jerryking + historians   72

Colin Palmer, Historian of the African Diaspora, Is Dead at 75 - The New York Times
July 11, 2019 | The New York Times | By Neil Genzlinger.

Colin A. Palmer, a historian who broadened the understanding of the African diaspora, showing that the American slave trade was only one part of a phenomenon that spanned centuries and influenced cultures worldwide, died on June 20 in Kingston, Jamaica. He was 75.....Professor Palmer published his first of many books in 1976.....it was called “Slaves of the White God: Blacks in Mexico, 1570-1650,” chronicling a period when the colonies that would become the United States were still in their formative stages. The book set him on a career-long path.....Palmer definitely brought about a deeper, more nuanced understanding of the African diaspora, one that extended well beyond African-American history or the history of the slave trade,” ....Palmer did more than just show that the African diaspora was not a single event; he examined the various strands of it for differences and similarities.....any examination of diaspora began with a study of Africa itself.....Palmer also wrote well-regarded articles and books on the Caribbean countries, including “Eric Williams and the Making of the Modern Caribbean” (2006), about the historian and politician who led Trinidad and Tobago to independence.....Palmer's research showed that the Spaniards had brought in black slaves to Mexico as early as the 1520s.....Palmer identified five streams of African diaspora, the first being the initial spread of humans from Africa in prehistory....There were two other “premodern” streams, as he called them. One involved the movement of Bantu-speaking peoples out of the areas now known as Nigeria and Cameroon to other parts of Africa and India in about 3000 B.C. The other was related to trading in the fifth century B.C.

The Atlantic slave trade, which he said began in earnest in the 15th century, was the fourth stream; the fifth began after slavery’s demise and continues today.
Africa  Afro-Latinos  Caribbean  Diaspora  historians  history  Mexico  obituaries  PhDs  scholars  slavery  UWI 
9 weeks ago by jerryking
Past mistakes carry warnings for the future of work
May 21, 2019 | Financial Times | by SARAH O'CONNOR.

* Data can mislead unless combined with grittier insights on the power structures that underpin it.
* William Kempster, a master mason who worked on St Paul's Cathedral in the 18th century, left wage records that helped expose a flaw in our understanding of the past.

It is often said that we should learn from the mistakes of the past. But we can also learn from the mistakes we make about the past. Seemingly smooth data can mislead unless it is combined with a grittier insight into the structures, contracts and power relationships that underpin the numbers. On that score, economists and politicians who want to make sense of today’s labour market have an advantage over historians: it is happening right now, just outside their offices, in all its complexity and messiness. All they have to do is open the door
17th_century  18th_century  builders  contextual  data  datasets  developing_countries  economic_history  economists  freelancing  gig_economy  handwritten  historians  human_cloud_platforms  insights  labour_markets  London  messiness  mistakes  politicians  power_relations  power_structures  record-keeping  United_Kingdom  unstructured_data  wages  white-collar 
may 2019 by jerryking
US declining interest in history presents risk to democracy
May 2, 2019 | Financial Times | by Edward Luce.

America today has found a less bloodthirsty way of erasing its memory by losing interest in its past. From an already low base, the number of American students majoring in history has dropped by more than a third since 2008. Barely one in two hundred American undergraduates now specialise in history......Donald Trump is a fitting leader for such times. He had to be told who Andrew Jackson was.....He also seems to think that Frederick Douglass, the escaped slave and 19th century abolitionist, is among us still.....But America’s 45th president can hardly be blamed for history’s unpopularity. Culpability for that precedes Mr Trump and is spread evenly between liberals, conservatives, faculty and parents........Courses on intellectual, diplomatic and political history are being replaced at some of America’s best universities by culture studies that highlight grievances at the expense of breadth.......Then there is the drumbeat of STEM — science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Most US states now mandate tests only in maths and English, at the expense of history and civic education...... In a recent survey, only 26 per cent of Americans could identify all three branches of government. More than half could not name a single justice on the US Supreme Court.....
the biggest culprit is the widespread belief that “soft skills” — such as philosophy and English, which are both in similar decline to history — do not lead to well-paid jobs.....folk prejudice against history is hard to shake. In an ever more algorithmic world, people believe that humanities are irrelevant. The spread of automation should put a greater premium on qualities that computers lack, such as intuitive intelligence, management skills and critical reasoning. Properly taught that is what a humanities education provides.......People ought to be able to grasp the basic features of their democracy. [Abiding] Faith in a historic theory only fuels a false sense of certainty....What may work for individual careers poses a collective risk to US democracy. The demise of strong civics coincides with waning voter turnout, a decline in joining associations, fewer citizen’s initiatives — and other qualities once associated with American vigour......There is no scientific metric for gullibility. Nor can we quantitatively prove that civic ignorance imposes a political cost on society. These are questions of judgment. But if America’s origins tell us anything it is that a well-informed citizenry creates a stronger society.
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here is what robots can't do -- create art, deep meaning, move our souls, help us to understand and thus operate in the world, inspire deeper thought, care for one another, help the environment where we live.......The role of the human is not to be dispassionate, depersonalized or neutral. It is precisely the emotive traits that are rewarded: the voracious lust for understanding, the enthusiasm for work, the ability to grasp the gist, the empathetic sensitivity to what will attract attention and linger in the mind. Unable to compete when it comes to calculation, the best workers will come with heart in hand.
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algorithms  automation  citizen_engagement  civics  Colleges_&_Universities  critical_thinking  democracy  Donald_Trump  Edward_Luce  empathy  engaged_citizenry  false_sense_of_certainty  foundational  historians  history  historical_amnesia  humanities  ignorance  political_literacy  sense-making  soft_skills  STEM  threats  U.S.  vulnerabilities 
may 2019 by jerryking
"Boss: The Black Experience in Business" Explores the History of African American Entrepreneurship Tuesday, April 23 on PBS
Apr 23, 2019 | WNET |

