jerryking + globalization   179

The last days of the middle-class world citizen
October 3, 2019 | Financial Times | Janan Ganesh.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
what I think Janan Ganesh is talking about; the divide between the globally mobile elite and the locally restricted peasantry is getting increasingly stark, and the middle class is being hollowed out.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
'10s  Big_Tech  climate_change  decline  deglobalization  disposable_income  downward_mobility  dystopian_futures  frictions  future  globalization  Janan_Ganesh  lifestyles  middle_class  millennials  pessimism  societal_choices  subtractive  The_One_Percent  thought-provoking  travel 
october 2019 by jerryking
Da Vinci code: what the tech age can learn from Leonardo
April 26, 2019 | Financial Times | by Ian Goldin.

While Leonardo is recognised principally for his artistic genius, barely a dozen paintings can be unequivocally attributed to him. In life, he defined himself not as an artist but as an engineer and architect......History does not repeat itself, but it rhymes. The Renaissance catapulted Italy from the Medieval age to become the most advanced place on Earth. Then, as now, change brought immense riches to some and growing anxiety and disillusionment to others. We too live in an age of accelerating change, one that has provoked its own fierce backlash. What lessons can we draw from Leonardo and his time to ensure that we not only benefit from a new flourishing, but that progress will be sustained? When we think of the Renaissance, we think of Florence. Leonardo arrived in the city in the mid 1460s, and as a teenager was apprenticed to the painter Verrocchio. The city was already an incubator for ideas. At the centre of the European wool trade, by the late 14th century Florence had become the home of wealthy merchants including the Medicis, who were bankers to the Papal Court. The city’s rapid advances were associated with the information and ideas revolution that defines the Renaissance. Johann Gutenberg had used moveable type to publish his Bible in the early 1450s, and between the time of Leonardo’s birth in 1452 and his 20th birthday, some 15m books were printed, more than all the European scribes had produced over the previous 1,500 years.

..as Leonardo knew, and the Silicon Valley techno-evangelists too often neglect, information revolutions don’t only allow good ideas to flourish. They also provide a platform for dangerous ideas. The Zuckerberg information revolution can pose a similar threat to that of Gutenberg.

In the battle of ideas, populists are able to mobilise the disaffected more effectively than cerebral scientists, decently disciplined innovators and the moderate and often silent majority. For progress to prevail, evidence-based, innovative and reasoned thinking must triumph.
.....Genius thrived in the Renaissance because of the supportive ecosystem that aided the creation and dissemination of knowledge — which then was crushed by the fearful inquisitions. Today, tolerance and evidence-based argument are again under threat.
accelerated_lifecycles  architecture  broad-based_scientific_enquiry  capitalization  cross-disciplinary  cross-pollination  curiosity  dangerous_ideas  digital_economy  diversity  engineering  evidence_based  Florence  genius  globalization  human_potential  ideas  immigrants  Italy  industry_expertise  Johan_Gutenberg  lessons_learned  Leonardo_da_Vinci  Medicis  medieval  physical_place  polymaths  observations  Renaissance  Renaissance_Man  Silicon_Valley  silo_mentality  tolerance  unevenly_distributed  visionaries 
april 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | Netflix Is Shrinking the World - The New York Times
Netflix, which has become the internet’s most invaluable and intoxicating portal to the parts of planet Earth that aren’t America......A win by “Roma” would be a fitting testament to Netflix’s ambitions. Virtually alone among tech and media companies, Netflix intends to ride a new kind of open-border digital cosmopolitanism to the bank.......Netflix, which has 139 million paying members around the world, has lately become something more than a licenser of other countries’ escapist television.

In 2016, the company expanded to 190 countries, and last year, for the first time, a majority of its subscribers and most of its revenue came from outside the United States. To serve this audience, Netflix now commissions and licenses hundreds of shows meant to echo life in every one of its markets and, in some cases, to blend languages and sensibilities across its markets......Netflix has discovered something startling: Despite a supposed surge in nationalism across the globe, many people like to watch movies and TV shows from other countries. ....Hollywood and Silicon Valley have long pursued expansion internationally. But Netflix's strategy is fundamentally different. Instead of trying to sell American ideas to a foreign audience, it’s aiming to sell international ideas to a global audience.....a crucial difference between Netflix and other tech giants: Netflix makes money from subscriptions, not advertising.....This simple difference flips all of its incentives. It means that Netflix has a reason to satisfy every new customer, not just the ones in the most prosperous markets. Each new title carries subtitles in 26 languages, and the company is creating high-quality, properly lip-synced audio dubbing in 10 languages. For years, Netflix has roiled the film and TV business in Hollywood with its billions. Now it’s taking its money — the company spent $12 billion on content in 2018 and is projected to spend $15 billion this year — to film and TV producers in France, Spain, Brazil, India, South Korea and the Middle East, among other places.

Because it is spending so much on shows from everywhere, Netflix has an incentive to get the biggest bang for its buck by pushing them widely across its user base. Its algorithms are tuned toward expanding your interests rather than narrowing them. As a result, many of Netflix’s shows are watched widely beyond their local markets......Netflix does seem to be pushing cultural boundaries and sparking new conversations all over the world....It’s legitimate to ask how long Netflix will be able to keep up this cross-border conversation — whether, as it keeps growing, it will have to make legal or moral compromises with local censors or other would-be cultural arbiters.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Matt
Michigan2h ago
Farhad, I totally enjoyed your extrospection of Netflix as a global epoch-maker and change agent. This is globalization at its best. Netflix is outsourcing (crowdsourcing), outspending, and outwitting the Hollywood (s) of this world. Its recipe is simple yet profound: telling the stories of people, everywhere in this world, to themselves in their down-to-earth languages and customs. And technology has everything to do with it. Netflix would not have been where it is today if it was not for streaming technology. The assertion is true: technology is bring the world closer together.

By Farhad Manjoo
Opinion Columnist

Feb. 22, 2019
content_creators  cosmopolitan  cross-cultural  entertainment  Farhad_Manjoo  globalization  Hollywood  international_expansion  internationalization  international_diversity  Netflix  original_programming  streaming  user_bases 
february 2019 by jerryking
The belle époque of the small nation is over
September 28, 2018 | Financial Times | by JANAN GANESH.

Globalisation has been the era of small countries but that time may now be passing. Ganesh raises an interesting point, what happens to small countries that, since the end of WW2, have enjoyed the protection of the rules-based system (UN, WTO, NATO, Pax Americana).

Singapore leaders were determined in their quest to that small nation be less small.....The paradox is that smallness has been an edge, not a curse, in the liberal age. For all the grandiloquence about a Washington Consensus and a Pax Americana, the US was never the principal profiteer from globalisation.....The real beneficiaries were the rapid enrichment of Ireland, the ethnic diversification of Sweden, the technological fecundity of Israel and the rise of Dubai from the sands as a shimmering entrepôt......1990-2010 was the golden age--the belle époque--of the small nation....Rules-based globalism was a precious equaliser for these places.... it also made advantages of their liabilities....Their shortage of domestic consumers was the ultimate incentive to cast around for other markets. Their lack of capital made them welcome foreign investors. Even the nicheness of their native languages (in some cases) obliged them to master English.

There is, without leaning too much on “national character”, a small-country hardiness ....an acceptance of the outside world as a non-negotiable fact: a blend of fatalism and resourcefulness that makes for formidable migrants....If small countries have mastered the global age, it is a feat that goes beyond the economic. They also have a cultural reach that was hard to picture not long ago, when nations needed the brawn of a BBC or a Canal Plus to foist their creative wares on distant audiences....all attest to what we are now obliged to call the “soft power” of small countries....The mistake is to see this moment as eternal. For those who live in or care about these places, the dread is that the coming decades will be as harsh as the last few have been kind. Almost all the conditions that allowed small nations to bloom look precarious....growing protectionism...big states throwing their weight around....Peter Thiel, in his bid for NZ citizenship, said he found “no other country that aligns more with my view of the future than New Zealand”. It was telling that such a prolific maker of sound bets backed a small, open, adaptable nation.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
I am more optimistic and believe many small states will adjust just fine. Why? Think of Taleb's flexibility idea - small states are less fragile than bigger ones, more nimble, more homogenous, faster to change I like also to add that there are more smaller successful counties than the ones mentioned (e.g., Switzerland, Costa Rica).
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
The flip side is that small countries may have greater ability to act thoughtfully and coherently than larger peers. But I agree - it is likely to be tough ahead.

