jerryking + historians + wwi   7

Canada beware: We are suffering a great depression in commodity prices - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL BLISS
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 15, 2016

The Great Depression of the 1930s used to be understood as a worldwide structural crisis that was partly an adjustment to the great expansion of crop acreage and other primary industries undertaken to meet the demands of the First World War. Unfortunately the history of those years now tends to be viewed through the distorting lenses of economists fixated on monetary policy and financial crisis management.

They thought that the crisis of 2008 might become a replay of the 1930s. For the most part they have not realized that it is today’s global depression in commodity prices that has eerie echoes of the great crack-up. If it’s true that we have overexpanded our productive capacity to meet the demands of Chinese growth, and if that growth is now going to slow, or even cease, then history is worrisomely on the verge of repeating itself....One sign of the beginning of wisdom is to be able to shed illusions. Make no mistake. Right now, the world is experiencing a great depression in commodity prices, led by the collapse of oil, that represents an enormous shrinkage in the valuation of our wealth. As a country whose wealth is still highly dependent on the returns we can get from selling our natural resources, Canada is very vulnerable. In a time of price depression, our wealth bleeds away.
'30s  adjustments  commodities  commodities_supercycle  economic_downturn  Great_Depression  historians  history  illusions  Michael_Bliss  natural_resources  overcapacity  pricing  overexpansion  slow_growth  wisdom  WWI 
january 2016 by jerryking
Going the distance to chronicle Canada’s necessary war - The Globe and Mail
MARK MEDLEY
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Sep. 23 2014

Tim Cook’s career arc as one of the country’s foremost popular historians is similarly shaped: He built his name writing about the First World War (At the Sharp End and Shock Troops, winner of the RBC Taylor Prize, are essential reading), but in recent years he has shifted focus elsewhere. “There’s not a lot left that I can write about the First World War,” he says. His latest book, The Necessary War, is the first in a two-volume series chronicling Canada’s role in the Second World War, which began 75 years ago this month.
historians  history  WWI  WWII  Canada  Canadian  books 
september 2014 by jerryking
Margaret MacMillan in Sarajevo, 100 years later - The Globe and Mail
MARGARET MACMILLAN
SARAJEVO — Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 27 2014
Margaret_MacMillan  WWI  history  historians  Sarajevo 
july 2014 by jerryking
For Canada, a victory worth remembrance -
Nov. 11 2013 | The Globe and Mail | J.L. Granatstein.

One great Canadian campaign, however, remains all but unknown. The Hundred Days, that short period running from Aug. 8, 1918, to the armistice on Nov. 11, saw the Canadian Corps score victory after victory against the toughest German defences on the Western Front. The Hundred Days was unquestionably the most decisive campaign ever fought by Canadian troops in battle, and if we remember the losses and pain on Remembrance Day, we should also remember the Canadian triumphs that dramatically shortened the First World War.
nation_building  history  WWI  Canadian  Canada  memorials  commemoration  J.L._Granatstein  veterans  soldiers  WWII  war  historians  Armistice  militaries 
november 2013 by jerryking
Historian Margaret MacMillan on what the ‘war to end wars’ can teach us -
Sep. 07 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Sandra Martin.
Her new book, The War that Ended Peace: The Road to 1914, will be out this fall – in anticipation of the 100th anniversary of the war next August.

Why are we still haunted by the First World War?

Because we still don’t know what to make of it. We’re still horrified by the loss, by the sense that it may have all been a mistake, by the sheer waste, and by what happened afterward. Nothing much was settled, it helped to brutalize European society, to breed ideologies like fascism and Bolshevism, to prepare the way for the horrors that came in the 1920s and 1930s and the Second World War. It’s also a war that created the modern world. It had its greatest impact on Europe, of course, but it shaped Canada and Australia, helped to speed the rise of the United States to superpower status, and redrew the map of much of the world. It was a watershed that remains one of the greatest historical puzzles.
history  historians  WWI  root_cause  Margaret_MacMillan  Syria  books  '30s  WWII  turning_points 
september 2013 by jerryking

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