Tying together the past and the present, Boss: The Black Experience in Business explores the inspiring stories of trailblazing African American entrepreneurs and the significant contributions of contemporary business leaders. Stories featured in the film include those of entrepreneur Madam C.J. Walker, publisher John H. Johnson, Motown CEO Berry Gordy, and business pioneer and philanthropist Reginald F. Lewis, among others. The film features new interviews with Vernon Jordan, senior managing director of Lazard, Freres & Co. LLC.; Cathy Hughes, CEO and founder of Urban One; Ursula Burns, former CEO of Xerox and chairman of VEON; Ken Frazier, chairman, president and CEO of Merck & Co., Inc.; Richelieu Dennis, founder, CEO and executive chairman of Sundial Brands; Robert F. Smith, chairman and CEO of Vista Equity Managing Partners, LLC; Earl "Butch" Graves, Jr., CEO of Black Enterprise; and John Rogers, CEO and founder of Ariel Investments.

As a capitalist system emerged in the United States, African Americans found ways to establish profitable businesses in numerous industries, including financial services, retail, beauty, music and media.
African-Americans  Berry_Gordy  C.J.Walker  CEOs  documentaries  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  filmmakers  founders  historians  history  inspiration  Kenneth_Frazier  Lazard  Merck  moguls  PBS  Reginald_Lewis  Robert_Smith  storytelling  trailblazers  Vernon_Jordan 
april 2019 by jerryking
In ‘Stony the Road,’ Henry Louis Gates Jr. Captures the History and Images of the Fraught Years After the Civil War
April 18, 2019 | The New York Times | By Nell Irvin Painter.

STONY THE ROAD
Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow
By Henry Louis Gates Jr.
Illustrated. 296 pp. Penguin Press. $30.

Vergangenheitsbewältigung = coming to terms with the past — and it carries connotations of a painful history that citizens would rather not confront but that must be confronted in order not to be repeated.
20th_century  African-Americans  bigotry  books  book_reviews  Henry_Louis_Gates  historians  history  Jim_Crow  John_Hope_Franklin  KKK  lynchings  memorabilia  racial_politics  Reconstruction  stereotypes  torture  white_nationalism  white_supremacy  imagery  Vergangenheitsbewältigung  W.E.B._Du_Bois  iconic 
april 2019 by jerryking
CBC Listen | Ideas | Ross King on the art of history
Ross King is one of the most popular historians Canada has ever produced. Yet originally, he wanted to be a novelist. And after researching his doctoral thesis on T. S. Eliot, he published his first book, which fictionalized the story of a castrato singer in 18th century London, as seen through the eyes of an aspiring painter. Then he became fascinated by Italian architect, Filippo Brunelleschi, who designed and built the famous cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore, in Florence. King says he discovered that it was more fun to write when you didn't need to "make up the facts." IDEAS host Paul Kennedy talks to the man who's also written non-fiction books about Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Machiavelli, Edouard Manet and Claude Monet, and about Canada's Group of Seven.
18th_century  Canadian  CBC  history  historians  podcasts 
january 2019 by jerryking
Sterling Stuckey, 86, Dies; Charted African Culture in Slavery - The New York Times
By Sam Roberts
Aug. 28, 2018

Sterling Stuckey, an eminent black historian who challenged his white colleagues by documenting how uprooted Africans not only retained their culture while they survived slavery but eventually suffused the rest of American society with their transplanted folkways, died on Aug. 15 in Riverside, Calif. He was 86.....He had recently finished the manuscript of his latest book, “The Chambers of the Soul: Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville and the Blues.”.....Through meticulous research, Professor Stuckey sought to discredit the white academics who had dominated and, in his view, devalued the field of African studies.

Early on he was bitterly critical of “numerous white experts on black Africa,” as he described them, who “have elaborated a fabric of untruths to rationalize continued white control over African studies.”.... his breakthrough essay, “Through the Prism of Folklore: The Black Ethos in Slavery,” published in 1968 by The Massachusetts Review, Professor Stuckey maintained that political and cultural studies of Africa must encompass people in North America and the West Indies.

...Professor Stuckey’s books included “Slave Culture: Nationalist Theory and the Foundations of Black America” (1987) and “Going Through the Storm: The Influence of African American Art in History” (1994).
Africa  African-Americans  black_nationalism  books  Colleges_&_Universities  history  historians  obituaries  PhDs  scholars  slavery 
august 2018 by jerryking
Lerone Bennett Jr., Historian of Black America, Dies at 89 - The New York Times
By NEIL GENZLINGERFEB. 16, 2018

Lerone Bennett Jr., a historian and journalist who wrote extensively on race relations and black history and was a top editor at Ebony magazine for decades, died on Wednesday in Chicago. He was 89......His best-known book was “Before the Mayflower,” drawn from a series of articles for Ebony and first published in 1962..... “Forced Into Glory: Abraham Lincoln’s White Dream.” “What Manner of Man: A Biography of Martin Luther King Jr.” (1964), “Black Power U.S.A.: The Human Side of Reconstruction, 1867-1877” (1967) and “The Shaping of Black America” (1975)..... Mr. Bennett talked about a three-part approach to affecting change.

