jerryking + contextual   51

Past mistakes carry warnings for the future of work
May 21, 2019 | Financial Times | by SARAH O'CONNOR.

* Data can mislead unless combined with grittier insights on the power structures that underpin it.
* William Kempster, a master mason who worked on St Paul's Cathedral in the 18th century, left wage records that helped expose a flaw in our understanding of the past.

It is often said that we should learn from the mistakes of the past. But we can also learn from the mistakes we make about the past. Seemingly smooth data can mislead unless it is combined with a grittier insight into the structures, contracts and power relationships that underpin the numbers. On that score, economists and politicians who want to make sense of today’s labour market have an advantage over historians: it is happening right now, just outside their offices, in all its complexity and messiness. All they have to do is open the door
17th_century  18th_century  builders  contextual  data  datasets  developing_countries  economic_history  economists  freelancing  gig_economy  handwritten  historians  human_cloud_platforms  insights  labour_markets  London  messiness  mistakes  politicians  power_relations  power_structures  record-keeping  United_Kingdom  unstructured_data  wages  white-collar 
may 2019 by jerryking
The Six Laws of Technology Everyone Should Know WSJ
Nov. 26, 2017 | WSJ |By Christopher Mims.

1. ‘Technology is neither good nor bad; nor is it neutral’ Melvin Kranzberg in the 1960s. He became a technology historian. Prof. Kranzberg’s first law is also his most important. He realized that the impact of a technology depends on its geographic and cultural context, which means it is often good and bad—at the same time. (E.g. DDT, a pesticide and probable carcinogen nonetheless saved the lives of hundreds of thousands of people in India as a cheap and effective malaria prevention. Or, Facebook groups, serve as a lifeline for parents of children with rare diseases while also radicalizing political extremists. Tech companies' enormous power means they have an obligation to try to anticipate the potential impact of anything they produce.....however, the dirty little secret of highly accomplished people is what we’ve had to neglect to achieve that,” (JK: tradeoffs) “To become spectacular at any discipline in technology means you’re not well-equipped to address these questions.”

2. ‘Invention is the mother of necessity.’ Yes, that’s backward from the way you remember it. It means “every technical innovation seems to require additional technical advances in order to make it fully effective,” In our modern world, the invention of the smartphone has led to the necessity for countless other technologies, from phone cases to 5G wireless. Apple’s cure for staring at your phone too much? A smartwatch to glance at 100 times a day.

3. ‘Technology comes in packages, big and small. To understand any part of a technological package requires looking at its interaction with and dependency on the rest of it—including the human beings essential to how it functions. While innovation destroys jobs, it also creates countless new ones.

4. ‘Although technology might be a prime element in many public issues, nontechnical factors take precedence in technology-policy decisions.’ “People think technology as an abstraction has some sort of intrinsic power, and it doesn’t,” “It has to be motivated by political power or cultural power or something else.”

Craig Federighi, Apple senior vice president, software engineering, spoke about differential privacy, which Apple says is a way to collect user data while protecting the individual’s anonymity.
More broadly, lawmakers are taking an interest in everything from privacy and data transparency to national security and antitrust issues in tech—more because of a shift in our culture than in the technology itself.

5. ‘All history is relevant, but the history of technology is the most relevant.’ The Cold War led to the buildup of nuclear weapons and the missiles to deliver them anywhere on Earth. That led to the development of a war-proof communication system: the internet..... But does that mean we owe the modern world to the existential contest between the U.S. and the former U.S.S.R.? Or was that conflict itself driven by previous technological developments that allowed Hitler to threaten both nations?

6. ‘Technology is a very human activity.’ “Technology is capable of doing great things,” .....how we use technology is up to us. The trick is, because technology generally reaches mass adoption via corporations, those businesses must think of the consequences of their actions as well as how they profit from them. When corporations don’t, regulators, journalists and the public sometimes do it for them.

As Prof. Kranzberg presciently noted at the dawn of the internet age, “Many of our technology-related problems arise because of the unforeseen consequences when apparently benign technologies are employed on a massive scale.”
anonymity  anticipating  Christopher_Mims  Cold_War  contextual  cultural_power  high-achieving  necessity  nuclear  overachievers  political_power  privacy  problems  scaling  technology  tradeoffs  unforeseen  unintended_consequences 
november 2017 by jerryking
Rules for Modern Living From the Ancient Stoics -
May 25, 2017 | WSJ | By Massimo Pigliucci.

Stoicism is practical and humane, and it has plenty to teach us. The philosophy may have been developed around 300 B.C. by Zeno of Cyprus, but it is increasingly relevant today, as evidenced by the popularity of events such as Stoicon, an international conference set to hold its fourth annual gathering in Toronto this October.

The Stoics had centuries to think deeply about how to live, and they developed a potent set of exercises to help us navigate our existence, appreciating the good while handling the bad. These techniques have stood the test of time over two millennia. Here are five of my favorites.

(1) Learn to separate what is and isn’t in your power. This lets you approach everything with equanimity and tranquility of mind. ...Understand and internalize the difference, and you will be happier with your efforts, regardless of the outcome.

(2) Contemplate the broader picture. Looking from time to time at what the Stoics called “the view from above” will help you to put things in perspective and sometimes even let you laugh away troubles that are not worth worrying about. The Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius made a note of this in his famous personal diary, “The Meditations”: “Altogether the interval is small between birth and death; and consider with how much trouble, and in company with what sort of people and in what a feeble body, this interval is laboriously passed.”

(3) Think in advance about challenges you may face during the day. A prepared mind may make all the difference between success and disaster.

(4) Be mindful of the here and now (i.e. living in the moment). The past is no longer under your control: Let it go. The future will come eventually, but the best way to prepare for it is to act where and when you are most effective—right here, right now.

(5) Before going to bed, write in a personal philosophical diary. This exercise will help you to learn from your experiences—and forgive yourself for your mistakes.

Stoicism was meant to be a practical philosophy. It isn’t about suppressing emotions or stalking through life with a stiff upper lip. It is about adjusting your responses to what happens, enduring what must be endured and enjoying what can be enjoyed.
Stoics  philosophy  Romans  journaling  self-discipline  mindfulness  span_of_control  mybestlife  preparation  beforemath  sense_of_proportion  the_big_picture  anticipating  contextual  forward_looking  foresight  GTD  perspectives  affirmations  beyond_one's_control  chance  living_in_the_moment  Greek  personal_control 
june 2017 by jerryking
David McCullough’s History Lessons
April 14, 2017 | WSJ | By Alexandra Wolfe.

