jerryking + culture   76

Opinion | What Does It Mean to ‘Look Like Me’?
Sept. 21, 2019 | The New York Times | By Kwame Anthony Appiah. Mr. Appiah is a philosopher.

Minorities can find it gratifying to see people who resemble them on-screen. But resemblance is a tricky thing........It’s a formula that we turn to again and again to affirm the value of inclusion, especially in the realm of popular culture: the importance of people who “look like me.”......The “look like me” formula appeals because it feels so simple and literal. We can think of a black or Asian toddler who gets to play with dolls that share her racial characteristics, in an era when Barbie, blessedly, is no longer exclusively white. The emotions it speaks to are real, and urgent. And yet the celebratory formula is trailed by jangling paradoxes, like tin cans tied to a newlywed’s car.......For one thing, nobody means it literally. Asians don’t imagine that all Asians look alike; blacks don’t think all blacks look alike.....What the visual metaphor usually signifies, then, is a kinship of social identity. ....the complexities don’t end there. When it comes to representation, two cultural conversations are happening at the same time. One is about “speaking our truths” — about exploring in-group cultural commonalities......e.g. the cultural conversation put on by comedians whose jokes you “get” — the in-group references that resonate with you, that trigger a knowing “nailed it!” smile......That’s one way of “looking like me.”.......What films like Crazy Rich Asians and Black Panther deliver is a way of “looking like me” that’s as much about aspiration as identification. We say that their characters look like us; maybe what we mean is that we wish to look like them.....What these fantasies ask is, Who gets to tell you what you look like? It’s not a representation of identity so much as it is a renegotiation of it.......How identity relates to identification is, of course, a complicated matter.........The truth is that our best stories and songs often gain potency by complicating our received notions of identity; they’re less a mirror than a canvas — and everyone has a brush. It takes nothing away from the thrill of feeling represented, then, to point out what the most ambitious forms of art and entertainment are always telling us: Don’t be so sure what you look like.
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How did children develop self-worth and an identity before movies and tv? People have to stop looking to mass and social media for self-esteem.
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The trouble is that racial and ethnic iconography, including color, eye shape, nose length etc . govern our responses to people the second we see them.
cultural_appropriation  cultural_conversations  culture  emotional_connections  identity_politics  inclusiveness  Kwame_Appiah  paradoxes  popular_culture  representation  self-identification  self-worth  visible_minorities  visual_cues 
22 days ago by jerryking
The biggest gender divide is in mathematics
September 5, 2019 | | Financial Times| by Carola Hoyos.

Numeracy is vital for everyone. But according to Alain Dehaze, chief executive of Adecco, the world’s biggest recruiting company, the most valuable mathematical skills in a more automated future, especially for those people who can also communicate them to generalists, are the ability to spot patterns; to problem solve logically; and to work with statistics, probability and large data sets to see into the future.
biases  culture  gender_gap  girls  high_schools  mathematics  numeracy  parenting  women 
5 weeks ago by jerryking
Opinion | The Dominance of the White Male Critic
July 5, 2019 | The New York Times |By Elizabeth Méndez Berry and Chi-hui Yang. Ms. Méndez Berry and Mr. Yang started a program to amplify the work of critics of color.
aesthetics  art  artists  art_reviews  blind_spots  criticism  culture  cultural_criticism  cultural_interpretation  curation  engaged_citizenry  opinions  opinion_makers  TIFF  white-saviors  white_men 
july 2019 by jerryking
The Arts in the 90s –
May 28, 2008 | Stabroek News | By Barrington Braithwaite.
'90s  art  art_galleries  artists  creative_class  culture  dance  drama  Guyana  Guyanese  history  nostalgia  playwrights 
may 2019 by jerryking
What It’s Like to Be a Black Man in Japan
March 9, 2019 | The New York Times |By Adeel Hassan.

diverse blackness is in Japan was limited. Through the column, I’ve learned of black lawyers, university presidents, stuntmen, filmmakers, J-pop idols, entrepreneurs galore, even true expats with political aspirations. This had the impact on me that I was hoping it would have on our Japanese hosts.

