jerryking + in-store   28

Amazon Wants to Rule the Grocery Aisles, and Not Just at Whole Foods
July 28, 2019 | The New York Times | By Karen Weise.

In early 2017, a memo, “Grocery Shopping for Everyone," circulated inside Amazon that imagined an ambitious new grocery chain........The new stores, the document envisioned, would have robust sections for produce, fresh food and prepared meals. Nonperishable products, like paper towels or canned beans, would be stored on a separate floor, away from customers. Shoppers could order those items with an app, and while they shopped for fresh food, the other products would be brought down in time for check out. There would also be an area to pick up groceries ordered online and to manage packages for delivery drivers......A few months later, in June 2017, Amazon barged into the grocery business in a different way, by announcing a blockbuster deal to buy Whole Foods for $13.4 billion.......The memo and other big grocery proposals stopped circulating inside Amazon, as Whole Foods demanded everyone’s attention.....now, two years later, instead of Whole Foods being the answer to Amazon’s grocery ambitions, it seems to have only whetted executives’ appetites.

The marriage has made clear the difficulties of selling fresh food inexpensively, either in a physical store or through delivery. Bananas are not the same as books....But the combination has also shown glimmers of success, particularly in delivery. And that has provided some fuel to Amazon executives pushing to add another food-selling option — one built from the ground up that would change how people buy groceries.....Amazon is now quietly exploring an ambitious new chain, probably separate from Whole Foods, that is not far removed from the one outlined in the old memo. It would be built for in-store shopping as well as pickup and delivery.....“People really need to understand — Whole Foods is the beginning, it’s not the end,” ......“It’s not everything.”......In an effort to shed Whole Foods’ “whole paycheck” reputation, Amazon bought more from national food distributors and cut back on the local farms......Other price-cutting efforts failed. The former head of a major produce company said Amazon told him it wanted to sell marquee fresh items at low prices every day. The executive said he had to explain that certain products, like berries or lettuce, may be available all year thanks to global supply chains, but that they cost more in the off-season. Forcing flat, low prices would put too much risk on growers.

Amazon executives, the person said, were caught off guard by the response. It didn’t seem as if they had fully appreciated how seasonality made predictable pricing far harder than selling cereal or paper towels.......Amazon has also run into some trouble integrating Whole Foods into its delivery machine.

Amazon never saw delivering cold milk and fragile fruit to doorsteps as something for the masses, according to former employees. Instead, executives thought of it as an option for people who wanted high-quality foods and could afford a premium price to have fragile and fresh items arrive at their doorstep......In theory, that was a good fit for Whole Foods and its affluent shoppers. Within six months, Amazon began making two-hour deliveries from Whole Foods in four cities for Prime members. Six months later, that had expanded to more than two dozen cities. It’s now available in 90.

But Whole Foods stores are not like Amazon’s delivery warehouses. Because Whole Foods sells so many fresh items, its stores have smaller back-of-house areas than a standard supermarket. That means employees who pick products for online orders must gather more items from the same shelves as shoppers. They roam aisles with scanners in hand, asking associates on the floor when they can’t find something......deliveries have shown big potential, making up almost all of Whole Foods’ growth......The promise of serving customers, but doing so more efficiently, has Amazon thinking again about aggressive investment in groceries.

Rather than dramatically substantially expand Whole Foods, .....Amazon is considering designing stores specifically with pickup and delivery in mind, and with a smaller area dedicated to fresh shopping — as the old memo imagined.....Amazon is interested in “creating multiple customer experiences under one roof.”.......Amazon has been looking for spaces close to Whole Foods locations, indicating a hub-and-spoke approach where one store serves as the warehouse and commissary for others.....To be a major grocery player, Amazon would need a little more than 2,000 stores, the old memo estimated. That’s far fewer than the 5,000 run by Walmart, the country’s top grocery seller, but more than the roughly 1,200 operated by Publix. Whole Foods got Amazon about a quarter of the way there.

A store designed with different shopping options......would be “highly scalable.”
Amazon  back-office  BOPIS  grocery  home_delivery  hub-and-spoke  in-store  Kroger  perishables  price-cutting  seasonality  supermarkets  Whole_Foods 
20 days ago by jerryking
For Sephora, the store is core to its beauty
July 24 2019 | | Financial Times | by Harriet Agnew and Hannah Copeland in Paris.

**Sephora stores focus on experience, allowing consumers to test products digitally on a virtual mirror for instance or personalise products **

Like its stores in New York’s Times Square and Dubai Mall in the Middle East, Sephora in La Défense has recently reopened after an extensive refurbishment. The investment reflects how bricks and mortar and experiential retail are key to Sephora’s growth. The LVMH-owned group, which stocks about 300 brands alongside its own label, has increased sales fourfold in the past eight years, fuelled by a booming beauty market........“A lot of people are scared of the retail apocalypse so they’re not investing in stores, and that becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy,” said chief executive Chris de Lapuente in an interview on the shop floor. “We’re investing in our stores, taking our top 100 stores in the world and renovating them to the best possible standard.”....Mr de Lapuente says one attraction of Sephora is that consumers “discover brands they can’t find anywhere else”, noting that about a third of its offerings are exclusive to Sephora, and it acts as an incubator for upcoming or niche brands....Exclusivity might be with Huda, which began selling false eyelashes in Dubai and subsequently developed a collaboration with Sephora; pop star Rihanna’s cosmetics brand Fenty, which is on track for €500m sales this year; or an exclusive collaboration with Dior for the Dior Backstage range of make-up.

Pointing to the beauty bar where customers can get a free makeover, Mr de Lapuente added: “Experiential retail is crucial to our success. Sephora is a place where people come for advice, they come to listen. We teach, inspire and play . . . You’re not going to get this online. Online you can do your research . . . here you can come and experiment.”

Mr Fujimori agrees, saying Sephora “successfully combines experiential retail with a leading ecommerce presence, leveraging digital technology to enhance the shopping experience in-store and online”......
Please use the sharing tools found via the share button at the top or side of articles. The challenge now for Sephora is to stay ahead in a world where there are more make-up and beauty brands than ever, and social media has lowered barriers to entry and boosted the speed to market. Meanwhile, Amazon last month announced the launch of its professional beauty stores, aimed at the mass market.

