jerryking + harvard   117

Opinion | Why Harvard Was Wrong to Make Me Step Down
June 24, 2019 | The New York Times | By Ronald S. Sullivan Jr., Mr. Sullivan is a law professor at Harvard Law School.

In May, Harvard College announced that it would not renew the appointment of me and my wife, Stephanie Robinson, as faculty deans of Winthrop House, one of Harvard’s undergraduate residential houses, because I am one of the lawyers who represented the Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein in advance of his coming sexual assault trial. The administration’s decision followed reports by some students that they felt “unsafe” in an institution led by a lawyer who would take on Mr. Weinstein as a client.

I am willing to believe that some students felt unsafe. But feelings alone should not drive university policy. Administrators must help students distinguish between feelings that have a rational basis and those that do not. In my case, Harvard missed an opportunity to help students do that......I would hope that any student who felt unsafe as a result of my representation of Mr. Weinstein might, after a reasoned discussion of the relevant facts, question whether his or her feelings were warranted. But Harvard was not interested in having that discussion. Nor was Harvard interested in facilitating conversations about the appropriate role of its faculty in addressing sexual violence and the tension between protecting the rights of the criminally accused and treating survivors of sexual violence with respect.

Instead, the administration capitulated to protesters. Given that universities are supposed to be places of considered and civil discourse, where people are forced to wrestle with difficult, controversial and unfamiliar ideas, this is disappointing......reasoned discourse lost out to raw feelings......I am not opposed to student protest. Many important social justice movements began with student protests, including movements from which I, as an African-American, have benefited. Had it not been for students who staged sit-ins at lunch counters, I would not have had the opportunity to be trained at Harvard Law School.

But I am profoundly troubled by the reaction of university administrators who are in charge of student growth and development. The job of a teacher is to help students think through what constitutes a reasonable argument. It is a dereliction of duty for administrators to allow themselves to be bullied into ..Unchecked emotion has replaced thoughtful reasoning on campus. Feelings are no longer subjected to evidence, analysis or empirical defense. Angry demands, rather than rigorous arguments, now appear to guide university policy.
African-Americans  bullying  capitulation  Colleges_&_Universities  critical_thinking  firings  gut_feelings  Harvard  Harvey_Weinstein  HLS  intolerance  logic_&_reasoning  missed_opportunities  op-ed  policymaking  political_correctness  professors  protests  students 
june 2019 by jerryking
Martin Kilson, Scholar and Racial Pathbreaker at Harvard, Dies at 88
April 30, 2019 | The New York Times | By Richard Sandomir.

Martin Kilson, a leftist scholar, fierce debater and follower of W. E. B. Du Bois who became the first tenured African-American professor at Harvard, died on April 24 in Lincoln, Mass. He was 88.....Professor Kilson was a prolific writer, an expert on ethnic politics in Africa and the United States, and a mentor to generations of students, among them the writer, teacher and philosopher Cornel West......Professor Kilson, an avowed integrationist, was already teaching courses in African politics in the 1960s when black students were starting to assert themselves on predominantly white campuses like Harvard.......Professor Kilson was a faculty sponsor of the Harvard-Radcliffe Association of African and Afro-American Students. But after the university’s Afro-American studies department was established in 1969, he became disenchanted with its governance, criticizing it as lacking academic rigor and maintaining that it had become an enclave for radical black students.

“Black solidarity forces are distinctly anti-intellectual and anti-achievement in orientation,” he wrote in a provocative essay about Harvard in The New York Times Magazine in 1973. “They indulge in the ‘black magic’ of nationalism, believing that miracles are possible if Negroes display fidelity to black nationalism or separatism and its anti-white attitudes, rituals and symbols.”....Kilson argued that the radical politics of separatists was an academic dead end.....“It took extraordinary courage in 1969 to challenge Black Panther and black power rhetoric,” the Rev. Eugene Rivers III, a former student of Professor Kilson’s, said in a telephone interview. “And he was right.”......Professor Kilson encountered Du Bois, the pioneering urban sociologist who was a founder of the N.A.A.C.P., as a freshman at Lincoln University, a HBCU....Du Bois remained an influence throughout Professor Kilson’s career....Harvard hired him as a lecturer in government in 1962. He was named an assistant professor two years later and granted tenure in 1968.