Here in Singapore, a senior politician summed it up very well: we are just a block of granite in the south china sea, and have no God-given right to exist as a country. The only way we can survive is by being paranoid and continuously reinventing ourselves.
city-states  globalization  Iceland  Janan_Ganesh  nimbleness  Peter_Thiel  post_globalization  rules-based  Singapore  small_states  soft_power  antifragility  Dubai  Ireland  punch-above-its-weight  paranoia  reinvention 
october 2018 by jerryking
Global Britain or globaloney - Bagehot
Mar 15th 2018 | The Economist | Bagehot.

Mr Tugendhat’s committee worries that “global Britain” cannot be the basis of foreign policy because it is little more than an “advertising slogan”. This columnist thinks the problem goes deeper. Global Britain is three badly thought out ideas rolled into one....
The first is that, thanks to its long history as a trading nation and imperial power, Britain is an irreducibly global country.....The second idea is that being global means embracing emerging markets. Since 2000 these have accounted for more than 60% of the world’s economic growth. The European Union is the economic equivalent of a “legacy system”: locked in the past, overburdened by entitlements and regulations, terrified of the creative destruction at the heart of capitalism. The emerging world, by contrast, is a bubbling cauldron of new opportunities and new consumers. ....The third idea is that “global Britain” means the Anglosphere. This embraces countries around the world that share a common culture because they were once part of the British empire.....The phrase “global Britain” is well intentioned, designed to send a message that Britain is not withdrawing from the world by leaving the EU. It remains open for business, active on the world stage, bouncily cosmopolitan. But Britain needs to do more than remain open for business. It needs to work out ways of engaging without overstretching its abilities and of embracing globalisation without forgetting that it has downsides as well as upsides. Talking globaloney isn’t going to help.
Brexit  delusions  downside_risks  EU  fallacies_follies  globalization  overstretching  slogans  United_Kingdom  upside  world_stage 
april 2018 by jerryking
In the fashion industry, McShopping has gone global - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
PUBLISHED AUGUST 7, 2017

invaded by the same global chains that have made the shopping streets of the world's great cities all start to look the same. In the main shopping districts of Paris, Madrid, London or Toronto, the invasion of the same global chains (e.g. Zara, H&M, Primark & Uniqlo) that have made the shopping streets of the world's great cities all start to look the same. It's destroying the visual identities of cities once visited for their unique charm.

The cheap-chic revolution has brought affordable fashion to the masses and, thanks to better monitoring of offshore factories, provided millions of decent jobs in developing countries. It also has its downsides. Massive amounts of "disposable" clothing end up in landfills each year. When clothes are this cheap, we don't think twice about chucking what we bought last month for something even trendier. Instead of four fashion seasons, we now have at least 12...... department stores are a dying breed. Those that survive will likely only do so by going global.
Konrad_Yakabuski  fast-fashion  fashion  apparel  retailers  department_stores  brands  globalization  concentration  identity  Uniqlo  H&M  HBC  Zara  Paris  Madrid  London  Toronto  disposability  Primark  uniqueness  J.Crew 
january 2018 by jerryking
China falls for the charms of an English education
December 20, 2017 | Financial Times | FREDERICK STUDEMANN.

Westminster School in London had signed an agreement to set up six new establishments in China in the next decade, the latest example of a British private school embracing the biggest education market in the world.

Under the terms of an ambitious deal, Westminster will export its successful teaching methods to Chengdu and other cities. In return the school will boost its bursary funds, making more money available to help families on lower incomes access an education at one of the UK’s leading — and pricier — academic independent schools...The venture sits within an initiative to promote collaboration between future leaders of both countries.

This all seems to tick many boxes. These range from a need for a “global Britain” to seize new opportunities, to Westminster acquiring the means to fulfil its obligations as a charity to make its schooling as widely available as possible.

The move is also in keeping with a broader trend. For years now British schools have been operating offshoots in China (and elsewhere), selling various brands of top-drawer education directly in to fast-growing markets....a broader question closer to home: what are overseas parents actually paying for? As the numbers of foreign students have increased, schools have adapted to their new customers. At what point do they lose the qualities that attracted overseas students in the first place?
United_Kingdom  education  globalization  China  high_schools  Brexit 
december 2017 by jerryking
China Could Sell Trump the Brooklyn Bridge - The New York Times
Thomas L. Friedman NOV. 14, 2017

The saying — “When you don’t know where you’re going, any road will get you there” — and it perfectly sums up the contrast between China’s President Xi Jinping and President Trump.....All along, Xi keeps his eye on the long-term prize of making China great again. Trump, meanwhile, touts every minor victory as historic and proceeds down any road that will give him a quick sugar high.

Trump literally has no idea what he’s doing and has no integrated strategy — because, unlike Xi, Trump’s given no thought to the big questions every effective leader starts his day with: “What world am I living in? What are the biggest trends in this world? And how do I align my country so more of my citizens get the most out of these trends and cushion the worst?”

What world are we in? One in which we’re going through three “climate changes” at once.
(1) Destructive weather events and the degradation of ecosystems are steadily accelerating.
(2) globalization: from an interconnected world to an interdependent one; from a world of walls, where you build your wealth by hoarding resources, to a world of webs, where you thrive by connecting your citizens to the most flows of ideas, trade, innovation and education.
(3) technology and work: Machines are acquiring all five senses, and with big data and artificial intelligence, every company can now analyze, optimize, prophesize, customize, digitize and automatize more and more jobs, products and services. And those companies that don’t will wither.
artificial_intelligence  Tom_Friedman  China  U.S.  Donald_Trump  globalization  technology  climate_change  TPP  international_trade  questions  think_threes  wealth_creation  grand_strategy  foundational  existential  extreme_weather_events  Xi_Jinping 
november 2017 by jerryking
A chilling portrait of the world's mafias
August 14, 2017 | Financial Times | Book review by John Lloyd of

Mafia Life: Love, Death and Money at the Heart of Organised Crime, by Federico Varese, Profile Books £14.99

Two of the most chilling observations in this learned, fluent book is, first, that the mafias “put themselves forward as institutions of government, ultimately in competition with the legitimate state”. Second, that “mafias thrive in democracies”.

Totalitarian regimes, such as the Italian Fascists, suppressed the mafia almost to extinction; democracy restored, they grew again. Only now — with massive policing, greater ease of sentencing, increased surveillance and pentiti — is the Sicilian mafia facing, if not extinction, then severe reduction. But the Neapolitan Camorra and above all the Calabrian ’Ndrangheta across the straits of Messina have grown and grow still. Calabresi families are rich on the proceeds of the heroin trade from the container port of Gioia Tauro (unfortunately Varese doesn’t say much about them here).