“Amazon is just another one of the many choices out there,” said Mr de Lapuente. “They have a strong e-commerce offering. They don’t have stores. We love that consumers love to shop online and in store.” He says that customers who buy both on- and offline tend to purchase three times more than those who buy using just one channel. Ecommerce represents an average of 20 per cent of sales in each country for Sephora, which uses influencers to build its community. “Amazon just forces us to raise our game.”....

The pressure is on to keep on innovating. “Beauty is so fast-moving, you can’t cruise,” said Mr de Lapuente. He says innovation will come both from new products (citing untapped potential in haircare and wellness), and from the way in which brands reach consumers. He sees opportunities in areas like voice-activated ordering through home assistants such as Amazon’s Alexa, and social commerce through platforms like China’s WeChat.

But despite such technological developments, for Mr de Lapuente, the store has a robust future.

At La Défense, customers are returning to work with Sephora’s distinctive striped bags modelled on the black and white stripes of Italy’s Siena Cathedral. “Is physical retail alive or dead?” mused Mr de Lapuente among the throng of shoppers. “It looks pretty alive to me. The store is where the magic happens.”
Amazon  beauty  brands  bricks-and-mortar  customer_experience  cosmetics  digital_influencers  e-commerce  experimentation  experiential_marketing  high-end  in-store  incubators  innovation  LVMH  makeup  millennials  omnichannel  refurbished  renovations  Sephora  women 
24 days ago by jerryking
Amazon to Launch New Grocery-Store Business
March 1, 2019 | WSJ | By Esther Fung and Heather Haddon.

Amazon is planning to open dozens of grocery stores in several major U.S. cities....as the retail giant looks to broaden its reach in the food business and touch more aspects of consumers’ lives......The new stores would be distinct from the company’s upscale Whole Foods Market chain. It isn’t clear whether the new stores would carry the Amazon name......Amazon in recent years has become increasingly focused on physical retail, posing a threat to traditional grocers. The new chain would help Amazon in fulfilling a yearslong initiative to build out a physical grocery presence, which was at one point potentially envisioned to reach more than 2,000 brick-and mortar stores in a variety of sizes and formats......Amazon is also exploring purchasing regional grocery chains with about a dozen stores under operation, one person said, that could bolster the new chain......Amazon’s further push into physical retail is its latest move far beyond its origins selling books and music on the web. Over the years it has become a cloud-computing giant, a major player in Hollywood entertainment and a burgeoning provider of logistics services. More recently it has emerged as a major competitor in digital advertising and launched forays in finance and health care......The new stores aren’t intended to compete directly with the more upscale Whole Foods stores and will offer a different variety of products, at a lower price point, these people said. Whole Foods doesn’t sell products with artificial flavors, colors, preservatives and sweeteners, among other quality standards.

Suppliers with big brands have hoped to have inroads into Whole Foods since Amazon bought the chain nearly two years ago. While Whole Foods has gradually expanded the big brands it carries—such as Honey-Nut Cheerios and Michelob beer—a conventional grocer can carry a much larger assortment of items. Amazon has had mixed results with its food-delivery business, and it wants to better understand how it can cater to grocery shoppers....Supermarket operators Walmart Inc., Kroger Co. and others are also trying to find ways to offer delivery and pickup to customers in a more cost-efficient manner...Amazon’s new grocery brand also comes as the retailer rolls out its cashierless Amazon Go stores in urban areas. It is testing that checkout technology for bigger retail stores. Meanwhile, Whole Foods is expanding its national footprint....For its new stores, Amazon is targeting new developments and occupied stores with leases ending soon.....Amazon doesn’t want restrictions on the type of goods it may sell at its stores and wants the ability to change the store and sell health and beauty products for instance......It is unclear whether these new stores will be cashierless, but they will be heavily tilted to customer service and pickup capabilities......a strategy where big retailers combine e-commerce with physical stores is the direction the industry is heading.
Amazon  BOPIS  bricks-and-mortar  cashierless  e-commerce  food  grocery  home-delivery  in-store  Kroger  new_businesses  physical_retail  rollouts  supermarkets  Wal-Mart  Whole_Foods 
march 2019 by jerryking
The dumb-bell economy: inside the booming business of exercise
FEBRUARY 9, 2018 | FT | Jo Ellison.

Where once consumers looked for acquisitions to express their status, our spending habits are shifting towards more holistic expenditures. In the past 20 years, the leisure industry has emerged as one of the most dynamic, disruptive and fashionable of forces. It’s all part of a new focus on the “lifestyle experience”, a trend that has possessed consumers and found luxury brands spiking with sporty new offerings — sneakers, leggings, apps and accessories — designed to harness the burgeoning market. As Harvey Spevak, the executive chairman and managing partner of the Equinox group, likes to say: “Health is the new wealth.”
.....2019 will see the first Equinox hotel opening in New York’s Hudson Yards, the first in a rollout of Equinox hotels earmarked for billions more in investment. The hotels will be founded on the same full-service ideal as the clubs. “Our vision for the hotels is to cater to the high-performance traveller,” says Spevak, “and we think about it as we do, historically, from a science perspective. We call it MNR — movement, nutrition and recovery — where a high-performance lifestyle and a healthy lifestyle is a three-legged stool.”.....as our lives have become busier, atomised and more urban, the gym has emerged as the new place in which to gather: to be part of a community....not only are millennials more likely to buy gym memberships, they’re driving the boutique business as well. The rise of the group workout, club membership and all of the attendant accessories that come with it have become part of the new language of “wellness”......Where you work out, who you work out with, and what you wear to work out in have become totems of fashionability. Spevak traces the first shoots of the wellness trend to 9/11, when he saw a jump in the number of people becoming focused on holistic health and taking care of themselves.
....But more than anything, the fitness boom must be a corollary of a digital revolution in which working out has become a ubiquitous feature of our online life; ....Minton agrees that a gym’s success depends on cultivating this tribal loyalty, delivering a unique experience and then selling product that marks its members out. “Some of the most interesting clubs are those that are expanding into less obvious areas,” he says. “We now have over 600 boutiques across the UK and they are growing faster than traditional gyms as they have a smaller footprint and can take pop-up spaces.......The experiential market is throwing a lifeline to retailers, as well. “The fashion link is growing,” adds Minton. “Fitness apparel brands like Lululemon, Sweaty Betty, Reebok, Nike all now offer free in-store workouts, which provide them with an opportunity to market their brand lifestyles more directly and forge a connection with the consumer.”.......“The demise of retail is a permanent shift,” says Spevak. “It doesn’t mean retail’s going to go away, but it’s going to look very different. The consumer, in my opinion, will continue to buy nice things for themselves, but I think in the scheme of priorities the experience is more important than the handbag.”
fitness  exercise  London  United_Kingdom  gyms  wellness  rollouts  strength_training  boutiques  leisure  Equinox  millennials  experiential_marketing  small_spaces  pop-ups  non-obvious  upscale  retailers  in-store 
february 2018 by jerryking
Nordstrom Tries On a New Look: Stores Without Merchandise - WSJ
By Suzanne Kapner
Sept. 10, 2017

