jerryking + databases   40

Marty Chavez Muses on Rocky Times and the Road Ahead
NOV. 14, 2017 | - The New York Times | By WILLIAM D. COHAN.

Mr. Chavez is about as far from the stereotypical Wall Street senior executive as you can imagine, and that is one reason his musings about the future direction of Wall Street are listened to carefully.

He grew up in Albuquerque, one of five children, who all went to Harvard. He got a doctorate in medical information sciences from Stanford University. (At that time, he was known by his full name Ramon Martin Chavez.)

In 1990, Mr. Chavez came out, the day after he defended his doctoral dissertation. – “Architectures and Approximation Algorithms for Probabilistic Expert Systems.” He is one of the few openly gay executives on Wall Street. ......In his current role as Goldman's CFO, Marty views his job as a simple one that is hard to get right: “I’m not paid or evaluated on the accuracy of my crystal-ball predictions,” he said. “I’m paid to enumerate every possible outcome and do something about every possible outcome well in advance, when it’s still possible to do something, because once it’s happened it’s too late.”....Unlike many of his peers on Wall Street, Mr. Chavez does not complain about the extent of the regulation that hit the financial industry as a result of Dodd-Frank. Generally speaking, he says, the regulations have helped banks “confront their problems and capitalize and bolster their liquidity,” making them “stronger as a result,” and the financial system safer and more profitable.....Instead of complaining about the extra expense and manpower required to comply with the mountain of new regulations, Mr. Chavez chooses instead to think about it differently. “If you approach the regulations as ‘Oh, we’ve got to comply,’ you’ll get one result,” he said. He prefers thinking about the regulations as, “This makes us and the system and our clients safer and sounder, and yes it’s a lot of work, but what can we learn from this work and how can we use this work in other ways to make a better result for our shareholders and our clients? Everywhere we look we’re finding these opportunities and they’re very much in keeping with the spirit of the times.”

Like any good senior Goldman executive, he does worry. (Lloyd Blankfein, the Goldman chief executive, once told me he spent 98 percent of his time worrying about things with a 2 percent probability.)

His biggest concern at the moment is the risk of “single points of failure” in the vast world of cybersecurity. He worries about any individual “repository of information” that does not have a backup and that can “be hacked.”

He does not even trust Goldman’s own computer system; he treats it as a potential enemy.

.....What also makes Goldman different from its peers is the firm’s love affair with engineers. At the moment, he said, engineers comprise around 30 percent of Goldman’s work force of about 35,000. It’s what drew him to Goldman in the first place — to work on Goldman’s in-house software, “SecDB,” short for “Securities Database,” an internal, proprietary computer system that tracks all the trades that Goldman makes and their prices, and regularly monitors the risk that the firm faces as a result.

He said the system generates some million and a half points of data that were used to calculate, for the first time, the firm’s “liquidity coverage ratio” — now 128 percent — and that were shared with regulators every day. He’s been busy trying to figure out how the newly generated data can be used to help him understand what the firm’s liquidity will be a year from now.

That way, he said, in his principal role as Goldman’s chief financial officer, he can perceive a problem in plenty of time to do something about it. “We’re able to get much better actionable insights that make the firm a less risky business because we’re able to go much further out into the future,” he said......
actionable_information  CFOs  cyber_security  databases  Dodd-Frank  engineering  financial_system  Goldman_Sachs  improbables  information_sources  jujutsu  Martin_Chavez  proprietary  regulation  SecDB  SPOF  think_differently  Wall_Street  William_Cohan  worrying 
november 2017 by jerryking
Yale to Build Tool Offering Real-Time Lessons on Financial Crises -
May 9, 2017 | WSJ | By Gabriel T. Rubin.

Yale University will launch an online platform to provide real-time support to policy makers dealing with financial crises, with the help of a $10 million gift from business leaders and philanthropists Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Bloomberg Philanthropies and the Peter G. Peterson Foundation.

The gift represents a major expansion of the Yale Program on Financial Stability, a degree-granting program in the university’s school of management that aims to train early- and midcareer financial regulators from around the globe.