Mafia life is often short and usually tense. The Russian vory v zakone (thieves-in-law), spawned in Soviet prison colonies, live more than any other by their own law, spurning contact with state and police, vicious in their feuds. The Japanese Yakuza, who like to trace their lineage back to the samurai (Varese thinks their origins are in late-19th-century gamblers), settle scores with a sword....
Mafias sometimes side with, and are used by, states. The Hong Kong Triads, facing pro-democracy demonstrations in 2014, took the side of the Chinese authorities in confronting the young demonstrators — and gained some credit with Beijing. Where mafia are powerful, as the drug cartels in Mexico and the Wa heroin refiners in Myanmar’s Shan and Kachin regions (said to process 45 per cent of world supply), they create their own “states” with laws, social provision and a savage punishment code.
organized_crime  drug_cartels  globalization  institutions  book_reviews  books  Japanese  Russians  Italians  mafia  gangs  viciousness 
august 2017 by jerryking
Global brands — FT.com
JUNE 29, 2017 by Scheherazade Daneshkhu and Chris Campbell
best_of  rankings  brands  Fortune_500  multinationals  globalization 
july 2017 by jerryking
Preparing Young Americans for a Complex World - The New York Times
the American economy is inextricably linked to the global economy. It’s estimated that one-fifth of jobs here are now tied to international trade. Moreover, many of the world’s major challenges — climate change, instability in financial markets, food and water insecurity, infectious diseases, migration, war and terrorism — are complex, interdependent and borderless. And with 40 million foreign-born residents, the United States is itself a global society with deep emotional ties to many nations and cultures. To survive and thrive, Americans have to learn how to manage greater complexity and collaborate across lines of difference.
complexity  globalization  international_trade  global_economy 
february 2017 by jerryking
Thomas Friedman’s Guide to Hanging On in the ‘Age of Accelerations’ - Bloomberg
by Paul Barrett
November 11, 2016,

Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist’s Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, $28)....the wisdom of pausing.... take time “to just sit and think”— a good reminder for the overcommitted.....Friedman's “core argument,” is his description of our disruptive times. By “accelerations,” he means the increases in computing power, which are enabling breakthroughs from 3D printing to self-driving cars. Meanwhile, globalization is creating vast wealth for those who capitalize on innovation and impoverishment for populations who don’t. All of this sped-up economic activity contributes to rising carbon levels, feeding the climate change that threatens civilization.....Friedman relishes catchphrases like “the Big Shift,” borrowed in this case from the HBR. He deploys B-school jargon to explain it, but the definition boils down to companies making the move from relying exclusively on in-house brainpower, patents, and data to exploiting “flows” of knowledge from anywhere in the world.... Friedman makes the case for changed policies to respond to the accelerations he chronicles.
accelerated_lifecycles  sustained_inquiry  Tom_Friedman  books  slack_time  reflections  3-D  globalization  impoverishment  climate_change  in-house  talent_flows  information_flows  GE  prizes  bounties  innovation  contests  contemplation  patents  data  brainpower  jargon  thinking  timeouts  power_of_the_pause 
january 2017 by jerryking
Movement politics: a guide to the new globalisation
NOVEMBER 24, 2016 by: Alan Beattie.

The Great Convergence: Information Technology and the New Globalization, by Richard Baldwin, Harvard University Press, RRP£22.95/$29.95, 344 pages.

....Just as South Korea has changed, so newly industrialising countries are less keen on setting up entire industries at home and instead try to insert themselves into global supply chains. Sometimes this means changing, not just exploiting, their comparative advantage. Baldwin cites Vietnam, which joined Honda’s supply network by starting to manufacture motorcycle parts using production and technical expertise imported from the parent company. Thus Vietnam’s existing advantage of low-cost labour joined with the management and technical know-how of Japan to create a new specialism......

This framework explains a lot about current tensions around globalisation. For one, the stricken manufacturing towns of the American Midwest, many of whose poorer inhabitants switched to voting for Donald Trump, have experienced first-hand what it feels like rapidly to become a redundant link in a global value chain.

Second, it shows why modern trade deals, such as the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership between the US and EU, are centred on rules protecting patents and copyrights, and allowing foreign corporations to sue governments if they feel their investments are being expropriated. Multinationals are less concerned with goods tariffs, which are now generally low and belong to an earlier era of trade governance, than they are with trying to protect the specialist knowledge on which their global supply chains depend.

It also foresees the future of globalisation once technology has relaxed the third constraint, the movement of people. The easier it becomes to manage processes from afar — improved videoconferencing, remote-controlled robots — the more virtual immigration can substitute for actual and the specialisation of global supply chains proceed even faster.
books  book_reviews  supply_chains  Vietnam  Honda  international_trade  comparative_advantage  patents  videoconferencing  TTP  MNCs  redundancies  globalization  Midwest  Rust_Belt  industrial_Midwest  value_chains  copyright  transatlantic 
november 2016 by jerryking
For Whites Sensing Decline, Donald Trump Unleashes Words of Resistance
JULY 13, 2016 | - The New York Times | By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE.

The resentment among whites feels both old and distinctly of this moment. It is shaped by the reality of demographic change, by a decade and a half of war in the Middle East, and by unease with the newly confident and confrontational activism of young blacks furious over police violence. It is mingled with patriotism, pride, fear and a sense that an America without them at its center is not really America anymore.

In the months since Mr. Trump began his campaign, the percentage of Americans who say race relations are worsening has increased, reaching nearly half in an April poll by CBS News. The sharpest rise was among Republicans: Sixty percent said race relations were getting worse.

And Mr. Trump’s rise is shifting the country’s racial discourse just as the millennial generation comes fully of age, more and more distant from the horrors of the Holocaust, or the government-sanctioned racism of Jim Crow.
Campaign_2016  Patrick_Buchanan  decline  deindustrialization  multiculturalism  globalization  race_relations  Donald_Trump  resentments  grievances  political_correctness  white_identity  identity_politics  bigotry  race_card  birthers  Colleges_&_Universities  whites  working_class  blue-collar  racial_resentment 
july 2016 by jerryking
Canada’s winning combination for the new global economy - The Globe and Mail
BRUCE SIMPSON AND SREE RAMASWAMY
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Mar. 26,
Canada  globalization  global_economy 
march 2016 by jerryking
The Language Barrier Is About to Fall - WSJ
By ALEC ROSS
Jan. 29, 2016

Universal machine translation should accelerate the world’s growing interconnectedness. While the current stage of globalization was propelled in no small part by the adoption of English as the lingua franca for business—to the point that there are now twice as many nonnative English speakers as native speakers—the next wave will open up communication even more broadly by removing the need for a shared language. Currently, when Korean-speaking businesspeople speak with Mandarin-speaking executives at a conference in Brazil, they converse in English. There will no longer be this need, opening the door of global business for nonelites and a massive number of non-English speakers.
languages  globalization  machine_learning  translations 
january 2016 by jerryking
White Supremacists Without Borders - The New York Times
JUNE 22, 2015 | NYT|MORRIS DEES and J. RICHARD COHEN.

This month, S.P.L.C. staffers will join activists from the United States and Europe at a conference in Budapest about this transnational white supremacism that is emerging as the world grows more connected by technology. The message of white genocide is spreading. White nationalists look beyond borders for confirmation that their race is under attack, and they share their ideas in the echo chamber of racist websites.

The days of thinking of domestic terrorism as the work of a few Klansmen or belligerent skinheads are over. We know Islamic terrorists are thinking globally, and we confront that threat. We’ve been too slow to realize that white supremacists are doing the same.
Charleston_shootings  white_supremacy  globalization  terrorism  racism  Confederacy  white_nationalists  nationalism  echo_chambers 
june 2015 by jerryking
Britain resigns as a world power
May 21, 2015 |The Washington Post | Fareed Zakaria
"I was struck by just how parochial it has become. After an extraordinary 300-year run, Britain has essentially resigned as a global power.

Over the next few years, Britain’s army will shrink to about 80,000."... Why does this matter? Because on almost all global issues, Britain has a voice that is intelligent, engaged and forward-looking. It wants to strengthen and uphold today’s international system — one based on the free flow of ideas, goods and services around the world, one that promotes individual rights and the rule of law.

This is not an accident. Britain essentially created the world we live in. In his excellent book “God and Gold,” Walter Russell Mead points out that in the 16th century many countries were poised to advance economically and politically — Northern Italy’s city-states, the Hanseatic League, the Low Countries, France, Spain. But Britain managed to edge out the others, becoming the first great industrial economy and the modern world’s first superpower. It colonized and shaped countries and cultures from Australia to India to Africa to the Western Hemisphere, including of course, its settlements in North America. Had Spain or Germany become the world’s leading power, things would look very different today.
BBC  books  cosmopolitan  cost-cutting  cutbacks  David_Cameron  drawdowns  EU  Fareed_Zakaria  foreign_policy  forward_looking  geopolitics  globalization  industrial_economy  international_relations  international_system  internationalism  leadership  London  middle-powers  parochialism  punch-above-its-weight  retreats  rule_of_law  superpowers  United_Kingdom  Walter_Russell_Mead 
may 2015 by jerryking
What's Keeping Black Students From Studying Abroad?
MAR 13 2015| The Atlantic | BRANDON TENSLEY.

The grim reality of this 5-percent problem is that it also excludes blacks from gaining some important perspectives, according to Zim Ugochukwu, the 26-year-old creator of Travel Noire, a digital publishing platform that "creates tools and resources for the unconventional traveler."
Colleges_&_Universities  African-Americans  education  cosmopolitan  globalization  travel 
march 2015 by jerryking
The Shake Shack Economy - The New Yorker
JANUARY 26, 2015 ISSUE

The Shake Shack Economy
BY JAMES SUROWIECKI

Unlike traditional fast-food restaurants, fast-casuals emphasize fresh, natural, and often locally sourced ingredients. (Chipotle, for instance, tries to use only antibiotic-free meat.) Perhaps as a result, their food tends to taste better. It’s also more expensive. The average McDonald’s customer spends around five dollars a visit; the average Chipotle check is more than twice that. Fast-casual restaurants first emerged in serious numbers in the nineteen-nineties, and though the industry is just a fraction of the size of the traditional fast-food business, it has grown remarkably quickly. Today, according to the food-service consulting firm Technomic, it accounts for thirty-four billion dollars in sales. Since Chipotle went public, in 2006, its stock price has risen more than fifteen hundred per cent.

The rise of Chipotle and its peers isn’t just a business story. It’s a story about income distribution, changes in taste, and advances in technology. For most of the fast-food industry’s history, taste was a secondary consideration.
fast-casual  food  globalization  James_Surowiecki  shifting_tastes  entrepreneur  Danny_Meyer  Panera  Chipotle  fast-food  income_distribution  Shake_Shack 
january 2015 by jerryking
Makers and Breakers - NYTimes.com
NOV. 8, 2014 | NYT | Thomas L. Friedman.

This is a great time to be a maker, an innovator, a starter-upper. Thanks to the Internet, you can raise capital, sell goods or services and discover collaborators and customers globally more easily than ever. This is a great time to make things. But it is also a great time to break things, thanks to the Internet. If you want to break something or someone, or break into somewhere that is encrypted, and collaborate with other bad guys, you can recruit and operate today with less money, greater ease and greater reach than ever before. This is a great time to be a breaker. That’s why the balance of power between makers and breakers will shape our world every bit as much as the one between America, Russia and China.
Tom_Friedman  entrepreneurship  hackers  Cleveland  innovation  start_ups  immigrants  rogue_actors  supply_chains  globalization  lean  small_business  microproducers  Israeli 
november 2014 by jerryking
Canada needs the long view, urgently - The Globe and Mail
Kevin Lynch

Contributed to The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Jan. 07 2014

The answer for Canada is not to be found in short-term political fixes, less technological change or reduced globalization. Rather, it lies in a return to a longer-term orientation: more structural policy thinking, a global economic strategy, greater dialogue and co-operation between public and private-sectors, better and more targeted education, and tackling our structural productivity and innovation deficits. It seems rather obvious that, in this changing world, the status quo cannot be a viable long-term strategy for any sector in the Canadian economy, from business to government to education.
strategic_thinking  competitiveness_of_nations  Canada  technological_change  Kevin_Lynch  globalization  long-term  productivity  innovation  P3 
january 2014 by jerryking
In Singapore, Building Businesses for the Next Billion - NYTimes.com
By QUENTIN HARDY

Singapore’s tiny size always forced it to look outward, whether servicing foreign ships or assembling electronics for export to Europe and the United States. Now that software is delivered over the Internet and almost everyone has a phone, Singapore still needs to export its business, but the regional market, with an extraordinary mixture of rich and poor, has a lot more potential....“There are over 1 billion people within a four-hour flight of Singapore,” said Hian Goh, a partner at Pivotal Asia Ventures. While that is true of a couple other Asian capitals, he noted, “nowhere else has the range wealth: Singapore’s $60,000 per capita GDP, and $3,000 in Laos. Technology is a force enabler for all of them.”

The expatriate ties are equally diverse, with companies from Russia and the European Union looking for cross-border investment, and individuals from South Africa and Slovakia who were drawn by the warm weather, easy business regulations and high-speed connectivity.

One incubator, called The Joyful Frog Digital Incubator (the name has something to do with “just do it”), wouldn’t seem out of place in the Silicon Valley, except the house barista is more cosmopolitan.

This isn’t to say “there is better than here,” or “Asia wins.” Those responses are increasingly incoherent. It may not be that kind of contest, and for many of these people, even in a state as closely managed as Singapore, the nation matters less than connectivity and what local populations need.

They are building a world where tech travels everywhere, demolishing existing systems and changing societies.
start_ups  Singapore  globalization  venture_capital  vc  cosmopolitan  city-states  exporting  outward_looking 
october 2013 by jerryking
The middle class is good politics but a curious crusade
Aug. 03 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Konrad Yakabuski.

A “thriving middle class” won’t come from new programs hatched in Ottawa. It will come from the innovators and entrepreneurs who harness Canada’s abundant human capital and natural resources to create wealth.

as TD Economics has shown, Canada has not experienced the same wage polarization that has led to rising income inequality south of the border. Social mobility is higher here and our tax system is more progressive. The after-tax income of the top 10 per cent of Canadians was 4.1 times that of the bottom 10 per cent in 2010. The U.S. ratio was 6 to 1.

There is no doubt that globalization and technological change have rendered thousands of middle-class Canadian jobs obsolete. But there is no reversing this trend, no matter how much would-be federal policy-makers aspire to meddle. Besides, globalization’s upsides outweigh its downsides. And Canadians, among the best-educated people on the planet, stand to benefit.

“Rewards to education, to innovation and to creativity are higher than they have ever been,” notes Princeton University economist Angus Deaton in The Great Escape, his forthcoming book on the history of inequality. “Perhaps the greatest escape in all of human history, and certainly the most rapid one [is] the reduction in global poverty since 1980 … The world has done much better than the pessimists predicted.”
Konrad_Yakabuski  globalization  Chrystia_Freeland  obsolescence  middle_class  technological_change  social_mobility  Toronto  expatriates  inequality  books  income_inequality  capitalization 
august 2013 by jerryking
Indigo’s next chapter could be global - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER

The Globe and Mail

Last updated Wednesday, Jun. 26 2013,
Marina_Strauss  retailers  Indigo  Heather_Reisman  globalization 
june 2013 by jerryking
My Little (Global) School - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: April 2, 2013

So what’s the secret of the best-performing schools? It’s that there is no secret. The best schools, the study found, have strong fundamentals and cultures that believe anything is possible with any student: They “work hard to choose strong teachers with good content knowledge and dedication to continuous improvement.” They are “data-driven and transparent, not only around learning outcomes, but also around soft skills like completing work on time, resilience, perseverance — and punctuality.” And they promote “the active engagement of our parents and families.”
education  high_schools  globalization  middle_class  benchmarking  Tom_Friedman 
april 2013 by jerryking
Big Changes Drive Small Carpet Firm - WSJ.com
October 30, 2006 | WSJ | By PHRED DVORAK
Theory & Practice
Big Changes Drive Small Carpet Firm
Hong Kong's Tai Ping Sets Global Growth on Overhaul In Management, Marketing

The small Hong Kong carpet maker hired an American chief executive who had never been to Asia and installed him in New York. It revamped its executive team, centralized marketing and acquired a high-end carpet maker in the U.S...."We're trying to create a minimultinational," says director John Ying, who helped push Tai Ping in its new direction.... small companies can -- and sometimes must -- globalize as much as big ones....
globalization  CEOs  Hong_Kong  small_business  howto  carpets  multinationals  microproducers  tips  marketing  strategy  management  turnarounds  metrics  managing_change 
february 2013 by jerryking
A New U.S. International Economic Strategy - WSJ.com
February 5, 2013 | WSJ | by Robert Zoellick.

A New U.S. International Economic Strategy
Taking the lead on trade and open markets can enhance global security, opportunity and the prospects for liberty.

(1) First, this country should strengthen its continental base by building on the North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico.
(2) the extraordinary monetary policies of late, led by the Federal Reserve's continued near-zero interest-rate policy, are taking us into uncharted territory.
(3)the U.S. needs to break the logjam on opening markets.
(4)Fourth, gender equality is not only fair and right—it is smart economics.
(5) Finally, the U.S. needs to match growth priorities of developing economies.
globalization  international_trade  Robert_Zoellick  NAFTA  IMF  WTO  economic_policy  gender_gap  entrepreneurship  Junior_Achievement  infrastructure 
february 2013 by jerryking
Class notes from a course on the age of complexity
Dec. 24, 2012 | The Financial Times p8.|by John Lloyd.

Now some have developed an anxiety about muddling through, and the lack of strategic thinking among leaders in public life.

General Sir David Richards, head of the British armed forces, recently stressed the need for long-range thinking about the world's unpredictability. Conflict in the Middle East, the rise of China, the slowing of Europe, fierce competition for raw materials, demographic shifts, terrorism and international crime are only some of the vast challenges he sees.

The UK public administration select committee, which scrutinises how the government is run, produced a report in April called Strategic Thinking on Government , in which it declared "we have little confidence that government policies are informed by a clear, coherent, strategic approach".
United_Kingdom  strategic_thinking  public_sector  long-range  unpredictability  globalization  Colleges_&_Universities  executive_education  complexity  LSE  long-term  from notes
december 2012 by jerryking
Clear Conscience -- Clear Profit - WSJ.com
September 29, 2006 | WSJ | By N.R. NARAYANA MURTHY.

Our experience has shown there are five elements of success in today's global marketplace:

(1) Listen to other people's ideas, especially those of the younger generations. Devise ways of management to tap the brilliance of young minds. Some of our best ideas grew from monthly "Ideation Days," brainstorming sessions led by employees under 30. Keep doors open. Let young workers walk into senior managers' offices to present their ideas without going through "proper channels." Retire early enough to give younger people a chance to take responsibility while still enthusiastic.
(2) Maintain meritocracy. Build a company where people of different nationalities, genders and religions compete in an environment of intense competition and total courtesy. Do this by using data to decide which ideas are adopted. Our motto: "In God we trust. Everyone else brings data to the table."
(3) Benchmark yourself against internal and external competitors to make sure you are doing everything faster today than you did yesterday, or last quarter.
(4) Continue to develop better ideas. Build something great, and then break it to build something better. Never fear being insufficiently focused on a single core business. As long as your most brilliant people are continuously experimenting with the best services to provide to customers, the results will turn out right in the end.
(5) Maintain pressure to implement the best ideas with ever-higher levels of excellence.

Leadership is key to inspiring employees to make these elements part of their daily lives. The golden core of leadership is the ability to raise aspirations. Aspiration doesn't just build companies, it builds civilizations. It changes a set of ordinary people into a team of extraordinary talents, empowering them to convert plausible impossibilities into convincing possibilities.
aspirations  benchmarking  brainstorming  CEOs  data_driven  experimentation  globalization  ideas  ideation  idea_generation  India  Infosys  ksfs  leadership  listening  meritocratic  millennials 
november 2012 by jerryking
Fasken Martineau makes big move into Africa - The Globe and Mail
JEFF GRAY - Law Reporter

The Globe and Mail

Published Sunday, Oct. 21 2012
law  South_Africa  globalization  Jeff_Gray  Africa 
october 2012 by jerryking
Africa next: The quest for Africa’s riches - The Globe and Mail
GEOFFREY YORK

LUBUMBASHI, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO — The Globe and Mail

Last updated Sunday, Sep. 30 2012
Geoffrey_York  Africa  Congo  globalization  emerging_markets  mining  South-South  BRIC  corruption  Renaissance_Capital 
october 2012 by jerryking
Birks’ CEO wraps jeweller in the Maple Leaf - The Globe and Mail
BERTRAND MAROTTE

MONTREAL — The Globe and Mail

Published Wednesday, Sep. 26 2012
Birks  jewellery  luxury  globalization  CEOs  national_identity  branding 
september 2012 by jerryking
How to become a plutocrat
Sept. 27 2012 | - The Globe and Mail | Chrystia Freeland.

Providing services to the plutocrats is one way to join them. But an even more powerful driver of 21st-century superstar economics is the way that globalization and technology have allowed some top-tier types to achieve global scale and earn the commensurate global fortunes. This is the effect that Sherwin Rosen, who invented the theory of the economics of superstars back in 1981, was most interested in, and it is both the most visible and the easiest to understand. These superstars are the direct beneficiaries of the twin gilded ages.
Chrystia_Freeland  high_net_worth  globalization  moguls  bespoke  luxury  craftsmanship  winner-take-all  plutocrats  superstars  increasing_returns_to_scale  21st._century  top-tier 
september 2012 by jerryking
Freshfields Focuses on Global Strategy to Get an Edge Over Rivals - NYTimes.com
September 24, 2012, 3:02 pmComment
Evolving Global Strategy Gives Law Firm an Edge
By MARK SCOTT
law_firms  globalization  Big_Law  Freshfields 
september 2012 by jerryking
A conversation that translates
June 7, 2012 | The Financial Times pg. 14 | Philip Delves Broughton.
(Pass on to Abdoulaye DIOP)
For global companies, creating an approach to risk that resonates across cultures can be a challenge, writes Philip Delves Broughton

Risk is a risky word. Already prone to misinterpretation among people who share a language and a culture, the difficulties multiply dangerously when it moves across borders.

What a Wall Street trader might define as moderately risky may seem downright insane to a Japanese retail broker; what an oil pipeline engineer in Brazil might characterise as gung-ho may appear overcautious to his revenue-chasing chief executive in London....The greatest pitfalls in managing risk across borders, he says, emerge from assuming too much. When dealing with fellow English speakers, it is easy to imagine that a shared language means shared assumptions - that the English, Americans and Australians think the same thing because they are using the same words.... Tips for managing risk across borders

Context is more important than language. Understand what matters most in the markets where you are doing business. Is it the law, logic or maintaining relationships?

Every word comes with its own "metadata" in different cultures. Be as specific as you can and never assume you have been properly understood without checking for potential misunderstandings.
cultural_assumptions  risks  risk-management  Communicating_&_Connecting  globalization  organizational_culture  transactions  national_identity  Philip_Delves_Broughton  translations  assumptions  misinterpretations  contextual  metadata  specificity  crossborder  cross-cultural  misunderstandings  interpretation  conversations  risk-assessment  words  compounded  risk-perception  multiplicative 
september 2012 by jerryking
Step Into the Office-Less Company - WSJ.com
September 4, 2012 | WSJ | By RACHEL EMMA SILVERMAN

Step Into the Office-Less Company
How One Tech Firm Manages 123 At-Home Employees Scattered Across 26 Countries and 94 Cities

Today, just 2.5% of the U.S. workforce considers home its primary place of work. But that number, which is based on census-data analysis, grew 66% from 2005 to 2010, according to the Telework Research Network, a consulting and research firm. And increasingly, employees at companies with physical offices are choosing to work remotely or forming virtual teams with colleagues world-wide, thanks to rapid advances in video, social-networking, cloud storage and mobile technology.

Many far-flung companies also have non-hierarchical management structures, providing teams and workers the authority to make decisions and complete tasks with light supervision.
managing_people  home_based  globalization 
september 2012 by jerryking
U.S. political debate stuck in the past -
Aug. 30 2012 | The Globe and Mail | CHRYSTIA FREELAND.

The argument between the Democrats and the GOP about the size of the state comes with little regard for the economic realities of this era. Like generals fighting the last war, U.S. politicians are solving the economic challenges of the past century....Thanks to smart machines and global trade, the well-paying, middle-class jobs that were the backbone of Western democracies are vanishing. The paradoxical driver of this middle-class squeeze is not some villainous force – it is, rather, the success of the world’s best companies, many of them American (i.e. Big Tech, the major platforms)....the knottiest economic problem of our time: Figuring out how to manage an economy whose engines of growth are enriching the few but squeezing the many....It took more than the spinning jenny or the steam engine to transform local, agrarian, family-based communities into national, urban, individualistic ones. New political and social institutions will be needed to midwife the latest shift into global and virtual communities. Inventing those institutions is difficult, and talking about them can be frightening, but that is the political conversation the Western world should be having.
Big_Tech  Chrystia_Freeland  Campaign_2012  globalization  Outsourcing  institutions  middle_class  job_destruction  job_displacement  job_loss  institution-building  downward_mobility  hollowing_out  backward_looking 
august 2012 by jerryking
The Global Entrepreneur
December 2008 | HBR | by Daniel J. Isenberg

* More and more start-ups are being born global.
* By tapping resources or serving customers across nations, entrepreneurs can take on larger rivals, chase global opportunities, and use distance to create new products or services.
* Distances, differences in cultural contexts, and paucity of resources are the main challenges new ventures face.
* Successful entrepreneurs are clear in their purpose, strike alliances from positions of weakness, are able to manage global supply chains, and can establish multinational organizations from the outset.
HBR  start_ups  small_business  entrepreneur  internationally_minded  supply_chains  new_products  globalization  Diaspora  networks  microproducers  DanieI_Isenberg 
august 2012 by jerryking
The emergence of a new global citizen - The Globe and Mail
CHRYSTIA FREELAND

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Aug. 16 2012
Chrystia_Freeland  Hong_Kong  capitalism  films  globalization 
august 2012 by jerryking
Another Jolt to Global Food Prices - NYTimes.com
August 9, 2012, 4:31 pmComment
Another Jolt to Global Food Prices
By JUSTIN GILLIS
globalization  pricing  food  agriculture 
august 2012 by jerryking
Real-World Advice for the Young
04.11.05 | Forbes | Rich Karlgaard.

We owe our young people ...a set of "road rules" for the real world.

Purpose. Every young person needs to know that he was created for a purpose. ...I would, however, argue that there is also an economic purpose to our lives. It is to discover our gifts, make them productive and find outlets for their best contribution.

Priorities. The best single piece of advice from Peter Drucker: Stop thinking about what you can achieve; think about what you can contribute (to your company, your customers, your marriage, your community). This is how you will achieve. Enron had an achievement-first culture; it just achieved the wrong things...how many schools teach young people to think in terms of contribution?

Preparation. Lest you think I'm urging young people down a Mother Teresa-like path of self-sacrifice, I'm not. The task is to fit purpose and contribution into a capitalistic world. There is a crying need for prepared young people who can thrive in a realm of free-market capitalism. This great system works magnificently, but it doesn't work anything like the way it's taught in most universities. In the real world, the pie of resources and wealth is not fixed; it is growing all the time. In the real world, the game is not rigged and static; rather, money and talent move at the speed of light in the direction of freedom and opportunity. In the real world, greed is bad (because it takes your eye off customers), but profits are very good. Profits allow you to invest in the future. In the real world, rising living standards do not create pollution. Instead, they create an informed middle class that wants and works to reduce pollution.

Pan-global view. The economy is global.... There is no going back.

Partner. Many of the great startups of the last 30 years began as teams of two...Behind this phenomenon is a principle: Build on your strengths. To mitigate your weaknesses--and we all have them--partner up! Find your complement.
Perseverance. Young people are smarter and more sophisticated today. It's not even close. My own generation's SAT scores look like they came out of baseball's dead-ball era. But apart from the blue-collar kids who are fighting in Iraq, most American kids today are soft. That's a harsh statement, isn't it? But cultural anecdotes back it up. Kids weigh too much. Fitness is dropping. Three American high schoolers ran the mile in under four minutes in the 1960s. It's been done by one person since. Parents sue coaches when Johnny is cut from the team. Students sue for time extensions on tests. New college dorms resemble luxury hotels. College grads, unable to face the world, move back in with their parents and stay for years.

Does this sound like a work force you'd send into combat against the Chinese?
in_the_real_world  Rich_Karlgaard  advice  Peter_Drucker  youth  students  entrepreneurship  partnerships  rules_of_the_game  purpose  globalization  Junior_Achievement  perseverance  millennials  serving_others  priorities  preparation  profits  greed  fitness  talent_flows  capital_flows  static  risk-mitigation  complacency  blue-collar  Chinese  capitalism  self-sacrifice  young_people  anecdotal 
august 2012 by jerryking
At Davos, Leaders are Debating Whether Corporations are More Powerful Than Governments
January 27, 2012 | TIME.com | By Rana Foroohar.

The top companies seem to exist in a world apart — they are booming, and their executives are prospering. If there is a meta theme to this year’s World Economic Forum in Davos, it is that the world’s largest companies are moving on and moving ahead of governments and countries that they perceive to be inept and anemic. They are flying above them, operating in a space that is increasingly disconnected from local concerns, and the problems of their home markets. And if the conversations here are any indication, they may soon take over much of what government itself does....The problem was nicely captured in this week’s New York Times piece on Apple, looking at why the iPhone is mostly made outside America. As one of the company’s executives put it, “We don’t have an obligation to solve America’s problems.” It’s a sentiment that was echoed on Time’s Board of Economists’ panel, where business leaders blamed for not sharing the $2 trillion in wealth sitting on corporate balance sheets argued that they did create jobs and prosperity — just not in this country.....Labor economist Clyde Prestowitz pointed out as much in an article in Foreign Policy this week where he noted that while Apple may not think American economic issues are it’s “problem,” it certainly depends on the Seventh Fleet to keep Asian waterways safe and clear so that it can deliver it’s products.....A lot of people here in Davos — people like Nobel laureate Chris Pissarides, and a number of high level investors I spoke with — say that we can’t innovate or educate our way out of this problem. It’s only going to get worse, particularly as a coming automation revolution starts to hollow out white collar jobs in rich countries.
Rana_Foroohar  Davos  multinationals  Apple  globalization  cash_reserves  job_destruction  job_displacement  downward_mobility  automation  hollowing_out  white-collar  developed_countries  Nobel_Prizes  large_companies  statelessness 
august 2012 by jerryking
Europe’s Lycamobile plans Canadian foray - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 23 2012 | The Globe and Mail | by Rita Trichur.
European telecommunications provider Lycamobile is planning to shake up Canada’s $18-billion wireless market with a new service aimed at immigrants and other ethnic consumers who regularly talk and text with family and friends living overseas.
telecommunications  globalization  wireless  immigrants  ethnic_communities  MVNOs 
july 2012 by jerryking
How Red Sox owners got it right
Jul. 20 2012 | The Globe and Mail | STEVE LADURANTAYE.

Over the past 10 years, the Boston Red Sox have been transformed a small baseball ownership group into one of the largest sports companies on the planet – consistently high payrolls, solid scouting and clutch plays have all helped the team post the second highest winning percentage in baseball over the past decade.
sports  Steve_Ladurantaye  Boston  globalization  branding  sponsorships  advertising 
july 2012 by jerryking
The Organic Myth
OCTOBER 16, 2006 | Business Week | Diane Brady

Stonyfield still cleaves to its organic heritage. For Chairman and CEO Gary Hirshberg, though, shipping milk powder 9,000 miles across the planet is the price you pay to conquer the supermarket dairy aisle. "It would be great to get all of our food within a 10-mile radius of our house," he says. "But once you're in organic, you have to source globally."