Nordstrom Local, doesn't stock clothes.....it's a new concept as retailers across the U.S. are wrestling with how to best to use their physical spaces and attract customers who are migrating to the web. For department-store chains like Macy’s Inc., J.C. Penney Co. , Kohl’s Corp. and Sears Holdings Corp. , one answer has been to shrink their footprint by closing stores or experimenting with smaller ones......consumer habits are changing.....“There aren’t store customers or online customers—there are just customers who are more empowered than ever to shop on their terms,”...Nordstrom Local, scheduled to open Oct. 3 in West Hollywood, Calif., will span 3,000 square feet, far less than the 140,000 square feet of one of Nordstrom’s standard department stores. It will contain eight dressing rooms, where shoppers can try on clothes and accessories, though the store won’t stock them. Instead, personal stylists will retrieve goods from nine Nordstrom locations in Los Angeles, or through its website. The stylists can also pull together looks for shoppers through a “style board” app.

“Shopping today may not always mean going to a store and looking at a vast amount of inventory,” said Shea Jensen, Nordstrom’s senior vice president of customer experience. “It can mean trusting an expert to pick out a selection of items.”..In addition to manicures, Nordstrom Local shoppers will be able to order wine, beer, coffee or juice from an in-store bar, and those who place orders on Nordstrom.com by 2 p.m. can pick them up there that day. They will also be able to return items at the store that they bought online or from other Nordstrom locations. Tailors will be available for alterations or to help members of Trunk Club, an online clothing service that Nordstrom acquired in 2014, select fabrics for custom garments.

Other retailers have experimented with inventory-free stores, including Bonobos, the men’s fashion brand bought by Wal-Mart Stores Inc. over the summer. Stores such as Pirch, a purveyor of high-end home appliances and decorative plumbing, have taken the experiential route, inviting shoppers to bring bathing suits to test their $1,000 showerheads....the traditional retail store hasn’t changed much over the years. One hindrance, according to Doug Stephens, founder of the consulting firm Retail Prophet, is that Wall Street measures success by sales per square foot and other metrics that are becoming outdated in a world where shoppers still visit stores but increasingly make their purchases online.
Nordstrom  Nordstrom_Local  Macy  personal_stylists  BOPIS  Doug_Stephens  retailers  sales_per_square_foot  physical_space  experiential_marketing  small_spaces  curation  department_stores  inventory-free  e-commerce  store_footprints  downsizing  Bonobos  metrics  in-store 
september 2017 by jerryking
A Tale of Two Metrics
August 7, 2017 | | RetailNext | Ray Hartjen, Director, Content Marketing & Public Relations.

Traffic can’t alone measure the effectiveness of demand creation efforts, but some well-placed math can show retailers strong correlations over a myriad of relevant variables. More over, as my colleague Shelley E. Kohan pointed out in her post earlier this summer, “Expanding the Scope of Metrics,” Traffic is foundational for meaningful metrics like Conversion and Sales Yield (Sales per Shopper), key measurements that help managers make daily decisions on the floor from tailoring merchandising displays to allocating staffing and refining associate training.
With metrics, it’s important to remember there’re different strokes for different folks, with different measurements critical for different functions, much like financial accounting and managerial accounting serve different masters. Today’s “big data” age allows retailers to inexpensively collect, synthesize, analyze and report almost unbelievable amounts of data from an equally almost unbelievable number of data streams. Paramount is to get the right information in front of the right people at the right time.
Sometimes, the right data is Sales per Square Foot, and it certainly makes for a nice headline. But, not to be outshined, other instances call for Traffic. As Chitra Balasubramanian, RetailNext’s Head of Business Analytics, points out in the same Sourcing Journal Online article, “Traffic equals opportunity. Retailers should take advantage of store visits with loyalty programs, heightened customer service, and a great in-store experience to create a long-lasting relationship with that customer to ensure repeat visits.”
metrics  sales  foot_traffic  retailers  inexpensive  massive_data_sets  data  creating_demand  correlations  experiential_marketing  in-store  mathematics  loyalty_management  the_right_people  sales_per_square_foot 
august 2017 by jerryking
Big Prize in Amazon-Whole Foods Deal: Data - WSJ
By Laura Stevens and Heather Haddon
June 20, 2017

The deal for Whole Foods Market Inc., which people familiar with the matter said came together quickly, presents Amazon with several potential gains. It could use the stores as distribution hubs to build out its online grocery-delivery business. Amazon also could stock gadgets such as its Kindle e-readers and Echo speakers, as well as goods from its burgeoning private label.

The bigger opportunity, though, is data.

Amazon for years has been looking for more ways to gather information about how consumers shop. It has long been rumored to be on the prowl for a breakthrough deal, even as it set up its own much smaller Amazon Go and AmazonFresh Pickup stores as experiments.