David McCullough thinks that the country isn’t in such bad shape. It’s all relative, says the 83-year-old historian and author of such books as the Pulitzer Prize-winning biographies “Truman” (1992) and “John Adams” (2001). He points to the Civil War, for instance, when the country lost 2% of its population—that would be more than six million people today—or the flu pandemic of 1918, when more than 500,000 Americans died. “Imagine that on the nightly news,” he says.

History gives us a sense of proportion, he says: “It’s an antidote to a lot of unfortunately human trends like self-importance and self-pity.”.....see history “as an aid to navigation in such troubled, uncertain times,”.....[McCullough] thought back to something that the playwright and novelist Thornton Wilder had said while a fellow at Yale during Mr. McCullough’s undergraduate days. When Wilder heard a good story and wished to see it on the stage, he wrote the play himself. When he wanted to read a book about an interesting event, he wrote it himself.....Even today, Mr. McCullough doesn’t use a computer for research or writing. He still goes to libraries and archives to find primary sources and writes on a typewriter. ...History, he adds, is “often boiled down to statistics and dates and quotations that make it extremely boring.” The key to generating interest, he says, is for professors and teachers to frame history as stories about people.
archives  authors  biographies  Civil_War  contextual  David_McCullough  DIY  flu_outbreaks  Harry_Truman  historians  history  John_Adams  libraries  self-importance  self-pity  sense_of_proportion  storytelling  Pulitzer_Prize 
april 2017 by jerryking
The Fast Lane: Revisiting last year’s promises
DECEMBER 30, 2016 by: Tyler Brûlé

The BBC’s Allan Little had a decent mini-doc on the shifting political sentiment of the past year but beyond that there’s been little in the way of compelling viewing. Most newsrooms felt like they had already switched off the lights and left the interns in charge when Berlin was attacked. There was little context and not nearly enough smart analysis of Germany’s stiflingly bureaucratic security apparatus. For days anchors were asking guests “how could this happen” when a sharp security correspondent could have told everyone from day one that Germany’s matrix of states mixed with federal agencies makes for a messy mélange when it comes to intelligence-sharing, surveillance and enforcement.
resolutions  contextual  security_&_intelligence  Germany  Tyler_Brûlé  surveillance  enforcement 
january 2017 by jerryking
Prostate cancer? Relax, and don’t rush your treatment - The Globe and Mail
ANDRÉ PICARD
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Sep. 20, 2016

a landmark study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, has provided some stark data on the benefits, risks and necessity of treatment for men with low- or medium-risk prostate cancer (meaning they have a Gleason score of 6-7).

Related: What's the best method of screening for prostate cancer?

The uplifting news is that, a decade after diagnosis, 99 per cent of men with early prostate cancer are still alive. The sort-of-surprising news is that mortality rates don’t really vary depending on type of treatment, or whether a man is treated at all. .....The other element of this story, which is not part of the new research, is about the effectiveness and appropriateness of testing. Another study published recently showed that digital rectal examination is a poor way of detecting prostate cancer and shouldn’t be done because it provides “maximal pain for minimal gain.”

PSA testing, for its part, is one of the most controversial issues in the cancer field. It doesn’t actually detect cancer, but elevated PSA levels trigger biopsies and often lead to a cascade of overtreatment. In Canada, routine PSA tests are not recommended.

What we really need is a test that shows if prostate cancer, once detected, will prove aggressive and deadly or not, and we don’t have that. Prostate cancer kills 4,100 Canadian men a year, but it’s not by doing more and earlier testing and more aggressive treatment that we will necessarily reduce that number. That’s a hard message to digest, and deliver.
cancers  mens'_health  André_Picard  health  PSA  prostate  overtreatment  thinking_deliberatively  reflections  contextual  timeouts  latency 
september 2016 by jerryking
Fast Response to ‘Brexit’ News: A Pop-Up Paper Finds Success in Britain - The New York Times
By NICOLA CLARK SEPT. 13, 2016 | NYT |

“It kind of dawned on me: Here was an audience that was so clearly identifiable and passionate,” said Mr. Kelly, a longtime British newspaper executive who is now chief content officer of Archant, a large British newspaper group. “If there ever was a time for launching a new newspaper, this is it.”

Less than two weeks later, in early July, The New European, a weekly print newspaper, hit newsstands nationwide. The paper, conceived as a finite, monthlong experiment, is now going into its 11th week after proving a surprisingly profitable hit with readers.....Some midsize publishers have focused on portfolios of smaller-scale titles that can be produced using the same infrastructure of presses, distribution and marketing networks. Those economies of scale can significantly reduce the marginal costs — and the risks — of developing new print products....earlier experiments, aimed at general-interest audiences, failed to capture enough demand from readers and advertisers to justify their publishers’ relatively modest initial investments....The New European was conceived as a niche publication--the 48 % of Britons who voted on June 23 to stay in the European Union Since it was meant to be short-lived, Archant avoided spending huge sums on market research or publicity campaigns. “We never set out to actually create a long-term brand,” “The way we structured it was to make money on a four-week run.....successful pop-up titles could be linked to popular political or social movements, or major sporting events like last month’s Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro.
pop-ups  newspapers  digital_media  Brexit  experimentation  new_products  product_launches  United_Kingdom  economies_of_scale  epiphanies  event-driven  events  social_movements  contextual  cost-structure  print_journalism  short-term  niches  short-lived  sports 
september 2016 by jerryking
Innovator Under 35: Hossein Rahnama, 32 - MIT Technology Review
Hossein Rahnama, 32
Mobile apps that tell you what you need to know before you have to ask
Flybits
Flybits  mobile_applications  contextual  Hossein_Rahnama 
september 2016 by jerryking
iBeacons: A Marketer’s Dream or Consumer’s Nightmare? | WIRED
The iBeacons circumvent the expense of Wi-Fi and the inaccuracy of GPS targeting indoors, built into devices running iOS 7 or Android 4 or higher. They can be placed seemingly anywhere, including stores, hotels, stadiums, museums, amusement parks and airports, to guide people along their journey in real-time.

Smartphone adoption and mobile app usage provides marketers with an opportunity to engage consumers when they are near a branded location or point of interest using real-time location-specific targeting. ....Contextual relevancy is key. A grocery store shopper may seek a deal on an ingredient for a saved recipe in Epicurious, a traveler may prefer mobile check-in functionality, and a visitor to an amusement site like The World of Coca-Cola may enjoy custom frames and backdrops for family photos. While the possibilities for engagement are limitless, marketers must understand each step in the customer journey and provide contextually relevant functionality specific to the location.