The new resources will support a small staff of researchers, led by Professor Andrew Metrick, as they build a database of “lessons from hundreds of interventions from past crises,” the university said. The effort is the first of its kind, according to Yale, and reflects a need for more research on “wartime” situations, rather than the preventive sort of regulatory research done by central banks around the world. Central banks often avoid extensive crisis preparations out of reluctance to promote moral hazard, leaving policy makers to reinvent the wheel each time a new crisis arises.....Mr. Geithner, who serves as the chairman of the Program on Financial Stability, said that he and other policy makers would have been able to act faster and with greater confidence during the financial crisis with access to the tools that Mr. Metrick’s team will build.

“There were probably four or five periods when the crisis was escalating, the panic was spreading, sitting on the phone for 20 hours a day trying to figure out how to do things,” Mr. Geithner recalled. “And we hadn’t had to do some of those things since the Great Depression. That took us a lot of time, and that can be costly.”

The open online platform will include descriptions of specific interventions—for example, the use of a “bad bank” to hold distressed assets—and will detail what did and didn’t work well in each case.
Yale  Colleges_&_Universities  crisis  regulators  Walter_Bagehot  central_banks  real-time  databases  lessons_learned  policy_tools  Peter_Peterson  reinventing_the_wheel  policymakers  confidence  economic_downturn  decision_making  speed  the_Great_Depression  crisis_management  crisis_response  Tim_Geithner  moral_hazards  financial_crises 
may 2017 by jerryking
Steve Ballmer Serves Up a Fascinating Data Trove - The New York Times
Andrew Ross Sorkin
DEALBOOK APRIL 17, 2017
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Steve_Ballmer  government  Andrew_Sorkin  databases  data  measurements  economics  indicators  real-time  forecasting  economic_data 
april 2017 by jerryking
Goldman breaks tradition with unconventional choice
December 17/ December 18, 2016 | Financial Times | Ben McLannahan.

His promotion to chief information officer in 2013 ― after a stint at Credit Suisse and Kiodex, an energy trading software company ― meant that he sat atop Goldman’s biggest division, accounting for about one-third of global headcount.

A big part of that job has been bringing down the amount the bank spends on maintaining old systems, which consume about one-third of Goldman’s annual $3bn tech budgets, according to estimates by Credit Suisse analysts.

He has also taken a page out of Google and Facebook’s playbook and started giving away some of the bank’s trading technology to clients via open-source software, inviting them to use it and improve it.

What sets Mr Chavez apart is “his ability to take decisive action based on what the world will look like in five to 10 years”, says Tom Farley, president of the New York Stock Exchange, who worked with him at Kiodex. “Other people may have a view of the future but they’re afraid to act on it.”

In an address to Goldman interns this summer, Mr Chavez told them that as a new graduate, he wanted to “get busy and do a bunch of things”. When he landed on Wall Street, he learnt that people called that attitude “optionality”.

“You don’t know that these options are going to be worth something, but if you do the work, pay the premium, own a whole bunch of these options on a lot of different outcomes and you’re diversified enough, probably something will work out,” he said.
Goldman_Sachs  Martin_Chavez  CFOs  appointments  Wall_Street  unconventional  SecDB  databases  generating_strategic_options  forward_looking  CIOs  Hispanics  optionality  new_graduates  legacy_tech  playbooks 
december 2016 by jerryking
At BlackRock, a Wall Street Rock Star’s $5 Trillion Comeback - The New York Times
SEPT. 15, 2016 | NYT | By LANDON THOMAS Jr.

(1) Laurence Fink: “If you think you know everything about our business, you are kidding yourself,” he said. “The biggest question we have to answer is: ‘Are we developing the right leaders?’” “Are you,” he asked, “prepared to be one of those leaders?”

(2) BlackRock was thriving because of its focus on low-risk, low-cost funds and the all-seeing wonders of Aladdin. BlackRock sees the future of finance as being rules-based, data-driven, systematic investment styles such as exchange-traded funds, which track a variety of stock and bond indexes or adhere to a set of financial rules. Fink believes that his algorithmic driven style will, over time, grow faster than the costlier “active investing” model in which individuals, not algorithms, make stock, bond and asset allocation decisions.

Most money management firms highlight their investment returns first, and risk controls second. BlackRock has taken a reverse approach: It believes that risk analysis, such as gauging how a security will trade if interest rates go up or down, improves investment results.

(3) BlackRock, along with central banks, sovereign wealth funds — have become the new arbiters of "flow.“ It is not about the flow of securities anymore, it is about the flow of information and indications of interest.”