If the deal goes through, the combination likely will be powerful. Amazon and Whole Foods can join their online and in-store knowledge to better predict what goods to carry in each store, said James Thomson, a former senior manager in business development at Amazon and now partner at the brand consultancy Buy Box Experts.....One enticing aspect of a deal between Amazon and Whole Foods is the significant overlap, analysts say, between the companies’ traditionally loyal customer bases.

A Morgan Stanley survey shows about 62% of Whole Foods shoppers are members of Amazon’s Prime service, opening the door for cross-sell promotions to entice customers who shop at both to spend more.

Amazon, though, doesn’t know how those customers shop in stores—a gaping hole in data about its more than 300 million shoppers.....Amazon has had a more difficult experiment with Amazon Go, its convenience-style store in which customers scan their phones as they walk in, pick up items to purchase and exit without a traditional checkout. The public opening has been delayed, in part because of technological hurdles and Amazon’s limited experience in managing the flow of customers and products in a physical space....

.......The data Amazon collects will likely help it decide which of its growing roster of private-label brands to expand and which new ones to launch, especially when it comes to consumables and food. Whole Foods already has a large private-label business...Bringing together online and offline data can help Amazon learn how to entice customers to make more impulse purchases online, according to analysts and retail consultants.
data  omnichannel  Amazon  Whole_Foods  physical_space  private_labels  impulse_purchasing  Amazon_Go  AmazonFresh  experimentation  cashierless  Amazon_Prime  cross-selling  in-store 
june 2017 by jerryking
Fast-Food Chains, Upscale Restaurants Want to Bring You Lunch - WSJ
By Julie Jargon
Updated June 1, 2017

Restaurants are no longer treating lunchtime delivery as an afterthought.

With online-ordering apps proliferating and many customers cutting down on eating out for lunch, the industry—from fast-food chains to upscale restaurateurs—is looking for ways to bring food to patrons without compromising their eating experience.......“Restaurant delivery is a $100 billion dollar market, and it’s exploding,” ......But enticing customers to order in at lunch, which has been a tough spot for burger chains in particular, remains difficult. McDonald’s Chief Executive Steve Easterbrook told investors on Wednesday that 60% of the chain’s delivery orders come in the evening and late at night. Getting burger delivery right—keeping the patty warm and juicy, while preventing toppings from getting the bun soggy—is notoriously tricky.....Even upscale restaurants are joining the delivery bandwagon. Some are so confident they are even eschewing tables and chairs.......Delivery only accounts for 3% of restaurant purchases nationwide, but it is growing fast. Non-pizza delivery purchases have risen by 30% in the past four years, according to market-research firm NPD Group Inc.....The exponential growth of delivery comes with a new set of challenges. Some restaurants are struggling to figure out how to properly staff their kitchens to handle both in-store demand and delivery orders......Working with third-party delivery services is an expensive proposition, because many of them charge restaurants a hefty fee—usually a share of order sales ranging from 17% to 30%—to participate and the restaurants lose out on high-margin sales like alcohol and soft drinks that people tend to order when they are eating on the premises.......delivery is the future: “As driverless cars and drones become the norm I think we’ll all be emailing Amazon and getting a drone delivering a sandwich.”
restaurants  fast-food  fast-casual  Uber  UberEats  McDonald's  upscale  lunchtime  delivery_services  in-store 
june 2017 by jerryking
How Sephora Is Thriving Amid a Retail Crisis - The New York Times
By LAURA M. HOLSONMAY 11, 2017

Much has been written about the crisis in retail, with shoppers deserting department stores for e-tailers and fast fashion, if they shop at all. The beauty business, though, has not had the same fate. Prestige beauty sales in the United States rose 6 percent in the 12 months ending in February, tallying $15.9 billion, according to the market research company NPD Group. Makeup alone is up 11 percent, totaling $7.3 billion. But that industry, too, is in the midst of its own upheaval, driven in part by the success of stores such as Sephora, the No. 1 specialty beauty retailer in the world....Bloggers and YouTube stars, Instagram videos and virtual assistants are replacing department store sales clerks, whose customers now know as much as they do (or more) about mermaid eyes and ombré lips. Brand loyalty is out, replaced by Sephora’s try-more-buy-more ethos. Friends hold as much sway these days as trained experts....two out of five women between ages 18 and 54 wear five or more makeup products every day. “It defines the selfie-obsessed, image-driven culture of our time,” .... There are more voices. And we are trying to cut through the confusion,” in part by allowing customers to try before they buy.....“It is easy to kill time, play around with things and then spend more money than I should,” ...“I am experimenting a lot, trying to figure out what I like.” She doesn’t shop at department stores. “I don’t associate [Sephora] with makeup,”....In 2015, Sephora opened its Innovation Lab in a converted warehouse in San Francisco to experiment with ways to combine mobile apps and in-store shopping into a cohesive experience. As a result of their efforts, customers can have as little or as much personal contact they want in stores ...Now department stores are scrambling to follow suit.
Sephora  beauty  retailers  crisis  LVMH  Instagram  brands  millennials  social_media  digital_influencers  experimentation  time_sink  play  Macy’s  Bloomingdale’s  cosmetics  makeup  customer_experience  experiential_marketing  image-driven  self-absorbed  fast_fashion  in-store 
may 2017 by jerryking
Three Hard Lessons the Internet Is Teaching Traditional Stores
April 23, 2017 | WSJ | By Christopher Mims.
Legacy retailers have to put their mountains of purchasing data to work to create the kind of personalization and automation shoppers are getting online
(1) Data Is King
When I asked Target, Walgreens and grocery chain Giant Food about loyalty programs and the fate of customers’ purchasing data—which is the in-store equivalent of your web browsing history—they all declined to comment. ...Data has been a vital part of Amazon’s retail revolution, just as it was with Netflix ’s media revolution and Google and Facebook ’s advertising revolution. For brick-and-mortar retailers, purchasing data doesn’t just help them compete with online adversaries; it has also become an alternate revenue source when profit margins are razor-thin. ....Physical retailers must catch up to online retailers in collecting rich data without making it feel so intrusive. Why, exactly, does my grocery store need my phone number?

