jerryking + fitness   244

Scientists still puzzled by the causes of osteoarthritis, but new ideas emerge
August 12, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by ALEX HUTCHINSON
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED 8 HOURS AGO
Alex_Hutchinson  exercise  fitness  injuries  osteoarthritis  running 
9 days ago by jerryking
How to train your core and reap the benefits - The Globe and Mail
July 29, 2019 | | by PAUL LANDINI, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL

Everyone needs to work on their core strength (yes, I said everyone – even you six-pack bikini models). A strong, functionally sound core enhances every aspect of physical life. Having visible abs is great, but all that means is your body fat percentage is low, which is a result of diet more than anything else. In order to add some go to your show, you need to make intelligent exercise choices that train the core the way it’s intended......The core performs movement – hip flexion, spinal extension, torso rotation – but it also resists, or prevents, those very same movements. On top of that, the core acts as a bridge between the upper and lower body, transferring kinetic energy between these two areas. Think of a sprinter pumping their arms as their legs chug-a-lug along the track; that arm movement feeds into the leg movement, propelling the runner faster and faster. Now think of the same sprinter trying to run with their hands tied behind their back.

Not quite as fast, is it?

three muscle groups:

* The rectus abdominis (a.k.a. the six-pack). [McGill Curl Up, plate crunches, hanging knee, leg raises and ab rollouts, the plank]
* The obliques [ the kettlebell windmill. hold a heavy-ish weight in one hand like a suitcase and march!, ab rollouts and plank variations will do the trick, the Pallof Press. ]
* The spinal erectors [ Back extensions and Romanian deadlifts ]
abdominals  core_stability  exercise  fitness  howto 
23 days ago by jerryking
How ‘The Pump’ can help give your muscles – and ego – a quick boost - The Globe and Mail
PAUL LANDINI
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED 7 HOURS AGO

If, however, you’ve been putting in the hours and you’ve already built an appreciable amount of muscle that’s not hidden underneath a smooth layer of fat, keep reading, because you’re a prime candidate for taking advantage of the vainglorious lifter’s best friend – “the pump.”

Immortalized by Arnold Schwarzenegger in the 1977 documentary Pumping Iron, “the pump” is the temporary increase in a muscle’s size that follows ultraintense sets of high-repetition resistance exercises. As your muscles contract during a lift, metabolic compounds such as lactic acid accumulate in and around the muscle cells. Water and blood is then drawn into the muscle (“pumped,” if you will) as a defence mechanism against the inflammation brought on by these compounds. The longer and more taxing the set, the more fluid that enters the cells, the ultimate result being a muscle that looks like it’s been shrink-wrapped.

A side benefit of this practical biological function? For up to about an hour afterward your muscles will appear significantly larger, providing an instant ego boost before strutting one’s stuff on the beach-side boardwalk or disrobing for a photo shoot. But the pump isn’t all smoke and mirrors. This style of training forms the basis of all bodybuilding programs, where the end goal is the accumulation of maximum muscle........The pump-training protocol is the exact opposite of strength training. Whereas strength gains come from lifting relatively heavy weights for low reps with up to two minutes of rest between sets, building a pump is all about high volume and minimal rest. Anywhere from 12 to 20 reps will suffice, with 30 to 45 seconds of rest max. Adding some pauses at the end-point of the exercises will increase the intensity and test your mental fortitude, as will employing “finishers” such as drop sets, in which you extend the set for as long as you can by continually reducing the weight once you’ve hit failure so you can keep firing off a few more reps.

Resistance bands are the perfect tool for building a pump, as they offer constant tension throughout the entire range of motion during each exercise, never giving your muscles a chance to rest.
exercise  fitness  strength_training 
8 weeks ago by jerryking
When Is It Safe for Children to Start Strength Training?
May 26, 2019 | WSJ | By Heidi Mitchell.

Under the AAP guidelines, children as young as 7 can embark on a strength-training program, as long as they do all exercises with good form, she says. Though this may sound young, Dr. Benjamin notes that strength training can consist of push-ups, sit-ups, handstands and squats—“all of which a 6-year-old gymnast would think of as a normal part of the sport.” She wouldn’t suggest anyone start out a strength-training program with weights.

As with other physical activities, strength training by kids 7 years and older has been shown to help improve cardiovascular fitness, bone density and mental health.
children  exercise  fitness  strength_training  functional_strength 
12 weeks ago by jerryking
The 6 Best Lifts for NEW Muscle Growth (GUARANTEED!) - YouTube
(1) Deadlifts >>> (a) chest-supported row (T-Bar row); (b) Reverse dumbbell lunge or forward dumbbell lunge. Teaches you how to push hard through that forward leg to get all momentum of your body back up to a standing position. How to push with great force through your legs, one at a time, into the ground. Then go back to deadlifting with both feet.