(4) Asset Liability and Debt and Derivatives Investment Network (Aladdin), is BlackRock's big data-mining, risk-mitigation platform/framework. Aladdin is a network of code, trades, chat, algorithms and predictive models that on any given day can highlight vulnerabilities and opportunities connected to the trillions that BlackRock firm tracks — including the portion which belongs to outside firms that pay BlackRock a fee to have access to the platform. Aladdin stress-tests how securities will respond to certain situations (e.g. a sudden rise in interest rates or what happens in the event of a political surprise, like Donald J. Trump being elected president.)

In San Francisco, a team of equity analysts deploys data analysis to study the language that CEOs use during an earnings call. Unusually bearish this quarter, compared with last? If so, maybe the stock is a sell. “We have more information than anyone,” Mr. Fink said.
systematic_approaches  ETFs  Wall_Street  BlackRock  Laurence_Fink  asset_management  traders  complacency  future  finance  Aladdin  risk-management  financiers  financial_services  central_banks  money_management  information_flows  volatility  economic_downturn  liquidity  bonds  platforms  frameworks  stress-tests  monitoring  CEOs  succession  risk-analysis  leadership  order_management_system  sovereign_wealth_funds  market_intelligence  intentionality  data_mining  collective_intelligence  risk-mitigation  rules-based  risks  asset_values  scaling  scenario-planning  databases 
september 2016 by jerryking
Understanding SecDB: Goldman Sachs’s Most Valued Trading Weapon - WSJ
By JUSTIN BAER
Sept. 7, 2016

traders use the system to track how a position would have performed over the past year, how it might do in the future under different scenarios, and how the holding might alter their broader portfolio. They can also use the system to help determine a price to charge the trade’s counterparty.

But traders aren’t SecDB’s only users. The firm’s risk managers use the system to peer into positions held by a trading desk or business to determine aggregate exposures.

Every Wall Street firm has tools to run each of those functions. But SecDB’s power comes from its universal use throughout the firm, its flexibility to add new variables or new sources of information, and its ability to tap into all of Goldman’s data.
Goldman_Sachs  traders  Wall_Street  databases  counterparties  information_sources  SecDB 
september 2016 by jerryking
Goldman Sachs Has Started Giving Away Its Most Valuable Software - WSJ
By JUSTIN BAER
Sept. 7, 2016

Securities DataBase, or SecDB, the system remains Goldman’s prime tool for measuring risk and analyzing the prices of securities, and it calculates 23 billion prices across 2.8 million positions daily. It has played a crucial role in many of the seminal moments of the firm’s recent history, including its controversial trading just ahead of the financial crisis.....There is perhaps no better sign of the changes that have engulfed Wall Street than this: Goldman has recently started giving clients the tools that made it a trading powerhouse, for free.

The firm’s motives aren’t altruistic; rather, many of the edges that once made Goldman’s traders feared and admired have been blunted. New rules have limited banks’ trading risks, and made it costly to hold large inventories of stocks and bonds on their books. And electronic trading has squeezed margins, dimming the clamor of trading floors across Wall Street....Traders and executives tap into SecDB to inform how to price securities, and how the value of those assets may change with a twist on the dial on any one of thousands of potential variables. That information can be used to analyze potential trades—and then to monitor the risks posed by those positions.

What made it the envy of Wall Street, though, was its ability to scale up to include new classes of securities, new trading desks, even whole businesses. And the data it harnessed was all in one place.
Wall_Street  Goldman_Sachs  tools  traders  risk-management  informational_advantages  software  free  databases  platforms  CIOs  proprietary  slight_edge  Aladdin  Martin_Chavez  scaling  SecDB  seminal_moments  asset_values  scenario-planning  stress-tests 
september 2016 by jerryking
Why Big Ag Likes Big Data - NYTimes.com
October 2, 2013, 3:02 pm 1 Comment
Why Big Ag Likes Big Data
By QUENTIN HARDY
massive_data_sets  agriculture  agribusiness  farming  data_mining  databases  GE  Climate_Corporation  Monsanto 
october 2013 by jerryking
Advertisers zeroing in on where, as well as who, you are
Apr. 04 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Susan Krashinsky.