Second, I learned how writing is a form of activism. I never intended to be an activist but it’s inevitable that if you take on issues with passion and persuasiveness that will lend itself to activism. By virtue of your prominence, people will look to you for leadership. It’s a hell of a responsibility and has placed me and my work in the cross hairs of some unsavory elements over here, some of whom labeled me and any black person with a similar “can’t sit silent and still and accept the nonsense” mentality as dangers to Japan.
African-Americans  blackness  culture  expatriates  Japan  race 
march 2019 by jerryking
I covered the City for 20 years — here’s what I learnt
March 8, 2019 | Financial Times | by Sarah Gordon |

Sarah Gordon says businesses must do more to improve their image and dispel widespread misconceptions
culture  farewells  finance  financial_journalism  leadership  lessons_learned  noughties  women 
march 2019 by jerryking
10,000 Hours with Reid Hoffman: What I Learned | Ben Casnocha
16 Lessons Learned (Among Many!)
1. People are complicated and flawed. Root for their better angels.
2. The best way to get a busy person’s attention: Help them.
3. Keep it simple and move fast w...
lessons_learned  advice  entrepreneurship  culture  psychology  productivity  self-deception  self-delusions  success  thought_experiments  networking  career  via:enochko  Reid_Hoffman  Ben_Casnocha  from notes
august 2018 by jerryking
When Did You First Feel Old? - WSJ
By Clare Ansberry
Oct. 2, 2017

It can hit us at any age; just feeling young at key turning points helps us live longer and happier lives

Awareness of age isn’t necessarily a bad thing.....Appreciating that time isn’t endless
helps set priorities.
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Aging is social, we old people have to help young people understand the process.
aging  grace  culture  turning_points  longevity  happiness 
october 2017 by jerryking
Sundar Pichai Should Resign as Google’s C.E.O. - The New York Times
David Brooks AUG. 11, 2017
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Google  censorship  culture  David_Brooks  CEOs  firings  Sundar_Pichai 
august 2017 by jerryking
In Defense of Cultural Appropriation - The New York Times
Kenan Malik JUNE 14, 2017

What is cultural appropriation, and why is it so controversial? Susan Scafidi, a law professor at Fordham University, defines it as “taking intellectual property, traditional knowledge, cultural expressions, or artifacts from someone else’s culture without permission.” This can include the “unauthorized use of another culture’s dance, dress, music, language, folklore, cuisine, traditional medicine, religious symbols, etc.”

Appropriation suggests theft, and a process analogous to the seizure of land or artifacts. In the case of culture, however, what is called appropriation is not theft but messy interaction. Writers and artists necessarily engage with the experiences of others. Nobody owns a culture, but everyone inhabits one, and in inhabiting a culture, one finds the tools for reaching out to other cultures.