(2) Personalization + Automation = Profits
Personalization and Automation = Profits
There’s a debate in the auto industry: Can Tesla get good at making cars faster than Ford, General Motors and Toyota can get good at making self-driving electric vehicles? The same applies to retail: Can physical retailers build intimate digital relationships with their customers—and use that data to update their stores—faster than online-first retailers can learn how to lease property, handle inventory and manage retail workers? [the great game ]

Online retailers know what’s popular, and how customers who like one item tend to like certain others. So Amazon’s physical bookstores can put out fewer books with more prominently displayed covers. Bonobos doesn’t even sell clothes in its stores, which it calls “guideshops.” Instead, customers go there to try clothes on, and their selections are delivered through the company’s existing e-commerce system.

Amazon’s upcoming Go convenience stores, selling groceries and meal kits, don’t require cashiers. That’s the sort of automation that could position Amazon to reap margins—or slash prices—to a degree unprecedented for retailers in traditionally low-margin categories like food and packaged goods.

While online retailers are accustomed to updating inventory and prices by the hour, physical retailers simply don’t have the data or the systems to keep up, and tend to buy and stock on cycles as long as a year, says George Faigen, a retail consultant at Oliver Wyman. Some legacy retailers are getting around this by teaming up with online players.

Target stocks men’s shaving supplies from not one but two online upstarts, Harry’s and Bevel. Target has said that, as a result, more customers are coming in to buy razors, increasing the sales of every brand on that aisle—even good old Gillette. Retailers have long relied on manufacturers to drive customers to stores by marketing their goods and even managing in-store displays. The difference is this: In the past, new brands had to persuade store buyers to dole out precious shelf space; now the brands can prove themselves online first.

(3) Legacy Tech Won’t Cut It

Perhaps the biggest challenge for existing retailers, says Euromonitor’s Ms. Grant, is finding the money to transition to this hybrid online-offline model. While Target has announced it will spend $7 billion over the next three years to revamp its stores, investors fled the stock in February after Target reported 2017 profits might be 25% less than expected.

When Warby Parker, the online eyeglasses retailer, set out to launch stores across the U.S., the company looked for in-store sales software that could integrate with its existing e-commerce systems. It couldn’t find a system up to the task, so it built one from scratch.

These kinds of systems allow salespeople to know what customers have bought both online and off, and what they might be nudged toward on that day. “We call it the ‘point of everything’ system,” says David Gilboa, co-founder and co-chief executive.

Having this much customer knowledge available instantly is critical, but it’s precisely what existing retailers struggle with, Mr. Faigen says.

Even Amazon is experiencing brick-and-mortar difficulties. In March, The Wall Street Journal reported that the Go stores would be delayed because of kinks in the point-of-sale software system.

Andy Katz-Mayfield, co-founder and co-chief executive of Harry’s, is skeptical that traditional retailers like Wal-Mart can make the leap, even if they invest heavily in technology.

The problem, he says, is that selling online isn’t just about taking orders through a website. Companies that succeed are good at selling direct to consumers—building technology from the ground up, integrating teams skilled at navigating online marketing’s ever-shifting terrain and managing the experience through fulfillment and delivery, Mr. Katz-Mayfield says.

That e-commerce startups are so confident about their own future doesn’t mean they are right about the fate of traditional retailers, however.

A report from Merrill Lynch argues Wal-Mart is embarking on a period of 20% to 30% growth for its e-commerce business. A spokesman for the company said that in addition to acquisitions, the company is focused on growing its e-commerce business organically.

It isn’t hard to picture today’s e-commerce companies becoming brick-and-mortar retailers. It’s harder to bet on traditional retailers becoming as tech savvy as their e-competition.[the great game]
lessons_learned  bricks-and-mortar  retailers  curation  personalization  e-commerce  shopping_malls  automation  privacy  Warby_Parker  Amazon_Go  data  data_driven  think_threes  Bonobos  Amazon  legacy_tech  omnichannel  Harry’s  Bevel  loyalty_management  low-margin  legacy_players  digital_first  Tesla  Ford  GM  Toyota  automobile  electric_cars  point-of-sale  physical_world  contra-Amazon  brands  shelf_space  the_great_game  cyberphysical  cashierless  Christopher_Mims  in-store  digital_savvy 
april 2017 by jerryking
Why Starbucks Might Be Innovating Too Fast - Barron's
By Alex Eule Jan. 26, 2017

Big Picture: Starbucks is seeing rapid success with its mobile ordering system, but it might be coming at the expense of in-store service.......The company now has so many customers placing advance orders via smartphones that some of its stores are having trouble keeping up.... “mobile order and pay” made up 7% of U.S. transactions in the latest quarter, up from just 3% a year ago.

But, it turns out, the existing stores haven’t been set up to handle the changing consumer behavior.

(From personal experience, I’ve noticed that Manhattan Starbucks counters are often over-filled with advance orders and those customers walk in and out, while the wait for in-store service is now longer than before.)