For example, in April WWE used its mobile app and iBeacons to drive fan engagement at its biggest event, Wrestlemania. Fans at the New Orleans convention center could receive notifications about when and where their favorite wrestling stars would be available for autograph signings. App users benefitted from a spot in the line ahead of those not using the app.
Apple  Bluetooth  engagement  sports  contextual  Opt-In  iBeacons  indoors  hotels  stadiums  museums  amusement_parks  airports  location_based_services  customer_journey  customer_touchpoints 
may 2016 by jerryking
Marketing in the Moments, to Reach Customers Online - The New York Times
JAN. 17, 2016 | NYT | By ROBERT D. HOF .

MOMENTS are having a moment in advertising. Or at least a micro moment.....It is not just a matter of reaching people at a particular time of day, a capability advertisers have employed for decades. Randy Wootton, chief executive of the ad technology firm Rocket Fuel, which recently announced a “marketing in the moment” approach, refers to ancient Greek concepts of time: chronos, or sequential time, and kairos, a moment of opportunity independent of linear time. The latter, of course, is the one his company claims to employ for marketers.

Another key, said Brian Solis, a principal analyst at Altimeter Group, a market research firm, is that the ads need to be more useful than they are attention-getting. According to a Google survey, 51 percent of smartphone owners have bought from a different company than they intended on the basis of information found online.....However, to build brands, an effort that accounts for the majority of ad spending, companies need more than a moment. And few marketers currently have all the skills needed for moments-based marketing, such as ethnographic studies of their customers and the ability to match customer data to the right context,
intentionality  immediacy  GPS  location_based_services  Greek  LBMA  advertising  instant_gratification  purchase_decisions  brands  branding  marketing  ephemerality  impulse_purchasing  contextual  Ram_Charan  P&G  real-time  Flybits  moments  linearity  seminal_moments  chronological  kairos 
february 2016 by jerryking
It’s not a small world after all - The Globe and Mail
PICO IYER
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Jun. 06, 2015

Yes, we may share the same cultural products. But go to a showing of Avatar in China, and tell me that it carries the same meaning for its audience as it would in Studio City. For the former, I’m sure, it’s as much about environmental destruction as to the latter it might be about a dazzling new technology. Watch the same movie in Baghdad and it becomes a parable about imperialism. Every country may draw from the same pop-cultural pool, but each translates it into its own context and language and tradition. We file into the same movie, but come out having seen a radically different film.

Again and again, in fact, what strikes me when I touch down in Jerusalem or Pyongyang is not how much it shares with Washington or London, but how much it doesn’t, in spite of common surfaces, (yes, nine months ago, I did see the two pizzerias and the 36-lane bowling-alley in North Korea’s capital). Which is why travel is more urgent than ever: Our screens vividly bring faraway places into our homes, projecting an image of closeness, but every encounter with the foreign in the flesh reminds us forcibly of how much lies far beyond our reckoning.
translations  contextual  national_identity  travel  interpretation  cultural_products 
june 2015 by jerryking
How to Buy Art: A Beginner’s Cheat Sheet - NYTimes.com
MAY 7, 2015 | NYT| By WILLIAM GRIMES and ROBIN POGREBIN.

EDUCATE YOUR EYE Go see as much as you can — at galleries, museums and art fairs and by trolling online. The more art you see, the more you will develop clear judgment. Knowledge can help put things in context, but expertise isn’t a prerequisite. Marc Glimcher, president of Pace Gallery, says: “Go to a museum first and see what speaks to you. Identify which thread of art history is meaningful to you before heading to the galleries or the auction.”

Photo

THE LONG VIEW Budding collectors shouldn’t just buy what initially captivates them. “Ask yourself how something might look when you know more, how something might look over time,” said Amy Cappellazzo, co-founder of Art Agency, Partners, an art advisory firm. “The best thing to do is put yourself in a position where the first purchase actually challenges you a little — you’re not sure you like something, but you can’t stop looking at it. Imagine your smarter self looking at it in five years.”
auctions  art  artwork  art_galleries  museums  howto  self-education  judgment  Colleges_&_Universities  art_schools  students  contextual  long-term  collectors  collectibles  investing  investment_advice  pitfalls  mistakes 
may 2015 by jerryking
Peter's Principles, Market Research and Forecasting Article | Inc.com
Excerpts and thoughts on "Adventures of a Bystander"

Drucker looks for simplicity but likes to convey complexity. He loves simplicity but realizes that getting there means making connections: to the past, to related fields. He answers questions by trotting through history, art, science. Listening to him, you learn not just the answer but also how to make connections between disparate subjects and thus deepen your understanding. It makes you, the listener, more valuable as an adviser and teacher.

History is Drucker's primary tool for complexifying. "I'm not a professional historian," he says, "but I've learned that nothing helps me as much in my work as a little bit of historical knowledge about a country, technology, or industry. Every few years I pick another major topic and read in it for three years. It's not long enough to make me an expert, but it's long enough to understand what the field is all about. I've been doing this for 60 years."
Peter_Drucker  advice  simplicity  complexity  consigliere  history  interconnections  connecting_the_dots  contextual  industry_expertise 
april 2015 by jerryking
Intellectual maestro craves connections as NACO’s music director - The Globe and Mail
ROBERT EVERETT-GREEN
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 27 2015,

The energetic Englishman’s conversation, during a short visit to Toronto, is full of the language of linkage and cross-reference. Just about everything good can be made better, in his view, if the connections between things, people and ideas are stronger... if classical music isn’t reaching parts of the population, he says, it’s because those who perform aren’t doing enough to make links between the music, its history and the way we live today. “I only really connect to a piece of music when I read around it, I mean the broad social context.”

Connecting dots is a familiar theme in the arts and in arts promotion these days, but Shelley is quite willing to chase it into the corners, as they say in hockey. ....tell a compelling story which helps to solve a problem (Daniel Doctoroff--Bloomberg's guy)
music  Communicating_&_Connecting  Ottawa  cultural_institutions  connecting_the_dots  artists  orchestras_&_symphonies  classical_music  CEOs  sense-making  contextual  cross-pollination  interconnections 
march 2015 by jerryking
Sandy Pentland on the Social Data That Business Should Use - WSJ
Feb. 10, 2014 | Journal Report - CIO Netowrk| WSJ's Steve Rosenbush speaking with MIT's Sandy Pentland.