“Every black person is obligated,” he said, “to try to do what he does as well as any person who ever lived can do it, or any person who ever lives can do it; then, to try to save one — just one — person if you can. And then to struggle to destroy a system which is multiplying black victims faster than all the black intellectuals and the black leaders in America can talk about. I see those three things connected.”
African-Americans  historians  obituaries  Ebony  magazines  journalists  books  writers  think_threes  Black_Power 
february 2018 by jerryking
What the history of the electric dynamo teaches about the future of the computer.
JUNE 9 2007 6:18 AM
By Tim Harford

David's research also suggests patience. New technology takes time to have a big economic impact. More importantly, businesses and society itself have to adapt before that will happen. Such change is always difficult and, perhaps mercifully, slower than the march of technology.

More recent research from MIT's Erik Brynjolfsson has shown that the history of the dynamo is repeating itself: Companies do not do well if they spend a lot of money on IT projects unless they also radically reorganize to take advantage of the technology. The rewards of success are huge, but the chance of failure is high. That may explain why big IT projects so often fail, and why companies nevertheless keep trying to introduce them.

Brynjolfsson recently commented that the technology currently available is enough to fuel a couple of decades of organizational improvements.
technology  Alfred_Chandler  historians  IT  productivity  productivity_payoffs  Erik_Brynjolfsson  organizational_improvements  organizational_change  organizational_structure  Tim_Harford 
may 2017 by jerryking
Acclaimed Canadian historian, author Michael Bliss dies at 76 - The Globe and Mail
TORONTO — The Canadian Press
Published Thursday, May 18, 2017

Bliss authored 14 books on business, politics, and medicine, was an Officer of the Order of Canada, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and a member of the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame.

When Bliss was inducted into the Medical Hall of Fame in 2016, Canadian Museum of History president Mark O’Neill called him “one of Canada’s leading intellectuals and historians.”

“Michael Bliss brings a wealth of knowledge to Canada and the world,” O’Neill said.
Canadian  historians  authors  writers  obituaries  uToronto  Michael_Bliss 
may 2017 by jerryking
David McCullough’s History Lessons
April 14, 2017 | WSJ | By Alexandra Wolfe.

David McCullough thinks that the country isn’t in such bad shape. It’s all relative, says the 83-year-old historian and author of such books as the Pulitzer Prize-winning biographies “Truman” (1992) and “John Adams” (2001). He points to the Civil War, for instance, when the country lost 2% of its population—that would be more than six million people today—or the flu pandemic of 1918, when more than 500,000 Americans died. “Imagine that on the nightly news,” he says.

History gives us a sense of proportion, he says: “It’s an antidote to a lot of unfortunately human trends like self-importance and self-pity.”.....see history “as an aid to navigation in such troubled, uncertain times,”.....[McCullough] thought back to something that the playwright and novelist Thornton Wilder had said while a fellow at Yale during Mr. McCullough’s undergraduate days. When Wilder heard a good story and wished to see it on the stage, he wrote the play himself. When he wanted to read a book about an interesting event, he wrote it himself.....Even today, Mr. McCullough doesn’t use a computer for research or writing. He still goes to libraries and archives to find primary sources and writes on a typewriter. ...History, he adds, is “often boiled down to statistics and dates and quotations that make it extremely boring.” The key to generating interest, he says, is for professors and teachers to frame history as stories about people.
archives  authors  biographies  Civil_War  contextual  David_McCullough  DIY  flu_outbreaks  Harry_Truman  historians  history  John_Adams  libraries  self-importance  self-pity  sense_of_proportion  storytelling  Pulitzer_Prize 
april 2017 by jerryking
The History the Slaveholders Wanted Us to Forget - The New York Times
By HENRY LOUIS GATES Jr.

Except for the relatively few African-Americans who saw through such racist fictions of Africa, drawn upon to devalue their humanity and justify their relegation to second-class citizenship — people such as Garvey, Henry Highland Garnet, Martin R. Delany, W.E.B. Du Bois (who would die a citizen of Ghana), Langston Hughes and Maya Angelou — far too many of us felt that “Africa” was something of an embarrassment. Richard Wright, the great novelist, published a book titled “Black Power” in 1954 about feeling that way.
historians  erasures  history  slavery  Africa  ignorance  slaveholders  Henry_Louis_Gates  African-Americans  second-class_citizenship  humanity  W.E.B._Du_Bois  Black_Power 
february 2017 by jerryking
Henry Louis Gates Jr.: Restoring Black History
SEPT. 23, 2016 | - The New York Times | By HENRY LOUIS GATES Jr.

The opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington helps to resolve the protracted debate about the contributions of black people to American history and, indeed, about whether they had a history worth preserving at all. Those questions were at the heart of the nation’s original debate about whether, and how, black lives matter.....“History,” James Baldwin wrote, “is not merely something to be read. And it does not refer merely, or even principally, to the past. On the contrary, the great force of history comes from the fact that we carry it within us, are unconsciously controlled by it in many ways, and history is literally present in all that we do.”.... the opening of the museum ...reinscribes race at a symbolically central place in American culture, on the National Mall, where we celebrate our collective public histories, ensuring that a mountain of evidence about black contributions to America will be on permanent display....More than a museum, the building on the National Mall is a refutation of two and a half centuries of the misuse of history to reinforce a social order in which black people were enslaved, then systematically repressed and denied their rights when freed. It also repudiates the long and dismal tradition of objectifying black people in museums.
slavery  Jim_Crow  history  historians  Henry_Louis_Gates  museums  Washington_D.C.  African-Americans  Thomas_Jefferson  Enlightenment  Hegel  John_Hope_Franklin  W.E.B._Du_Bois  Carter_Woodson  Arthur_Schomburg  Obama  James_Baldwin  Smithsonian  David_Adjaye 
september 2016 by jerryking
Canada beware: We are suffering a great depression in commodity prices - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL BLISS
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 15, 2016

The Great Depression of the 1930s used to be understood as a worldwide structural crisis that was partly an adjustment to the great expansion of crop acreage and other primary industries undertaken to meet the demands of the First World War. Unfortunately the history of those years now tends to be viewed through the distorting lenses of economists fixated on monetary policy and financial crisis management.