Hirshberg's dilemma is that of the entire organic food business. Just as mainstream consumers are growing hungry for untainted food that also nourishes their social conscience, it is getting harder and harder to find organic ingredients. There simply aren't enough organic cows in the U.S., never mind the organic grain to feed them, to go around. Nor are there sufficient organic strawberries, sugar, or apple pulp -- some of the other ingredients that go into the world's best-selling organic yogurt...For Big Food, consumers' love affair with everything organic has seemed like a gift from the gods. Food is generally a commoditized, sluggish business, especially in basic supermarket staples. Sales of organic groceries, on the other hand, have been surging by up to 20% in recent years. Organic milk is so profitable -- with wholesale prices more than double that of conventional milk -- that Lyle "Spud" Edwards of Westfield, Vt., was able to halve his herd, to 25 cows, this summer and still make a living, despite a 15% drop in yields since switching to organic four years ago. "There's a lot more paperwork, but it's worth it," says Edwards, who supplies milk to Stonyfield...But success has brought home the problems of trying to feed the masses in an industry where supplies can be volatile. Everyone from Wal-Mart to Costco Wholesale Corp. (COST ) is feeling the pinch. Earlier this year, Earthbound Farm, a California producer of organic salads, fruit, and vegetables owned by Natural Selection Foods, cut off its sliced-apple product to Costco because supply dried up -- even though Earthbound looked as far afield as New Zealand. "The concept of running out of apples is foreign to these people," says Earthbound co-founder Myra Goodman, whose company recalled bagged spinach in the wake of the recent E. coli outbreak. "When you're sourcing conventional produce, it's a matter of the best product at the best price."

Inconsistency is a hallmark of organic food. Variations in animal diet, local conditions, and preparation make food taste different from batch to batch.
food  organic  local  globalization  Wal-Mart  supermarkets  grocery  Danone  yogurt  Stonyfield  dairy  myths  variability 
june 2012 by jerryking
Beyond Peter Pan: How ConAgra's Pot Pie Recall Bakes In Hard Lessons for Supply Chain Management
October 22, 2007 | CIO.com | By Kim S. Nash.

Recalls are blooming like flowers in spring: Dole’s e.coli bagged salads; Metz Fresh’s salmonella spinach; REI’s faulty children’s bikes; Mattel’s lead-painted and choking-hazard toys, just to name a few. Federal records show at least 628 recalls so far this year, and another 941 in 2006. (For more, check our History of Famous Recalls.) Globalization accounts for some of this surge. Many U.S. companies depend on overseas production, where quality controls are difficult to monitor. And it’s not just hard goods like toys from China. Food, too, arrives by container ship from other countries, and sometimes it’s contaminated. So far this year, for example, more than 8,660 cartons of cantaloupe from Costa Rica have been recalled for salmonella risks, according to U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) records.
product_recalls  supply_chains  globalization  ConAgra  peanut_butter  traceability  tracking  CIOs 
june 2012 by jerryking
Boardroom farmers: Some of the world's biggest agricultural investors - The Globe and Mail
Paul Waldie
From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Nov. 24, 2010

A subsidiary of Toronto-based Sprott Resource Corp., called One Earth Farms, is also working with first nations to manage up to one million acres of farmland in Saskatchewan, Alberta and Manitoba.
agriculture  farming  investors  HAIG  AgCapita_Partners  Assiniboia_Capital  Bonnefield_Financial  Pike_Management  globalization  boards_&_directors_&_governance  Paul_Waldie  One_Earth_Farms 
may 2012 by jerryking
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