MR. ROSENBUSH: For most of us, social data is Twitter, it's Facebook. What do you mean by it?

MR. PENTLAND: Those sorts of things are people's public face. On the other hand, for instance, there's badge data. Every corporation has name badges. Many of these record where people come and go, door swipes and things like that. That's a different type of social media. Or if I look at cellphone data, I can tell when people get together, what they search for, who they talk to. You can look at connections between people in ways you never could before. The way most people approach this is incorrect, because they're asking questions about individuals. A better way to approach is asking questions about interactions between people.
social_data  interpretation  Twitter  interactivity  Facebook  social_physics  Communicating_&_Connecting  informed_consent  location_based_services  data  massive_data_sets  contextual  LBMA 
february 2015 by jerryking
Big Data rewards come with tricky set of risks for companies - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Nov. 03 2014

It was a sign that Loblaw Cos. Ltd. was taking a specific strategy with its loyalty program: telling people who shop at the company’s stores that their purchases would be recorded and tracked, but that they would be offered something of value in return: rewards for buying the things they like best.

In an age of “Big Data,” companies are scrambling to better target their communications with customers. If done right, businesses hope that this will eliminate more of the irrelevant advertising that makes people tune out at best and irritates them at worst.

But it has also thrown the advertising industry into a potentially damaging situation. As more of our behaviour is tracked, both online and off, many consumers are becoming wary about how their information is stored and used. Combine that with repeated instances of massive breaches of data security, and the corporate world faces the threat of losing the trust of consumers altogether....One area where consumer data is particularly important is in mobile advertising, where companies send people real-time offers on their mobile phones. But consumers are cautious. In supermarkets, 66 per cent of Canadians said that offers on their phones would make them uncomfortable.

“The complexity of the context is something that, if a marketer doesn’t feel their way through that, they can misstep,”
massive_data_sets  Loblaws  Susan_Krashinsky  data_breaches  mobile  contextual  advertising  loyalty_management  Aimia  privacy  risks  location_based_services  missteps 
november 2014 by jerryking
Your brain has limited capacity: Here's how to maximize it
Aug. 24 2014 | - The Globe and Mail | WENCY LEUNG.

Daniel Levitin explains in his new book, The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload, the evolution of the human brain hasn’t caught up with the demands of today’s world....The brain has a limited capacity to process information and juggle multiple tasks. But Levitin, a professor of psychology and behavioural neuroscience at McGill University, says we can help the brain do its job more efficiently by organizing our lives around how it functions. By using so-called brain extenders, methods that offload some of the brain’s functions, we can help declutter our thoughts and sharpen memories....Lessons learned:
(1) Evaluate the probabilities. To better systematize your approach to decision-making, use Bayesian inferencing which involves updating one’s estimates of probabilities, based on increasingly refining the information available.
(2) Take the time to write it down. Writing stuff down, improves the chances of it getting imprinted on your brain. Writing things down also conserves mental energy that you would otherwise expend fretting about forgetting them. Don’t settle for organizing your thoughts with notebooks and to-do lists. Levitin suggests writing them on index cards--which can be re-sorted.
(3) Your friendships could use a reminder. Actively organizing data about your social world to allow you to have more meaningful interactions. This means taking notes when you meet new people that help you contextualize your link to them, such as who made the introduction and whether you share any hobbies, and using memory “ticklers,” such as setting a reminder on your electronic calendar every few months to check in with friends if you haven’t heard from them in a while.
(4) When in doubt, toss it in a junk drawer. There is an important purpose for the junk drawer. It allows you to cut down on time and mental energy spent making trivial decisions.
cognitive_skills  thinking  information_overload  decision_making  books  friendships  decluttering  contextual  probabilities  journaling  Daniel_Levitin  sorting  pruning  note_taking  Bayesian  memorization  systematic_approaches  organizing_data 
august 2014 by jerryking
Sponsor Generated Content: The State of the Data Economy
June 23, 2014

Where the Growth is
So for many companies right now, the core of the data economy is a small but growing segment—the information two billion-plus global Internet users create when they click "like" on a social media page or take action online. Digital customer tracking—the selling of “digital footprints” (the trail of information consumers leave behind each time they surf the Web)—is now a $3 billion segment, according to a May 2014 Outsell report. At the moment, that's tiny compared to the monetary value of traditional market research such as surveys, forecasting and trend analysis. But digital customer tracking "is where the excitement and growth is," says Giusto.

Real-time data that measures actions consumers are actually taking has more value than study results that rely on consumer opinions. Not surprising, businesses are willing to pay more for activity-based data.

Striking it Richer
Outsell Inc.'s analyst Chuck Richard notes that the specificity of data has a huge affect on its value. In days past, companies would sell names, phone numbers, and email addresses as sales leads. Now, data buyers have upped the ante. They want richer data—names of consumers whose current "buying intent" has been analyzed through behavioral analytics. Beyond the “who,” companies want the “what” and “when” of purchases, along with “how” best to engage with prospects.
"Some companies are getting a tenfold premium for data that is very focused and detailed," Richard says. "For example, if you had a list of all the heart specialists in one region, that’s worth a lot."

Tapping into New Veins
Moving forward, marketers will increasingly value datasets that they can identify, curate and exploit. New technology could increase the value of data by gleaning insights from unstructured data (video, email and other non-traditional data sources); crowdsourcing and social media could generate new types of shareable data; predictive modeling and machine learning could find new patterns in data, increasing the value of different types of data.

Given all this, the data economy is sure to keep growing, as companies tap into new veins of ever-richer and more-specific data.
data  data_driven  SAS  real-time  digital_footprints  OPMA  datasets  unstructured_data  data_marketplaces  value_creation  specificity  value_chains  intentionality  digital_economy  LBMA  behavioural_data  predictive_modeling  machine_learning  contextual  location_based_services  activity-based  consumer_behavior 
july 2014 by jerryking
Aldo seizes ‘put up or shut up’ moment for shoes - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Feb. 27 2014,

Aldo announced the biggest investment in development that the company has made in its 41-year history. Over the next five years, it will spend $363-million and hire roughly 400 people in an effort to better market itself to customers who have more options than ever.

“We’re being confronted with more competition from so many different angles at this point. It’s basically a ‘put up or shut up’ moment,”....Fundamentally, Mr. Bensadoun sees this as a marketing problem.

Clothing retailers have the luxury of showing you a shoe in its proper context – in other words, as part of an outfit. One of the things Aldo is planning for its store of the future is more screens in-store (e.g. digital signage) that will help to do that, in the absence of any apparel stock.

The store could choose a top 10 looks of the week, Mr. Bensadoun suggests, which could be browsed on the screens (and on a mobile-friendly version of the same service for people on smartphones.) Those looks would specify which shoes to wear with them so that customers could pick footwear based on an overall style they identify with. It would also go the other way: for those who pick up a shoe they like, it will be possible to see how to wear it, and with what....Data are another key part of this transformation project.

Part of Aldo’s multimillion-dollar investment will be devoted to building a better data analytics team as well as hiring research and behaviour experts. This is a priority for all marketers, who face a buying public that has never been more inundated with messages – on television, on their mobile phones, tablets, and computers.

“The consumer insights and analytics department at Aldo was very much in its infancy, up until very recently,”
Aldo  shoes  retailers  e-commerce  marketing  analytics  data  Susan_Krashinsky  SHoeMint  ShoeDazzle  Zappos  customer_insights  consumer_research  contextual  seminal_moments  consumer_behavior  in-store  footwear 
july 2014 by jerryking
From one pollster to another: Stop trying to predict elections - The Globe and Mail
BRUCE ANDERSON
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Jun. 11 2014

To me, excellence in this profession is more about eternal curiosity, less about being convinced that you can predict tomorrow based on what you know about yesterday.

Lately, some in the polling industry have been indulging in an unhealthy, feverish competition to predict the outcome and seat distribution of every election. I think it’s a bit of a fool’s errand.

I’m personally enjoying the fact that the race for Ontario is down to the wire and the outcome is more uncertain than ever.

It’s a great time to remind ourselves that the suspense of a big unknown is more interesting than endless over-confident predictions about the chemistry of turnout rates and the implications of same for a handful of swing ridings.....the best value lies in the big picture, the context and the general reactions to parties, leaders and ideas.
elections  political_campaigns  predictions  opinion_polls_&_surveys  public_opinion  Bruce_Anderson  the_big_picture  contextual 
june 2014 by jerryking
The Power of 'Thick' Data - WSJ.com
By
Christian Madsbjerg and
Mikkel B. Rasmussen
March 21, 2014

companies that rely too much on the numbers, graphs and factoids of Big Data risk insulating themselves from the rich, qualitative reality of their customers' everyday lives. They can lose the ability to imagine and intuit how the world—and their own businesses—might be evolving. By outsourcing our thinking to Big Data, our ability to make sense of the world by careful observation begins to wither, just as you miss the feel and texture of a new city by navigating it only with the help of a GPS.

Successful companies and executives work to understand the emotional, even visceral context in which people encounter their product or service, and they are able to adapt when circumstances change. They are able to use what we like to call Thick Data.
thick_data  massive_data_sets  Lego  ethnography  visceral  storytelling  social_data  observations  Samsung  consumer_research  imagination  skepticism  challenges  problems  sense-making  emotions  contextual 
march 2014 by jerryking
To Persuade People, Tell Them a Story - WSJ.com
Nov. 9, 2013 | WSJ | By Dennis Nishi.

"Lead With a Story: A Guide to Crafting Business Narratives That Captivate, Convince, and Inspire.

* Use far fewer slides. Use a lot more anecdotes
* Turn presentations into stories that your audience can relate to, instead of lecturing them on what needs changing.
* Judge performance on the quality of questions being asked and the quality of feedback received.
* Being an effective storyteller requires preparation.
* Move beyond facts and figures, which aren't as memorable as narratives, says Cliff Atkinson, author of "Beyond Bullet Points."
* Many people in business think raw data is persuasive. But when you're dealing with people from other departments and in different fields who don't understand how you got that data, you can lose them pretty quickly. * Step back and put yourself into their shoes and take them through the process of understanding," "Distill the most important facts and wrap them in an engaging story."
* Find ways to connect with your audience on an emotional level, Neuroscientists have discovered that most decisions—whether people realize it or not—are informed by emotional responses. Do legwork to find significant events in your audience's lives or your own that you can base your story on or use to reinforce your points.
* Insert anecdotes about taking care of a sick family member or a memorable customer story, says Mr. Smith, author of "Lead With a Story: A Guide to Crafting Business Narratives That Captivate, Convince, and Inspire."
* Organize your story into three acts and starting by establishing context. You want to let your audience know who the main characters are, what the background of the story is, and what you'd like to accomplish by telling it, he says. Open, for example, by describing a department that's consistently failed to meet sales goals.
* Move on to how your main character—you or the company—fights to resolve the conflicts that create tension in the story. Success may require the main character to make additional capital investments or take on new training. Provide real-world examples and detail that can anchor the narrative, he advises.
* The ending should inspire a call to action, since you are allowing the audience to draw their own conclusions about your story versus just telling them what to do. Don't be afraid to use your own failures in support of your main points.
* Whatever you do, don't preface your story with an apology or ask permission to tell it. Be confident that your story has enough relevance to be told and just launch into it. Confidence and authority, he says, help to sell the idea to your audience.
storytelling  presentations  Communicating_&_Connecting  persuasion  books  P&G  howto  pitches  buy-in  large_companies  emotional_commitment  narratives  self-confidence  preparation  empathy  seminal_moments  contextual  think_threes  anecdotal 
november 2013 by jerryking
What fatal flaw led us so deeply into debt?
October 18, 1997 | Globe & Mail | William Thorsell.

The Unheavenly City by Edward Banfield.

Wisdom has three practical dimensions (with intuition providing a fourth for the truly sage person). The first part of wisdom is knowledge, the second is context based on experience, the third is a long perspective on time......the more forward-looking you are, the higher your social class is. People who live a great deal of their intellectual life in the future derive two great advantages over those who do not: They avoid predictable damage to their interests, and they exploit opportunities that might otherwise be lost to others.

This requires a high tolerance for delayed gratification.

In his engaging book, Future Perfect, Stanley Davis argues that most people are stuck managing the results of things that have already happened....the aftermath. Great leaders manage what has not yet happened....the beforemath. "People who take out life insurance and have home mortgages are managing the beforemath...they are managing the consequences of events that have not yet taken place."
William_Thorsell  books  instant_gratification  delayed_gratification  sophisticated  social_classes  debt  debt_crisis  wisdom  long-term  intuition  far-sightedness  beforemath  anticipating  contextual  forward_looking  foresight  aftermath 
july 2013 by jerryking
Mobile Companies Crave Maps That Live and Breathe - NYTimes.com
By VINDU GOEL
Published: June 10, 2013

As mobile phones become all-in-one tools for living, suggesting where to eat and the fastest way to the dentist’s office, the map of where we are becomes a vital piece of data. From Facebook to Foursquare, Twitter to Travelocity, the companies that seek the attention of people on the go rely heavily on location to deliver relevant information, including advertising.....Maps that are dynamic, adapting to current conditions like traffic or the time of day, are the most useful of all. ...Context is everything — where you are, what other people have said about where you are, how to get there, what’s interesting to do when you get there,”... For users of smartphones that run Google’s Android software in particular, maps and directions are smoothly integrated into the address book, calendar and location-sensitive applications like Web searches and dining recommendations. Even for people with other phones, Google Maps still provides the back-end technology for many applications.

“We’re seeing maps become the canvas to everyone’s app,” said Eric Gundersen, chief executive of MapBox, which provides mapping tools to a number of popular apps like Foursquare and Evernote. “The map is alive; the map is responsive.”
mapping  Waze  crowdsourcing  Google  mergers_&_acquisitions  dynamic  canvas  M&A  location_based_services  wayfinding  contextual  real-time  Google-Maps  responsiveness 
june 2013 by jerryking
An Elizabethan Cyberwar - NYTimes.com
May 31, 2013 | NYT | By JORDAN CHANDLER HIRSCH and SAM ADELSBERG.

Instead of trying to beat back the New World instability of the Internet with an old playbook, American officials should embrace it. With the conflict placed in its proper perspective, policy makers could ratchet down the rhetoric and experiment with a new range of responses that go beyond condemnation but stop short of all-out cyberwar — giving them the room to maneuver without approaching cyberconflict as a path to Defcon 1.

In these legally uncharted waters, only Elizabethan guile, not cold war brinkmanship, will steer Washington through the storm.
cunning  cyber_warfare  China  China_rising  U.S.  security_&_intelligence  guile  lessons_learned  contextual  Elizabethan  cyber_security  instability  resilience  perspectives  tools  frenemies  espionage  risk-mitigation  policy_tools  cyberweapons  U.S.-China_relations  policymakers  policymaking  playbooks 
june 2013 by jerryking
The Financial Bonanza of Big Data
March 7, 2013 | WSJ | By KENNETH CUKIER AND VIKTOR MAYER-SCHÖNBERGER:
Vast troves of information are manipulated and monetized, yet companies have a hard time assigning value to it...The value of information captured today is increasingly in the myriad secondary uses to which it is put—not just the primary purpose for which it was collected.[True, but this secondary or exhaust data has to be placed in the right context in order to maximize value]. In the past, shopkeepers kept a record of all transactions so that they could tally the sums at the end of the day. The sales data were used to understand sales. Only more recently have retailers parsed those records to look for business trends...With big data, information is more potent, and it can be applied to areas unconnected with what it initially represented. Health officials could use Google's history of search queries—for things like cough syrup or sneezes—to track the spread of the seasonal flu in the United States. The Bank of England has used Google searches as a leading indicator for housing prices in the United Kingdom. Other central banks have studied search queries as a gauge for changes in unemployment.

Companies world-wide are starting to understand that no matter what industry they are in, data is among their most precious assets. Harnessed cleverly, the data can unleash new forms of economic value.
massive_data_sets  Amazon  books  Google  branding  Facebook  Wal-Mart  Bank_of_England  data  data_driven  value_creation  JCK  exhaust_data  commercialization  monetization  valuations  windfalls  alternative_data  economic_data  tacit_data  interpretation  contextual  sense-making  tacit_knowledge 
march 2013 by jerryking
Value of big data depends on context
According to Hayek, it is not only localised and dispersed knowledge, but also tacit knowledge that is crucial for the functioning of the market system. Often, useful localised knowledge is tacit. By definition, tacit knowledge cannot be articulated and mechanically transferred to other individuals.[See Paul Graham on doing things that don't scale] Companies and governments have become more successful in collecting large volumes of data but it is nearly impossible to capture useful tacit knowledge by these data collection methods.

Furthermore, the value of big data is not about the volume and the amount of collected data but it depends on our ability to understand and interpret the data. As human faculties of interpretation and understanding differ greatly, the value of big data is subjective and dependent on particular context. Ironically, the skillful use of big data may require tacit knowledge.
data_collection  letters_to_the_editor  massive_data_sets  Friedrich_Hayek  tacit_data  contextual  sense-making  interpretation  tacit_knowledge  valuations  Paul_Graham  unscalability  from notes
february 2013 by jerryking
What Data Can’t Do - NYTimes.com
By DAVID BROOKS
Published: February 18, 2013

there are many things big data does poorly. Let’s note a few in rapid-fire fashion:

* Data struggles with the social. Your brain is pretty bad at math (quick, what’s the square root of 437), but it’s excellent at social cognition. People are really good at mirroring each other’s emotional states, at detecting uncooperative behavior and at assigning value to things through emotion.
* Data struggles with context. Human decisions are embedded in contexts. The human brain has evolved to account for this reality...Data analysis is pretty bad at narrative and emergent thinking.
* Data creates bigger haystacks. This is a point Nassim Taleb, the author of “Antifragile,” has made. As we acquire more data, we have the ability to find many, many more statistically significant correlations. Most of these correlations are spurious and deceive us when we’re trying to understand a situation.
* Big data has trouble with big (e.g. societal) problems.
* Data favors memes over masterpieces. Data analysis can detect when large numbers of people take an instant liking to some cultural product. But many important (and profitable) products are hated initially because they are unfamiliar. [The unfamiliar has to accomplish behavioural change / bridge cultural divides]
* Data obscures hidden/implicit value judgements. I recently saw an academic book with the excellent title, “ ‘Raw Data’ Is an Oxymoron.” One of the points was that data is never raw; it’s always structured according to somebody’s predispositions and values. The end result looks disinterested, but, in reality, there are value choices all the way through, from construction to interpretation.

This is not to argue that big data isn’t a great tool. It’s just that, like any tool, it’s good at some things and not at others. As the Yale professor Edward Tufte has said, “The world is much more interesting than any one discipline.”
massive_data_sets  David_Brooks  data_driven  decision_making  data  Nassim_Taleb  contrarians  skepticism  new_graduates  contextual  risks  social_cognition  self-deception  correlations  value_judgements  haystacks  narratives  memes  unfamiliarity  naivete  hidden  Edward_Tufte  emotions  antifragility  behavioral_change  new_products  cultural_products  masterpieces  EQ  emotional_intelligence 
february 2013 by jerryking
Comments on the philosophy of data
data was a fact, information was the basis of a decision. Data is not information until we put it in context. A red light is a fact, a red light over a street intersection is the basis for a decision and thus, information. We seem to believe that all data are equally valuable but data without context is useless.
data  information_overload  letters_to_the_editor  contextual  from notes
february 2013 by jerryking
Rachel Carson’s Lessons, 50 Years After ‘Silent Spring’ - NYTimes.com
By NANCY F. KOEHN
Published: October 27, 2012

Rachel Carson, throughout her personal and public struggles, she was an informed spokeswoman for environmental responsibility.

She was a classic introvert who exhibited few of the typical qualities associated with leadership, like charisma and aggressiveness. But as people like Susan Cain, author of “Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking,” have pointed out, leadership can come in less obvious forms.... her story is a reminder that one person’s quiet leadership can make a difference.... RACHEL CARSON’S story offers many leadership lessons, including the importance of persistence in pursuing an objective. When I discuss her with business executives, many are struck by her ability to stay focused on goals in the face of obstacles including severe illness.

Another lesson involves the importance of doing thorough research and taking the long view. A sense of context based on hard facts, along with a knowledge of history, is essential to understanding what’s at stake in difficult and uncertain situations. It also confers a sense of authority on the person who has acquired this knowledge.

A third insight concerns the juggling of personal demands and professional ambitions. Carson understood the challenge — and satisfaction — of dealing with our obligations to others even as we follow our professional drive. And she saw that this can rarely be navigated smoothly. For her, and for many executives with whom I have worked, times of great productivity were followed by fallow periods when ambitions had to be put aside for personal reasons.
solo  leadership  environment  cancers  women  non-obvious  trailblazers  books  introverts  contextual  long-term  history 
october 2012 by jerryking
A conversation that translates
June 7, 2012 | The Financial Times pg. 14 | Philip Delves Broughton.
(Pass on to Abdoulaye DIOP)
For global companies, creating an approach to risk that resonates across cultures can be a challenge, writes Philip Delves Broughton

Risk is a risky word. Already prone to misinterpretation among people who share a language and a culture, the difficulties multiply dangerously when it moves across borders.

What a Wall Street trader might define as moderately risky may seem downright insane to a Japanese retail broker; what an oil pipeline engineer in Brazil might characterise as gung-ho may appear overcautious to his revenue-chasing chief executive in London....The greatest pitfalls in managing risk across borders, he says, emerge from assuming too much. When dealing with fellow English speakers, it is easy to imagine that a shared language means shared assumptions - that the English, Americans and Australians think the same thing because they are using the same words.... Tips for managing risk across borders

Context is more important than language. Understand what matters most in the markets where you are doing business. Is it the law, logic or maintaining relationships?

Every word comes with its own "metadata" in different cultures. Be as specific as you can and never assume you have been properly understood without checking for potential misunderstandings.
cultural_assumptions  risks  risk-management  Communicating_&_Connecting  globalization  organizational_culture  transactions  national_identity  Philip_Delves_Broughton  translations  assumptions  misinterpretations  contextual  metadata  specificity  crossborder  cross-cultural  misunderstandings  interpretation  conversations  risk-assessment  words  compounded  risk-perception  multiplicative 
september 2012 by jerryking
Advice from the Corner Office: Use Google; Avoid Grammar Gaffes - Law Blog - WSJ
May 30, 2008 | WSJ | By Jamie Heller.

Read Justice Scalia’s New Book on Advocacy: It’s “important and entirely accurate” says Berry. Among the points that stood out to Berry: Write well. It’s okay, for example, to use synonyms in briefs, within limits, though the same rule wouldn’t apply with contracts.

Get Yourself Smart on a Subject, Fast: When they get assignments, he says, self starters “contextualize” the issue by “Googling stuff for fifteen minutes.” Lexis and Westlaw, he says, are fine for focusing on a point of law. But the peripheral vision provided by a Web search is also invaluable. It can yield relevant law journal articles, blog posts, plaintiffs’ lawyers sites, law-firm newsletters and the like.

Make Grammatical Mistakes and Typos at Your Peril: “Do not ever for the second time give your senior a piece of writing with a typo or a grammatical mistake,” says Berry. “I will take it once and I will tell the junior my set speech.” But if it happens again? Well, find out for yourself.
What is Berry’s set speech? A lawyer’s job is “to force the reader’s mind in a direction, to move a mind forward through the ideas.” A grammatical error or typo “derails the train of thought.”
grammar  Google  CEOs  writing  spelling  lawyers  law_firms  advice  new_graduates  perspectives  contextual  individual_initiative  self-starters  LexisNexis  Westlaw 
june 2012 by jerryking
A failure in generalship
May 2007 | Armed Forces Journal | By Lt. Col. Paul Yingling.

Prussian military theorist Carl von Clausewitz noted that passion, probability and policy each play their role in war....generals must provide policymakers and the public with a correct estimation of strategic probabilities. The general is responsible for estimating the likelihood of success in applying force to achieve the aims of policy...“Learning to Eat Soup With a Knife,” by John Nagl
leadership  politics  war  warfare  strategy  strategic_thinking  organizational_culture  civilian-military_relations  Prussian  books  Carl_von_Clausewitz  generalship  probabilities  contextual  militaries  policymakers  policymaking 
may 2012 by jerryking
Why Your Target's Is a Good Read
Sept. 2004 | | Mergers & Acquisitions: The Dealermaker's Journal, 00260010, , Vol. 39, Issue 9 | By:David K. Thornquist

Traditional due diligence focuses on reviewing board minutes, reports, financials, sales forecasts, and other writings that are fully vetted. This is supplemented by interviews with managers who answer questions to the best of their ability, but with the caveat that management can't have complete knowledge of everything and everyone under their watch. And individual managers may have a host of motives and objectives that prompt answers that are not fully candid.
Uncovering the real story

Traditional due diligence, however, typically ignores email, the lifeblood of an efficiently run business. The spontaneous and unpolished nature of e-mail presents the most candid view of what is really going on in a company. It provides context. It also can fly in the face of the fully vetted printed record offered by a company under the due diligence microscope.
due_diligence  M&A  e-mail  e-discovery  scuttlebutt  unstructured_data  tacit_data  contextual 
march 2012 by jerryking
The “Post-PC” Era: It’s Real, But It Doesn’t Mean What You Think It Does | Forrester Blogs
May 17, 2011 | Forrester Blogs | by Sarah Rotman Epps who
explains that computing is shifting from: Stationary to ubiquitous.
Contrast the experience of computing on a desktop PC, in one place with a
clear start and finish time, to that of the anytime/anywhere computing
done on a smartphone or tablet. Ubiquitous computing = context-aware
computing, aided by sensors like accelerometers, gyroscopes, and
geolocators in smartphones & tablets.
Formal to casual. Instant-on/always-on computing on smartphones and
tablets fills in-between moments like standing in line or watching TV.

Abstracted to physical. Touchscreens on smartphones and tablets
enable direct physical manipulation of content in two-dimensional space.
Cameras with facial recognition, voice sensors, and motion sensors
(e.g. Microsoft Kinect for Xbox 360) permit a wider range of physical
interaction with devices, where a user’s body and voice become the
controller.
post-PC  Apple  Forrester  smartphones  sensors  on-demand  tablet_computing  pervasive_computing  digital_economy  contextual  facial-recognition 
may 2011 by jerryking
Instant Communication Can Have Bad Consequences — Letters to the editor - WSJ.com
APRIL 9, 2011.
During the American Civil War, Charles Wilkes, a Union naval officer,
broke international law by capturing two Confederate diplomats en route
to Europe on a neutral British ship, the Trent. Adams observed: "When we
so pride ourselves on what we consider the self-evident value of modern
inventions, we may be given pause when we realize that, had there been a
submarine cable in 1861, it is almost certain that England and the
North would have been at war that December. As it was, the slowness of
communication gave both sides time to think, and allowed [Secretary of
State William H.] Seward in America and [Lords] Palmerston and Russell
in England . . . to guide the situation."

"The slowness of communication" is a phrase to savor. Today it is
assumed that speed of communication is an absolute virtue. Combining
speed with a lack of context, electronic media radically undermine
reflection and criticism. We live in a sea of thoughtlessness, informing
ourselves to death.
Communicating_&_Connecting  Peggy_Noonan  power_of_the_pause  letters_to_the_editor  Civil_War  reflections  immediacy  contextual  timeouts  real-time  latency  unintended_consequences  revenge_effects  thinking_deliberatively 
april 2011 by jerryking
How to avoid other industries' pitfalls ProQuest
Mar 16, 2009 | PRweek. (U.S. ed.). New York: Vol. 12, Iss. 11;
pg. 8, 1 pgs | by Emma Pankenier Leggat. The issue of measurement
and ROI in PR is one of endless debate. Why then does the entire
industry seem to happily accept the notion of selfreporting - our own
flawed version of self-regulation? How can the very same individuals who
toil for results personally vouch that they attained those results?

Results need to be better contextualized. There should be no more
reporting on impressions unless they are put in context and benchmarked
against an industry average, competitive set, or historical comparison.

Another lesson from the finance world: A sophisticated analytics lab
realizes that ROI does not simply mean "what you got for what you
invested." It means "what you got over and above what you could have
through a less risky investment. "
ProQuest  public_sector  analytics  data_driven  ROI  measurements  contextual  benchmarks  risk-adjusted  self-reporting  self-regulation 
march 2010 by jerryking
It's the Purpose Brand, Stupid - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 29, 2005 | Wall Street Journal | by CLAYTON M.
CHRISTENSEN, SCOTT COOK and TADDY HALL. Carving up markets by product,
price point or customer type often causes marketers to deliver products
overloaded with unwanted features or designed to improve on a product or
appeal to a demographic profile -- but not necessarily real customers.
the marketer's fundamental task is not so much to understand the
customer as it is to understand what jobs customers need to do -- and
build products that serve those specific purposes.
Clayton_Christensen  disruption  product_innovation  product_launches  innovation  market_segmentation  Marriott  failure  Coca-Cola  customer_insights  feature_overload  purpose  contextual  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  brand_purpose 
january 2010 by jerryking
GE's CEO shares his tips for better management
June 11, 2004 | Globe & Mail | By HARVEY SCHACHTER.
Simplify constantly: Every leader needs to clearly explain the top three
things the organization is working on.

Understand breadth, depth and context: It's vital to understand how your
organization fits into the world. Indeed, that was the most important
thing he learned since taking over the reins.
GE  Harvey_Schachter  leadership  CEOs  Jeffrey_Immelt  contextual 
december 2009 by jerryking
The Gripping Statistic : How to Make Your Data Matter
Mon Aug 10, 2009 | Fast Company | By Dan Heath & Chip
Heath. A good statistic is one that aids a decision or shapes an opinion. For a stat to do either of those, it must be dragged within the everyday (e.g. using ratios or useful analogies). That's your job -- to do the dragging. In our world of billions and trillions, that can be a lot of manual labor. But it's worth it: A number people can grasp is a number that can make a difference.
analogies  base_rates  Cisco  Communicating_&_Connecting  contextual  data  data_journalism  high-impact  mathematics  narratives  numeracy  persuasion  probabilities  ratios  statistics  storytelling  sense-making  value_creation 
september 2009 by jerryking
The Medium - Photo Negative - Google Misses an Opportunity With Its Life Magazine Archive - NYTimes.com
February 27, 2009 NYT Magazine article VIRGINIA HEFFERNAN who
is mystified by Google’s recent decision to essentially dump its
priceless trove of photos from Life magazine — some 10 million images
from Life’s holdings, most of them never published — into an online
crate.
Google has failed to recognize that it can’t publish content under its
imprint without also creating content of some kind: smart, reported
captions; new and good-looking slide-show software; interstitial
material that connects disparate photos; robust thematic and topical
organization.
Google  photography  curation  content  Life_Magazine  storytelling  interstitial  overlay_networks  jazmin_isaacs  metadata  missed_opportunities  contextual  sorting  creating_valuable_content 
march 2009 by jerryking
After 50 years, Journal enters weekend fray
Monday, September 12, 2005 G&M article by SHAWN MCCARTHY.
Adopt to understand how to offer analysis and context. "The key to
success for The Wall Street Journal or any business publication is to
provide context and analysis, to explore trends in the financial world,
and to profile decision makers,""Our whole goal is to be a lighthouse as
opposed to a street light; to show people where things are going and
not where they are."
analysis  WSJ  Trends  newspapers  HeyMath  mathematics  contextual  Waudware  thought_leadership 
february 2009 by jerryking

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