Starbucks president and chief operating officer Kevin Johnson, who’s set to become CEO in April, told investors that smartphone order volume has “created a new operational challenge...significant congestion at the handoff point. This congestion resulted in some number of customers who either entered the store or considered visiting a Starbucks store, and then did not complete a transaction.”
innovation  Starbucks  congestion  handoffs  in-store  order_management_system  mobile_applications  smartphones  consumer_behavior  operations  wait_times  brands  large_companies  shortcomings  revenge_effects  the_big_picture 
january 2017 by jerryking
Amazon Working on Several Grocery-Store Formats, Could Open More Than 2,000 Locations - WSJ
By LAURA STEVENS and KHADEEJA SAFDAR
Updated Dec. 5, 2016

Amazon.com Inc. unveiled Monday its first small-format grocery store, Amazon Go, one of at least three brick-and-mortar formats the online retail giant is exploring as it makes a play for an area of shopping that remains stubbornly in-store....The Amazon Go store, at roughly 1,800 square feet in downtown Seattle, resembles a convenience store-format in a video Amazon released Monday. It features artificial intelligence-powered technology that eliminates checkouts, cash registers and lines. Instead, customers scan their phone on a kiosk as they walk in, and Amazon automatically determines what items customers take from the shelves. After leaving the store, Amazon charges their account for the items and sends a receipt....While Amazon is moving into brick-and-mortar grocery shopping, other large retailers are expanding their online services. Wal-Mart’s curbside pickup service offers some convenience without the cost of home delivery.
Amazon  Amazon_Go  grocery  supermarkets  analog  home-delivery  e-commerce  small_spaces  store_footprints  bricks-and-mortar  artificial_intelligence  AmazonFresh  convenience_stores  cashierless  in-store 
december 2016 by jerryking
M&M Meat Shops expands offerings, changes name in bid to lure customers - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Mar. 15, 2016
Acquired about 18 months ago by private equity firm Searchlight Capital Partner LP,....
"In November, M&M upgraded its website and click-and-collect e-ordering, which it has been offering for eight years. Shoppers order online and pick up at the store of their choice. The site has enjoyed a 40-per-cent rise in e-orders since the relaunch, Mr. O'Brien said. E-commerce purchases, at $65-plus each on average, are usually more than twice the value of in-store purchases, he added."
Marina_Strauss  meat  retailers  frozen_foods  CEOs  rebranding  M&M_Food_Market  BOPIS  e-commerce  private_equity  privately_held_companies  in-store 
march 2016 by jerryking
Jump to the front of the line with this app - The Globe and Mail
JOSH O'KANE
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015

“The idea at a really high level is, can we make local commerce better if it were way, way faster, and we removed all the friction of waiting and in-store payment?” asks Mr. Reddy, who co-founded Ritual with Robert Kim.

Ritual was designed as a hyper-local service.

....ask yourself whether you’re in the productivity business or convenience business. Or even better, ask your users. This could change the way you think about your business and its future.
neighbourhoods  restaurants  scaling  Ritual  mobile_applications  wait_times  lineups  hyperlocal  frictions  in-store 
december 2015 by jerryking
SXSW exclusive: First-timer reflections
MARCH 12, 2014 | RetailingToday.com| BY ANNE MARIE STEPHEN AND DEBORAH WEINSWIG

The keynote speaker at this event was legendary retailer, Richard Marcus. Marcus says tech should have a purpose in impacting the retail customer experience. He says two things matter in retailing, “take care of customers and they come back, take care of merchandise and they don’t.”

The CIO of TGIF Friday’s, Trip Sessions, shared his goal to create a more sticky experience using technology with the aim of creating a 1-1 personalized experience. They use foursquare as a tool allowing waitstaff the ability to connect directly with guests in-store.

We keep hearing that the pace of change is accelerating from retailers and industry experts alike. This conference really epitomized that theme. From CES to NRF to SXSW, the themes have been fairly consistent. Retailers need to increasingly focus on tech and the time is now. There are many tools and resources available, but they can’t afford to wait.
SXSW  LBMA  location_based_services  one-on-one  personalization  retailers  conferences  Austin  restaurants  customer_experience  stickiness  in-store 
november 2015 by jerryking
All hail the hashtag: How retailers are drawing you in, one Facebook post at a time - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Sep. 29, 2015

Welcome to Retail 3.0, in which retailers use social media in a bid to draw young shoppers such as Campos back to bricks-and-mortar outlets.

Just a few years ago trendy shops lured consumers with an in-store coffee bar or barber shop. But today a hot brew or hair trim isn’t enough: Retailers increasingly feel the pressure to attract cyber-savvy shoppers to their physical outlets with eye-catching social media experiences that can be shared multiple times.

The social-media initiatives range from fitting rooms in Kate Spade stores that provide a backdrop for selfies with “like?” in a speech bubble to luxury parka purveyor Nobis installing photo booths at its store launch parties; and department store Nordstrom, whose roots are in shoes, encouraging shoppers to “shoefie” (take a selfie of their footwear) next to the store’s name. The images, uploaded on social media, put a spotlight on the brands.....social-media posts can pump up sales during an event as much as 20 per cent. About 60 per cent of Canadian consumers say they’ve come into contact with different products and brands through social media and, of those, 46 per cent say the interactions resulted in them making more purchases, up from 32 per cent in 2014, according to a survey this year by consultancy PwC.
digital_influencers  event-driven  social_media  Retail_3.0  imagery  Marina_Strauss  product_launches  selfies  retailers  millennials  Instagram  Facebook  e-commerce  bricks-and-mortar  in-store  footwear 
october 2015 by jerryking
Hoxton Analytics: Counting footfall for retailers - FT.com
September 8, 2015 12:02 pm
Hoxton Analytics: Counting footfall for retailers
Richard Newton

The retail research company was founded with the aim of reconciling the desire of retailers to monitor footfall and shopper demographics with their customers’ dislike of in-store video surveillance.

Owen McCormack, CEO and one of the two UCL data scientists who set up the business, says pointing the camera at shoes preserves customer privacy....The information is used to manage staffing, merchandising and the measurement of customer conversion rates.
retailers  analytics  foot_traffic  privacy  in-store 
september 2015 by jerryking
Brands Get Creative with Holiday Pop Up Stores - CMO Today - WSJ
December 3, 2014 | WSJ | By NATHALIE TADENA.

SC Johnson’s Glade, the maker of air fresheners and home scents, is using its first-ever pop-up boutique in New York City’s Meatpacking District to “sell feelings” that are inspired by the brand’s fragrances. Visitors to the pop-up, which opened last month and runs through Dec. 23, can lounge in one of five interactive areas that are designed to embody feelings associated with Glade scents – the red honeysuckle nectar-scent inspired “Energized” room, for example, features an Oculus Rift virtual thrill ride. There’s also a “Scent Lab,” decorated with a mosaic wall made up of 1,500 scented candles, for visitors to sample scents up close.