“He took a lot of pride in that accomplishment,” his daughter Hannah Kilson said in a telephone interview....Kilson used that sharp pen in 2002 when he challenged Randall L. Kennedy, a distinguished African-American professor at Harvard Law School, over the title of Professor Kennedy’s book “Nigger: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word.”
academic_rigor  African-Americans  Black_Panthers  black_nationalism  black_power  black_separatism  black_studies  Cornel_West  Eugene_Rivers  Harvard  Henry_Louis_Gates  integration  left-wing  obituaries  PhDs  scholars  trailblazers  W.E.B._Du_Bois  wishful_thinking 
may 2019 by jerryking
‘Lopping,’ ‘Tips’ and the ‘Z-List’: Bias Lawsuit Explores Harvard’s Admissions Secrets
July 29, 2018 | - The New York Times | By Anemona Hartocollis, Amy Harmon and Mitch Smith.
=======================================
One tries very hard to assess the candidate’s potential. Is he or she a self-starter? How much help has he had? Has the candidate peaked? How will he or she react to not being head of the class?

Does he or she have the core values, confidence, perspective and flexibility to adapt and thrive? Not surprisingly, companies and others prefer applicants who have what a law firm where I later recruited called “a can-do attitude.”
===============================
........The case has been orchestrated by Edward Blum, a longtime crusader against affirmative action and voting rights laws, and it may yield him a fresh chance to get the issue before the Supreme Court. The court turned away his last major challenge to university admissions, Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, in 2016.

[Read: How other Ivy League schools are coming to Harvard’s defense.]

The debate goes back to the civil rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s. The assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968 was a turning point, pushing colleges to redouble their efforts to be more representative of American society.

But Asians were an overlooked minority despite a long history of discrimination. .......The plaintiffs say that the personal rating — which considers an applicant’s character and personality — is the most insidious of Harvard’s admissions metrics. They say that Asian-Americans are routinely described as industrious and intelligent, but unexceptional and indistinguishable — characterizations that recall painful stereotypes for many people of Asian descent. (The applicant who was the “proverbial picket fence” was Asian-American.).........Professor Khurana, the Harvard College dean, acknowledged that Harvard was not always perfect, but said it was trying to get its practices right.

“I have a great deal of humility knowing that some day history will judge us,” Professor Khurana said. “I think that’s why we are constantly asking ourselves this question: How can we do better? How could we be better? What are we missing? Where are our blind spots?”
admissions  affirmative_action  Asian-Americans  blind_spots  Colleges_&_Universities  discrimination  diversity  Harvard  Ivy_League  lawsuits  race-blind  race-conscious  selection_processes  biases  elitism  ethnic_stereotyping  meritocratic  students  racial_disparities  1968  core_values 
august 2018 by jerryking
Opinion | Robert E. Rubin: Philosophy Prepared Me for a Career in Finance and Government - The New York Times
By Robert E. Rubin

Mr. Rubin was secretary of the Treasury from 1995 to 1999.

April 30, 2018

Raphael Demos. Professor Demos, an authority on Greek philosophy, was Harvard’s Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy and Civil Policy. But to me, when I took a class with him my sophomore year, he was a genial little man with white hair and an exceptional talent for engaging students from the lecture hall stage, using an overturned wastebasket as his lectern. Professor Demos would use Plato and other great philosophers to demonstrate that proving any proposition to be true in the final and ultimate sense was impossible. His approach to critical thinking planted a seed in me that grew during my years at Harvard and throughout my life. The approach appealed to what was probably my natural but latent tendency toward questioning and skepticism.

I concluded that you can’t prove anything in absolute terms, from which I extrapolated that all significant decisions are about probabilities. Internalizing the core tenet of Professor Demos’s teaching — weighing risk and analyzing odds and trade-offs — was central to everything I did professionally in the decades ahead in finance and government.......Demos crystallized for me the power of critical thinking: asking questions, recognizing that there are no provable certainties and analyzing the probabilities. And that, coupled with my coffeehouse lessons, was the best preparation one could have — not just for a career but also for life.
Robert_Rubin  Colleges_&_Universities  Harvard  philosophers  philosophy  Plato  Wall_Street  Goldman_Sachs  career_paths  advice  life_skills  probabilities  decision_making  critical_thinking  U.S.Treasury_Department  Greek  tradeoffs 
may 2018 by jerryking
Academics Rank Harvard No. 1 in Reputation - WSJ
By Melissa Korn
June 14, 2017

Harvard University is the best—again.

For the seventh straight year, Harvard tops the Times Higher Education list of universities with the best reputations among more than 10,500 published academics from 137 countries.

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Stanford University rounded out the top three for 2017, as they did last year, and U.S. schools held eight of the top 10 positions.