The typical response rate for one of these campaigns is about 1 per cent. The location-specific campaign increased that by 400 per cent on average.

“There’s been a wholesale change in the amount …of data available and the tools available to actually understand it. It’s turning that data into knowledge that is the biggest task,” Mr. Okrucky said.

In an age where we transmit data from devices in our pockets many times a day, using information such as postal code profiles, housing statistics, and demographics by district may seem like an old-fashioned marketing tactic. And it is. But the processing of that information is changing rapidly: the ability to sort through massive data sets, to cross-reference them, and create detailed targets, has accelerated.

“It really gets to the cloud computing capability. We do programs with all these data sets very quickly. And some of the data sets can be absolutely massive,” said Phil Kaszuba, vice-president and general manager at DMTI.
Susan_Krashinsky  location  location_based_services  personalization  target_marketing  CDC  flu_outbreaks  massive_data_sets  advertising  data  databases  online_behaviour  behavioural_targeting  Aimia  LBMA  DMTI  specificity  response_rates  cloud_computing 
april 2013 by jerryking
The Lease They Can Do: What the Fight Over 'Used' Music Reveals About Online Media
April 03, 2013 | Businessweek | By Paul Ford.

What is a song worth to Spotify or competitors such as Rdio? To them, a song is an entry in a very large database—and they solve the licensing problem by managing the licenses in bulk, then allowing listeners access to their libraries of music. At some level, Spotify is not a music service but a license clearinghouse that specializes in music....So far, the large music labels have been able to negotiate with streaming services, but as the streaming music players get bigger their power will increase; Spotify is apparently looking for price breaks from the major labels.

The big question now is not “whose album gets made?” but more “who gets to listen?” Not just who, but when—and who gets paid for the privilege? Oh, for the days when record stores featured bootlegs and cats. The clerks might have been snotty, but at least you didn’t have to have endless discussions about databases and doctrine. No one, anywhere, had to know how often you listened to Supertramp.

That’s another part of the puzzle. Streaming services generate a tremendous amount of data that has value of its own; sooner or later it will be used to make decisions about what gets produced....So this is not about technology. Nor is it really about music. This is about determining the optimal strategy for mass licensing of digital artifacts. Songs are the commodity but the licenses are currency....So this is the task: Figure out how to make money, reward artists enough that they continue to make new things, and pacify the labels and studios, while also creating something that doesn’t rip off, confuse, or upset the audience. If someone can do that, then why stick to movies, music, or perhaps books? New forms of media could be sold as well. Tumblr blogs, animated GIFs, casual games, and the like could all flow into such systems. Right now, when media objects are sold, it’s often as art (like the six-second Vine video called “Tits on Tits on Ikea” that artist Andrea Washko recently sold for $200). A massive marketplace in ridiculous pictures could emerge. Flickr (YHOO)could turn into a mall. Pinterest could become … Pintere$t.
clearinghouses  music  online  Rdio  Spotify  streaming  licensing  licensing_rights  downloads  musicians  music_industry  databases  digital_artifacts  artists  markets  data  music_labels  Flickr  Pinterest  music_catalogues 
april 2013 by jerryking
Big Data Broadens Its Range - WSJ.com
March 13, 2013| WSJ | By RACHAEL KING and STEVEN ROSENBUSH.

Big Data Broadens Its Range
New Wave of Software Is Helping Companies Like AutoZone Boost Their Businesses
massive_data_sets  databases 
march 2013 by jerryking
Diamonds in the Data Mine
May 2003 | HBR | By Gary Loveman.

Harrah's Entertainment has outplayed its competition and won impressive gains, despite being dealt a weak hand by the economy The secret? Mining the company's rich database to develop compelling customer incentives. in the Las Vegas Strip, and all of the neighbors are making spectacles of themselves. The $750 million Mirage boasts a Vesuvian volcano that erupts...
HBR  predictive_modeling  Las_Vegas  databases  gaming  CEOs  Harrah's  casinos  yield_management  data_mining  incentives 
january 2013 by jerryking
Trailblazers
July 1998 | Marketing Tools (American Demographics) | Arthur Middleton Hughes
early_adopters  databases 
october 2012 by jerryking
Data Definitions
Definitions of a data warehouse, database marketing, data mining software, scoring, campaign management software, customer segmentation, dynamic scoring, attrition/churn. What about unstructured data, batch data versus real-time data?
definitions  data  data_driven  databases  data_mining  attrition_rates 
july 2012 by jerryking
From Harvard Yard To Vegas Strip Article
10.07.02 | Forbes.com - Magazine | Carol Potash.

Through branding, cross-casino marketing, loyalty cards, and technology, CEO Gary Loveman has made Harrah's Entertainment, the most diversified of the big four gaming companies, a model of effective customer feedback. In an industry accustomed to relying on intuition, Harrah's has built a database of 25 million customers that drills down through all its activities. Digital profiles are based not on observed behavior of what customers have spent but on analysis of what they are capable of spending. The technology includes built-in marketing interventions designed to close the gap between actual and potential spending. In this new world of computer-generated predictions, the customers are willing participants. Harrah's may be the best example of this kind of ongoing feedback system that could be applied to theme parks, ski resorts, cruise lines, retailers, and subscription businesses such as AOL and satellite TV.
predictive_modeling  Las_Vegas  databases  theme_parks  gaming  CEOs  Harrah's  casinos  yield_management  data_mining  customer_profiling  loyalty_management  customer_feedback  variance_analysis  leisure  branding  Gary_Loveman  marketing  observations 
july 2012 by jerryking
A Mindset, Not a Technology | Folio: The Magazine for Magazine Management | Find Articles
Dec 15, 1999 | Folio: The Magazine for Magazine Management | Tony Silber.

But technology improvements only enable. They're a means, not the end. The real commitment has to be a companywide understanding of how valuable a fully developed database marketing operation is--especially for magazine publishers, who, because of their lists, already have a rather sophisticated picture of their customers. Database marketing--data mining, data warehousing, one-to-one marketing, whatever you want to call it--is really a mindset, an approach, a framework for doing business. And it remains, to me at least, unclear how many publishing companies are really maximizing the inherent, but often latent, value of their databases. That's why we decided to do this issue.
data  data_driven  databases  marketing  frameworks  Condé_Nast  mindsets  latent  companywide 
july 2012 by jerryking
Be Data Literate -- Know What to Know - WSJ.com
November 15, 2005 | WSJ |By PETER F. DRUCKER. (This article originally appeared in The Wall Street Journal on Dec. 3, 1992).

Few executives yet know how to ask: What information do I need to do my job? When do I need it? In what form? And from whom should I be getting it? Fewer still ask: What new tasks can I tackle now that I get all these data? Which old tasks should I abandon? Which tasks should I do differently? Practically no one asks: What information do I owe? To whom? When? In what form?...A "database," no matter how copious, is not information. It is information's ore. For raw material to become information, it must be organized for a task, directed toward specific performance, applied to a decision. Raw material cannot do that itself. Nor can information specialists. They can cajole their customers, the data users. They can advise, demonstrate, teach. But they can no more manage data for users than a personnel department can take over the management of the people who work with an executive.

Information specialists are toolmakers. The data users, whether executive or professional, have to decide what information to use, what to use it for and how to use it. They have to make themselves information-literate. This is the first challenge facing information users now that executives have become computer-literate.

But the organization also has to become information-literate. It also needs to learn to ask: What information do we need in this company? When do we need it? In what form? And where do we get it?
CFOs  CIOs  critical_thinking  data  databases  data_driven  decision_making  digital_savvy  incisiveness  information-literate  information-savvy  insights  interpretative  managerial_preferences  metacognition  organizing_data  Peter_Drucker  questions 
may 2012 by jerryking
Database Maker Tries 'Action' Apps - WSJ.com
Sept. 22. 2011 WSJ By DON CLARK.

Ingres Corp., a maker of database software, is changing its name and
shifting directions sharply to kick sales growth into a higher gear.

The company is looking to address longstanding gripes that so-called
business-intelligence software—programs used by companies that take
snapshots of business information, such as regional sales data, to help
users identify key trends—is too difficult to use. Ingres wants to
create products that behave more like the consumer-oriented apps found
on smartphones, which can take action in response to changes in business
information.

To reflect its new offerings, the Silicon Valley company is changing its
name to Actian Corp.
Ingres  decision_making  business_intelligence  databases  mobile_applications 
september 2011 by jerryking
World Bank Is Opening Its Treasure Chest of Data
July 2, 2011 | NYT|By STEPHANIE STROM. The World Bank’s
traditional role has been to finance specific projects that foster eco.
dvlpmnt,...it might come as a surprise that its president , Robert
Zoellick, argues that the most valuable currency of the WB isn’t its $—
it is its information. ...For > a yr, the WB has been releasing its
prized data sets, currently giving public access to more than 7,000 that
were previously available only to some 140,000 subscribers — mostly
govts & researchers, who paid for access. ...Those data sets contain
all sorts of info. about the developing world, whether workaday
economic stats — GDP, CPI & the like — or arcana like the # of women
are breast-feeding their children in rural Peru.

It is a trove unlike anything else in the world, and, it turns out,
highly valuable. For whatever its accuracy or biases, this data defines
the economic reality of billions of people and is used in making
policies & decisions that enormously impact their lives.
World_Bank  information_flows  data  databases  massive_data_sets  transparency  open_source  Robert_Zoellick  crowdsourcing  mashups  datasets  decision_making  policymaking  developing_countries 
july 2011 by jerryking
Data-as-a-Service: Factual, InfoChimps & Google Squared
Oct. 20, 2010, By Imran Ali . Do you have unique datasets in
your biz. that could be valuable to others?...dB apps have been
curiously absent from the mix of web worker productivity tools...a new
generation of tools are providing this functionality. DaaS providers are
emerging enabling users to create, manage & publish specialized
datasets, providing both authoring tools & opportunities to
participate in a web of data, not just of pgs...Factual bills itself as
an “open data repository” where users can upload & create datasets,
as well as add data hosted by Factual to their own sites &
apps...InfoChimps positions itself as a “data mktplace” enabling
publishers & owners of datasets to charge for their usage.
Publishers can offer free & paid datasets, charging either for API
access or for making them downloadable. Some datasets are organized into
collections from particular organizations,e.g. Wikipedia & Data.gov
==> InfoChimps allows orgs. to outsource mgmt. of their open data
policies.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
What's an example of a company creating a valuable dataset from scratch?
DaaS  Infochimps  Factual  data  Google_Squared  Freshbooks  massive_data_sets  databases  data_scientists  commercialization 
july 2011 by jerryking
Big Thoughts on Big Data: Infochimps
Mar. 2, 2011, | Gigaom -- Cloud Computing News | By Stacey Higginbotham
data  massive_data_sets  Infochimps  DaaS  databases  Freshbooks  data_scientists 
july 2011 by jerryking
Scraping, cleaning, and selling big data
11 May 2011 | O'Reilly Radar | by Audrey Watters.
What are some of the challenges of acquiring data through scraping?
Flip Kromer: There are several problems with the scale and the metadata,
as well as historical complications.

Scale — It's obvious that terabytes of data will cause problems, but
so (on most filesystems) will having tens of millions of files in the
same directory tree.
Metadata — It's a chicken-and-egg problem. Since few programs can
draw on rich metadata, it's not much use annotating it. But since so few
datasets are annotated, it's not worth writing support into your
applications. We have an internal data-description language that we plan
to open source as it matures.
Historical complications — Statisticians like SPSS files. Semantic
web advocates like RDF/XML. Wall Street quants like Mathematica exports.
There is no One True Format. Lifting each out of its source domain is
time consuming.
massive_data_sets  data  analytics  data_mining  databases  digital_economy  chicken-and-egg  data_quality  metadata 
may 2011 by jerryking
Austin's affordable hardware helps its shopkeepers take on Manhattan
28-Sep-2005 | Financial Times | By Dan Roberts. Online article title "Austin's affordable hardware helps it take on New York".
affordability  Austin  Texas  Whole_Foods  cheap_revolution  traceability  tracking  small_business  start_ups  databases 
october 2009 by jerryking
FT.com / Companies / Technology - Make sense of the in-house data mountain
November 22, 2006 | Financial Times | By Tom Braithwaite. With
swaths of unstructured data lying in corporate servers, whether in the
form of e-mails, PowerPoint presentations or TV images, companies are
increasingly seeking the means to sift through the in-house information
mountain.
search  in-house  databases  information_overload  haystacks  massive_data_sets  data_mining  unstructured_data  sense-making 
june 2009 by jerryking

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