“We’re continuing to transform Glade into a lifestyle brand, in part by appealing to a new generation of Glade customers with memorable experiences like the Glade Boutique and unexpected partnerships,” said Kelly Semrau, SC Johnson Senior Vice President Global Corporate Affairs.

Pop-up shops give brands that may not have its own year-round storefront the physical space to “really do something extraordinary and breakthrough,” noted Dan Katz-Golden, strategy director at branding firm Siegel+Gale. Many marketers are turning to pop-up shops for brand-building purposes rather than to boost sales, giving brands the luxury to create a unique in-store experience without having to worry so much about the nuts and bolts of selling products, he said.
pop-ups  brands  Christmas  retailers  customer_experience  kiosks  uniqueness  lifestyles  in-store  breakthroughs 
december 2014 by jerryking
Same-Day Service for Online Shoppers: More Home Delivery, In-Store Pickup - WSJ
By ELIZABETH HOLMES
Updated Dec. 9, 2014

Retailers are poised with two get-it-now solutions. Shoppers can buy online and pick up in stores, the more widely available same-day option. Or, they can get same-day home delivery, the Holy Grail of e-commerce.

Once the domain of restaurants and florists, same-day delivery has expanded to tech giants like Google, and Amazon is experimenting with bike messengers and drones. Meanwhile, stores like Macy’s , Bloomingdale’s, and Neiman Marcus are getting in on the game, offering some online shoppers that same-day gratification, either at no charge or for a nominal fee....The more commonly offered option to buy online and pick up in store—known in the industry as “BOPIS”—is an important step for retailers toward “omnichannel” operations, or integrated online and in-store inventory.

Gap Inc., operator of Gap, Banana Republic and Old Navy stores and websites, began inviting Web and mobile shoppers last year to “reserve in store.” The shopper reserves an item and a specific pick-up location using one of the brand websites or apps. An employee picks the item from the selling floor and scans it to confirm the size and style. Shoppers receive an email or text when the order is ready....To make same-day delivery cost effective, Deliv looks to aggregate pickups and deliveries, says Daphne Carmeli, Deliv’s founder and chief executive. Sending one driver to pick up one package and deliver it in one hour would cost between $20 and $22. When the driver picks up and delivers two packages, those costs are halved. “It doesn’t take much pooling to get down to this disruptive price,” Ms. Carmeli says.
retailers  logistics  e-commerce  speed  delivery  home-delivery  Deliv  same-day  omnichannel  Macy’s  Bloomingdale’s  Neiman_Marcus  web  rooming  BOPIS  in-store 
december 2014 by jerryking
Retailers compete with Amazon: Lowes Foods
July 11, 2014 | CNBC | Kristina Yates.

"What do we do to survive?" That's the No. 1 question branding expert Martin Lindstrom gets from his clients, brick-and-mortar stores.

Lindstrom's answer: entertainment. Create an "in-store sensory experience, and a sense of community, that can't be packaged and delivered by mail, or perhaps by drone in the future," "We have five senses that we can appeal to. When you go to Amazon, you have a maximum of appealing to two senses."

Appealing to all the senses is a concept that Lowes Foods, a 99-location grocery chain across the Carolinas and Virginia, is embracing wholeheartedly. The company hired Lindstrom and his team to give its traditional stores a makeover.
......
The store in Clemmons, North Carolina—ground zero for the chain's reinvention of the grocery shopping experience—doesn't look like a traditional supermarket. On the outside, it looks more like a greenhouse. On the inside, it's a mix of farmer's market and theme park.

"It's an experience. It feels like a destination, like we're going to Disneyworld," said long-time customer Mike Parnitzke.

Lindstrom hired writers from Walt Disney to create a storyline throughout the store. The most visual and unique example of that philosophy is the "Chicken Kitchen," where each chicken is celebrated with a chicken dance when it comes out of the rotisserie oven. Then there's "Sausageworks," which looks like a crazy laboratory complete with a crazy sausage professor, concocting whacky sausage flavors like the "Star Spangler," a bacon cheddar cheeseburger sausage for the Fourth of July. The "Beer Den" lets customers sample local draft beers. There's also the community table, hosting events from recipe sharing to speed dating.

"It's really about finding a connection with the guest. To have them come back and say, 'Oh my gosh, I had so much fun here in your store,'" said store manager Kate Allred...... brick-and-mortar stores have to create a memorable experience if they want to retain customers. "Brick-and-mortar stores are not necessarily going away," she said, "but we know that 20 percent of all specialty retail spending is done online."

According to the Food Marketing Institute, consumers spent $5.8 billion online grocery shopping in 2012. It's an industry that is attracting heavyweights like Amazon and Wal-Mart, and already has established players like Peapod.com, Freshdirect.com and Harris Teeter.

"You can't compete on volume, you can't compete on prices because the online retailer will always win," said Lindstrom.

Lowes Foods' new, rebranded store has seen basket size rise 7 percent and transaction volume increase 23 percent since January, the grocer says.
.
The company is remodeling 10 more stores this year, but Lindstrom said the work doesn't stop when the makeover is done. "This is like a sand castle. It's beautiful day one, day two it starts to fall apart. To communicate that to an organization of 10,000 people, and in some cases a million people, is pretty hard. It has to go through the system."
.....

The company's hiring pool has also changed. "If we can go look, for example, at local schools of arts, schools of theater, let's go find some folks who can go through and play the role and actually take care of our guests, and we can teach them the grocery industry," Lowe said.
retailers  grocery  supermarkets  branding  Lowes_Foods  digital_media  shopping_experience  web_video  contra-Amazon  experiential_marketing  e-commerce  Amazon  Disney  theme_parks  in-store 
july 2014 by jerryking
Aldo seizes ‘put up or shut up’ moment for shoes - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Feb. 27 2014,

Aldo announced the biggest investment in development that the company has made in its 41-year history. Over the next five years, it will spend $363-million and hire roughly 400 people in an effort to better market itself to customers who have more options than ever.