But American dominance of the global higher-education scene is fading, according to the survey, which was conducted in 15 languages between January and March of this year.
Harvard  reputation  Colleges_&_Universities  rankings 
june 2017 by jerryking
Nice Speech, Mark Zuckerberg! You’re Still a Few Credits Short - WSJ
By Deepa Seetharaman and Sarah E. Needleman
May 26, 2017

Mr. Zuckerberg opened his afternoon commencement speech with a few jokes and then urged graduates to “create a world where every single person has a sense of purpose” at a time when jobs are declining due to automation and social safety nets are wearing thin.

Today’s great struggle, he said, is between the “forces of freedom, openness and global community against the forces of authoritarianism, isolationism and nationalism.”
Mark_Zuckerberg  Harvard  Commencement  speeches  Colleges_&_Universities  dropouts  new_graduates 
may 2017 by jerryking
William Coleman Fought Civil-Rights Battles From the Inside - WSJ
William T. Coleman Jr. graduated at the top of his Harvard Law School class, served in President Gerald Ford’s cabinet as transportation secretary, argued 19 cases before the Supreme Court and was a director of companies including International Business Machines Corp. and PepsiCo Inc. He was one of the few blacks of his generation to become a top-level insider in business and government.

In his later years, he also was frustrated that American schools and neighborhoods remained largely segregated. “We underestimated the complexity of achieving sustained integration,” he wrote in his 2010 memoir, “Counsel for the Situation.”

He shunned extreme language. “You accomplish things by being in the room when the deal is made, and it’s just not in your interest to take positions where you’re not going to get in the room,” he said in an oral history.....He relished legal problem-solving, and it allowed him to live well. Blue-chip companies “pay me a hell of a lot of money to tell them what to do and what not to do,” he said in an interview with the National Visionary Leadership Project. He also remained active in civil rights.
African-Americans  lawyers  Harvard  '70s  NAACP  memoirs  books  obituaries  civil_rights  segregation  desegregation  problem_solving  cabinets  HLS  blue-chips 
april 2017 by jerryking
Harvard Law, Moving to Diversify Applicant Pool, Will Accept GRE Scores - The New York Times
By ELIZABETH OLSON MARCH 8, 2017

Harvard Law School, moving to open its doors to a larger, more diverse pool of applicants, said on Wednesday that it would accept the graduate record examination, known as the GRE, for the admission of students entering its fall 2018 class.

The law school, whose alumni include senators, chief executives, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and President Barack Obama, is the second accredited law school in the United States to accept the GRE for admission. It follows the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law, which made the change a year ago.

At the time, Arizona’s decision provoked a heated debate in the legal profession, which has long supported the Law School Admissions Test, or LSAT, over whether that test should be relied on as a single valid predictor of law school success.

Since Arizona’s move, around 150 law school deans, including Martha Minow of Harvard Law, have expressed support for the change. Now Harvard Law is taking the same step. The school said it would start a pilot program in the fall, when students begin submitting applications for the three-year juris doctor program that begins in 2018.

The change “will encourage more students in the United States and internationally from a greater degree of disciplines to apply,” said Jessica Soban, assistant dean and chief admissions officer. Applicants who want to can still submit LSAT scores.
Harvard  law_schools  diversity  applicants  standardized_testing  HLS  pilot_programs 
march 2017 by jerryking
The ‘Warren Buffett of Brazil’ Behind the Offer for Unilever
FEB. 17, 2017 | The New York Times | by LIZ MOYER.
Profile of Jorge Paulo Lemann.

Mr. Lemann, 77, a Harvard-educated former Brazilian tennis champion, ranks 19th on the Forbes list of world billionaires, with a fortune estimated at $29 billion. He and his partners at 3G have developed over the years what many call a playbook for extracting costs from companies by eliminating frivolities like corporate-owned aircraft and expensive office space, revamping management and slashing jobs.

They instill strict austerity that forces managers to justify expenses beyond basic operating needs. Their model makes expansion overseas crucial for increasing returns.

They have also focused on major consumer brands rather than on diversifying......Mr. Lemann and Mr. Buffett share a similar investment philosophy: patience. Instead of selling his portfolio after he has cut and remodeled companies, Mr. Lemann has used Anheuser-Busch InBev and now Kraft Heinz as base camps for further global expansion.
3G_Capital  private_equity  Brazilian  patience  Unilever  Kraft_Heinz  Harvard  moguls  high_net_worth  cost-cutting  Warren_Buffett  playbooks 
february 2017 by jerryking
The ‘H-Bomb’ Fizzles: The Harvard Brand Takes a Hit - The New York Times
By TEDDY WAYNE DEC. 10, 2016
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Harvard  Colleges_&_Universities  elitism  brands 
january 2017 by jerryking
Edith Cooper Goldman Sachs on talking about race at work - Business Insider
Edith Cooper, Goldman Sachs
Sep. 23, 2016,

Focusing on what you can control and taking mindful steps and positive action towards what matters to you
Goldman_Sachs  African-Americans  Harvard  HBS  women  beyond_one's_control  Wall_Street  human_resources  affirmations  span_of_control  Edith_Cooper 
december 2016 by jerryking
Algorithms Aren’t Biased, But the People Who Write Them May Be - WSJ
By JO CRAVEN MCGINTY
Oct. 14, 2016

A provocative new book called “Weapons of Math Destruction” has inspired some charged headlines. “Math Is Racist,” one asserts. “ Math Is Biased Against Women and the Poor,” declares another.

But author Cathy O’Neil’s message is more subtle: Math isn’t biased. People are biased.

Dr. O’Neil, who received her Ph.D in mathematics from Harvard, is a former Wall Street quant who quit after the housing crash, joined the Occupy Wall Street movement and now publishes the mathbabe blog.
algorithms  mathematics  biases  books  Cathy_O’Neil  Wall_Street  PhDs  quants  Occupy_Wall_Street  Harvard  value_judgements 
october 2016 by jerryking
The Disrupters: Making New York’s Cultural Boards More Diverse
JULY 30, 2016 | The New York Times| By JACOB BERNSTEIN.

But Dr. Muhammad, the former director of the Schomburg center, cautioned against seeing Mr. Smith’s entry into New York cultural life as a sign that things will change in a meaningful way.

“White people are going to be wealthier on average, wealthier people are going to be in leadership positions more often, and in those positions they’re likely to be part of a network of people in the same social milieu,” Dr. Muhammad said. “There’ll continue to be people like Robert Smith, who happen to be African-American and do wonderful things, but there’s a giant wealth gap between blacks and whites, and it’s only widened in the wake of the great recession. Is this a sign of a trend that black people will be the heads of boards all over the country? I doubt it.”
Darren_Walker  glass_ceilings  African-Americans  high_net_worth  cultural_institutions  boards_&_directors_&_governance  diversity  New_York_City  museums  lawyers  investment_banking  Wall_Street  Harvard  Robert_Smith  racial_disparities 
august 2016 by jerryking
How Stanford Took On the Giants of Economics - The New York Times
SEPT. 10, 2015 | NYT | By NEIL IRWIN.

Stanford’s success with economists is part of a larger campaign to stake a claim as the country’s top university. Its draw combines a status as the nation’s “it” university — now with the lowest undergraduate acceptance rate and a narrow No. 2 behind Harvard for the biggest fund-raising haul — with its proximity to many of the world’s most dynamic companies. Its battle with Eastern universities echoes fights in other industries in which established companies, whether hotels or automobile makers, are being challenged by Silicon Valley money and entrepreneurship....reflection of a broader shift in the study of economics, in which the most cutting-edge work increasingly relies less on a big-brained individual scholar developing mathematical theories, and more on the ability to crunch extensive sets of data to glean insights about topics as varied as how incomes differ across society and how industries organize themselves....The specialties of the new recruits vary, but they are all examples of how the momentum in economics has shifted away from theoretical modeling and toward “empirical microeconomics,” the analysis of how things work in the real world, often arranging complex experiments or exploiting large sets of data. That kind of work requires lots of research assistants, work across disciplines including fields like sociology and computer science, and the use of advanced computational techniques unavailable a generation ago....Less clear is whether the agglomeration of economic stars at Stanford will ever amount to the kind of coherent school of thought that has been achieved at some other great universities (e.g. Milton Friedman's The Chicago School neoclassical focus on efficiency of markets and the risks of government intervention and M.I.T.’s economics' Keynesian tradition)
economics  economists  empiricism  in_the_real_world  Stanford  MIT  Harvard  Colleges_&_Universities  recruiting  poaching  movingonup  rankings  machine_learning  cross-disciplinary  massive_data_sets  data  uChicago  microeconomics  Keynesian  Chicago_School 
september 2015 by jerryking
Learning to Engineer a Better Brisket - The New York Times
JULY 18, 2015 | NYT | By CLAIRE MARTIN .

They began by analyzing smokers on the market, focusing on Big Green Egg, a popular one with a ceramic cooking chamber. They evaluated the extra-large version, which costs $1,200. “We went through the patent of the Big Green Egg and just completely dissected it,” Mr. Parker said. “Where’s the opportunity here? Where’s the weakness here?”