Critics of cultural appropriation insist that they are opposed not to cultural engagement, but to racism. They want to protect marginalized cultures and ensure that such cultures speak for themselves, not simply be seen through the eyes of more privileged groups
appreciation  culture  cultural_appropriation 
june 2017 by jerryking
30 things about art and life, as explained by Charles Saatchi
He rarely gives interviews, but a new book offers an intriguing insight into what drives the enigmatic collector's passion for art
You've been successful at discovering new artistic talent. But are there not always great artists who go undiscovered?
By and large, talent is in such short supply that mediocrity can be taken for brilliance rather more than genius can go undiscovered.
You have been described both as a "super-collector" and as "the most successful art dealer of our times". Looking back on the past 20 years, how would you characterise your activities?
Who cares what I'm described as? Art collectors are pretty insignificant in the scheme of things. What matters and survives is the art. I buy art that I like. I buy it to show it off in exhibitions. Then, if I feel like it, I sell it and buy more art. As I have been doing this for 30 years, I think most people in the art world get the idea by now. It doesn't mean I've changed my mind about the art that I end up selling. It just means that I don't want to hoard everything for ever.
Your practice of buying emerging artists' work has proved highly contagious and is arguably the single greatest influence on the current market because so many others, both veteran collectors and new investors, are following your lead, vying to snap up the work of young, relatively unknown artists. Do you accept that you are responsible for much of the speculative nature of the contemporary art market?
I hope so. Artists need a lot of collectors, all kinds of collectors, buying their art.
Do you think you have messed up anybody's life by flogging off all their work?
I don't buy art just to make artists happy any more than I want to make them sad if I sell their work. Don't you think you're being a bit melodramatic?
Before you went into advertising, what other career did you consider?
"Consider" isn't quite how it was. At 17 and with two O-levels to show after a couple of attempts, a career path wasn't realistic, nor a chat with the Christ's College careers officer, who wouldn't have recognised me in any event as my absenteeism record was unrivalled. I answered a situations vacant ad in the Evening Standard for a voucher clerk, pay £10 weekly. It was in a tiny advertising agency in Covent Garden, and a voucher clerk had to traipse round all the local newspaper offices in Fleet Street – of which there were hundreds at the time – and pick up back copies of papers in which the agency's clients had an advert appearing. The voucher clerk's role was to get the newspaper, find the ad, stick a sticker on it so the client could verify its appearance, and the agency could get paid. Vital work, obviously. One of the advantages of it being a tiny agency was that one day they got desperate when their creative department (one young man) was off sick, and they asked me if I could try and make up an ad for one of their clients, Thornber Chicks. This ad was to appear in Farmer and Stock-Breeder magazine, and hoped to persuade farmers to choose Thornbers, as their chicks would grow to provide many cheap, superior quality eggs and a fine return. I didn't know how you wrote an ad, or indeed how to write anything much other than "I will not be late for assembly", for which I had been provided much practice. So I looked through copies of Farmer and Stock-Breeder and Poultry World, chose some inspiring-sounding words and phrases, cobbled them together, stuck on a headline – I think I stole it from an old American advertisement – and produced "Ask the man who owns them" as a testimonial campaign featuring beaming Thornber farmers. The client bought it.
Does a love of art, particularly Renaissance art on a biblical theme, make one feel closer to God?
I believe God must be very disappointed in his handiwork. Mankind has clearly failed to evolve much in all these years; we're still as cretinous and barbaric as we were many centuries ago, and poor God must spend all day shaking his head at our vileness and general ineptitude. Or perhaps, we might just give him a good laugh. But of course, I hope God likes our art enough to forgive us our sins, particularly mine.
I like the new gallery but hated your gallery in County Hall. What were you thinking!
I was stupid, stupid, stupid. I got bored with knowing my first gallery in Boundary Road too well, so well in fact that I could hang my shows to the centimetre while sitting on a deckchair in Margate. Plus, I wanted to introduce new art to as wide a public as possible, and I went for somewhere with a much bigger footfall on the South Bank next to the London Eye. So I gave up the airy lightness of Boundary Road for small oak-panelled rooms, and nobody liked it. I saw it as a challenge, but one which I clearly wasn't up to.
Which artists do you display in your own home? Are you constantly changing the works you have there? Is there a core of favourites which stay there?
My house is a mess, but any day now we'll get round to hanging some of the stacks of pictures sitting on the floor.
Who are the artists you are most pleased with discovering?
Over the years I have been very lucky to see some great artists' work just at the start of their careers, so that I could feel "pleased with discovering" them. However, I have also "discovered" countless artists who nobody but me seemed to care much for and whose careers have progressed very slowly, if at all. So I certainly don't have an infallible gift for spotting winners. I think it's fair to say that I bought Cindy Sherman in her first exhibition in a group show, with some of her black-and-white film stills framed together in those days as a collage of 10 images, and went on to buy much of her work for the next few years. I bought most of the work from Jeff Koons's first exhibition in a small and now-defunct artist-run gallery in New York's East Village, which included the basketballs floating in glass aquariums and the Hoovers and other appliances in fluorescent-lit vitrines. But this is getting too self-congratulatory and the truth is I miss out on just as many good artists as I home in on.
Are paintings a better investment than sharks in formaldehyde? The Hirst shark looks much more shrivelled now than it used to, but a Peter Doig canvas will still look great in 10 years and will be much easier to restore.
There are no rules about investment. Sharks can be good. Artists' dung can be good. Oil on canvas can be good. There's a squad of conservators out there to look after anything an artist decides is art.
Why do overseas museums have better collections of Britart than the Tate?
Because the Tate curators didn't know what they were looking at during the early 1990s, when even the piddliest budget would have bought you many great works. But I'm no better. I regularly find myself waking up to art I passed by or simply ignored.
Looking ahead, in 100 years' time, how do you think British art of the early 21st century will be regarded? Who are the great artists who will pass the test of time?
General art books dated 2105 will be as brutal about editing the late 20th century as they are about almost all other centuries. Every artist other than Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol, Donald Judd and Damien Hirst will be a footnote.
If you were commissioning your own portrait, in which medium would you choose to be represented?
I'd rather eat the canvas than have someone paint me on it.
What is it like being married to a domestic goddess?
She's too good for me, I know, but she knows it too and reminds me every day.
Do you ever do the cooking?
I can do eggs. And cornflakes.
Do you encourage your children to look at your art and go to museums and galleries?
My children think it's very uncool to have anything to do with my gallery. But they quite like the gallery shop.
What advice do you and your wife give your children?
Nigella's mum gave her an invaluable insight into nice behaviour. According to Nigella her advice went something like this: "It is better to be charmed than to charm." By this she meant that what makes people feel good about themselves is feeling as if they have been charming, interesting; in short, have been listened to. For her, the notion that one should oneself be riveting or aim to be quite the most fascinating person in the room was a vulgarity and just sheer, misplaced vanity. Trying to be charming is self-indulgent; allowing oneself to be charmed is simply good manners.
Should the country be spending money on saving old masters for the nation, or buying up works by the next generation of artists?
At the risk of being lynched – again – by the art crowd, I don't think there is a great need any more to save paintings for the nation at the cost of supporting new art. What difference does it make if a Titian is hanging in the National Gallery, the Louvre or the Uffizi? This isn't the 18th century: people travel, so there's no need to be nationalistic about the world's art treasures. Much more important is to back living artists.
What is your favourite museum in the world?
The Prado in Madrid. I have a weakness for Goya, but the museum itself is so unfussy, and clearly loves to display its many masterpieces as unshowily as possible, each visit reinforces my belief in the enduring importance of art.
I know very little about contemporary art but have £1,000 to invest. Any advice?
Premium bonds. Art is no investment unless you get very, very lucky, and can beat the professionals at their game. Just buy something you really like that will give you a thousand pounds' worth of pleasure over the years. And take your time looking for something really special, because looking is half the fun.
What is your proudest achievement?
I don't do pride. That's not to say I don't have an ego the size of an aircraft hangar, but I'm not even very proud of that.
How much money have you lost in the recession?
I daren't look.
Aren't those dot paintings [by Damien Hirst] just like wallpaper?
You may as well say that Rothko paintings look like nice rugs. There's no crime in art being decorative.
With Mark … [more]
art  collectors  Saatchi_gallery  Reality_TV  Art_and_design  Culture  Media  The_Observer  Features  via:millersashley  art_market 
november 2016 by jerryking
Exit the Dragon? Kung Fu, Once Central to Hong Kong Life, Is Waning - The New York Times
By CHARLOTTE YANGAUG. 22, 2016
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Bruce_Lee  Hong_Kong  martial_arts  '70s  culture  films  movies  actors 
august 2016 by jerryking
Pillars of Black Media, Once Vibrant, Now Fighting for Survival - The New York Times
JULY 2, 2016 | NYT | By SYDNEY EMBER and NICHOLAS FANDOS.

As racial issues have once again become a prominent topic in the national conversation, the influence of black-owned media companies on black culture is diminishing.

“Ebony used to be the only thing black folks had and read,” Ms. Spann-Cooper said. “As we became more integrated into society, we had other options.”

Continue reading the main story
To that end, Time Inc. now owns the magazine Essence and Viacom owns Black Entertainment Television. The Oprah Winfrey Network, a partnership between Ms. Winfrey and Discovery Communications, has been around since 2011. The Undefeated, ESPN’s site covering the intersection of race and sports, debuted in May. The emergence of Black Twitter has also given African-Americans a powerful voice on social media.

Johnson Publishing stressed that the Clear View Group, the private equity firm that bought Jet and Ebony, was an African-American-led company and positioned the sale more as a partnership. “...Traditional media companies have struggled for years to adapt to a digital world, but the pressure on black-owned media has been even more acute. Many are smaller and lack the financial resources to compete in an increasingly consolidated media landscape. Advertisers have turned away from black-oriented media, owners say, under the belief that they can now reach minorities in other ways.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
See my Pinboard reference to [Carol Williams' concern] that agencies catering to multicultural audiences employ mass marketing strategies that look to target such consumers simply by casting minorities in ads, or making assumptions based on social media data.

“It becomes an issue of, ‘If they see themselves in a commercial, they’ll buy the product,’ rather than it being about the messaging and how that messaging is delivered to them,” she said.

Some companies are also using digital technology to “withdraw what they perceive as insights out of these communities,” she added, instead of “developing research techniques to really get to know this culture.”
African-Americans  owners  digital_media  mass_media  FCC  broadcasting  publishing  consolidation  television  culture  magazines  radio  black-owned  Carol_Williams  Essence  Ebony  print_journalism 
july 2016 by jerryking
Violently Wrought, Kaitlyn Greenidge interviews Marlon James - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics
Kaitlyn Greenidge interviews Marlon James
November 3, 2014

Guernica: When you are inside the big book, how do you map out structure?

Marlon James: I have note sheets. I use Moleskine notebooks. I’m analog like that. I have a plot chart. I have different columns for the character, rows with different times of day, because even though it’s a big book, each chapter takes place basically in a day. So I need to know where Nina Burgess is at nine o’clock, and where she’ll be at ten. It allows me to be spontaneous. It’s sort of like how knowing prosody really liberates a poet.

If you know you have a backbone, you can bend and contort. That’s what allowed a lot of the freedom in the book. Because half of that stuff in that chart I didn’t follow. Because characters become real and they don’t take crap from you. But also because I always knew where the return line was. You can always go so far out on a limb and know you have to come back to this point. Plot charts and diagramming also stopped me from playing favorites. Because everybody had to get equal time.
Marlon_James  writers  Caribbean  culture  violence  fiction  books  Jamaica  '70s  profile  authors  teachers  Bob_Marley  writing  analog  spontaneity  Moleskine  plot_charts  diagramming  Man_Booker  prizes 
january 2016 by jerryking
The Ongoing Economic Exploitation of Black Music | Dr. Lisa Tomlinson
Cultural Critic and Language Specialist
Email
The Ongoing Economic Exploitation of Black Music
Posted: 01/08/2016
African-Americans  Caribbean  culture  cultural_appropriation  cultural_criticism  exploitation  music_industry  music 
january 2016 by jerryking
Renaissance man Joseph Rotman was a patron of education - The Globe and Mail
JANET MCFARLAND
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jan. 27 2015

He and his wife, the former Sandra Frieberg, whom he married in 1959 and with whom he had two children, have long been known for their support for Canadian culture and arts.
Rotman  obituaries  UWO  philanthropy  institution-building  moguls  tributes  benefactors  uToronto  culture  cultural_institutions  patronage  education  Colleges_&_Universities  renaissance  Renaissance_man 
january 2015 by jerryking
Toronto the good time – who knew? - The Globe and Mail
LYSIANE GAGNON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, May. 21 2014
Toronto  Montreal  culture  cultural_institutions  things_to_do 
may 2014 by jerryking
As Iceland shows, the arts can be a valuable business asset for Canada - The Globe and Mail
TODD HIRSCH
As Iceland shows, the arts can be a valuable business asset for Canada Add to ...
Subscribers Only

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Mar. 27 2014
Todd_Hirsch  Iceland  art  artists  culture  arts  cultural_institutions  creativity  prosperity  creative_class  funding  fine_arts 
march 2014 by jerryking
One final ignominy for a pioneer of abstract art
Sep. 26 2013 | - The Globe and Mail | RUSSELL SMITH

We Canadians shouldn’t be shocked – we ourselves have little concept of placing historical markers of cultural grandeur in our cities. We don’t name our streets after our artists, even when a great artist lived there. We don’t even put up plaques on their former houses. Our municipal governments have no interest in turning our dull concrete grids into a series of references to fantasy – as the streets of Paris and London, for example, are; there, you can walk and meet ghosts of both authors and fictional characters; not only can you see who died of consumption in a garret upstairs, but also whose character did. These plaques lay a fictional city over a real one. (Oh well, you might say, Canada is not famous for its art anyway. And I would say, yes, and this is why.)
Russell_Smith  art  Russia  ideacity  culture  history  overlay_networks  fantasy  wayfinding  artists  cities  virtual_worlds  cityscapes  iconic  street_furniture  landmarks  metaphysical  London  Paris  imagination 
september 2013 by jerryking
The art of leadership
November 17-18, 2012 | Financial Times pg. 22--Culture | by Peter Aspden.

The arts have the power to build social integration and point to a higher purpose for humanity.

1. Boldness
2. Suppleness
3. Democracy
4. A sense of mission
5. Imagination.
leadership  culture  United_Kingdom  museums  leaders  cultural_institutions  talent  arts  value_propositions  mission-driven  social_integration 
february 2013 by jerryking
Canada must refuel for cultural creativity - The Globe and Mail
EDGAR COWAN, JOHN HOBDAY and IAN WILSON

The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Sep. 04 2012,

culture has since been relegated to “niche” status under successive governments, and the cultural sector as a whole has been relegated to the periphery of policy-making.

Now, as we face the challenges of a highly competitive global digital economy, Canada’s under-capitalized but lively and diverse cultural and creative resources could become important strategic innovation assets....Last October, Innovation Canada: A Call To Action, an influential report prepared under the chairmanship of OpenText’s Tom Jenkins, emphasized the centrality of innovation as “the ultimate source of the long-term competitiveness of businesses and the quality of life of Canadians.”

The mobile digital technology explosion has already transformed many aspects of our daily lives. It has dramatically changed our workplaces. Old business models and habits are being challenged, new forms of expression are emerging and our children, the digital natives, are functioning in new ways.

It has radically altered how we communicate with family and friends, and how we relate to our cultural assets: how we listen to music; how we create and read books; how we distribute and view films; how we find information; even how we experience theatre, opera and ballet.