They thought that the crisis of 2008 might become a replay of the 1930s. For the most part they have not realized that it is today’s global depression in commodity prices that has eerie echoes of the great crack-up. If it’s true that we have overexpanded our productive capacity to meet the demands of Chinese growth, and if that growth is now going to slow, or even cease, then history is worrisomely on the verge of repeating itself....One sign of the beginning of wisdom is to be able to shed illusions. Make no mistake. Right now, the world is experiencing a great depression in commodity prices, led by the collapse of oil, that represents an enormous shrinkage in the valuation of our wealth. As a country whose wealth is still highly dependent on the returns we can get from selling our natural resources, Canada is very vulnerable. In a time of price depression, our wealth bleeds away.
'30s  adjustments  commodities  commodities_supercycle  economic_downturn  Great_Depression  historians  history  illusions  Michael_Bliss  natural_resources  overcapacity  pricing  overexpansion  slow_growth  wisdom  WWI 
january 2016 by jerryking
John Steele Gordon: The Little Miracle Spurring Inequality - WSJ
By JOHN STEELE GORDON
Updated June 2, 2014

Extreme leaps in innovation, like the invention of the microprocessor, bring with them staggering fortunes....The great growth of fortunes in recent decades is not a sinister development. Instead it is simply the inevitable result of an extraordinary technological innovation, the microprocessor, which Intel brought to market in 1971. Seven of the 10 largest fortunes in America today were built on this technology, as have been countless smaller ones. These new fortunes unavoidably result in wealth being more concentrated at the top.

But no one is poorer because Bill Gates , Larry Ellison , et al., are so much richer. These new fortunes came into existence only because the public wanted the products and services—and lower prices—that the microprocessor made possible. Anyone who has found his way home thanks to a GPS device or has contacted a child thanks to a cellphone appreciates the awesome power of the microprocessor. All of our lives have been enhanced and enriched by the technology.....technology opens up many new economic niches, and entrepreneurs rush to take advantage of the new opportunities....The Dutch exploited the new trade (with India and the East Indies) so successfully that the historian Simon Schama entitled his 1987 book on this period of Dutch history "The Embarrassment of Riches."...attempt to tax away new fortunes in the name of preventing inequality is certain to have adverse effects on further technology creation and niche exploitation by entrepreneurs—and harm job creation as a result. The reason is one of the laws of economics: Potential reward must equal the risk or the risk won't be taken.
Silicon_Valley  wealth_creation  innovation  income_distribution  income_inequality  productivity_payoffs  plutocracies  software  Thomas_Piketty  microprocessors  historians  history  entrepreneurship  books  Industrial_Revolution  Gilded_Age  Simon_Schama  Dutch  discontinuities  disequilibriums  adverse_selection 
march 2015 by jerryking
Going the distance to chronicle Canada’s necessary war - The Globe and Mail
MARK MEDLEY
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Sep. 23 2014

Tim Cook’s career arc as one of the country’s foremost popular historians is similarly shaped: He built his name writing about the First World War (At the Sharp End and Shock Troops, winner of the RBC Taylor Prize, are essential reading), but in recent years he has shifted focus elsewhere. “There’s not a lot left that I can write about the First World War,” he says. His latest book, The Necessary War, is the first in a two-volume series chronicling Canada’s role in the Second World War, which began 75 years ago this month.
historians  history  WWI  WWII  Canada  Canadian  books 
september 2014 by jerryking
Margaret MacMillan in Sarajevo, 100 years later - The Globe and Mail
MARGARET MACMILLAN
SARAJEVO — Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 27 2014
Margaret_MacMillan  WWI  history  historians  Sarajevo 
july 2014 by jerryking
Your ancestry may be your destiny
Mar. 22 2014 | The Globe and Mail | by Margaret Wente.

A deeply challenging new book by economic historian Gregory Clark (The Son Also Rises: Surnames and the History of Social Mobility) argues that such endurance is not the exception but the norm. It goes on to argue that most people’s outcomes can be predicted at conception. To an alarming degree, your destiny is determined by your ancestors.
ancestry  books  economic_history  genes  historians  Margaret_Wente  social_classes  social_mobility 
march 2014 by jerryking
For Canada, a victory worth remembrance -
Nov. 11 2013 | The Globe and Mail | J.L. Granatstein.

One great Canadian campaign, however, remains all but unknown. The Hundred Days, that short period running from Aug. 8, 1918, to the armistice on Nov. 11, saw the Canadian Corps score victory after victory against the toughest German defences on the Western Front. The Hundred Days was unquestionably the most decisive campaign ever fought by Canadian troops in battle, and if we remember the losses and pain on Remembrance Day, we should also remember the Canadian triumphs that dramatically shortened the First World War.
nation_building  history  WWI  Canadian  Canada  memorials  commemoration  J.L._Granatstein  veterans  soldiers  WWII  war  historians  Armistice  militaries 
november 2013 by jerryking
'12 Years a Slave,' and Historians' Problems with Slave Narratives : The New Yorker
October 23, 2013
Slavery’s Shadow
Posted by Annette Gordon-Reed

The historian’s task is to recognize this truth, figure out what problems are inherent to each form of evidence, and find ways, if possible, to surmount them. Take that most cherished of historical documents, the family letter. Letter writers often used the medium to create a pictures of what their families were like, and to illustrate what role they played in the family. Sometimes the picture was good. Sometimes it was bad. But the family letter is always subjective, and carries with it the problems that go along with all subjective judgments. We must be wary of them—not reject them out of hand but, rather, recognize their limitations.