They built computer models of Big Green Egg, of the brisket and, eventually, of their own smoker. They ran hundreds of computer simulations, and they learned that maintaining a precise, steady cooking temperature is crucial to evenly breaking down the meat’s collagen, tenderizing it. Several students spent their spring break taking a crash course in ceramics at the Harvard Ceramic Studio to build two prototypes of the smoker.

During the smoking sessions, the students attached sensors to the cooking surfaces and collected smoke particles and airflow data. They also inserted thermal imaging devices and probes into the brisket. “It was a heavily instrumented piece of meat,” Mr. Parker said. “It looked like it was in an intensive care unit.”

The final design was a 300-pound ceramic smoker with an hourglass shape that was inspired by power plant cooling towers. An internal computer controls fans that blow oxygen into the fire; it calculates whether the fire needs more or less oxygen and communicates the smoker’s temperature to a smartphone app. Refueling most other smokers requires opening the top and inserting more charcoal and wood chips, which destabilizes the temperature.

A chute on the side of the Harvard smoker lets the chef add more fuel without disrupting its internal temperature. Sensors gauge fuel levels, the temperature of the cooking surface and the weight of the food being smoked, and transmit that information to the app.
Harvard  students  Colleges_&_Universities  patents  competitive_intelligence  entrepreneurship  design  problem_solving  BBQ  engineering  Stanford  cured_and_smoked  beef  sensors 
july 2015 by jerryking
What to Learn in College to Stay One Step Ahead of Computers - NYTimes.com
MAY 22, 2015 | NYT | By ROBERT J. SHILLER.

The successful occupations, by this measure, shared certain characteristics: People who practiced them needed complex communication skills and expert knowledge. Such skills included an ability to convey “not just information but a particular interpretation of information.” They said that expert knowledge was broad, deep and practical, allowing the solution of “uncharted problems.”

These attributes may not be as beneficial in the future. But the study certainly suggests that a college education needs to be broad and general, and not defined primarily by the traditional structure of separate departments staffed by professors who want, most of all, to be at the forefront of their own narrow disciplines.....In a separate May 5 statement, Prof. Sean D. Kelly, chairman of the General Education Review Committee, said a Harvard education should give students “an art of living in the world.”

But how should professors do this? Perhaps we should prepare students for entrepreneurial opportunities suggested by our own disciplines. Even departments entirely divorced from business could do this by suggesting enterprises, nonprofits and activities in which students can later use their specialized knowledge....I continue to update the course, thinking about how I can integrate its lessons into an “art of living in the world.” I have tried to enhance my students’ sense that finance should be the art of financing important human activities, of getting people (and robots someday) working together to accomplish things that we really want done.
Robert_Shiller  Yale  Harvard  college-educated  education  students  automation  machine_learning  Colleges_&_Universities  finance  continuing_education  continuous_learning  Communicating_&_Connecting  indispensable  skills  Managing_Your_Career  21st._century  new_graduates  interdisciplinary  curriculum  entrepreneurship  syllabus  interpretation  expertise  uncharted_problems 
may 2015 by jerryking
Most Black Students at Harvard Are From High-Income Families</A>
In a 2004 interview Professor Henry Louis Gates Jr., director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African-American Research at Harvard, told the London Observer, “The black kids who come to Harvard or Yale are middle class. Nobody else gets through.”

That same year Professor Gates, speaking at a public forum at Princeton University, stated his belief that 75 percent of the black students at Harvard were of African or Caribbean descent or of mixed race. According to Professor Gates, more than two thirds of all Harvard's black students were either the children or grandchildren of West Indians or Africans and very few of Harvard's black students were the descendants of American slaves.
Henry_Louis_Gates  Harvard  students  middle_class  Colleges_&_Universities  Afro-Caribbeans  African-Americans 
may 2015 by jerryking
Harvard Accused of Bias Against Asian-Americans
A complaint Friday alleged that Harvard University discriminates against Asian-American applicants by setting a higher bar for admissions than that faced by other groups. The complaint, filed by a…
Harvard  Colleges_&_Universities  admissions  Asian-Americans  biases  elitism  achievement_gaps  ethnic_stereotyping  meritocratic  students  racial_disparities  Ivy_League 
may 2015 by jerryking
Why a Harvard Professor Has Mixed Feelings When Students Take Jobs in Finance
Walker New York 2 hours ago APRIL 10, 2015
Professor Mullainathan's article illustrates perfectly why the study and profession of economics has been dubbed the "dismal science." He draws upon highbro...
letters_to_the_editor  finance  Harvard  Wall_Street  from notes
april 2015 by jerryking
Why a Harvard Professor Has Mixed Feelings When Students Take Jobs in Finance - NYTimes.com
APRIL 10, 2015 | NYT | By SENDHIL MULLAINATHAN.