“We’re being confronted with more competition from so many different angles at this point. It’s basically a ‘put up or shut up’ moment,”....Fundamentally, Mr. Bensadoun sees this as a marketing problem.

Clothing retailers have the luxury of showing you a shoe in its proper context – in other words, as part of an outfit. One of the things Aldo is planning for its store of the future is more screens in-store (e.g. digital signage) that will help to do that, in the absence of any apparel stock.

The store could choose a top 10 looks of the week, Mr. Bensadoun suggests, which could be browsed on the screens (and on a mobile-friendly version of the same service for people on smartphones.) Those looks would specify which shoes to wear with them so that customers could pick footwear based on an overall style they identify with. It would also go the other way: for those who pick up a shoe they like, it will be possible to see how to wear it, and with what....Data are another key part of this transformation project.

Part of Aldo’s multimillion-dollar investment will be devoted to building a better data analytics team as well as hiring research and behaviour experts. This is a priority for all marketers, who face a buying public that has never been more inundated with messages – on television, on their mobile phones, tablets, and computers.

“The consumer insights and analytics department at Aldo was very much in its infancy, up until very recently,”
Aldo  shoes  retailers  e-commerce  marketing  analytics  data  Susan_Krashinsky  SHoeMint  ShoeDazzle  Zappos  customer_insights  consumer_research  contextual  seminal_moments  consumer_behavior  in-store  footwear 
july 2014 by jerryking
Music and Passion
Odell, PatriciaView Profile. Promo18.6 (May 2005): 26.


In-store, Tecate sponsored the Latin music listening station in each of 21 Virgin Megastores, backlit with branded images. Tabletop units ...
Latin  beer  music  brands  in-store  from notes
april 2014 by jerryking
Nabbing grocery shoppers where it counts most – at the store shelf
Jun. 11 2012 | - The Globe and Mail | MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER.
consumer-products giant Unilever Canada Inc. will soon move almost all its marketing spending for its Knorr products – about $5-million annually – to in-store initiatives such as displays, signs, samplings and chef appearances while ditching television, radio, digital and other media ads.
grab shoppers’ attention at the store aisle where most – 76 per cent – of today’s purchasing decisions are being made, compared with 70 per cent in 1995.
grocery  Marina_Strauss  Unilever  CPG  Kraft  in-store 
june 2012 by jerryking
Take that washer for a spin (cycle) first
03 Aug 2004 | The Globe and Mail B.1.| Marina Strauss.

Maytag stores are the latest example of "experience retailing," where merchants pour extra money into in-store setups that allow shoppers to actually use or experience products before deciding on a purchase.

In an increasingly low-margin, cutthroat sector, letting consumers test-drive merchandise can give retailers an edge over rivals, observers say.
ProQuest  Marina_Strauss  Maytag  experience  experiential_learning  retailers  in-store 
april 2012 by jerryking
In a Shift, Marketers Beef Up Ad Spending Inside Stores - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 21, 2005 | WSJ | By EMILY NELSON and SARAH
ELLISON....Some stores charge marketers a fee for in-store displays --
as if they were selling space on a roadside billboard. Others don't have
the clout or think they will be compensated through the overall boost
to sales. Those that charge face another wrinkle: there's no standard
system for measuring the audience for in-store ads and therefore no easy
way to charge for the space. The fees for each project are negotiated
on a case-by-case basis, a time-consuming task.

Ideas for Asif and LBMA as well as Turnstyle. Help stores monetize their 3rd party in-store advertising opportunities.
digital_signage  P&G  marketing  in-store  advertising_agencies  market_research  LBMA 
august 2011 by jerryking
Local Online Advertising: A Primer
Nov 2007 | Franchising World. Vol. 39, Iss. 11; pg. 77, 3 pgs
| by Jeffrey Kolton. ..."Research conducted by Yahoo and comScore,
identified a new class of consumers known as "ROBO" for research
online-buy offline customers. "..."A separate comScore study found that
82 % of local searchers follow up offline via an in-store visit, phone
call, or purchase, emphasizing the importance for marketers to integrate
their on & offline information. 61 % then made purchases. Clearly,
search marketing drives local business....It's easier to talk than type,
and free directory assistance services such as Jingle network's 1-800
FREE 411; Microsoft's 1-800 555 TELL; Google's 1-800 GOOG 411 and
AT&T's 1-800 Yellow Pages are the fastest-growing voice channels
connecting local buyers and sellers...A marketing plan that fails to
address the blended search, video and voice environment is like playing
18 holes of golf with a single club. It's possible to finish, but it
won't be pretty.
ProQuest  local_advertising  City_Voice  small_business  franchising  Yellow_Pages  consumer_research  primers  in-store 
july 2010 by jerryking
ANALYSIS & COMMENTARY How To Forge A High-Tech Marriage Between Primary Care And Population Health
no. 5 (2010) | Health Affairs | David M. Lawrence.
"...innovations that deliver primary and population health care directly
to consumers are the seeds of a solution that promise far greater
benefit. These innovations include in-store clinics, in-home and on- and
in-body monitoring devices with wireless communication linkages, and
emerging diagnostic tools that promise greater precision in recognizing
preclinical disease states. They can help the United States and other
nations address the significant challenges ahead: major demographic
shifts, increased global competition, the growing burden of chronic
illness, and the costs of training and employing sufficient numbers of
primary care physicians to meet future demands...."
health_informatics  healthcare  innovation  in-store 
may 2010 by jerryking
How Technology Is Changing the Face of Innovation - WSJ.com
AUGUST 17, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by ERIK BRYNJOLFSSON
And MICHAEL SCHRAGE. Technology is transforming innovation at its
core, allowing companies to test new ideas at speeds—and prices—that
were unimaginable even a decade ago. They can stick features on Web
sites and tell within hours how customers respond. They can see results
from in-store promotions, or efforts to boost process productivity,
almost as quickly.
innovation  science_&_technology  Markiter  experimentation  accelerated_lifecycles  Erik_Brynjolfsson  Michael_Schrage  books  in-store 
august 2009 by jerryking

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