(2) Squats >>> (value of the glutes when it comes to performing the squat. Don't half rep it. Activate the glutes to help with the bottom of the lift, but you have to get deep enough. A variation of the glute hamstring raise. Initiate the contraction by squeezing your butt cheeks together. Hip flextion.

(3) Overhead Press. Z press. Sit down on the ground, and overhead press from that position.

(4) Weighted Pull-ups. Work on stability of the shoulder blade.
AthleanX  breakthroughs  deadlifts  fitness  glutes  military_press  pull-ups  squats  strength_training 
may 2019 by jerryking
The shoes you work out in are affecting your health and performance
May 13, 2109 | The Globe and Mail | PAUL LANDINI.

* KICKING IT OLD SCHOOL - Classic skate shoes such as Vans, Airwalks, Chuck Taylors and Converse are perfect for lifting.
* KICKING IT SUPER OLD SCHOOL - lose the shoes all together, at least on lower-body exercises (you can keep your socks on if you’d like).
* TAKING IT TO THE NEW SCHOOL - Nike’s Metcon Trainers (supposedly a bit narrow for those with wide feet) and Reebok’s Crossfit NANO 8.0 bleu line (preferred training shoe for running,)are designed specifically for weight-room workouts.
* If seeking a second skin for your feet, the New Balance Minimus and the Xero Prio (my personal favourite).
* Metcon Flyknit if you run in addition to lifting, they're a bit more flexible
* a good place to start is by reaching for a low-support, low-heeled shoe, like the Reebok Nano, Nike Metcon, Under Armour TriBase Reign, or Altra HIIT XT, to get that close-to-ground feel. “The less of a heel, the better,”

If, however, you care about things such as lifting in a pain-free manner and increasing your quality of movement in general, you need to pay more attention to your choices in weight-room footwear.

Whether you’re squatting a barbell, throwing a punch or swinging a baseball bat, the force behind these movements comes from the ground up, channelled through the body via the feet. This is why I shudder every time I see someone bench-press with their legs casually extended, or worse, with their feet elevated off the floor. Even though it’s ostensibly an upper-body exercise, your legs play an important role in bench-pressing. If all you’re relying on is your arms and chest to move that weight, you’re limiting your potential progress and putting yourself at risk of an injury.........soft, wedge-heeled support is the exact opposite of what you want in a lifting shoe. In fact, everything that makes running shoes suitable for the road is what makes them awful for lifting. Let’s say you’re about to deadlift. How are you supposed to push through the floor with maximum force if you’re standing on two inches of cushy foam? You’ll never get the barbell off the floor with enough speed to allow for a max-effort lift.

The same principle applies to squats; however, here, the consequences are more dire. Most non-lifting shoes have thick heels that slope down to the floor. This shifts your weight forward, to the toes. The deeper you sink into that squat, the more your weight shifts forward. Add a barbell to this mix and it won’t be long until you’re one of those poor misguided souls who says squatting is bad for your knees, when really it’s your beat-up Brooks that are to blame.

So what, then, should we wear on our feet when lifting weights? This is one of the few easy answers in this business, and thankfully the solutions don’t have to cost a whole lot. Generally speaking, you want a shoe that offers a wide toe box and a flat, flexible sole that sticks to the floor. Some arch support is fine and may even be necessary, but the less structure to the shoe the better. Remember those hundred-plus moving parts in each of your feet? They need training, too! If they’re constantly being supported by artificial means, they’ll never get stronger.
fitness  footwear  shoes  strength_training 
may 2019 by jerryking
Sitting for More Than 13 Hours a Day May Sabotage the Benefits of Exercise
April 10, 2019 |The New York Times | By Gretchen Reynolds.

Regular exercise reduces the risk of heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and many other chronic conditions. Even a single workout can improve our metabolisms, studies show, so that we burn fat more efficiently after meals and keep our blood sugar and insulin levels steady.

Inactivity, meanwhile, has almost the opposite physiological effects. People who spend most of their waking hours sitting face heightened risks for many chronic diseases. They often also experience metabolic problems that raise the risk of diabetes and heart disease, including insulin resistance, poor blood sugar control and high levels of triglycerides, the fatty acids from food that linger in the blood if they are not metabolized.
inactivity  sedentariness  mens'_health  disease  exercise  fitness 
april 2019 by jerryking
A Guide to Your Knees - Well Guides - The New York Times
By Dr. Jordan Metzl

Never had knee pain? Excellent. Let’s keep it that way. And while not all knee problems are preventable, you can prevent many issues and also improve knee function with strength and flexibility training.

With increased muscular strength and flexibility surrounding your knees, the better they bear their load. Muscles are shock absorbers; the stronger they are, the better they can offload the hips and knees and the better your joints will feel — no matter your age.

STRENGTH
Lower extremity strength training includes anything that builds muscle around the hips and knees. Stationary biking is the easiest way to start and has the added benefit of aiding knee and hip mobility. Biking can be done several times per week on a stationary or recumbent bike; we recommend biking for 20 to 30 minutes per session.

Functional strength exercises are designed to strengthen multiple muscle groups simultaneously. Unlike a single muscle exercise such as a bicep curl, functional strength exercises like as a push-up, strengthen all of the muscles in a body area simultaneously. When you move normally, muscles work together, so it makes more sense to exercise them together as well........
Bodyweight Split Squat
Single Leg Hip Raise
Single Leg Toe Touch

FLEXIBILITY
As sore knees stiffen, the muscles around the knees tighten as well. This soft tissue tightening often amplifies knee pain. A foam roller is a terrific, low-cost option that can be used at home to improve flexibility and reduce pain through a process known as myofascial release.

HOW TO ROLL YOUR KNEE
The Hamstrings Roll

Place a foam roller under your right knee, with your leg straight. Cross your left leg over your right ankle. Please your hands flat on the floor behind you.
Roll your body forward until the roller reaches your glutes. Then roll back and forth over the roller.
Repeat with the other side.
Note: You can also do this with both legs on the roller.

Glutes Roll

Sit on a foam roller with it positioned on the back of your right thigh, just below your glutes. Cross your right leg over the front of your left thigh. Put your hands behind you for support.
Roll your body forward until the roller reaches your lower back. Then roll back and forth.
Repeat on the other side.
exercise  fitness  functional_strength  injuries  primers  knees  mens'_health  legs  glutes  injury_prevention 
march 2019 by jerryking
Unlocking the secrets to military-grade fitness - The Globe and Mail
ALEX HUTCHINSON
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL

.A recent study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research reveals some telling clues about which physical abilities are the best predictors of success in the U.S. Army’s storied 75th Ranger Regiment – though such clues, military experts are quick to point out, don’t tell the whole story.

Would-be rangers have to complete a gruelling obstacle course called the Ranger Physical Assessment Test (RPAT) that involves climbing ropes, scaling walls, dragging an 84-kilogram sled, and running more than five kilometres, all while wearing combat boots and nearly 10 kilograms of body armour. They have to finish in less than 40 minutes to pass.

A test such as this requires full-body strength, power and endurance in various proportions. So how do you train for it?

A team of U.S. Army researchers combed through data from more than 1,000 recruits who completed this test between 2014 and 2017, looking to see if success or failure could be predicted from the baseline physical tests the recruits had previously completed – things such as deadlifts, push-ups, jumps and sprints.

All seven of the tests they analyzed were linked to RPAT success, but there were three in particular that had significant independent predictive power: broad jump (standing start and you have to stick the landing); pull-ups (overhand grip, straight body, locked elbows at the bottom each time); and average time in a pair of 300-yard shuttle runs (back and forth between two lines 25 yards apart, with two-minutes rest between runs).......“After pulling tens of thousands of pieces of hard data,” he says, “there was one that correlated in some statistically significant way to a higher likelihood of graduating from our basic special warfare training school: pull-ups.”
elite  exercise  fitness  pull-ups  strength_training  U.S._Special_Forces  functional_strength 
march 2019 by jerryking
The Best Type of Exercise to Burn Fat
Feb. 27, 2019 | The New York Times | By Gretchen Reynolds.

A few minutes of brief, intense exercise may be as effective as much lengthier walks or other moderate workouts for incinerating body fat.... super-short intervals could even, in some cases, burn more fat than a long walk or jog, but the effort involved needs to be arduous......high-intensity interval training, which typically involves a few minutes — or even seconds — of strenuous exertion followed by a period of rest, with the sequence repeated multiple times. Most H.I.I.T. workouts require less than half an hour, from beginning to end (including a warm-up and cool-down), and the strenuous portions of the workout are even briefer......studies show that interval workouts can improve aerobic fitness, blood sugar control, blood pressure and other measures of health and fitness to the same or a greater extent than standard endurance training, such as brisk walking or jogging, even if it lasts two or three times as long....the most common question..... is whether they also will aid in weight control and fat loss....Plan your workouts around your preferences and schedules, he says, and not concerns about which type of exercise might better trim fat.
aerobic  arduous  best_of  cardiovascular  exercise  fat-burning  fitness  high-impact  high-intensity  interval_training  endurance 
february 2019 by jerryking
Indulge your gym lover with this last-minute gift guide - The Globe and Mail
One of the best memoirs I’ve read, Muscle: Confessions of an Unlikely Bodybuilder tells the story of Sam Fussell, bookish Oxford graduate turned steroid-abusing powerhouse. Whether recalling the halcyon days of the 1980s California lifting scene or analyzing the insecurities that fuelled his torturous workouts, Fussell’s impressive literary chops make this a must-read.