Every profession produces both private returns — the fruits of labor that a person enjoys — and social returns — those that society enjoys. If I set up a shop on Etsy selling photographs, my private returns may be defined as the revenue I generate. The social returns are the pleasure that my photographs provide to my customers....
career_paths  career  Wall_Street  students  economics  Harvard  Colleges_&_Universities  talent  rent-seeking  arbitrage  finance 
april 2015 by jerryking
Roger Ferguson of TIAA-CREF: Always Act as if You’re an Owner - NYTimes.com
NOV. 29, 2014 | NYT | Adam Bryant.
Is there a value on your list that is particularly important to you?

One is about personal accountability. One of the phrases I use is that if you owned this company, what would you do? And if your colleagues were owners, what would you want them to do?

What are your best interview questions?

What do you do with your free time? I’m listening for somebody who is a little more balanced. I’m always asking about team experiences, and about resilience and fortitude. How did you recover from setbacks? What did you do? I like to hear stories, and concrete examples.

What career and life advice do you give to graduating college students?

You have to be prepared to take some risks and maybe fail a little bit. Don’t make the same mistake over and over again, but don’t be afraid of making any mistakes. Because your career is like a climbing wall, not a ladder, and you don’t know where it’s going to end up. You have to be a continuous learner as you go up the wall.
money_management  pension_funds  setbacks  CEOs  African-Americans  McKinsey  Managing_Your_Career  advice  new_graduates  values  accountability  interviews  TIAA-CREF  Harvard  owners 
december 2014 by jerryking
Brands not just a new wrapper for institutions
Fall 2014 | Western Alumni Alumni Gazette   | by Paul Wells, BA'89.

Michael Ignatieff is an asset to the Harvard brand. Or rather, to the Kennedy School brand, because Ignatieff is returning to the John F. Kennedy School of Government, also known as the Harvard Kennedy School or even as HKS. In other words, Harvard today is a sort of a nested set of Russian dolls of identity. There’s Harvard on the outside, and various affiliated schools further in, with academics of greater or lesser star power in the middle.

And it’s all of those attributes together, that jumble of organizations and individuals, that informed audiences think about when they think about Harvard.....In 2012 Arthur Brisbane, the former public editor of the New York Times, noted he found himself at “an oddly disaggregated New York Times of hyper-engaged journalists building their own brands, and company content flung willy-nilly into the ether.” The Times, surely the strongest newspaper brand in the world, has watched while reporter-columnists like David Carr, Mark Bittman, Paul Krugman, David Brooks take their act at least partly on the road, through active Twitter accounts, books, TV and public speaking gigs. I’ve even had well-meaning readers tell me I’d do better to leave Maclean’s and hang out my own shingle. But that misunderstands the nature of the relationship: The umbrella organization strengthens the individual writer’s clout — and vice versa. Strong identities aren’t something to fear on a big team. They’re essential to the team’s success
Paul_Wells  Colleges_&_Universities  Harvard  brands  branding  KSG  Michael_Ignatieff  personal_branding  NYT  symbiosis  relationships  unidirectional  bidirectional  misunderstandings  star_power  columnists  identity  matryoshka_dolls  writers 
september 2014 by jerryking
Past Fictions, a Lack of Trust and No Deal in SAC Case - NYTimes.com
February 6, 2014, 9:19 pm
Past Fictions, a Lack of Trust and No Deal in SAC Case
By JAMES B. STEWART
SAC_Capital  Harvard  deception  Mathew_Martoma 
february 2014 by jerryking
The New Establishment: The Decline And Fall of the Eastern Empire
October 1994 | | Vanity Fair |By David Halberstam

Perhaps more than any other single person, Henry Kissinger augured the end of the gifted amateurs of the Old Establishment. His ascension to power represented the rise of the free agent—the professional political player who brilliantly manipulated the press, played both sides of issues, and put his own agenda ahead of all others. David Halberstam pins Dr. Kissinger to the pages of history.
Henry_Kissinger  profile  Harvard  David_Halberstam  APNSA 
december 2013 by jerryking
Historian David Landes’s theories of ‘superior’ cultures are still polarizing
Sep. 11 2013 | - The Globe and Mail | DOUGLAS MARTIN

David Landes, a distinguished Harvard scholar of economic history, saw tidal movements in the rise of seemingly small things. He suggested that the development of eyeglasses made precision tools possible. Maybe, he said, using chopsticks helped Asian workers gain the manual dexterity needed to make microprocessors....In his 482-page Revolution in Time: Clocks and the Making of the Modern World, published in 1983, Prof. Landes examined the growth of the Industrial Age through the history of timepieces, tracing their origin to medieval European monasteries; monks, he wrote, needed something to tell them when to gather for a regular round of group prayer.... His most influential work, The Wealth and Poverty of Nations: Why Some Are So Rich and Some So Poor (1998), answered the question posed in its title (a play on that of Adam Smith’s classic work) by pointing to the importance of the Protestant work ethic and European attitudes toward science and technology....His dissertation became his first book, Bankers and Pashas: International Finance and Economic Imperialism in Egypt....Reviewing his 2006 book, Dynasties: Fortunes and Misfortunes of the World’s Great Family Businesses, for The Times of London, Christopher Silvester described the writing as pithy, thoughtful and sprightly. The book offers 13 sketches of tycoons, including Henry Ford, John D. Rockefeller and Armand Peugeot.
historians  obituaries  books  cultural_values  family_business  economic_history  scholars  Harvard  work_ethic  industrial_age  precision  manual_dexterity  moguls 
september 2013 by jerryking
The Weekend Interview With Ben Nelson: The Man Who Would Overthrow Harvard - WSJ.com
August 9, 2013 | WSJ | By MATTHEW KAMINSKI.

Minerva a "reimagined university." Sure, there will be majors and semesters. Admission requirements will be "extraordinarily high," he says, as at the Ivies. Students will live together and attend classes. And one day, an alumni network will grease job and social opportunities.

But Minerva will have no hallowed halls, manicured lawns or campus. No fraternities or sports teams. Students will spend their first year in San Francisco, living together in a residence hall. If they need to borrow books, says Mr. Nelson, the city has a great public library. Who needs a student center with all of the coffee shops around?

Each of the next six semesters students will move, in cohorts of about 150, from one city to another. Residences and high-tech classrooms will be set up in the likes of São Paulo, London or Singapore—details to come. Professors get flexible, short-term contracts, but no tenure. Minerva is for-profit.

The business buzzword here is the "unbundling" of higher education, or disaggregation. Since the founding of Oxford in the 12th century, universities, as the word implies, have tried to offer everything in one package and one place. In the world of the Web and Google, physical barriers are disappearing.

Mr. Nelson wants to bring this technological disruption to the top end of the educational food chain, and at first look Minerva's sticker price stands out. Freed of the costs of athletics, the band and other pricey campus amenities, a degree will cost less than half the average top-end private education, which is now over $50,000 a year with room and board...."My first six months, what did the consulting firm teach me? They didn't teach me the basics of how they do business. They taught me how to think. I didn't know how to check my work. I didn't think about order of magnitude. I didn't have habits of mind that a liberal arts education was supposed to have given me. And not only did I not have it, none of my other colleagues had it—people who had graduated from Princeton and Harvard and Yale."
howto  thinking  Harvard  disruption  Colleges_&_Universities  Ivy_League  elitism  MOOCs  Minerva  Jason_Isaacs  unbundling  disaggregation  imagination  check_your_work  orders-of-magnitude 
august 2013 by jerryking
McGuinty headed to Harvard University - The Globe and Mail
ADRIAN MORROW

The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Jun. 28 2013
Dalton_McGuinty  Harvard  KSG 
june 2013 by jerryking
Harvard Law School Can Learn From MOOCs -
Harvard Law School Can Learn From MOOCs
Apr 11, 2013 Bloomberg By Raja Bobbili & Daniel Doktori
law_schools  MOOCs  Harvard  law_students  HLS 
april 2013 by jerryking
Endowments: Ivory-towering infernos
Dec 11th 2008 | The Economist |From the print edition.

As Mr Swensen explains in his influential book, “Pioneering Portfolio Management: An Unconventional Approach to Institutional Investment”, which was published in 2000, the “permanent” endowments of universities (and of some charitable foundations) meant that they could be the ultimate long-term investors, able to ride out market downturns and liquidity droughts.

By investing heavily in illiquid assets, rather than the publicly traded shares and bonds preferred by shorter-term investors, an institution with an unlimited time horizon would earn a substantial illiquidity premium.
Yale  Harvard  endowments  Colleges_&_Universities  books  illiquidity  alternative_investments  private_equity  institutional_investors  long-term 
february 2013 by jerryking
Paula Broadwell switched her PhD bid from Harvard to British college - News - Boston.com
By Callum Borchers, Tracy Jan and Bryan Bender
Globe Correspondent, Globe Staff / November 14, 2012
Harvard  KSG  Paula_Broadwell  scandals  PhDs 
november 2012 by jerryking
A Shift in Black Christianity as Harvard Installs a Minister - NYTimes.com
By SAMUEL G. FREEDMAN
Published: November 11, 2012

“This pulpit can be an important bully pulpit, and Peter Gomes used it in that way,” Lawrence H. Mamiya, a professor at Vassar College and an author of “The Black Church in the African American Experience,” wrote in an e-mail. “Given the climate of academic freedom on campus, the Pusey minister also has a greater degree of independence than most clergy to speak out on controversial issues.” ... Black ministers and theologians of Mr. Walton’s generation have inherited an African-American church trying to serve both the entrenched poor and the upwardly mobile educated class. It is also pulled between the liberation theology most notably articulated by Dr. King and the so-called health-and-wealth gospel promoted by contemporary megachurch pastors like the Rev. T. D. Jakes.

Mr. Walton criticized that approach in his book about black televangelists, “Watch This!” His Harvard pulpit, he said, will also afford him a forum for registering such concerns.
African-Americans  Harvard  churches  Christianity  appointments 
november 2012 by jerryking
Role Models
May 26, 1990 | The Economist pg. 46 |

The school claims to be recruiting hard: the trouble is that there are few black lawyers who want to do teaching jobs. It is only fairly recently that large numbers of blacks have attended the better law schools, and the brightest of them tend to become practising lawyers. A degree from a law school opens many doors, and a career in teaching is less likely to appeal to black graduates, relatively few of whom come from wealthy families.

The law school's contention that it is looking but not finding is not accepted by Mr Bell and his allies. It is looking for the wrong son of people, they answer: the school should look beyond “Gucci" candidates from an elite law school.

But Harvard is not alone in finding it to recruit black teachers. An American Council on Education survey, released last summer, indicated that eight out often colleges were making some sort of effort to hire more teachers from minority groups. Their effort is unlikely to lead to much in the way of results. The problem is simple: the demand is great but the supply of qualified blacks and Hispanics is limited.

Asians are another story. Although there are six times as many blacks as Asians in the United States, Asians got mine as as blacks in 1988. Relatively few black Americans go to college and only about a third of the students who do go are working in fields that are likely to lead to a graduate school of arts or sciences.

The push for a diverse faculty rests on the notion that black students, at all levels, need role models: teachers who are also black. This may be a tenable argument for schoolchildren: black children need to know that blacks can excel (and girls, of all colours, need to see that women can become doctors and astronauts). But the argument cannot be sustained at university level, where it may well lead to tokenism and lowering of standards. And role models, after all, come in all colours.
women  African-Americans  law_schools  Harvard  HLS  professors  academy  academia  academic  Derrick_Bell  role_models  diversity  tokenism  children  Colleges_&_Universities 
august 2012 by jerryking
An intellectual with the gloves off
24 May 2003 | The Globe and Mail pg. F.3| by John Allemang.

Tellingly, the former World Bank economist didn't just parade these hard facts as essential truths, but contrasted them with the soft-centred nostalgia felt by academics with a more sentimental education. "There's a tendency on the part of Western intellectuals to idealize rural life, and poor rural life, in developing countries."....His model of a university, which sounds a lot like a roundtable gathering at the White House, is of "a tough-minded place where there's a tough-minded clash of ideas, from which better ideas emerge." It's not an institution for the faint-hearted, and you can see that much of his impatience with the people and ideas he's confronted at Harvard have as much to do with a perceived lack of intellectual rigour as with their positioning on the spectrum of truth.
Larry_Summers  Harvard  intellectually_rigorous  deanships  Colleges_&_Universities  grade_inflation  growth  economic_development  truth-telling  tough-mindedness  developing_countries 
may 2012 by jerryking
The Speechmaker: How Bill Gates Got Ready for Harvard - WSJ.com
June 8, 2007 (Link to Eric Reguly criticism of how Gates is addressing the problems of agriculture)

The Speechmaker: How Bill Gates Got Ready for Harvard
Warren Buffett Offered Tips on Delivery and Tone; A Dropout Gets a Degree By ROBERT A. GUTH

In the analytical style for which he became famous in high-tech circles, Mr. Gates recommended a four-point plan for attacking a complex problem: determine a goal, find the "highest-leverage approach," discover the ideal technology for that approach, "and in the meantime, make the smartest application of the technology that you already have."
public_speaking  speeches  preparation  billgates  Harvard  commencement  complexity  Microsoft  problem_solving  Communicating_&_Connecting  dropouts  leverage  complex_problems  return_on_effort 
may 2012 by jerryking
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