In order to surf this digital tsunami, we need to understand the broad role of the creative sector in the innovation agenda, and consider how we manage the changes, challenges and opportunities that will be beneficial to us as Canadians....Canada needs a new innovative economic “road map,” firmly linking dynamic creative and cultural sectors with open and welcoming business and technology sectors. This collaboration is essential to our achieving the Canada we want to be. Our innovative arts, culture and heritage sector already generates more than $46-billion for the Canadian economy and employs more than 600,000 people. These figures alone suggest that governments and the business community should recognize the potential of this sector to be mobilized and to play an evolving role in pointing the way to a successful innovation strategy.

Canadians should be made more aware that there is a much broader creative constituency than just those in the traditional visual and performing arts. Creativity is nurtured within many professional sectors: architects, graphic artists, fashion and industrial designers, video game creators, journalists, broadcasters, research scientists of all kinds, health-care professionals, academics, teachers – and many others – particularly among those involved in our dynamic digital technology sector.

One can only begin to imagine the incredible economic benefits for Canada from a “coalition of creators,” encouraging the nimble minds from the vital cultural sector to collaborate with other creative design sectors, and the burgeoning digital technology sector
culture  digital_economy  collaboration  cross-pollination  Canada  creative_renewal  cross-disciplinary  creative_class  creativity  innovation  competitveness  roadmaps  arts  constituencies  cultural_creativity 
september 2012 by jerryking
Fear of a Black President
September 2012 | - The Atlantic | By Ta-Nehisi Coates
race  politics  culture  Obama  Ta-Nehisi_Coates 
august 2012 by jerryking
What Else Is New?
May 14, 2007 | The New Yorker by Steven Shapin.
books  culture  history  innovation  technology 
april 2012 by jerryking
The business case for beautiful libraries - The Globe and Mail
LISA ROCHON | Columnist profile | E-mail
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 10, 2012
culture  libraries  planning  case_studies  Lisa_Rochon  architecture 
february 2012 by jerryking
Crippled by Their Culture
Thomas Sowell: Crippled by Their Culture
THE GAP

Race doesn't hold back America's "black rednecks." Nor does racism.

The Wall Street Journal
Tuesday, April 26, 2005
Thomas_Sowell  culture  African-Americans  race  rednecks  the_South  authenticity  cultural_values 
november 2011 by jerryking
English Historian Blames Black Culture for Riots - NYTimes.com
August 13, 2011, 2:05 pm
English Historian Blames Black Culture for Riots
By ROBERT MACKEY
United_Kingdom  riots  hip_hop  culture  Afro-Caribbeans 
august 2011 by jerryking
A Paler Shade of White
October 22, 2007 | The New Yorker| by Sasha Frere-Jones
indie  music  blues  soul  music_industry  race  culture  racism  business  hip_hop 
august 2011 by jerryking
Eric Fischl’s ‘America - Now and Here’ Project - NYTimes.com
By RANDY KENNEDY
Published: March 30, 2011
Trucks transport 70 percent of the freight in the United States,
according to the Department of Transportation. After years of rumors
about a Great American Art Trip in the works, the painter Eric Fischl
has announced a privately financed program in which a truck-based roving
museum and performance space will tour the country for two years to
address what he sees as an identity crisis in American culture.
trucking  museums  theatre  culture 
march 2011 by jerryking
black like them
April 29, 1996 | gladwell dot com | Malcolm Gladwell
Malcolm_Gladwell  African-Americans  Caribbean  migrants  culture  attitudes  immigrants 
march 2011 by jerryking
Reading and the Web - Texts Without Context - NYTimes.com
March 17, 2010 | New York Times | By MICHIKO KAKUTANI. ..."the
contentious issues of copyright, intellectual property and plagiarism
that have become prominent in a world in which the Internet makes
copying and recycling [simple]..." "the [Web], is encouraging “authors,
journalists, musicians and artists” to “treat the fruits of their
intellects and imaginations as fragments to be given without pay to the
hive mind.” "online collectivism, social networking and popular software
designs are changing the way people think and process information, a
question of what becomes of originality and imagination in a world that
prizes “metaness” and regards the mash-up as “more important than the
sources who were mashed.”"
culture  media  reading  social_media  trends  mashups  intellectual_property  plagiarism  copyright 
march 2010 by jerryking
The Culture of Today’s Changing World
May/June 2009 | Departures | By Joshua Cooper Ramo. From
Hezbollah in Beirut to a investment fund in Beijing, we’re living in an
age of unthinkable change and surprise. "In a world of constant newness
in science, technology, and media, there’s no reason to think politics
and economics should be immune to change any more than the way we search
for information is. If we truly want to develop a sense of the unstable
geography at this moment and master the suddenly essential language of
surprise and hope and danger, our only chance is to get out of the house
(or the bunker) and start looking for signs of the new. Travel,
tourism, and culture instantly become more than hobbies or distractions;
they are transformed into our best hope of understanding. Because while
we are now indisputably living in the age of the unthinkable, it
doesn’t mean we’re living in the age of the unexplainable."
Joshua_Cooper_Ramo  globalization  dangers  politicaleconomy  instability  unpredictability  travel  tourism  culture  surprises  constant_change  sense-making  unthinkable 
january 2010 by jerryking
Internal Constraints
October 2001 | Reason Magazine |Q & A with John McWhorter by Cathy Young and Michael W. Lynch.
John_McWhorter  African-Americans  racism  culture 
january 2010 by jerryking
The Protocol Society
Dec. 22, 2009 | NYT | By DAVID BROOKS. A protocol economy has
very different properties than a physical stuff economy. The success
of an economy depends on its ability to invent and embrace new
protocols, its' “adaptive efficiency,” -- how quickly a society can be
infected by new ideas. Protocols are intangible, so the traits needed to
invent and absorb them are intangible, too. First, a nation has to have
a good operating system: laws, regulations and property rights. Second,
a nation has to have a good economic culture: attitudes toward
uncertainty, the willingness to exert leadership, the willingness to
follow orders. A strong economy needs daring consumers (China lacks
this) and young researchers with money to play with (N.I.H. grants used
to go to 35-year-olds but now they go to 50-year-olds). See “From
Poverty to Prosperity,” by Arnold Kling and Nick Schulz and Richard
Ogle’s 2007 book, “Smart World,” When the economy is about ideas,
economics comes to resemble psychology.
David_Brooks  innovation  books  culture  adaptability  ideaviruses  risk-taking  R&D  N.I.H.  property_rights  regulations  rule_of_law  institutional_integrity  services  digital_economy  rules-based  intellectual_property  demand-driven  psychology  customer-driven  intangibles  behavioural_economics  protocols  poverty  prosperity 
december 2009 by jerryking
"The Hidden River of Knowledge"
May 21, 2007 | New York Times | Commencement address by David Brooks.

In short, things are about to change big time. And one of my messages today is that you know that uncertainty you feel today? It never goes away. The question is, do you know how to make uncertainty your friend?....here's one other thing I've noticed that separates the really great people from the merely famous ones. They talk to dead people.

Merely famous people have pictures of themselves on the wall. Really great people have pictures of dead people on the wall, and on their desks. It's one of the first things I look for when I go into somebody's office...And they talk about these dead people....
The dead were alive to them, and looking over their shoulder....The Greeks used to say we suffer our way to wisdom...Success is not something that we do or that happens to us. Success is something that happens through us....We inherit, starting even before we are born, a great river of knowledge, a great flow from many ages and many sources. The information that comes from millions of years ago, we call brain chemistry. The information that comes from hundreds of thousands of years ago from our hunter and gatherer ancestors we call genes. The information that was handed down thousands of years ago we call religion. The information passed along hundreds of years ago we call culture. The information passed along from decades ago we call family. The information you absorbed over the past few years at Wake Forest we call education....We exist as creatures within this hidden river of knowledge the way a trout exists in a stream or a river. We are formed by the river. It is the medium in which we live and the guide about how to live.

The great people I've seen talking to the dead do so because they want to connect with the highest and most inspiring parts of the river. When people make mistakes, often it is not because they are evil. It's because they don't have an ideal to live up to.

These great people also talk to the dead because they want a voice from outside their selves....the best people I've met don't feel that smart or that special. They have powerful jobs, but they don't feel powerful. They don't feel like architects building these great projects from scratch. They feel instead like river boat captains negotiating the currents around them.

They want to step outside their egotism and understand the river of events. They want to feel how people in the past have negotiated its channels. They want other voices in their heads so they can possess the ultimate power, which is the power of facing unpleasant truths.

Finally, I think they talk to the dead because they want to widen their time horizons....Think hard about who you marry. It's the most important decision you will ever make. Devote yourself to your kids. Nothing else is guaranteed to make you happy. The only thing I'd add is, create a posse of dead people. Create an entourage of heroes. Put their pictures on your wall, and keep them in your mind.

They will remind you of your place in the hidden river of wisdom. They'll serve as models. They'll give you an honest perspective on how you're doing. They'll remind you that your blessings don't come from you but from those who came before you.
advice  affirmations  ancestry  blog  brain_chemistry  career  cognitive_skills  commencement  culture  cultural_transmission  David_Brooks  education  family  genes  Greek  hidden  happiness  heroes  humility  hunter-gatherers  ideas  inspiration  Managing_Your_Career  marriage  perspectives  role_models  sense_of_proportion  speeches  success  suffering  the_counsel_of_the_dead  transcendental  uncertainty  Wake_Forest  wide-framing  wisdom 
november 2009 by jerryking
How to stimulate creativity
June 15, 2009 | Knowledge @ INSEAD | by Karen Cho
creativity  change  culture  global  howto  Toronto 
july 2009 by jerryking
Where Have All the Muses Gone? - WSJ.com
MAY 16, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by LEE SIEGEL
artists  inspiration  culture 
may 2009 by jerryking
Start-Up Town —
Friday, October 10, 2008 |The American, A Magazine of Ideas |By Ben Casnocha
start_ups  cities  location  culture 
april 2009 by jerryking
The Stages of Anti-Semitism
MARCH 30, 2009, 11:30 P.M. ET| The Wall Street Journal | by BRET STEPHENS
anti-Israel  Bret_Stephens  culture  anti-Semitism 
april 2009 by jerryking
Closing the Culture Gap
Spring 2006| Stanford Social Innovation Review. Stanford: Vol.
4, Iss. 1; pg. 71, 4 pgs| G Pascal Zachary. There is a a surprising
gap in the skill set of many foreign aid workers in Africa: a lack of
knowledge of the history, social practices, and thinking of the people
they've come to help. This culture gap proves costly time and again.
Africa  foreign_aid  culture  History  Stanford  G._PASCAL_ZACHARY 
march 2009 by jerryking
The Disadvantages of an Elite Education
Summer 2008| The American Scholar|by William Deresiewicz

Our best universities have forgotten that the reason they exist is to make minds, not careers
Colleges_&_Universities  education  culture  introspection  Ivy_League  elitism  disadvantages 
march 2009 by jerryking
The Wall Street Journal Classroom Edition
DECEMBER 2005 :: SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY By Christopher Rhoads
Staff Reporter of The Wall Street Journal.
culture  tips  change  corporate  motorola 
february 2009 by jerryking
Obama and Race - WSJ.com
Feb. 21, 2008 op-ed piece by Daniel Henniger looking at Barack
Obama through the lens of Bill Cosby's 1980s TV sitcom. he argues that
Bill Cosby was trying to stanch the downward pitch of black street
culture--and lost.
Obama  African-Americans  politics  culture  Daniel_Henninger  Bill_Cosby  social_classes 
january 2009 by jerryking
Those were the days;
06-25-2004 G & M RoB Magazine article by Doug Steiner on
the behaviour changes occurring in Bay Street among the brokerages.

First Marathon--led by Lawrence Bloomberg--and Gordon Capital, Connacher's secretive institutional boutique, were the Street's two toughest and savviest firms. First Marathon helped pioneer the discount brokerage concept in the early 1980s with Marathon Brown (which TD Bank bought in 1993). Bloomberg also perfected the "eat what you kill" compensation plan of fat bonuses for partners and employees who put together lucrative deals. It changed the payouts of almost every trader and investment banker on Bay Street, Howe Street and Ren Lvesque Boulevard....By 1995, the internet was changing trading forever. Disnat, E*TRADE Canada and other on-line dealers pushed the banks into flat-fee trading. Within three years, commissions for small trades tumbled 70%.

Yet Canada still had five stock exchanges: Vancouver, Alberta, Winnipeg, Toronto and Montreal. TSE president Rowland Fleming urged the exchanges to modernize, and the TSE closed its trading floor in 1997. His pugnacious leadership style helped persuade the dealers to remove both him and their own duplication of costs by consolidating the exchanges.

The culture was changing as well. Watering holes in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver lost customers. Alcohol was no longer greasing the wheels of fortune. It was being replaced by MBAs, CFAs and hard work.
'80s  Bay_Street  behavioral_change  bourses  brokerage_houses  cultural_change  culture  Doug_Steiner  eat_what_you_kill  Gordon_Capital  hard_work  reminiscing  stockmarkets 
january 2009 by jerryking
America Needs Its Frontier Spirit - WSJ.com
Daniel Henniger piece on the potential that an overreaction to
the current financial crisis can play in dampening America's historic
appetite for risk taking.
crisis  finance  History  risk-taking  culture  Daniel_Henninger  risk-appetite  economic_dynamism 
january 2009 by jerryking

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