflict_toleration  Confucius_Institutes  consumer_behavior  contingency_planning  core_businesses  corruption  counterintelligence  counternarratives  creating_valuable_content  creative_renewal  Crimea  crony_capitalism  CSIS  cyberattacks  cyberespionage  debt  decline  democracy  deterrence  digital_influencers  digital_media  Donald_Rumsfeld  Doug_Saunders  due_diligence  economic_protectionism  education  empathy  engaged_citizenry  enterprise_clients  entrepreneur  epicenters  espionage  execution  executive_management  farming  fashion  FDI  financial_system  first90days  focus  food  Ford  foreign_policy  frenemies  frontier_markets  generating_strategic_options  geopolitics  globalization  Google  government_relations  grand_strategy  gridlocked_politics  grocery  guidelines  Hal_Lancaster  hard_power  hard_times  hard_work  Harvard  Harvey_Schachter  heterogeneity  Hezbollah  high-impact  history  House_of_Commons  howto  Huawei  Hugh_Segal  humility  immigrants  implementation  improvisation  incentives  incrementalism  indispensable  industrial_zones  influence  influence_peddling  information_sources  innovation  inquisitiveness  Inside_the_Beltway  international_system  intimidation  investors  Iran  Iraq  James_Lukaszewski  JCK  Jim_Balsillie  John_Ibbitson  Justin_Trudeau  Ken_Chenault  Kremlin  large_companies  large_payoffs  leaders  leadership  Lebanon  lessons_learned  leverage  listening  lobbying  local_journalism  magazines  managing_people  managing_up  Managing_Your_Career  manufacturers  maritime  marketing  market_intelligence  mass_media  mercantilism  Merrill_Lynch  Michael_McDerment  middle-powers  Middle_East  Mideast_Peace  migrants  millennials  movingonup  multiple_stressors  naivete  NATO  networking  networks  network_density  network_power  newsletters  newspapers  new_rules  Niccolò_Machiavelli  niches  Nigeria  nuclear  Obama  office_politics  Oprah_Winfrey  orchestration  outcomes  outsiders  overrated  oversight  Pablo_Picasso  Palestinian  perseverance  Persian_Gulf  personal_energy  Peter_Munk  PMO  policy  policymakers  policymaking  political_advocacy  political_capital  political_culture  political_geography  political_power  politicians  politics  power  power_brokers  pragmatism  Prem_Watsa  primers  print_journalism  private_equity  problem_solving  professors  profile  propaganda  ProQuest  public_relations  purpose  reading  relationships  reputation  research  restaurants  revolving_door  Richard_Parsons  risk-aversion  risk-avoidance  risk-management  risk-mitigation  risks  Robert_McNamara  Robin_Sharma  Roger_Martin  rogue_actors  rules_of_the_game  Russia  ruthlessness  sabbaticals  SecDef  security_&_intelligence  security_consciousness  self-confidence  self-knowledge  self-promotion  self-starters  serving_others  situational_awareness  skin_in_the_game  soft_power  solution-finders  solutions  sophisticated  South_Africa  South_China_Sea  speaking_up  Stanley_O'Neal  start_ups  statecraft  Stephen_Harper  strategic_geography  strategic_thinking  stylish  supermarkets  superpowers  supply_chains  Syria  systemic_risks  TDSB  technology  the_Cabinet  the_right_people  think_differently  threats  timeouts  tips  Tom_Friedman  too_big_to_fail  transactional_relationships  U.S.foreign_policy  U.S.Treasury_Department  U.S._Federal_Reserve  Ukraine  uncertainty  unexploited_resources  upbeat  value_propositions  Vladimir_Putin  Wall_Street  Washington_D.C.  White_House  whiz_kids  wisdom  WoM  Word-of-mouth  worldviews  writing  Zimbabwe 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: