jerryking + free   51

The Prime Effect: How Amazon’s Two-Day Shipping Is Disrupting Retail
Sept. 20, 2018 | WSJ | By Christopher Mims.

Amazon.com Inc. has made its Prime program the gold standard for all other online retailers... The $119-a-year Prime program—which now includes more than 100 million members world-wide—has triggered an arms race among the largest retailers, and turned many smaller sellers into remoras who cling for life to the bigger fish.

In the past year, Target Corp. , Walmart Inc. and many vendors on Google Express have all started offering “free” two-day delivery. (Different vendors have different requirements for no-fee shipping, whether it’s order size or loyalty-club membership.)

Amazon and its competitors are often blamed for the death of bricks-and-mortar retail, but the irony is that these online retailers generally achieve fast shipping by investing in real estate—in the form of warehouses rather than stores. To compete on cost, the vendors must typically ship goods via ground transportation, not faster-but-pricier air. The latest to offer free two-day delivery is Overstock.com , which claims it can reach over 99% of the U.S. in that time frame from a single distribution center in Kansas City, Kan.

But the biggest online retailers aren’t the only ones building massive fulfillment centers and similar operations. Fulfillment startups and large companies from other sectors are hoping to scale up by luring smaller sellers who want alternatives to Amazon’s warehousing and delivery operations.
Amazon  Amazon_Prime  arms_race  delivery_times  disruption  e-commerce  free  fulfillment  retailers  same-day  shipping  third-party  warehouses 
september 2018 by jerryking
Costco Wholesale expands online grocery in Ontario | News
Costco launched its Canadian grocery site and delivery service in July.

“This new shopping option makes available a wider selection of quality goods available to members and businesses across Ontario - from Windsor to Ottawa.".

Initially introduced in Toronto and the Golden Horseshoe markets in July, the success of the service has prompted Costco to offer grocery delivery across the province, with the exception of Northern Ontario. The new service features hundreds of grocery items including health and beauty aid products along with vitamins and supplements.

All orders from the site come with a two-day delivery guarantee with no delivery fees for orders over $75.
Costco  e-commerce  e-grocery  free  grocery  home-delivery  order-size  supermarkets  Toronto  Golden_Horseshoe 
september 2018 by jerryking
GO Transit calls time on free parking
APRIL 6, 2018 | The Globe and Mail | OLIVER MOORE.

It costs up to $40,000 to build one parking spot at a GO train station, and most often, commuters pay nothing to use it. The agency that runs the transit service says this can’t go on......The simplest way to encourage people not to drive to GO stations is to have more of the passengers living nearby. Some of the new stations proposed under the RER plan are in urban areas, with ready-made clientele close at hand. And the area around other stations can densify, making GO more convenient for more people.

“Let’s turn them into active mobility hubs,” said Cherise Burda, the director of the City Building Institute at Ryerson University. “Looking at utilizing the station lands as communities and not just as parking lots, that’s where you’re going to get a lot more ridership.”

Proximity goes only so far, though. Metrolinx stats show that a lot of their passengers are quite close to their station already. Some 13 per cent of them travel less than one kilometre to a GO rail station, and another 19 per cent come between one and two kilometres. But only 18 per cent of passengers arrive by foot, transit or bicycle, meaning that a large number of people are making short drives to the station.

After expanding parking at a breakneck pace for years, Metrolinx is hoping to slash the number of rail passengers who drive alone to the station by 40 per cent. Parking will be discouraged through price, while access to stations for those coming by foot, transit and bike will be improved. Also, more residential density around stations will be encouraged.
GO  terminals  transit  free  parking  Metrolinx  commuting  RER  property_development 
april 2018 by jerryking
Why Mississauga wants to charge for parking
November 18, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | OLIVER MOORE
parking  Mississauga  free 
november 2017 by jerryking
How to Stream Thousands of Free Movies Using Your Library Card - NYT Watching
By Monica Castillo

More than 200 public library systems in the United States have teamed up with the streaming platform Kanopy to bring some 30,000 movies to library cardholders, free of charge. Kanopy’s emphasis is on documentaries and international films, all of which can be streamed on your computer, through a Roku box or on iOS and Android phone apps.

Be careful not to plan a mega binge-watch just yet, though. Each library imposes its own limit to the number of free movies a single cardholder can watch each month, from three to 20 titles per card, a spokeswoman for Kanopy said. Once they’ve registered their library cards with Kanopy, viewers can keep track of how many movies they have left in the upper right-hand corner of the onscreen interface. The limit for New York Public Library cardholders is 10 free movies a month, while Brooklyn Public Library allows six. Outside of New York, Los Angeles County libraries, for example, have a 10 movie limit.
streaming  free  films  movies  libraries  howto  James_Baldwin 
august 2017 by jerryking
Subscription Music Service Sounds a New Note: Profit - WSJ
By Ethan Smith
Updated June 30, 2017

NYC-based Saavn is a relative minnow among them, with 22 million monthly active users who are predominantly in India and seven nearby nations. To them it offers a free service with unlimited access to 30 million songs—both Indian and Western—in exchange for sitting through ads. Charts and playlists spotlight music from various regions, eras and artists, such as Bollywood star Shah Rukh Khan.

Outside South Asia, Saavn is subscription-only. For around $5 a month, users in the U.S., U.K. and about 200 countries gain access to 11 million songs, most of them Bollywood tunes and other Indian music. Users in India can pay 99 rupees (about $1.54) a month for an ad-free “pro” option.

The service also offers music from 10 artists it has signed directly to record label-style deals, along with 30 talk shows.
ad_supported  free  Bollywood  Spotify  Apple_Music  streaming  ethnic_communities  music  India  subscriptions  Indian-Americans 
june 2017 by jerryking
The Student Protests Roiling South Africa
October 21, 2016 | The New Yorker | Rosa Lyster lives in Cape Town, South Africa.
South_Africa  Colleges_&_Universities  apartheid  protests  students  free  tuition  education 
october 2016 by jerryking
Goldman Sachs Has Started Giving Away Its Most Valuable Software - WSJ
By JUSTIN BAER
Sept. 7, 2016

Securities DataBase, or SecDB, the system remains Goldman’s prime tool for measuring risk and analyzing the prices of securities, and it calculates 23 billion prices across 2.8 million positions daily. It has played a crucial role in many of the seminal moments of the firm’s recent history, including its controversial trading just ahead of the financial crisis.....There is perhaps no better sign of the changes that have engulfed Wall Street than this: Goldman has recently started giving clients the tools that made it a trading powerhouse, for free.

The firm’s motives aren’t altruistic; rather, many of the edges that once made Goldman’s traders feared and admired have been blunted. New rules have limited banks’ trading risks, and made it costly to hold large inventories of stocks and bonds on their books. And electronic trading has squeezed margins, dimming the clamor of trading floors across Wall Street....Traders and executives tap into SecDB to inform how to price securities, and how the value of those assets may change with a twist on the dial on any one of thousands of potential variables. That information can be used to analyze potential trades—and then to monitor the risks posed by those positions.

What made it the envy of Wall Street, though, was its ability to scale up to include new classes of securities, new trading desks, even whole businesses. And the data it harnessed was all in one place.
Wall_Street  Goldman_Sachs  tools  traders  risk-management  informational_advantages  software  free  databases  platforms  CIOs  proprietary  slight_edge  Aladdin  Martin_Chavez  scaling  SecDB  seminal_moments  asset_values  scenario-planning  stress-tests 
september 2016 by jerryking
Parks Canada seeks to manage free-entry influx in 2017 - The Globe and Mail
BRUCE CHEADLE
OTTAWA — The Canadian Press
Published Wednesday, Apr. 20, 2016
parks  anniversaries  free  one-time_events 
may 2016 by jerryking
To support Canadian startups, offer pro bono legal clinics - The Globe and Mail
MYRA TAWFIK AND JAMES HINTON
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jun. 17, 2015
pro_bono  free  law  patents  patent_law  law_schools  start_ups  innovation 
june 2015 by jerryking
Support Our Students - NYTimes.com
JAN. 19, 2015
Continue reading the main story

David Brooks
David_Brooks  Colleges_&_Universities  Obama  free  tuition 
january 2015 by jerryking
If the artists starve, we’ll all go hungry - The Globe and Mail
ELIZABETH RENZETTI
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jan. 19 2015

After 20 years in the music business, she says she’s seeing songwriters “leaving in droves. If you can’t make a living, if you can’t afford go to the dentist, you’re going to leave.” This is a lament you’ll hear from artists everywhere these days: We can’t afford to do this any more. The well has dried up. Freelance rates are what they were when the first Trudeau was in power. Rents rose, and royalties fell. Novelists are becoming real-estate agents; musicians open coffee shops.

The evidence of this culture shock is in front of our eyes, in the shuttered book shops and video stores and music clubs, yet it’s remarkably unremarked upon. Artists don’t actually to like to complain publicly about their lot in life, knowing the inevitable backlash from those who still believe that creating is not “a real job.... American journalist Scott Timberg argues in his new book, Culture Crash: The Killing of the Creative Class.
artists  Elizabeth_Renzetti  Pandora  streaming  creative_types  songwriters  musicians  free  creative_class  entertainment  piracy  copyright  entertainment_industry  downloads  blockbusters  creative_economy  books  art 
january 2015 by jerryking
Venture: The (musical) schlock stops with Jingle Punks - The Globe and Mail
DAVE MORRIS
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Sep. 25 2014

Jared Gutstadt had been playing in struggling bands by night and working as a video editor at MTV by day, choosing tracks from “production music” libraries to soundtrack the action in the likes of Chappelle’s Show.

The music industry boasts dozens of libraries, the largest of which are affiliated with the major record labels, and millions of songs are available for licensing, from no-name tracks to cover songs to huge, prohibitively expensive hits. The Rolling Stones famously charged Microsoft a reported $3-million (U.S.) to license Start Me Up for an ad campaign for Windows 95.

Ready-made production music normally costs a fraction of that figure. The filmmaker or TV company licenses the publishing rights (the lyrics and structure of a song, as opposed to the actual recording), paying what’s known as a “synchronization” fee. In 2013, according to the IFPI, synchronization fees worldwide totalled $337-million. In addition, whenever the TV show or movie featuring the track is broadcast or reproduced on DVDs, the owner of the recording itself is usually entitled to another sum, producing a revenue stream that can be small, but potentially steady.

Gutstadt and a partner saw an opportunity to be the suppliers of the music for the shows he and his MTV co-workers were editing, and Jingle Punks was born. The opportunity to become more than a niche player emerged not long after.

“There wasn’t enough production music that was easily accessible for the tidal wave of content that was going to occur,” Gutstadt says on the phone from his office in Los Angeles. That wave was unscripted reality shows.

Jingle Punks’ technical innovation, spearheaded by co-founder and software developer Dan Demole, was to offer a curated selection of license-able songs organized by what Gutstadt describes as a “relational search algorithm.” Users can search for music using non-musical terms such as the names of movies, and select and pay for the use of those songs, all through the company’s website.
music  free  start_ups  MTV  digital_media  algorithms  licensing  licensing_rights  musicians  music_catalogues  music_labels  music_publishing  Dave_Chappelle 
september 2014 by jerryking
Box, Dropbox and Hightail Pivot to New Business Models - NYTimes.com
AUG. 24, 2014 | NYT | By QUENTIN HARDY.

how do you avoid free? Box is trying to cater to special data storage needs, like digital versions of X-rays for health care companies and other tasks specific to different kinds of customers. Hightail is trying to do something similar for customers like law firms. And Dropbox? It is trying to make sure that its consumer-minded service stays easier to use than what the big guys provide.
digital_storage  Box  Dropbox  Hightail  business_models  cloud_computing  free 
august 2014 by jerryking
David Isenberg Sees Smart Business Model In 'Stupid Network'
February 20, 1998 | Wall Street Journal p. B1 | by THOMAS PETZINGER JR.

Dr. Isenberg worshipped the émigré biologist Albert Szent-Gyorgyi, a Nobel laureate and friend of his family. "If you're going to fish," the old scientist told him, "use a big hook." . . .

Picture of
David Isenberg by Elliot Banfield
Used with permission of Elliot Banfield
AT&T  telecommunications  free  disruption  Thomas_Petzinger  Nobel_Prizes  contrarians  Bell_Labs  George_Gilder  business_models 
march 2013 by jerryking
Value, not cost, is the basis of education
Mar. 13 2013 | The Globe and Mail | TODD HIRSCH.

“Free tuition NOW.” But if the picketing university students were honest, their signs would read: “I want someone else to pay for my education.” Education is never free. Someone has to pay.

But the students’ view that someone else should help pay for their tuition is a reasonable request....Cost is what we give up to get something, and it’s usually captured by the dollar price of the good. Value reflects how useful, essential or emotionally appealing something is, and that can differ wildly between individuals and circumstances.

For a variety of reasons, cost is not always aligned with value. ...Like free drinks at an open bar, free tuition would no doubt be welcomed by students. But is there a danger education could be devalued? Would it be wasted if students dropped out of courses with less thought or regard, if they didn’t pay the tuition? Or might they “consume” too much, earning degree after degree with no practical goal in sight?...The tuition debate focuses entirely on the cost of education. But if we focused more on the value of education, the tone of the debate would change.

Postsecondary education offers tremendous value to students, both in terms of becoming critical, reasoned thinkers and also in terms of earning potential. There’s also value to society because education is a public good that benefits everyone.
education  valuations  costs  free  tuition  Quebec  Colleges_&_Universities 
march 2013 by jerryking
Delish Magazine, Sold Only at Walmart, Performs Remarkably Well - NYTimes.com
By STUART ELLIOTT
Published: February 24, 2013

The food category is doing better than many others in publishing as marketers of packaged foods seek to reach budget-conscious consumers who are eating at home rather than dining out. Examples include Food Network Magazine, recently introduced by Hearst as a joint venture with Scripps Networks Interactive, and Dash, a newspaper-distributed magazine and Web site in the Parade Publications division of Advance Publications.

The Meredith Corporation, which competes in the food category with magazines like Family Circle and Ladies’ Home Journal, has started a food Web site, Recipe.com; acquired a second, Allrecipes.com; and bought two food magazines, EatingWell and Every Day With Rachael Ray.
Wal-Mart  magazines  food  value-conscious  Hearst  budget-conscious  free  advertising  consumer_goods 
february 2013 by jerryking
The real cost of free software
Aug 2000 | Ziff Davis Smart Business for the New EconomyVol 13. lss. 8; pg. 50 | by Josh Smith.

Abstract (Summary)
Smith discusses the negative effects of free software. According to Mark Minasi, author of "The Software Conspiracy.” free giveaways are just an excuse to produce substandard software.
free  software  marketing  strategy  quality 
february 2013 by jerryking
The Google Effect
December 05, 2005 | InformationWeek | Rick Whiting.
Google  free  analytics 
january 2013 by jerryking
Divide and Conquer: Competing with Free Technology under Network Effects - Academic Article - Harvard Business School
Summer 2008 | HBR |by Deishin Lee and Haim Mendelson

Abstract

We study how a commercial firm competes with a free open source product. The market consists of two customer segments with different preferences and is characterized by positive network effects. The commercial firm makes product and pricing decisions to maximize its profit. The open source developers make product decisions to maximize the weighted sum of the segments' consumer surplus, in addition to their intrinsic motivation. The more importance open source developers attach to consumer surplus, the more effort they put into developing software features. Even if consumers do not end up adopting the open source product, it can act as a credible threat to the commercial firm, forcing the firm to lower its prices. If the open source developers' intrinsic motivation is high enough, they will develop software regardless of eventual market dynamics. If the open source product is available first, all participants are better off when the commercial and open source products are compatible. However, if the commercial firm can enter the market first, it can increase its profits and gain market share by being incompatible with its open source competitor, even if customers can later switch at zero cost. This first-mover advantage does not arise because users are locked in, but because the commercial firm deploys a divide and conquer strategy to attract early adopters and exploit late adopters. To capitalize on its first-mover advantage, the commercial firm must increase its development investment to improve its product features.
early_adopters  late_adopters  networks  network_effects  free  competitive_advantage  product_launches  open_source  competitive_strategy  customer_adoption  first_movers  locked_in 
january 2013 by jerryking
The Business of Free Software
January 15, 2007 | HBS Working Knowledge | Julia Hanna
software  free  HBR 
january 2013 by jerryking
How To ... Sell a Product Everyone is Getting for Free
April 1, 2004 | Business 2.0 | By Michael V. Copeland; Steve Gottlieb
free 
july 2012 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: On making a ruckus in your industry
Seth Godin on April 07, 2012

* Bring forward a new idea or technology that disrupts and demands a response
* Change pricing dramatically
* Redefine a service as a product (or vice versa)
* Organize the disorganized, connect the disconnected
* Alter the speed to market radically
* Change the infrastructure, the rules or the flow of information
* Give away what used to be expensive and charge for something else
* Cater to the weird, bypassing the masses
* Take the lead on ethics

(Or you could just wait for someone to tell you what they want you to do)
Seth_Godin  blogs  disruption  pricing  information_flows  free  ethics  niches  change_agents  disorganization  ideas  new_businesses  idea_generation  disconnecting  Tabla  game_changers  Play_Bigger 
may 2012 by jerryking
BETTER THAN FREE
[2.5.08] | EDGE | By Kevin Kelly.

This super-distribution system has become the foundation of our economy and wealth. The instant reduplication of data, ideas, and media underpins all the major economic sectors in our economy, particularly those involved with exports — that is, those industries where the US has a competitive advantage. Our wealth sits upon a very large device that copies promiscuously and constantly....how does one make money selling free copies?

I have an answer. The simplest way I can put it is thus:

When copies are super abundant, they become worthless.
When copies are super abundant, stuff which can't be copied becomes scarce and valuable. When copies are free, you need to sell things which can not be copied. What can't be copied?
(1) "Trust." Trust cannot be copied. You can't purchase it. Trust must be earned, over time. It cannot be downloaded. Or faked. Or counterfeited (at least for long).
(2) Immediacy
(3) Personalization
(4) Interpretation — As the old joke goes: software, free. The manual, $10,000.
(5) Authenticity — You might be able to grab a key software application for free, but even if you don't need a manual, you might like to be sure it is bug free, reliable, and warranted. You'll pay for authenticity.
(6) Accessibility — Ownership often sucks. You have to keep your things tidy, up-to-date, and in the case of digital material, backed up. And in this mobile world, you have to carry it along with you. Many people, me included, will be happy to have others tend our "possessions" by subscribing to them. We'll pay Acme Digital Warehouse to serve us any musical tune in the world, when and where we want it, as well as any movie, photo (ours or other photographers).
(7) Embodiment — At its core the digital copy is without a body. You can take a free copy of a work and throw it on a screen. But perhaps you'd like to see it in hi-res on a huge screen? Maybe in 3D? PDFs are fine, but sometimes it is delicious to have the same words printed on bright white cottony paper, bound in leather.
(8) Patronage — It is my belief that audiences WANT to pay creators. Fans like to reward artists, musicians, authors and the like with the tokens of their appreciation, because it allows them to connect. But they will only pay if it is very easy to do, a reasonable amount, and they feel certain the money will directly benefit the creators.
(9)Findability — findability is an asset that occurs at a higher level in the aggregate of many works. A zero price does not help direct attention to a work, and in fact may sometimes hinder it. But no matter what its price, a work has no value unless it is seen; unfound masterpieces are worthless. — being found is valuable.
network_effects  free  Kevin_Kelly  value_creation  digital_economy  immediacy  scarcity  personalization  abundance  findability  patronage  embodiment  accessibility  authenticity  interpretation  replication  Information_Rules  value_added  superfans  SaaS  ownership 
november 2011 by jerryking
Free Texting Apps Are Threat to Wireless Carriers - NYTimes.com
By JENNA WORTHAM
Published: October 9, 2011

Apple plans to introduce a new service called iMessage, which could quickly become the biggest fish in this pond. The service lets iPhone owners send messages with text, photos and video to other iPhone owners over a Wi-Fi or cellular data connection. The service, part of an update to Apple’s iOS mobile operating system, will automatically handle messages sent between iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch users who have upgraded to the latest software.

The basic idea is the same with both old- and new-style messages: short bursts that pop up almost instantly on the recipient’s phone. But the path that they take is different. A text message is sent over cellular networks. Services like iMessage transmit messages over the carriers’ data networks and the Internet, much like e-mail. Cellphone customers pay for each text message or sign up for a texting plan, while the newer messages will fall under a customer’s wireless data plan.

Analysts say Apple is trying to duplicate the success of services like BlackBerry Messenger, or BBM, a free application for BlackBerry smartphone owners that lets them send messages back and forth as in an instant-messaging conversation. It has engendered loyalty among BlackBerry users and has kept some from switching to an Apple or Android device.

“BBM is the stickiest feature of the BlackBerry experience, even more than e-mail,” said Roger Entner, an analyst at Recon Analytics who follows the wireless industry. “Once you have that, you are considerably less likely to switch away from the consumer experience. IMessage makes the whole iOS universe more valuable.”
text_messages  free  wireless  mobile_applications  Apple  social_messaging  messaging  Jenna_Wortham 
october 2011 by jerryking
iPhone 4S unleashes more creative destruction | Considered View | Breakingviews
04 October 2011 | By Robert Cyran.

Apple has an astonishing ability to casually unleash creative destruction. Its latest iPhone, the 4S, offers faster data-processing and downloads, as well as voice-powered software. This may not have lived up to the most feverish expectations of investors: Apple shares fell while the market rallied. But it will do more than enough to create headaches for companies ranging from Research In Motion to American Greetings.

Smartphones started by devouring the personal digital assistant, as any former Palm Pilot aficionado can testify. They terrorized the market for fixed-line phones, which are now in sharp decline. Apple’s newest gadget shows just how hungry smartphone makers, and Apple in particular, are to eat rivals’ lunches.

The new iPhone’s camera offers sharply better video. That will further hurt sales of digital still and video cameras. Its software allows easy and free texting to other Apple devices. That’s bad news for telephone operators, who make fat margins on such services. Instant messaging has also been the killer app for BlackBerry users.
Apple  iPhone  creative_destruction  smartphones  wireline  margins  staying_hungry  RIM  BlackBerry  blindsided  voice_assistants  voice_interfaces  text_messages  free  investors'_expectations  bad_news 
october 2011 by jerryking
New Online Services Offer Hope to Music Fans - NYTimes.com
June 22, 2011 | NYT | By JON PARELES. Dematerializing
recorded music has consequences. The positive: it hugely multiplies the
potential audience, letting the music travel fast and far to listeners
who would never have known it existed. It escalates music’s
portability...Negative: it also drives down the price of recorded
music, often to zero, ...the unexpected combination of a nearly infinite
supply, constant availability, suboptimum sound quality and the
intangibility makes songs more trivial...a challenge to culturally
ambitious musicians: before they can be larger than life, they have to
be larger than the LCD screen. Or they can try to conquer that screen
and play the Internet as an instrument, using its defining attribute:
interactivity.....The evolving world of music: Bjork is working on an
album, “Biophilia,” that will have smartphone apps built around every
song: apps that diagram the song in both conventional music notation and
invented graphic notation. ....
Bjork  music  music_industry  cloud_computing  iTunes_Match  Pandora  Dar.fm  Rhapsody  Napster  MOG  Rdio  Spotify  smartphones  Jon_Pareles  streaming  Apple  free  mobile_applications 
june 2011 by jerryking
Book Chat on 'The Big Thirst': The Future of Water
May 3, 2011 | NYTimes.com. | By DAVID LEONHARDT. Who reviews,
‘The Big Thirst’: The Future of Water by Charles Fishman, who a longtime
writer for Fast Company magazine. Fishman previously wrote “The
Wal-Mart Effect,” which was an Economist “book of the year” in 2006 and a
finalist in The Financial Times’s awards for best business
book.....Free water — water so cheap you never think about cost when
making water use decisions — is a silent disaster. When something is
free, the message is: It’s unlimited. Free water leads to constant waste
and misallocation.
“We will not, going forward, have water that has all three of those
qualities at the same time: unlimited, unthinkingly inexpensive and
safe.” ....Reminds me of an adage often cited in engineering circles:
"Good, fast, cheap - - pick any two."
water  books  water_footprints  future  free  optimization  fast  cheap  pricing  resource_allocation  misallocations  waste  inexpensive  engineering  fast-paced 
may 2011 by jerryking
No salesman will call
March 31, 2006 | Report on Business Magazine | DOUG STEINER.
Yes, you can get free on-line investment advice that's solid and has no
strings attached...."Selhi's website focuses on advice about investing,
which is very different from investment advice. In recent years, he and
several other volunteer sages and coaches have been regulars on several
websites, and have got to know one another. Many of them are also
self-taught. Others are industry professionals who are retired or
disillusioned by the lack of truth about investing costs.

Together, this group has built a new website,
http://www.financialwebring.com, that is a forum for a low-cost
investing community. Through blogs, links and chat rooms, the site helps
everyone through every step and unspoken nuance of the investing
process. When I asked Selhi why he does all this, he responded with a
question: "Why do people volunteer?" He doesn't make money from his
work. The satisfaction comes from helping others. "
Doug_Steiner  investment_advice  free  DIY  advice  equity_research  disillusioned  investing  investors 
august 2010 by jerryking
Tech Is Too Cheap to Meter: It's Time to Manage for Abundance, Not Scarcity
Excerpted from Free: The Future of a Radical Price, copyright
©2009 Chris Anderson, to be published by Hyperion in July. Chris
Anderson (canderson@wired.com) is Wired's editor in chief.
Chris_Anderson  free  scarcity  abundance 
june 2009 by jerryking
Wired Struggles to Find Niche in Magazine World - NYTimes.com
May 17, 2009 | New York Times | STEPHANIE CLIFFORD. Article
profiles Wired Magazine's Chris Anderson and the paradox of his personal
success chronicling the new economy with the magazine's challenge of
finding supporting advertisers.
Wired  advertising  Chris_Anderson  Condé_Nast  magazines  free  freemium 
may 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com: 'Freemium' services: A Web surfer's paradise
January 25, 2007 at 7:50 AM EDT, Globe and Mail Update by SHANE SCHICK
Web_2.0  free  freemium  online_training  HVAC 
march 2009 by jerryking
The Economics of Giving It Away - WSJ.com
JANUARY 31, 2009 WSJ article by CHRIS ANDERSON. In a battered
economy, free goods and services online are more attractive than ever.
So how can the suppliers make a business model out of nothing?
Freshbooks  entrepreneurship  online  Web_2.0  free  start_ups  business_models  Chris_Anderson 
february 2009 by jerryking

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