related tags

'10s  3-D  3G_Capital  21st._century  abuses  academic_achievement  accelerated_lifecycles  advertising  advertising_agencies  advice  Africa  African-Americans  AgCapita_Partners  aging  agriculture  airlines  airline_industry  airports  al-Qaeda  algorithms  Amanda_Lang  American  American_Giant  America_in_Decline?  analytics  Andrew_Sorkin  Andrew_Wylie  anecdotal  angels  Anne-Marie_Slaughter  antifragility  apparel  Apple  architecture  art  artificial_intelligence  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  Asia  Asian  aspirations  Assiniboia_Capital  assumptions  atoms_&_bits  automation  automobile  averages  awards  backlash  backward_looking  Bangladesh  banking  Basel_III  BBC  benchmarking  bespoke  best_of  beverages  beyondtheU.S.  bigotry  Big_Law  Big_Tech  Birks  birthers  Blackstone  blue-collar  blue_oceans  boards_&_directors_&_governance  Bonnefield_Financial  booklists  books  book_reviews  borderless  Boston  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  bounties  brainpower  brainstorming  brain_drain  branding  brands  Brazil  Bret_Stephens  Brexit  BRIC  broad-based_scientific_enquiry  business  business_development  business_models  business_schools  C.K._Prahalad  Callaway_Golf  Campaign_2012  Campaign_2016  Canada  Canadian  capacity-building  capitalism  capitalization  capital_flows  Carlyle_Group  carpets  cash_reserves  catastrophes  category_killers  cattle  CEOs  change  Charleston_shootings  cheap_revolution  Chicago  children  China  China_rising  Chinese  Chipotle  chorizo  Chris_Anderson  Chrystia_Freeland  CIOs  Cirque_du_Soleil  cities  city-states  CIVETS  Cleveland  climate_change  cloud_computing  cnn  coffee  cold_storage  collaboration  Colleges_&_Universities  commodities  commodities_supercycle  Communicating_&_Connecting  comparative_advantage  competitiveness_of_nations  competitive_advantage  complacency  complexity  compounded  ConAgra  concentration  Confederacy  Congo  conspiracies  constant_change  consumers  consumer_behavior  consumer_research  containment  contemplation  content_creators  contests  contextual  conversations  copyright  corruption  cosmopolitan  cost-cutting  CPG  craftsmanship  crisis  cross-cultural  cross-disciplinary  cross-pollination  crossborder  cultural_assumptions  cultural_diversity  culture  cured_and_smoked  curiosity  cutbacks  dairy  Dambisa_Moyo  dangerous_ideas  dangers  DanieI_Isenberg  Danny_Meyer  Danone  data  data_driven  David_Brooks  David_Cameron  David_Rubenstein  David_Sanger  David_Sparling  Davos  deal-making  dealerships  dealmakers  decline  deglobalization  deindustrialization  delusions  demographic_changes  department_stores  design  developed_countries  development  DFAIT  Diaspora  digitalization  digital_economy  digital_media  diplomacy  disaffection  dislocations  disorder  disorganization  disposability  disposable_income  distribution_channels  diversity  Dominic_Barton  Donald_Trump  Doug_Saunders  downside_risks  downward_mobility  drawdowns  drug_cartels  Dubai  dystopian_futures  e-discovery  EBSCOhost  echo_chambers  ecological_risks  economics  economic_development  economic_downturn  economic_history  economic_nationalism  economic_policy  economic_prognostication  economic_risk  economic_stagnation  economists  economy  education  elitism  emerging_markets  emigration  energy  engineering  entertainment  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  equality_of_opportunity  ethnic_communities  ethnography  EU  evidence_based  executive_education  existential  expatriates  experimentation  exporting  extreme_weather_events  face2face  failed_states  fallacies_follies  family  family_breakdown  family_business  Fareed_Zakaria  Farhad_Manjoo  farmers'_markets  farming  fashion  fast-casual  fast-fashion  fast-food  FDI  filetype:pdf  films  fin-tech  finance  financial  financial_history  fitness  flat_world  Flexcar  flexibility  Florence  food  food_crops  foreign_aid  foreign_policy  Fortune_500  forward_looking  foundational  franchising  free-trade  free_trade  Freshfields  frictions  frontier_markets  Functioning_Core  funding  future  Gadi_Prager  galleries  gangs  GE  geeks  gender_gap  genius  Geoffrey_York  geographic_ingredient_branding  geopolitics  Gillian_Tett  Glenn_Hutchins  global  globalization  global_economy  golden_age  Gordon_Pitts  graduation_rates  grand_strategy  Great_Depression  greed  grievances  grocery  growth  gurus  H&M  habits  hackers  HAIG  hair  Hal_Lancaster  hardships  HBC  HBR  HBS  Heather_Reisman  heritage_migration  heterogeneity  high-end  high-touch  high_net_worth  high_schools  hiring  history  hollowing_out  Hollywood  home_based  Honda  Hong_Kong  howto  human_capital  human_potential  Ian_Bremmer  IBM  Iceland  ideas  ideation  idea_generation  identity  identity_politics  IMF  immigrants  immigration  imperialism  impermanence  impotence  impoverishment  improvisation  in-house  in-person  income_distribution  income_inequality  increasing_returns_to_scale  India  Indians  Indigo  indispensable  Indonesia  industrial_economy  industrial_Midwest  industrial_policies  Industrial_Revolution  industry_expertise  ineffectual  inequality  inexpensive  influence  information_flows  Infosys  infrastructure  innovation  Insead  insecurity  insights  instability  institution-building  institutional_investors  institutions  insurance  Integreon  interconnections  interdependence  intermediaries  internal_migration  internationalism  internationalization  internationally_minded  international_diversity  international_expansion  international_marketing  international_relations  international_system  international_trade  interpretation  interviews  investing  investment_banking  investors  in_the_real_world  iPod  Ireland  isolation  Israeli  Italians  Italy  Ivey  J.Crew  James_Surowiecki  Janan_Ganesh  Japanese  jargon  JBS  JCK  Jeffrey_Immelt  Jeffrey_Simpson  Jeff_Gray  jewellery  joblessness  jobs  job_creation  job_destruction  job_displacement  job_loss  job_search  Joe_Friesen  Johan_Gutenberg  Joseph_Stiglitz  Joshua_Cooper_Ramo  jugaad  Junior_Achievement  kaleidoscopic  Kevin_Lynch  kiosks  Kitchener-Waterloo  knowledge_workers  Konrad_Yakabuski  KPMG  ksfs  labour  landscapes  languages  large_companies  law  lawtech  lawyers  law_firms  layoffs  leadership  leadership_development  lean  Leonardo_da_Vinci  lessons_learned  lifestyles  listening  lists  literary_agents  local  localization  logistics  London  long-range  long-term  low-wage  LSE  luxury  M&A  machine_learning  Madrid  mafia  Malcolm_Gladwell  management  management_consulting  managing_change  managing_people  Managing_Your_Career  manufacturers  mapping  Marina_Strauss  marketing  market_entry  massive_data_sets  mass_migrations  MBAs  McKinsey  meat-processors  mechanization  media  media:document  medical_devices  Medicis  medieval  mergers_&_acquisitions  meritocratic  metadata  metaphors  metrics  Mexican  Michael_Levine  micro  microfinance  microproducers  middle-powers  middlemen  middle_class  Midwest  migrants  Mike_Lazaridis  millennials  mining  misinterpretations  misunderstandings  MNCs  mobile_phones  moguls  mom-and-pop  money  multiculturalism  multinationals  multiplicative  multipolarity  museums  MVNOs  myths  NAFTA  narratives  nationalism  national_identity  nativism  Nato  natural_calamities  natural_resources  neighbourhoods  nerds  Netflix  NetJets  networks  network_power  news  new_categories  new_products  New_York_City  Niall_Ferguson  nimbleness  Nobel_Prizes  Non-Integrating_Gap  North_Carolina  Nouriel_Roubini  Nulogy  obama  observations  obsolescence  OFT  One_Earth_Farms  OPMA  opportunities  oration  orchestration  organic  organizational_culture  organizational_design  organized_crime  original_programming  Outliers  Outsourcing  outward_looking  overpaid  overstretching  P3  Pablo_Picasso  Panera  Pangea3  paranoia  parenting  Paris  parochialism  partnerships  passports  patents  Patrick_Buchanan  Pat_Condon  Paul_Romer  Paul_Waldie  peanut_butter  peer-to-peer  Pentagon  perseverance  personal_care_products  personal_grooming  pessimism  Peter_Drucker  Peter_Thiel  Philip_Delves_Broughton  physical_place  Pike_Management  piracy  PISA  playbooks  plutocrats  policy  policymakers  policymaking  politicaleconomy  political_correctness  political_risk  political_will  politics  polymaths  post_globalization  poverty  power  power_of_the_pause  preparation  pricing  Primark  priorities  private_equity  prizes  problems  problem_solving  producers  productivity  product_category  product_recalls  professional_service_firms  profits  ProQuest  prospects  protectionism  public_sector  publishing  punch-above-its-weight  purpose  questions  race_card  race_relations  racial_resentment  racism  Rana_Foroohar  rankings  Rebecca_Buckman  rebuilding  recessions  redundancies  reflections  refugees  regulation  regulatory_risk  reinvention  remittances  Renaissance  Renaissance_Capital  Renaissance_Man  resentments  retailers  retreats  reverse_innovation  Rich_Karlgaard  ripple_effects  rising_powers  risk-assessment  risk-management  risk-mitigation  risk-perception  risks  road_warriors  Robert_Kaplan  Robert_Zoellick  rogue_actors  rules-based  rules_of_the_game  rule_of_law  Russians  Rust_Belt  sales  sausages  scaling  schadenfreude  security_&_intelligence  self-destructive  self-sacrifice  sense-making  services  serving_others  Shake_Shack  shifting_tastes  Silicon_Valley  silo_mentality  Silver_Lake  Singapore  single_parents  size  skills  skills_training  slack_time  slogans  small_business  small_states  smartphones  SMEs  social_capital  social_decay  social_entrepreneurship  social_mobility  societal_choices  soft_power  solo  South-South  South_Africa  South_China_Sea  South_Korea  specificity  speeches  sponsorships  sports  standalone  Starbucks  start_ups  statelessness  state_capitalism  static  STEM  Stephen_Harper  Stephen_Schwarzman  Steven_Rattner  Steve_Ladurantaye  stocks  Stonyfield  strategic_planning  strategic_thinking  strategies  strategy  streaming  students  subtractive  supermarkets  superpowers  superstars  supply_chains  support_systems  surprises  surveys  sustained_inquiry  Swatch  Sylvain_Charlebois  talent  talent_flows  talent_management  talent_representation  Tata  technological_change  technology  telecommunications  terrorism  textiles  text_messages  the_Great_Decoupling  The_One_Percent  the_single_most_important  thinking  think_threes  Thomas_Barnett  Thomas_Homer-Dixon  Thomson_Reuters  thought-provoking  thought_leadership  timeouts  Tim_Hortons  tips  tolerance  Tom_Friedman  top-tier  Toronto  tough_love  tourism  TPP  traceability  tracking  trade  transactions  transatlantic  transient  translations  travel  trends  trickle-up  TTP  Turkey  turnarounds  Tyler_Cowen  U.S.  U.S.foreign_policy  UN  unbanked  uncertainty  underserved  unemployment  unevenly_distributed  Uniqlo  uniqueness  United_Kingdom  unpredictability  unthinkable  upside  urbanization  Uruguay  user_bases  uToronto  uWaterloo  values  value_chains  value_propositions  variability  vc  venture_capital  viciousness  videoconferencing  Vietnam  visas  visionaries  Vladimir_Putin  Wahaha  Wal-Mart  Wall_Street  Walter_Russell_Mead  war_for_talent  Washington_D.C.  water  wealth_creation  Western_Union  white-collar  whites  white_identity  white_nationalists  white_supremacy  Wigmore_Farms  WikiLeaks  winner-take-all  Wipro  wireless  WLU  women  words  working_class  world_stage  WTO  Xi_Jinping  Yale  yogurt  young_people  youth  Zara  zero-sum_games 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: