jerryking + diabetes   13

Why Can’t We Stop Pancreatic Cancer?
Sept. 23, 2019 | The New York Times | By Jane E. Brody.

Although pancreatic cancer is a relatively uncommon malignancy, accounting for only 3 percent of life-threatening cancers over all, it is one of medicine’s most challenging. Aside from avoiding smoking, obesity and Type 2 diabetes, there is little a person can do to prevent it, and there is nothing comparable to mammography or colonoscopy to screen for it in seemingly healthy individuals when it is most amenable to cure.

Among the small minority of patients — like Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg — who are cured of this disease, it is nearly always discovered accidentally at a very early symptom-free stage during an unrelated medical procedure. By the time this cancer produces symptoms, it has nearly always spread beyond the pancreas. In fact, surgery is a treatment option in relatively few patients because the cancer is usually already too advanced at diagnosis for surgery to have survival value......A large part of the problem with early detection lies with the location and size of this vital organ. The pancreas is a source of enzymes that facilitate digestion and of the hormone insulin that regulates blood sugar, making it available to tissues for energy. It is a mere six inches long sitting deep in the abdomen behind the stomach and surrounded by the spleen, liver and small intestine.

Therefore, you’d be unlikely to feel the presence of a small pancreatic tumor, and any early symptoms that might result from one, such as loss of appetite, are easily attributed to something far less ominous. Nor would you or an examining doctor be able to notice a premalignant lesion, as can happen with cancers of the cervix, colon and skin.........Further complicating early detection is the speed at which pancreatic cancer seems to progress. According to Dr. Lennon and coauthors, recent study findings “suggest that early stage pancreatic cancers often invade the veins, which drain directly to the liver and result in early metastatic spread,” which may explain why only 10 percent of patients have localized disease at diagnosis.......Meanwhile, it may help extend survival in some people if they recognize symptoms of pancreatic cancer and act on them without delay. Possible symptoms include loss of appetite, abdominal pain that radiates to the back, new-onset diabetes in someone over 50, jaundice, itchy skin, a change in how alcohol tastes, and pale odd-smelling feces that float.
cancers  risks  diabetes  howto  pancreas  risk_factors  symptoms 
29 days ago by jerryking
Waking Up at 4 A.M. Every Day Is the Key to Success. Or to Getting a Cold.
June 5, 2019 | The New York Times | By Adam Popescu.

Is the key to success emulating high-profile achievers who are hacking their bodies to increase productivity? Even if capitalism favors early wake-up times, at least as a badge of honor, there is no data that shows that successful people get less sleep...... this early-rising trend propagated by entertainers and entrepreneurs is deeply troubling. And while some people seem to need less sleep than others, we can’t game our body clocks.......In 1999, researchers at the University of Chicago monitored a group who slept only four hours a night — a common amount for those who wake up very early — for six days in a row. That group quickly developed higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol, higher blood pressure and produced half the usual amount of antibodies to a flu vaccine........When we delay or speed up our internal body clock, it can have the same consequences as not getting enough sleep, a phenomenon known as advanced sleep-wake phase disorder.......Missing even two hours here, an hour there, then having a wildly different sleep pattern over the weekend, is the gateway drug to chronic sleep deprivation. Fatigue, irritability and overall mental confusion are the dangers and symptoms of such deprivation....In 2008, professors at the University of Chicago, including Eve Van Cauter, the director of the Sleep, Metabolism and Health Center, found a link between sleep loss and an increased risk for obesity and diabetes. A decade later, the university advanced those studies to find that chronic sleep loss can increase the amount of free fatty acids in the blood.

That means a metabolism disruption that reduces the body’s ability to use insulin to regulate blood sugar.
blood_pressure  circadian_rhythms  diabetes  early_risers  high-achieving  immune_system  overachievers  self-care  sleep 
june 2019 by jerryking
I’ve Interviewed 300 High Achievers About Their Morning Routines. Here’s What I’ve Learned. - The New York Times
By Benjamin Spall
Oct. 21, 2018
Experiment with your wake-up time
While the majority of the people I’ve interviewed tend to get up early — the average wake-up time for everyone I’ve talked to is 6:27 a.m. — successful people like to experiment to find the sweet spot that works for them.......Make time for whatever energizes you
Most successful people carve out time in their morning to commit to things that make them feel relaxed, energized and motivated. That can mean working out, reading, meditating or just spending time with your loved ones.....
Get enough sleep
The quality of your sleep the night before directly impacts your ability to perform the next day and, indeed, your ability to enjoy your day. Your morning routine means nothing without a good night’s sleep behind it. Not getting enough sleep has been linked to chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease, and might even decrease the effectiveness of your immune system.

Don’t become complacent about how much sleep you need; most people require between seven and nine hours of sleep a night. If you’re constantly trying to get by on less than seven hours of sleep, it will catch up with you, likely sooner rather than later......Adapt your routine to different situations
While it might not always be possible to keep your full morning routine in place when you’re away from home, it is possible to have a travel-ready routine that is always there when you need it.....Don’t beat yourself up
Nearly everyone I’ve talked to said they don’t consider one, two or even three missed days of their morning routine a failure, so long as they get back to it as soon as they can.
GTD  productivity  routines  lessons_learned  insomnia  adaptability  best_practices  choices  serenity  sleep  high-achieving  early_risers  diabetes  immune_system 
october 2018 by jerryking
How to Minimize Pancreatic Cancer Risk - The New York Times
By Jane E. Brody
July 23, 2018

In most of the approximately 6 percent of five-year survivors, pancreatic cancer is discovered early quite by accident, usually during a scan or surgery for some other reason.....The pancreas is a small two-part glandular organ — about 7 inches long and 1.5 inches wide — lying in the upper abdomen behind the stomach. It performs two vital functions. One part of the gland is a source of digestive enzymes and the other part produces the hormones insulin and glucagon that control blood levels of glucose and fatty acids.

Some known risk factors for pancreatic cancer are beyond an individual’s control: older age, being an African-American or Ashkenazi Jew and having two or more first-degree relatives (parents or siblings) who have had the cancer.

But it is the modifiable risk factors that are currently of greatest concern. Aside from tobacco smoking, which accounts for 20 percent to 25 percent of pancreatic cancers even as this risk factor continues to decline, the main risks for pancreatic cancer cases and deaths are obesity, Type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome, all of which have risen to epidemic levels in recent years.....be alert to the possibility of hidden cancer in patients newly diagnosed with diabetes who are 50 or older, have no family history of the disease, are losing weight and their diabetes is not controlled by oral medication......Early diagnosis is vital because pancreatic cancer is highly resistant to most therapies and often recurs after surgery. Currently, only 20 percent of cancers are even eligible for surgery, she said. The pancreas is next to very large blood vessels and when the tumor involves them, it cannot safely be removed.

One bright spot for people with diabetes: The drug metformin, often used by patients to help control blood sugar, has in some studies been associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer and improved survival chances for those who develop the cancer. This drug, which has also been linked to longevity and healthy aging, is an inexpensive generic with an excellent safety record.
cancers  risks  diabetes  howto  pancreas  risk_factors 
july 2018 by jerryking
The New Innovator’s Dilemma: When Customers Won’t Pay for Better - WSJ
Aug. 15, 2017 | WSJ | By Denise Roland.

As the turmoil at Novo Nordisk shows, there are commercial limits to innovation. Nokia Corp. and BlackBerry Ltd. both lost their market dominance in smartphones because competitors beat them with major technological advances. Both firms are in the process of reinventing themselves.

In other cases, though, innovation has hit a wall. That is especially the case in some pockets of the pharmaceuticals business, where the scope for big improvements is narrowing.
CDC  Novo_Nordisk  innovation  pricing  marketing  strategy  insulin  diabetes  Denmark  Danish  pharmaceutical_industry  pharmacy-benefit_management 
august 2017 by jerryking
Mapping Where Torontonians Bike and Run
FEBRUARY 2, 2015 | Torontoist | BY DAVID HAINS

Developers map out the world's most popular spots for walking, jogging, and cycling—and reveal where in this city Torontonians like, and don't like, to get outside and get active.

....the maps show pieces of a larger story. The most popular trails might seem simply like fun places for a run or merely the result of individual choices, but they’re part of a larger context that governs how the city works—how the built and natural environment, a community’s land-use mix, housing affordability, community health options, and other factors affect the way we relate to and use different parts of the city.
mapping  Toronto  running  cycling  ravines  parks  neighbourhoods  community_health  public_policy  correlations  diabetes  health_outcomes  healthy_lifestyles  cardiovascular  land_uses  self-selection 
january 2017 by jerryking
Skipping breakfast,
Andrew Ryan

The Globe and Mail

Dec. 02 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Andrew Ryan.

FEAST AND FAMINE

Doctors could soon be advising patients with Type 2 diabetes to skip breakfast and plan their days around a big lunch.
diabetes  mens'_health  breakfasts  lunchtime 
december 2013 by jerryking
Nestlé bites into new market
December 15, 2006 | WSJ | Deborah Ball and Jeanne Whalen.

Acquisition from Novartis will provide entrée to pharma-like foods in the hopes of making medical-nutrition products taste good. Nestlé SA is betting on nutritionally engineered feeds for people with cancer or diabetes or for the elderly who struggle to keep on weight, in an unusual strategy for a maker of grocery-store food brands....Nestlé, the world’s biggest food company in terms of sales, hopes to expand the types of diseases it targets, while also tapping Novartis's relationships with hospitals, doctors and nursing homes. In turn, Nestlé’s expertise in flavours and packaging can help improve the taste and look of clinical nutrition items.
Big_Food  brands  Nestlé  cancers  aging  diabetes  nutrition  health_foods  flavours  packaging 
august 2012 by jerryking

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