Part instructional guide, part historical encyclopedia, The Purposeful Primitive is a contemporary classic of weightlifting literature. Marty Gallagher, powerlifting coach extraordinaire, digs deep into the history of physical culture, delivering biographical portraits of iron giants such as Bill Pearl, Dorian Yates and Ed Coan while dissecting the training methods that made these men legends.

Regular readers of my column know that consistency is the key to achieving your fitness goals. In Atomic Habits, author and self-improvement guru James Clear outlines a practical framework for improving just about every aspect of your life through the power of habit. Needless to say, the strategies put forth in this instant bestseller have implications that reach far beyond the gym.
books  consistency  fitness  footwear  gift_ideas  gyms  habits  self-improvement  shoes  strength_training 
december 2018 by jerryking
Is Aerobic Exercise the Key to Successful Aging?
Dec. 12, 2018 | - The New York Times | By Gretchen Reynolds.

Aerobic activities like jogging and interval training can make our cells biologically younger, according to a noteworthy new experiment. Weight training may not have the same effect, the study found, raising interesting questions about how various types of exercise affect us at a microscopic level and whether the differences should perhaps influence how we choose to move.
aerobic  aging  benefits  exercise  fitness  health  interval_training  strength_training 
december 2018 by jerryking
There’s no such thing as being too fit - The Globe and Mail
ALEX HUTCHINSON
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED 10 HOURS AGO
exercise  fitness 
november 2018 by jerryking
Technogym steps up pace to win world fitness race
November 18, 2018 | Financial Times | Rachel Sanderson in Milan

Technogym, the Italian maker of top end gym equipment, is launching a new platform to broadcast live and on-demand workouts from top gyms worldwide as the race for fitness tech heats up.

The Milan-listed company, founded by owner and chief executive Nerio Alessandri in 1983, will launch Technogym Live in January starting first in the UK and Italy. It will allow owners of Technogym equipment fitted with broadcast consoles to watch cycling, running, rowing, boxing and boot camp classes from its partner fitness studios around the world.

The move comes as fitness has become a new frontier for the tech industry. Fitness streaming apps, such as audio app Aaptiv, connected to home equipment such as start-up Peloton Interactive stationary bicycles have become a big growth area.
fitness  gyms  Peloton  platforms  Technogym  connected_devices  wellness 
november 2018 by jerryking
Are you cheating at the gym? | The GoodLife Fitness Blog
most common short cuts.
SWINGING
Lifting weights is built of two parts, the concentric and eccentric, or the contract and stretch. If you’re swinging into the move to build momentum then you’re not able to control the eccentric phase and you sacrifice results. You also risk injury when you’re not in control. Use a one second count on the concentric movement, and four on the eccentric.
strength_training  shortcuts  exercise  fitness  gyms  cheating 
july 2018 by jerryking
Adopt a movement-based approach for optimized workouts - The Globe and Mail
MAY 25, 2017 | SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED | PAUL LANDINI

the four most common movement patterns: 1. pushing (vertical and horizontal), 2. pulling (vertical and horizontal), 3. squatting (knee-dominant) and 4. hinging (hip-dominant). Master these movements and you'll be able to execute just about any exercise that comes your way.

(1) Pushing

Main muscles: Pectorals (chest), deltoids (shoulders), triceps (back of arms).

Best exercises: Push-ups; landmine press; one-arm kettlebell press.
(2) Pulling
Main muscles: Latissimus dorsi (mid back), rhomboids (upper back), biceps (front of arms).

Best exercises: Pull-ups; inverted row; face pull

(3) Squatting

Main muscles: Quads (front of legs), glutes (butt), hamstrings (back of legs).

Best exercises: Goblet squat; split squat; reverse lunge.

(4) Hinging

Main muscles: Hamstrings, glutes, spinal erectors (low back).

Best exercises: Deadlift; Romanian deadlift; kettlebell swing
back_exercises  deadlifts  exercise  fitness  face-pulls  glutes  movement-based  pull-ups  push-ups  shoulder_exercises  squats  strength_training  functional_strength 
april 2018 by jerryking
The Common Advice for Those With Thinning Bones Could Be All Wrong - WSJ
Bone building happens specifically at the areas of the bone you stress during your workout, says Pamela S. Hinton, associate professor of nutrition and exercise physiology, at the University of Missouri, in Columbia.

For this reason, a dead lift is one of the best exercises because it “uses big muscles around the hips and hamstrings,” causing the muscle to pull on the bone. It also recruits the muscles around the lumbar and thoracic spine to stabilize the body during the lift, says Polly de Mille, exercise physiologist at the Women’s Sports Medicine Center at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York. Proper form is critical to safety, she adds.
aging  longevity  strength_training  intensity  fitness  exercise  high-intensity  trauma  overcompensation  deadlifts  osteoporosis  bone_density  high-impact 
april 2018 by jerryking
Running Is the Worst Way to Get Fit - Tonic
Nick English

Nov 17 2016

Running is a crappy way to lose fat and an inferior way to boost cardiovascular health, but it's somehow become the most popular exercise on Earth after walking.....It's an incredibly inefficient way to build strength. And as we all know, a strong body is the number one way to prevent injuries, increase metabolism, burn fat, and stay mobile and functional in old age. Folks "do cardio" because they want to burn off their bellies. And running is a bad pick.

"That's usually what the mentality is, that it's a way to get leaner and lose weight, but doing other things outside of running will probably have a better effect at catalyzing that result," he says. Boyce's fat-loss prescription, like that of practically any trainer worth their salt, is compound strength exercises. That means multi-joint movements like the squat, deadlift, overhead press, chin-ups, pull-ups, and push-ups......Studies have consistently shown that weight training and sprinting are more effective than running at targeting belly fat and creating a good hormonal environment for fat loss, meaning better insulin sensitivity, less of the stress hormone cortisol, and more growth hormone and testosterone. ....exercising the heart at a higher intensity is a better way to get the job done. Studies have shown that shorter sessions of anaerobic training, like fast-paced resistance training or sprints, are just as good for heart health as long, drawn-out runs and better at maintaining muscle and increasing aerobic fitness (or VO2 max, if you want to be specific). ...."In many ways, sprinting is safer than running,"....you're going to have more of a fat loss effect from sprinting for the same reasons you get it from weights: You're doing things that require strength, explosiveness, exertion, and intensity, so your muscles are going to have to work a little bit harder, they're going to burn more calories, and you're going to be more metabolic after you finish your workout as well.".....
aerobic  cardiovascular  compound_movements  deadlifts  exercise  fast-paced  fat-burning  fitness  functional_strength  howto  interval_training  high-impact  high-intensity  injury_prevention  military_press  pull-ups  running  squats  strength_training 
april 2018 by jerryking
How to reduce the risk of joint injuries in your fitness routine - The Globe and Mail
more young people are having joint replacement surgeries due in large part to their “repetitive athletic pursuits.” In other, less measured words: too many young people are training like dummies.

In most cases, overuse injuries are a result of poor program design, improper exercise selection or bad technique. All three of these factors tend to arise when overly excited rookie lifters go it alone. A smart strength coach or personal trainer will know how to help their clients avoid grinding their joints into dust by choosing the right exercises, in the right order, done the right way.

Strength Training Anatomy-3rd Edition Paperback – Mar 9 2010
by Frederic Delavier (Author)
fitness  injuries  exercise  strength_training  books  pain  anatomy 
april 2018 by jerryking
The dumb-bell economy: inside the booming business of exercise
FEBRUARY 9, 2018 | FT | Jo Ellison.

Where once consumers looked for acquisitions to express their status, our spending habits are shifting towards more holistic expenditures. In the past 20 years, the leisure industry has emerged as one of the most dynamic, disruptive and fashionable of forces. It’s all part of a new focus on the “lifestyle experience”, a trend that has possessed consumers and found luxury brands spiking with sporty new offerings — sneakers, leggings, apps and accessories — designed to harness the burgeoning market. As Harvey Spevak, the executive chairman and managing partner of the Equinox group, likes to say: “Health is the new wealth.”
.....2019 will see the first Equinox hotel opening in New York’s Hudson Yards, the first in a rollout of Equinox hotels earmarked for billions more in investment. The hotels will be founded on the same full-service ideal as the clubs. “Our vision for the hotels is to cater to the high-performance traveller,” says Spevak, “and we think about it as we do, historically, from a science perspective. We call it MNR — movement, nutrition and recovery — where a high-performance lifestyle and a healthy lifestyle is a three-legged stool.”.....as our lives have become busier, atomised and more urban, the gym has emerged as the new place in which to gather: to be part of a community....not only are millennials more likely to buy gym memberships, they’re driving the boutique business as well. The rise of the group workout, club membership and all of the attendant accessories that come with it have become part of the new language of “wellness”......Where you work out, who you work out with, and what you wear to work out in have become totems of fashionability. Spevak traces the first shoots of the wellness trend to 9/11, when he saw a jump in the number of people becoming focused on holistic health and taking care of themselves.
....But more than anything, the fitness boom must be a corollary of a digital revolution in which working out has become a ubiquitous feature of our online life; ....Minton agrees that a gym’s success depends on cultivating this tribal loyalty, delivering a unique experience and then selling product that marks its members out. “Some of the most interesting clubs are those that are expanding into less obvious areas,” he says. “We now have over 600 boutiques across the UK and they are growing faster than traditional gyms as they have a smaller footprint and can take pop-up spaces.......The experiential market is throwing a lifeline to retailers, as well. “The fashion link is growing,” adds Minton. “Fitness apparel brands like Lululemon, Sweaty Betty, Reebok, Nike all now offer free in-store workouts, which provide them with an opportunity to market their brand lifestyles more directly and forge a connection with the consumer.”.......“The demise of retail is a permanent shift,” says Spevak. “It doesn’t mean retail’s going to go away, but it’s going to look very different. The consumer, in my opinion, will continue to buy nice things for themselves, but I think in the scheme of priorities the experience is more important than the handbag.”
fitness  exercise  London  United_Kingdom  gyms  wellness  rollouts  strength_training  boutiques  leisure  Equinox  millennials  experiential_marketing  small_spaces  pop-ups  non-obvious  upscale  retailers  in-store 
february 2018 by jerryking
Lift Weights, Eat More Protein, Especially if You’re Over 40 - The New York Times
By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS FEB. 7, 2018

To answer the simplest question of whether taking in more protein during weight training led to larger increases in muscle size and strength, the researchers added all of the results together....And the answer was a resounding yes. Men and women who ate more protein while weight training did develop larger, stronger muscles than those who did not.
strength_training  fitness  exercise  aging  midlife  diets  proteins 
february 2018 by jerryking
“COMPLETE” Back Workout (Width, Density, Strength!) - YouTube
lat pulldown
barbell dead row
static hold, wide raise
high boy row
perpendicular landmine row (parallel to the bar)
hyper extension machine. (dumbells)
superman hold (snow angels.)
AthleanX  exercise  fitness  strength_training  back_exercises 
february 2018 by jerryking
Strengthen your glutes for better balance and less pain
November 1, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | KATHLEEN TROTTER.

Weak or inactive glutes – which are all too common – can contribute to lower back, hip, knee and ankle pain, not to mention reduced daily function and decreased endurance, strength and power.

The causes include excessive sitting (tight hip flexors), habituated improper loading patterns (over-recruitment of quads and lower back) and motor-control deficits. Even those who perform exercises that theoretically strengthen the glutes tend to unknowingly recruit other muscles.

How weak glutes can lead to injuries

Walking, jogging and running require hip extension – i.e., the leg moving backward to propel the body forward. The gluteus maximus is responsible for this motion. When you lack adequate hip extension, the body compensates, often by extending through the lower back or tilting the pelvis. These compensations stress the lower back, contributing to degenerative changes in the spine, muscle pain and an inefficient gait, and the pelvic tilt can cause the hamstrings to become over-lengthened and thus easily strained.

Pelvis stability impacts the knee. The femur makes up half the knee joint. The femur is controlled by pelvis muscles (primarily glutes). Thus, hip control is knee control. One common result of weak glutes is knee pain from an internally rotated femur that torques the knee.

How to activate and strengthen your glutes

1. Stretch your hip flexors, especially if you have a fairly sedentary lifestyle, which most of us do.

Sitting shortens hip flexors. Tight hip flexors inhibit the glutes. The bum can't fully engage when hip flexors are tight.

Lunge stretch: Step your left leg forward into a shallow lunge, both feet facing forward. Tuck your pelvis – your right hip bones should move toward your ribs. Feel a stretch up the front of your right thigh. Hold for 30 seconds or more. Switch sides.

2. "Activate" so you can integrate. Activation exercises "turn on" muscles that are not firing appropriately.

Isometric hip extensions: Tie a resistance band around your thighs. Lie on your right side, head supported, bottom leg bent, top leg straight and top hip long. Lift the top leg up and back in space slightly. Hold for 10 seconds. Initiate the motion from your bum. Release. Repeat for 10 reps. No band? Do the exercise without the band but hold for 30 seconds, working up to 60 seconds.

Band squats: Stand with a band tied around your thighs, feet slightly wider than shoulder width. Use the hip strategy outlined below to sit backward and imagine your sit bones widening as you squat. Hold for 10 seconds, engaging your bum to meet the tension of the band. Repeat 10 times. No band? Do body-weight squat holds for 20 seconds each.

The long-term goal is to integrate the now-active muscle into functional movement patterns such as squats. This way, motions that should theoretically work the glutes will actually work them. Do activation exercises daily until your bum is able to engage. Once activated, these exercises work well as part of a warm-up before training your lower body.

Utilize a "hip strategy" when squatting, lunging, performing step-ups, etc.

Hip strategy: This biases the glutes. To perform, lean up to 45 degrees forward, have a proportionally greater bend at the hip than the knee and when possible load the exercise from the back versus the front.

Knee strategy: This biases the quads. To perform, have an erect torso (shoulders over hips) and a proportionally larger bend at the knee versus the hip.

One strategy is not "good" and the other "bad." What you use depends on your goal. If you require stronger thighs, use the knee strategy. To get your glutes to join the party, use the hip strategy. Once your glutes are active, alternate strategies week to week.

Be mindful

The greatest predictor of future injury is previous injury. If you've had ankle, knee, hip or back injuries, don't wait for pain – pre-emptively train your glutes. Consider having an expert assess your overall movement mechanics. The body is a series of dominoes – every muscle and joint affect the muscles and joints above and below. To improve function and decrease rates of injury, work to understand your kinetic chain as a whole.

The goal of this program is to make unconsciously "active glutes" a new norm. I want your bum to work appropriately when you run, walk, sit or stand without you consciously deciding to use it. To make this a reality, purposeful thought – at least initially – is required. Turn your music off and stop chatting. Consider putting a hand on the muscle being worked. The brain responds well to tactile feedback. Concentrate on form and the muscles you're attempting to work.
endurance  exercise  fitness  glutes  squats  stretching  strength_training 
november 2017 by jerryking
How Peloton is Marketing a $2,000 Bike Beyond the Rich - WSJ
By Alexandra Bruell
Oct. 25, 2017

When Carolyn Tisch Blodgett joined fitness startup Peloton as its brand marketing lead a year-and-a-half ago, the company’s executives were focused on promoting the functionality of their product -- a $1,995 stationary bike with an attached tablet and a $39-a-month subscription service for access to live and on-demand classes.

What they were missing, however, was a compelling brand story about the bike’s convenience and its role in connecting riders around the country, largely through a leaderboard that displays rider data, said Ms. Blodgett.

“My challenge over the last year-and-a-half has been telling this brand story,” she said. “We wanted to bring the product to life but also the brand.”

Ms. Blodgett also conducted research showing that the company had been targeting a core, affluent audience, but overlooking a less affluent consumer who was willing to splurge on a convenient fitness habit.

Peloton is now shifting gears with a new financing program ($97 per month for 39 months for both the bike and subscription service), an ad campaign that’s more relatable to a diverse consumer base and an NBC Olympics sponsorship.
Peloton  fitness  storytelling  brand_identity  brands  data_driven  connected_devices  subscriptions  overlooked  overlooked_opportunities  functionality 
october 2017 by jerryking
3 Ways To Build A Better Mind-Muscle Connection
Todd Bumgardner
July 20, 2016

1. Cueing Mantras

The meditative "om" is often misunderstood, but it's been used for centuries for a reason: It works. This simple, one-syllable utterance cuts away the outside world and gives a meditator the means to travel inward. We can use the same process to improve our exercise performance and focus.

The means are simple, and what I like to call "three-letter self-cueing mantras." Think about the most impactful tasks a lift requires: getting into the starting position, finding a good middle position, and performing the lift forcefully. Let's use the deadlift as the example.

You want to start, and finish the lift, tall and tight. You have to reach into a good bottom position before lifting, and you have to drive the floor away for a solid lift. The deadlift mantra, then, is TRD: Tall and Tight. Reach. Drive.
deadlifts  exercise  fitness  gyms  mantras  mindfulness  self-talk  strength_training 
june 2017 by jerryking
Why Running May Be Good for Your Back - The New York Times
Phys Ed
By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS JUNE 7, 2017

People who regularly run or walk briskly appear to have healthier discs in their spines than people who do not exercise, according to one of the first studies to closely examine links between movement and disc health.

The findings refute a widely held belief that activities like running might overtax the spine and indicate that, instead, they make it sturdier.

The human spine is a complicated mechanism, composed of vertebral bones cushioned between intervertebral discs. These discs, shaped like tiny whoopee cushions, contain a viscous fluid that compresses and absorbs pressure during movement, keeping the back in good working form.

With age, disease or injury, spinal discs can degenerate and bulge, resulting in back pain, which can be debilitating......Muscles and bones respond to the physical strains of movement by becoming larger and stronger. But most experts thought that spinal discs remain impervious to this process and might in fact be harmed by the jarring from running........Interestingly, mileage barely mattered. The discs of the people who ran less than 30 miles per week were almost identical to those in the long-distance group, suggesting that, compared to moderate mileage, heavy training does not augment disc health but also does not contribute to deterioration.......The sweet spot for disc health seemed to reside somewhere in the range of fast walks and gentle jogs.....this was a one-time snapshot of people’s backs. It cannot prove that exercise caused people’s discs to become healthier, but only that people who ran had healthier discs.
running  exercise  fitness  human_spine 
june 2017 by jerryking
The Best Exercise for Aging Muscles
MARCH 23, 2017 | The New York Times | By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS.

There were some unsurprising differences: The gains in muscle mass and strength were greater for those who exercised only with weights, while interval training had the strongest influence on endurance.

But more unexpected results were found in the biopsied muscle cells. Among the younger subjects who went through interval training, the activity levels had changed in 274 genes, compared with 170 genes for those who exercised more moderately and 74 for the weight lifters. Among the older cohort, almost 400 genes were working differently now, compared with 33 for the weight lifters and only 19 for the moderate exercisers.

Many of these affected genes, especially in the cells of the interval trainers, are believed to influence the ability of mitochondria to produce energy for muscle cells; the subjects who did the interval workouts showed increases in the number and health of their mitochondria — an impact that was particularly pronounced among the older cyclists.

It seems as if the decline in the cellular health of muscles associated with aging was “corrected” with exercise, especially if it was intense,
aging  endurance  exercise  fitness  high-impact  interval_training  strength_training 
april 2017 by jerryking
The Fitness Shift That Should Worry Every Gym Owner - WSJ
By RACHEL BACHMAN
Jan. 21, 2017

Streaming fitness is surging. So are services that let people sample nearby fitness studios for a monthly fee, according to new data from Atlanta-based firm Cardlytics. Many subscribers to these on-demand fitness options are siphoning spending from traditional gyms, the data shows.

Payments to on-demand fitness services jumped to 7.7% of total spending on workouts last year, up from 4.8% two years earlier, according to Cardlytics. Spending for on-demand fitness now exceeds spending at yoga and Pilates studios, according to the data.

Traditional gyms still command the overwhelming majority of workout spending, but that share fell to about 73% in 2016 from nearly 78% in 2014.
fitness  trends  on-demand  gyms  streaming 
january 2017 by jerryking
Ditch this outdated upper-body exercise in 2017 - The Globe and Mail
KATHLEEN TROTTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jan. 03, 2017
exercise  gyms  fitness  things_to_do 
january 2017 by jerryking
The strong, skinny type: Today’s male body ideal is more than just being fit - The Globe and Mail
SIMON LEWSEN
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015

.....If the body-image demands on women are absurdly restrictive, the pressures on young men are weirdly contradictory: Weekend guy rituals with pitchers, nachos and wings are difficult to reconcile with the lean ideal. These disparities play out in popular culture. For every laid-back Seth Rogen, there’s a shredded Channing Tatum; for every fluctuating Jonah Hill, there’s a consistently slender Joseph Gordon-Levitt.

In the midst of these conflicting pressures, guys such as Lukac and Hayos have found a solution: Weekday discipline is a licence for weekend permissiveness. “My rule is eat clean and healthy most of the time,” says Lukac. “But if I’m going to indulge in something, there’s going to be no guilt follow-up. I’m going to eat that meal, and that’s going to be it.”

Similarly, Hayos aims for an 80/20 split between clean living and dude excess. The equilibrium sometimes veers in wild directions – “At my age, I’m going out a lot, drinking a lot, so I live a balanced lifestyle, but it’s on the extremes” – but the see-saw routine works for him. Sure, it’s intense, but I’ve met artists, musicians and software designers who are just as committed to their hobbies as Hayos is to his..... I spoke to enough stable, self-aware guys to be convinced that intensive exercise can be gratifying and psychologically healthy. But it’s not just about fitness. It’s an emotional thing, too. Virtually every man I spoke with remembers a moment – the discovery of thinning hair or a sudden spike in weight during university – that made him want to regain control.

Working out is about the desire to take command of our unpredictable bodies. It’s an attempt – sometimes remarkably successful, if only in the short run – to dictate the terms on which our bodies will change instead of letting aging and genetics take the lead.
BMI  body-image  cardiovascular  conscious_spending  decision_making  exercise  fitness  guilt-free  sense_of_control  strength_training 
october 2016 by jerryking
Which Type of Exercise Is Best for the Brain? - The New York Times
By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS FEBRUARY 17, 2016

For the first time, scientists compared head-to-head the neurological impacts of different types of exercise: running, weight training and high-intensity interval training. The surprising results suggest that going hard may not be the best option for long-term brain health......if you currently weight train or exclusively work out with intense intervals, continue. But perhaps also thread in an occasional run or bike ride for the sake of your hippocampal health.
exercise  fitness  health  medical  strength_training  intensity  high-intensity  interval_training  high-impact 
february 2016 by jerryking
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