What do we do to satisfy ourselves that any critical or important information contained in a family letter, or in any letter, is reliable? We look for evidence outside of the document, preferably created by someone other than the letter writer, to support what it says. If the letter presents information that we have no good reason to question—if the writer is not saying anything that is fantastical, or which contradicts other known information—we tend to accept its assertions. There is only so much time in the day and in life. The same process can be, and has been, followed with slave narratives.
slavery  storytelling  historians  history  critical_thinking  problems 
october 2013 by jerryking
‘Ebony and Ivy,’ About How Slavery Helped Universities Grow - NYTimes.com
October 18, 2013 | NYT | By JENNIFER SCHUESSLER.


Mr. Wilder, a history professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has a new book, “Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America’s Universities,” which argues provocatively that the nation’s early colleges, alongside church and state, were “the third pillar of a civilization based on bondage.” ... Mr. Wilder, scholars say, seems to be the first to look beyond particular campuses to take a broader look at the role of slavery in the growth of America’s earliest universities, which, he argues, were more than just “innocent or passive beneficiaries” of wealth derived from the slave trade.

“Craig shows that what happened at one institution wasn’t simply incidental or idiosyncratic,” said James Wright, a former president of Dartmouth College, which is discussed in the book. “Slavery was deeply embedded in all our institutions, which found ways to explain and rationalize slavery, even after the formation of the American republic.”....“There has been a fear that there’s something lurking in the archives that will be devastating to these institutions, and that people doing this work are motivated by hostility,” Mr. Wilder said. “But history is a poor medium for seeking revenge.” ...“Before the Civil War, about half of the student body came from the South,” Ms. Sandweiss said. “What was it about this place that made people feel like it was a good place to send their sons?”
Lurking behind such historical questions, scholars say, is a more contentious contemporary one: What should universities do today to make African-Americans feel as if they fully belong?
antebellum  Ivy_League  elitism  Colleges_&_Universities  African-Americans  slavery  history  historians  archives  books 
october 2013 by jerryking
Table Talk With Simon Schama | Cuisine With History - WSJ.com
September 19, 2013 | WSJ | Paul Levy.

With his documentary series "The Story of the Jews" currently on the BBC and the first volume of the accompanying book published this month, we sat down with Mr. Schama at Mishkin's deli in London, which calls itself "a kind of Jewish deli."


What did he think of the food?"It's so much better than when I was last here," he says. "The matzo ball soup I ordered just as a test is perfect. The salt beef is magnificent, though I'd have liked it a little less lean—it's Aberdeen Angus and cured here."
Simon_Schama  recipes  historians  fish  delicatessens  London 
september 2013 by jerryking
Historian David Landes’s theories of ‘superior’ cultures are still polarizing
Sep. 11 2013 | - The Globe and Mail | DOUGLAS MARTIN

David Landes, a distinguished Harvard scholar of economic history, saw tidal movements in the rise of seemingly small things. He suggested that the development of eyeglasses made precision tools possible. Maybe, he said, using chopsticks helped Asian workers gain the manual dexterity needed to make microprocessors....In his 482-page Revolution in Time: Clocks and the Making of the Modern World, published in 1983, Prof. Landes examined the growth of the Industrial Age through the history of timepieces, tracing their origin to medieval European monasteries; monks, he wrote, needed something to tell them when to gather for a regular round of group prayer.... His most influential work, The Wealth and Poverty of Nations: Why Some Are So Rich and Some So Poor (1998), answered the question posed in its title (a play on that of Adam Smith’s classic work) by pointing to the importance of the Protestant work ethic and European attitudes toward science and technology....His dissertation became his first book, Bankers and Pashas: International Finance and Economic Imperialism in Egypt....Reviewing his 2006 book, Dynasties: Fortunes and Misfortunes of the World’s Great Family Businesses, for The Times of London, Christopher Silvester described the writing as pithy, thoughtful and sprightly. The book offers 13 sketches of tycoons, including Henry Ford, John D. Rockefeller and Armand Peugeot.
historians  obituaries  books  cultural_values  family_business  economic_history  scholars  Harvard  work_ethic  industrial_age  precision  manual_dexterity  moguls 
september 2013 by jerryking
Historian Margaret MacMillan on what the ‘war to end wars’ can teach us -
Sep. 07 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Sandra Martin.
Her new book, The War that Ended Peace: The Road to 1914, will be out this fall – in anticipation of the 100th anniversary of the war next August.

Why are we still haunted by the First World War?

Because we still don’t know what to make of it. We’re still horrified by the loss, by the sense that it may have all been a mistake, by the sheer waste, and by what happened afterward. Nothing much was settled, it helped to brutalize European society, to breed ideologies like fascism and Bolshevism, to prepare the way for the horrors that came in the 1920s and 1930s and the Second World War. It’s also a war that created the modern world. It had its greatest impact on Europe, of course, but it shaped Canada and Australia, helped to speed the rise of the United States to superpower status, and redrew the map of much of the world. It was a watershed that remains one of the greatest historical puzzles.
history  historians  WWI  root_cause  Margaret_MacMillan  Syria  books  '30s  WWII  turning_points 
september 2013 by jerryking
Paul Johnson: The World-Changing Margaret Thatcher - WSJ.com
April 8, 2013 | WSJ| By PAUL JOHNSON.

The World-Changing Margaret Thatcher
Not since Catherine the Great has there been a woman of such consequence.
historians  Margaret_Thatcher  op-ed  United_Kingdom 
april 2013 by jerryking
History Doesn't Follow the Rules
200X | TIME | Jeff Greenfield
The world can change in a day, all right, but not always the way we think it will. LOOKING FOR A LESSON IN HUMILITY? STAND AT A MAJOR historical marker, and try drawing a perfectly reasonable, prudent conclusion about where that marker is pointing.

...revised views of history are what keep successive generations of historians in business, continuously updating where the latest dominoes have fallen. Eighty years from now, scholars will still be debating the meaning of what happened 80—or even 800—years ago. We journalists like to say that journalism is the first rough draft of history—a mere acknowledgment, perhaps that there is a Higher Authority in whose hands rests the final draft.
history  unpredictability  humility  seminal_moments  historians  worthiness  journalists  journalism 
august 2012 by jerryking
The Rhino Principle
01.30.06 | Forbes.com | Paul Johnson
We can choose to lead quiet lives and get through them without achieving much. But if we want to do the big thing, if we hope to leave a record that will be admired and remembered, we must learn to distinguish between the peripheral and the essential. Then, having clearly established our central objective, we must charge at it again and again until the goal is achieved.

That is what the rhinoceros does. It may not be a model animal in most ways. But it does one thing very well. And that one thing we can learn: Charge!
historians  gtd  indispensable  worthiness  signals  noise  discernment  judgment  thinking_big 
june 2012 by jerryking
A Historian's Take on Islam Steers U.S. in Terrorism Fight - WSJ.com
February 3, 2004 | WSJ | By PETER WALDMAN | Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL.
A Historian's Take on Islam Steers U.S. in Terrorism Fight
Bernard Lewis's Blueprint -- Sowing Arab Democracy -- Is Facing a Test in Iraq....Bernard Lewis, Princeton University historian, author of more than 20 books on Islam and the Middle East, is the intellectual author of what is referred to as the the Lewis Doctrine. Though never debated in Congress or sanctified by presidential decree, Mr. Lewis's diagnosis of the Muslim world's malaise, and his call for a U.S. military invasion to seed democracy in the Mideast, have helped define the boldest shift in U.S. foreign policy in 50 years. The occupation of Iraq put the doctrine to the test--and it failed...."The Lewis Doctrine posits no such rational foe. It envisions not a clash of interests or even ideology, but of cultures. In the Mideast, the font of the terrorism threat, America has but two choices, "both disagreeable," Mr. Lewis has written: "Get tough or get out." His celebration, rather than shunning, of toughness is shared by several other influential U.S. Mideast experts, including Fouad Ajami and Richard Perle.

A central Lewis theme is that Muslims have had a chip on their shoulders since 1683, when the Ottomans failed for the second time to sack Christian Vienna. "Islam has been on the defensive" ever since, Mr. Lewis wrote in a 1990 essay called "The Roots of Muslim Rage," where he described a "clash of civilizations," a concept later popularized by Harvard political scientist Samuel Huntington. For 300 years, Mr. Lewis says, Muslims have watched in horror and humiliation as the Christian civilizations of Europe and North America have overshadowed them militarily, economically and culturally."
historians  Bernard_Lewis  terrorism  U.S.foreign_policy  Middle_East  Mideast_Peace  humiliation  blueprints 
may 2012 by jerryking
A First Draft of History? - WSJ.com
March 12, 2005 | WSJ | By BRET STEPHENS

The cliché is that journalism is the first draft of history. Yet a historian searching for clues about the origins of many of the great stories of recent decades--the collapse of the Soviet empire; the rise of Osama bin Laden; the declining American crime rate; the economic eclipse of Japan and Germany--would find most contemporary journalism useless. Perhaps a story here or there might, in retrospect, seem illuminating. But chances are it would have been nearly invisible at the time of publication: eight column inches, page A12.

The problem is not that journalists can't get their facts straight: They can and usually do. Nor is it that the facts are obscure: Often, the most essential facts are also the most obvious ones. The problem is that journalists have a difficult time distinguishing significant facts--facts with consequences--from insignificant ones. That, in turn, comes from not thinking very hard about just which stories are most worth telling....As for the media, it shouldn't be too difficult to do better. Look for the countervailing data. Broaden your list of sources. Beware of exoticizing your subject:
Bret_Stephens  journalism  journalists  critical_thinking  history  signals  noise  frictions  pain_points  worthiness  countervailing  storytelling  seminal_moments  wide-framing  discernment  origin_story  historians  consequential  clichés  worthwhile_problems 
may 2012 by jerryking
Newt Gingrich wants you to make him run for president
February 5, 2007 | Fortune | Nina Easton.

Has anyone revitalized or created a bright spot in a flat or declining industry?
At the Tempe conference, Gingrich politely listens to such proposals as applying Toyota-style production-control techniques to the health system - and then slices through them with an alternative mantra of competition, deregulation, modernized information systems, and personal responsibility. ...In other words, in Gingrich's world consumer health care should look more like Travelocity...Instead, the Center for Health Transformation offers policy ideas to companies that want to get health-care costs off their backs but oppose government-imposed, universal-health-insurance plans as costly and burdensome. The center's roster of 75 clients is impressive, including insurers Blue Cross & Blue Shield and GE Healthcare, providers like the American Hospital Association, and employers like GM (Charts) and Ford (Charts). Clients pay fees ranging from $10,000 to $200,000 a year....Gingrich's own epiphany about a presidential run dates back three years, when he picked up Harold Holzer's "Lincoln at Cooper Union." The book tells the story of how Lincoln's lengthy 1860 speech in New York City - an intellectually rigorous rebuttal of slavery's legal grounding - wowed the Eastern establishment and transformed a gawky, badly dressed Western politician into a leading presidential candidate. Gingrich saw himself in this story of the underestimated outsider making good, despite the seeming hubris of comparing himself to Lincoln, and it now underpins his unorthodox quest for the presidency...Gingrich also says things like "If you want to shape history, it's useful to actually know history" without a hint of self-consciousness...Of the other Republican contenders for President he says, "We're not in the same business. They are running for the White House. I am trying to change the country."..."My planning horizons are 17 years. I want to give you a sense of scale," he explains, as if helping me focus on his long view of things. "I also do what I think the country needs. I don't operate under personal ambition." ...."There are 3,300 counties, 17,000 elected school boards, 60,000 cities and towns, 14,000 state legislators, 50 governors, and 535 elected federal legislators," he says.
profile  historians  healthcare  lean  books  Six_Sigma  innovation  best_practices  change_agents  long-term  unorthodox  decline  competition  deregulation  information_systems  personal_responsibility  underestimation  outsiders  Abraham_Lincoln  personal_ambition  intellectually_rigorous 
may 2012 by jerryking
Cruel ironies - FT.com
December 16, 2005 | FT | By Christian Tyler.

ROUGH CROSSINGS: Britain, the Slaves and the American Revolution
by Simon Schama
BBC Books £20, 488 pages
slavery  emancipation  Simon_Schama  history  historians  book_reviews 
january 2012 by jerryking
Leadership Lessons From the Shackleton Expedition - NYTimes.com
By NANCY F. KOEHN
Published: December 24, 2011

Consider just a handful of recent events: the financial crisis of 2008; the gulf oil spill of 2010; and the Japanese nuclear disaster, the debt-ceiling debacle and euro crisis this year. Constant turbulence seems to be the new normal, and effective leadership is crucial in containing it.

Real leaders, wrote the novelist David Foster Wallace, are people who “help us overcome the limitations of our own individual laziness and selfishness and weakness and fear and get us to do better, harder things than we can get ourselves to do on our own.”

Shackleton exemplified this kind of leadership for almost two years on the ice. What can we learn from his actions?...Shackleton begun the voyage with a mission of exploration, but it quickly became a mission of survival.

This capacity is vital in our own time, when leaders must often change course midstream — jettisoning earlier standards of success and redefining their purposes and plans.
uncertainty  unpredictability  leadership  expeditions  explorers  historians  lessons_learned  pivots  turbulence  constant_change  leaders  human_frailties  course_correction  arduous  Antartica  South_Pole  Ernest_Shackleton  new_normal 
december 2011 by jerryking
So much more than a nose on our currency - The Globe and Mail
Dec. 10, 2011 | Globe and Mail |JEFFREY SIMPSON.

If Richard Gwyn’s books were published in the United States, they’d be catapulted instantly onto all the bestseller lists and remain there for a long stretch....In Canada, Mr. Gwyn has produced a wonderfully researched, engagingly written two-volume biography of Sir John A. Macdonald, beautifully presented by Random House Canada. This is history on a grand scale, with a riveting central character and a country being literally built around him.

Nation Maker is an appropriate title for the second volume. Canada came together under Macdonald’s watch, and with his care. In the same time frame, the Meiji Restoration thrust Japan into the world, Bismarck united Germany and Il Risorgimento resulted in a united Italy. Canadian modesty aside, Canada has been a good deal less disruptive of the international order than these three countries for the past century and a half. Put that way, Canadian history is something to ponder, even celebrate.
Richard_Gwyn  history  historians  writers  Sir_John_A._Macdonald  Canada  Canadian  Jeffrey_Simpson  nation_builders  book_reviews 
december 2011 by jerryking
Why I give Sir John an A
Nov 25, 2004 | The Globe and Mail.pg. R.3 |Charlotte Gray

Last spring, I was a guest on CBC Radio. Callers were invited to phone in and describe the qualities that some mythical "great Canadian" should embody.
ProQuest  Canadian  Canada  best_of  history  historians  nation_builders  Sir_John_A._Macdonald  Charlotte_Gray 
october 2011 by jerryking
Instant messengers - FT.com
September 30, 2011 5:35 pm
Instant messengers

By John Gapper

In principle, the two types of history – an instant account and the long view – are complementary. The journalist digs up the ground and tries to uncover facts immediately, and the historian assembles all the available data and adds perspective. Rival versions of history may agree on the basic facts but shape them differently to produce varying conclusions.
journalists  historians  Andrew_Sorkin  Michael_Lewis  Frank_Partnoy 
october 2011 by jerryking
Niall Ferguson and the brain-dead American right - Glenn Beck - Salon.com
, May 24, 2011 |Salon | By Michael Lind

The British historian owes his celebrity here to the absence of authentic American conservative intellectuals
Niall_Ferguson  conservative  pundits  historians 
october 2011 by jerryking
Norm Augustine: The Education Our Economy Needs - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 21, 2011 | WSJ | By NORM AUGUSTINE.

We lag in science, but students' historical illiteracy hurts our politics and our businesses.
illiteracy  history  historians  students  high_schools  critical_thinking 
september 2011 by jerryking
Margaret MacMillan’s multiplicity
Oct. 08, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | MARGARET MacMILLAN
reading  books  historians  Oxford  Margaret_MacMILLAN 
october 2010 by jerryking
John Henrik Clarke - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"The events which transpired 5,000 yrs ago; 5 yrs. ago or 5
min. ago, have determined what will happen 5 min. from now; 5 yrs. from
now or 5,000 yrs from now. All history is a current event."

"...education has but one honorable purpose, one alone, everything else
is a waste of time...that is to train the student to be a proper handler
of power."

"Every form of true education trains the student in self-reliance"
"African people need to stop shouting 'nationtime' until they are clear
about the responsibilities of running a nation."
"History is a clock people use to tell their historical culture and
political time of the day. It's a compass that people use to find
themselves on the map of human geography. The history tells them where
they have been, where they are and what they are. But most importantly
history tells a people where they still must go and what they still must
be"
**********************************************************************
I see history as my root and my illumination ☑
5 August /6 August 2017 | Financial Times | by Kwame Nkrumah Cain.
African-Americans  historians  quotes  history  political_power  education  self-reliance  North_Star  the_counsel_of_the_dead  wisdom  Kwame_Nkrumah 
may 2010 by jerryking
A 'rare moment of recognition' for a pioneer of social history - The Globe and Mail
Mar. 17, 2010 | Globe & Mail | by SIRI AGRELL. Toronto
historian Natalie Zemon Davis was named yesterday as the recipient of
the Holberg International Memorial Prize - awarded by the Norwegian
parliament and worth about $785,000.

U of T president David Naylor said the international recognition is a
"fantastic boost" to the school's arts, social science and humanities
faculties, and validates a continued focus on areas of studies that have
suffered a decline in public funding and support.
uToronto  historians  history  humanities  David_Naylor 
march 2010 by jerryking
Louis R. Harlan, Historian of Booker T. Washington, Dies at 87 - Obituary (Obit) - NYTimes.com
January 29, 2010 | New York Times | By WILLIAM GRIMES.
“Booker T. Washington: The Making of a Black Leader, 1856-1901” was
published by Oxford University Press in 1972 and won the Bancroft Prize
the following year. “Booker T. Washington: The Wizard of Tuskegee,
1901-1915,” published by Oxford in 1983, won both the Bancroft Prize and
the Pulitzer Prize for biography in 1984. “It was the first really
three-dimensional work that went into the secret life, the private
world, of the most famous black man of his time,” said Mr. Smock, the
author of “Booker T. Washington: Black Leadership in the Age of Jim
Crow” (Ivan R. Dee, 2009).
Booker_T._Washington  historians  obituaries  biographies  Pulitzer_Prize 
january 2010 by jerryking
FT.com / Management - The corporate memory-makers
January 11 2010 | Financial Times | By Alicia Clegg. From a
communications perspective, say enthusiasts, the combination of
technology and storytelling creates all kinds of possibilities for
businesses to bring their brands imaginatively to life as well as to
pass knowledge and skills from one generation of employees to the next.
Through the retelling of veterans’ memories, companies hope to build
stronger, more successful, cultures.
business_archives  historians  storytelling  organizational_culture  heritage  commemorative  archives  history  corporate 
january 2010 by jerryking
Book Review: "Thucydides: The Reinvention of History" - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 30, 2009 |Wall Street Journal | PETER STOTHARD. The School of Athens
The difficulty of drawing lessons from an ancient war—of distinguishing facts from what one would like to be facts.BY
rising_powers  book_reviews  Greek  historians  history  Thucydides 
november 2009 by jerryking
The Sun Set on One, but It Rises on Another
Apr. 10, 2003 | The Wall Street Journal pg. D8 | By John
O'Sullivan who reviews EMPIRE By Niall Ferguson (Basic Books, 392 pages,
$35.
Niall_Ferguson  historians  book_reviews 
november 2009 by jerryking
A Sweet Taste of Empire
Jan. 12, 2003 | TIME | By MICHAEL BRUNTON who reviews Empire:
How Britain Made the Modern World, written by Niall Ferguson, Professor
of Political and Financial History at Oxford University.
Niall_Ferguson  book_reviews  historians 
november 2009 by jerryking
Ernest May, International Relations Expert, Dies at 80 - Obituary (Obit) - NYTimes.com
By DENNIS HEVESI
Published: June 6, 2009

Thinking in Time--great book

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes"
Harvard  geopolitics  U.S.foreign_policy  diplomacy  obituaries  writers  decision_making  historians 
june 2009 by jerryking
Alfred Chandler, Pulitzer winner, leading business historian - The Boston Globe
May 14, 2007 | Boston Globe | By Mark Feeney, Globe Staff.
Alfred D. Chandler's greatest accomplishment was to " establish business
history as an independent and important area for study,"
historians  HBS  obituaries  Pulitzer_Prize 
may 2009 by jerryking
FT.com / Home UK / UK - A rummage in the corporate attic
July 24, 2008, Financial Times, pg. 10, article by Alicia
Clegg details how commemorative research can benefit a company
commercially with image and marketing. References Bruce Weindruch,
founder, of the History Factory, a consultancy offering "heritage
management services".
archives  branding  business_archives  commemorative  historians  history  heritage  organizational_culture  research  storytelling 
march 2009 by jerryking
What ails Europe?
Friday, June 17, 2005 WSJ op-ed by historian Paul Johnson.
In a must-read editorial in today's Wall Street Journal, historian Paul Johnson lays out what ails Europe today.
History  op-ed  Europe  historians 
february 2009 by jerryking

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