jerryking + challenges   94

Want to transform your industry? Be ready to embrace resistance - The Globe and Mail
BRETT BELCHETZ
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL

important lessons that we learned along the way:

TAKE WHAT’S USEFUL, LEAVE WHAT’S NOT
Comments and criticisms can be invaluable for young companies – but you need to become a master at differentiating between feedback that matters and feedback that doesn’t. ...... it’s critical to pay attention to actual customers, zeroing in on their feedback (both good and bad) and continuously improving our offering. It’s important not to dilute the quality of the user experience in an effort to jump over hurdles raised by non-customers.

FOCUS ON THE “PERSUADABLES”
It’s essential that your company identify those who are persuadable from those who are not... Pick targets carefully and convert them strategically......Circle back to the “unpersuadables” at a later point.

VIEW CHALLENGES AS COMPLIMENTS
.....If your vision didn’t have a chance of succeeding or wasn’t ambitious enough, nobody important would care enough to challenge you. The reality is that many industries are in need of evolution, and those pushing for change are rarely celebrated or welcomed by their peers. To succeed as a leader with a transformative vision, it’s necessary to celebrate resistance.

NEVER FORGET YOUR MISSION
Focus on your original mission – the problem you set out to solve in the first place. That’s your North Star. And surround yourself with people who believe in it too. Everything you do from day one onward has to tie back to your mission in a clear and compelling way. Resistance is inevitable, but it can never – not even for a second – throw you off course. The leaders and companies that succeed are the ones who remain dead focused on their reason for existing. It’s much easier to deal with resistance when you know, without a doubt, the value you will bring by overcoming it.
challenges  compliment  feedback  industry  mission-driven  North_Star  persuasion  resistance  transformational  UX 
november 2019 by jerryking
Apple’s Pressing Challenge: Build Its Services Business - WSJ
By Tripp Mickle
Jan. 10, 2019

The tech landscape is dotted with hardware companies that have turned to services for growth. For companies like International Business Machines Corp. , Hewlett Packard and Dell Technologies Inc., the transition came as they faced slowdowns in their core business and wasn’t always smooth. Those companies pushed into business services. Apple is focused on consumers, whose tastes can change rapidly. Its success hinges on driving sales of apps and new offerings like video content and news subscriptions.......Apple’s services are tied to the amount of iPhones, iPads and Macs in people’s hands—and growth in those devices has begun to slow.
App_Store  Apple  Apple_IDs  challenges  iTunes  services  shifting_tastes  subscriptions 
january 2019 by jerryking
Ten Years Out
December 5 2017 | FT | By Gideon Rachman, James Kynge, Vanessa Houlder and Richard Waters.

From massive migration to prying governments, businesses will have to weather startling changes over the next decade.....It can be difficult, when assailed daily by news of populism, terrorism and cyber hacking, to look to anything beyond the next crisis. Yet business leaders need to focus on the future. What, for example, does it mean for employers that by 2027, Africa’s population will have grown by a third and Europe’s will have flatlined? How will companies cope when governments expect them to gather more staff data and play ever larger roles in enforcing tax laws?

In Ten Years Out, four senior FT journalists outline what they see as the biggest challenges that no chief executive will be able to ignore. They also provide some tips on how companies can best prepare themselves for the changes that are coming.
forecasting  trends  CEOs  challenges  migration  tax  artificial_intelligence  China  Richard_Waters 
december 2017 by jerryking
Silicon Valley Stumbles in World Beyond Software
DEC. 6, 2016 | WSJ | BY JACK NICAS

In software, programmers can control their environment. The physical world is messy and unpredictable. Even the smartest computers can’t prepare for every possibility. Add to that the burden of public safety and regulation and it is easy to see why the tech industry hasn’t been able to replicate its success in the digital realm.

“The world is so unforgiving. You can’t just ask it to be more organized,” said Astro Teller, the ponytailed chief of X, Alphabet’s research lab that has investigated—and decided against—space elevators and jetpacks.

Moreover, digital progress is rapid, because computing power increases dramatically over time and software can be replicated endlessly. In the physical world, advances are constrained by physics.
physics  analog  Google  drones  challenges  cyberphysical  Silicon_Valley  software  meat_space  moonshots  Amazon  physical_world 
december 2016 by jerryking
Tech Startups Struggle to Close Deals With IT Buyers - WSJ
By ANGUS LOTEN
Aug. 24, 2016

As Haier and other large corporations become increasingly digital, they are spending more time checking out technology offered by small, independent tech firms. Yet startup products and services for enterprises, while more accepted than a few years ago, still face significant resistance on the path toward revenue, CIOs and industry analysts say.

“I won’t take a risk on something that isn’t from a proven enterprise technology company,” especially for key functions, such as sales, human resources, cybersecurity or even office email, said Ms. Johnston. “Some startups are just so cheap or free, you’re nervous to go with it. What if they go out of business?”

Only 23% of 112 large corporations in a recent survey said working with startups was very important, according
customer_adoption  start_ups  large_companies  CIOs  Haier  challenges  cloud_computing  risk-aversion  SaaS  IT  risks 
august 2016 by jerryking
Africans were pioneers in business in Guyana
January 12, 2010 | Stabroek News | F. Skinner.

Africans are the pioneers of the majority of business trends and innovations in Guyana, but there is hardly any tangible proof of this. Their ideas were worked and developed only to change hands with no royalties attached. ...Mr King identified many problems/obstacles facing the African businessman. He pointed out that if an Indian is a barber his son and even grandson are destined to be barbers. Next, the lack of other rich African businessmen to turn to for support – financial or business advice – when the banks and your competitors gang up against you.....He discussed the proposition with his closest friends and was asked, “What you gon do wid all that property?” He admitted that it was not that his friends were deliberately giving him bad advice, it was that they simply did not know and he was no different. He regretted the missed opportunity because a few years later one year’s rental of a small section on the ground floor would have paid for the entire property at the time....They ran into financial problems and got some assistance from the government, which was not enough. Which African organization could they have turned to for financial assistance? The same can be said about another three who had the stone quarry....All the persons mentioned were out there with their shoulders to the wheel. There are reasons for their failures. We must identify these reasons and address them as a community. Glaring though is the lack of a support system in the community.
We must accept that we must generate wealth and not just depend on education, a salaried job or a government. We must be able to be trustworthy to each other. We must stop this individualist approach to business. One ‘pointer’ can’t sweep. Our foreparents trusted each other enough to form co-ops and bought land.
Afro-Guyanese  small_business  history  '70s  entrepreneurship  letters_to_the_editor  Guyanese  trailblazers  trustworthiness  advice  pioneers  missed_opportunities  regrets  support_systems  challenges  wealth_creation  failure  post-mortems  disunity 
june 2016 by jerryking
Why law and accounting firms struggle to innovate - The Globe and Mail
Oct. 06, 2015 | The Globe and Mail | RYAN CALIGIURI.

Why is it that professional service firms, especially accounting and law firms, find it so difficult to embrace innovation in order to build a stronger future?...The biggest factor is that professional service firms are driven primarily by billable hours and any time someone is not billable they are seen as not adding value. This means that in order to innovate someone has to “stop adding value” by not being billable. There is far too much focus on “today” in professional service firms and not enough on the future – this mentality will continue to hold back firms and do more damage in the long run....Most professional service firms also don’t have a system for driving innovation in an efficient manner so they often waste a great deal of time getting caught up in details that don’t matter. ...Many of the law and accounting firms I worked with were doing very well so they didn’t see a need to innovate. ....Firms are often not good at implementing new services or products, they don’t have a culture that supports, fosters, or encourages innovation, and they are often too smart for their own good and get overly complex with their innovation initiatives......First, a firm’s overall corporate strategy needs to incorporate an element of innovation as one of its top long-term goals. Without a strategic focus and investment in innovation, any efforts will often fall flat as they will be approached loosely or in a silo that eventually gets overtaken by billable work.....Next, get a quick win by surveying or researching your client’s business, their industry, and even their own clients. Looking deeper into your client’s business and understanding their problems and opportunities will help you find ways to add value through a new product or service and will enable your firm to get off on the right foot.....Insights from clients can drive new products, services and systems that will fill a need.
However, professional service firms that are looking for a leap in innovation need to go beyond customer insights and explore future trends, industry experts, and, yes, even patent databases for further stimulus to drive new ideas.
This is the difference between firms that innovate and those that die. If you’re in a professional service firm and believe that there is no threat, quite frankly, you are crazy to think so.
innovation  professional_service_firms  law_firms  quick_wins  accounting  challenges  billable_hours  complacency  disruption  Ryan_Caligiuri  silo_mentality 
october 2015 by jerryking
Ontario Tender Fruit Lab
October- December 2014

Found by Googling "challenges import exotic fresh produce ontario"
Ontario  fruits  fresh_produce  branding  organic  agribusiness  agriculture  farming  retailers  supermarkets  grocery  MaRS  sustainability  challenges  problems  solutions  farmland  local 
august 2015 by jerryking
The promise and peril of digital diplomacy - The Globe and Mail
TAYLOR OWEN
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 09 2015

the same governments that are seeking to enable free speech in countries like Iran are at the same time rapidly expanding the surveillance state. Thanks to the revelations of Edward Snowden we now know how the state has chosen to respond to this new space of digital empowerment. Like a traditional battlefield, they are seeking to control it. To, as they themselves claim, “know it all.”

And herein lies the central tension in the digital diplomacy initiative. By seeking to control, monitor and undermine the actions of perceived negative actors, the state risks breaking the very system that positively empowers so many. And this will ultimately harm those living under autocratic and democratic regimes alike.

The answer, unfortunately, is not as simple as many critics of digital diplomacy assert. Simply returning to traditional in-person diplomacy ignores the global shift to decentralized digital power. Digital diplomacy is a well-intentioned attempt to participate in this new space. However, it is one that is both ill-suited to the capabilities of the state, and is negated by other digital foreign policy programs.

We are at the start of a reconfiguration of power. Navigating this terrain is one of the principal foreign policy challenges of the 21st century.
diplomacy  risks  Communicating_&_Connecting  social_media  foreign_policy  uToronto  public_diplomacy  Outsourcing  Edward_Snowden  challenges  21st._century  rogue_actors  digital_diplomacy  surveillance_state 
february 2015 by jerryking
Exit interview: The ROM’s departing CEO and the museum’s challenges - The Globe and Mail
JAMES ADAMS
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Nov. 28 2014

This was the hope: That after the $300-million convulsion known as Renaissance ROM, Janet Carding would, as the Royal Ontario Museum’s director and CEO effective Sept. 13, 2010, begin to re-establish the Toronto museum as a museum. Her predecessor, William Thorsell, had spent most of his 10 years bringing to fruition the bricks-and-mortar overhaul of the Grande Olde Dame on the southwest corner of Queen’s Park and Bloor Street West – an overhaul brazenly exemplified by the jagged thrusts of the Michael Lee-Chin Crystal designed by starchitect Daniel Libeskind.

With the Crystal, Thorsell made the ROM a talking point, a lightning rod for debate, a rude, not-to-be-ignored presence on Toronto’s topography. It would be Carding’s job to take all that attention and, through a judicious mix of programming, exhibitions and education, translate it into visitors, be they visitors physically accessing the museum’s six million artifacts and 40 galleries through the new front door on Bloor, or virtually, through digital media.

This is the reality: Carding, it was announced this week, is to leave the ROM in March, a full five months and a bit before the expiration of the five-year contract she signed with the museum’s board of trustees in 2010
exits  CEOs  ROM  museums  Toronto  leadership  challenges  William_Thorsell  landmarks  iconic  Queen’s_Park 
november 2014 by jerryking
Fresh Produce Group Chooses NetSuite Over the Competition
Challenges:
Previous systems provided limited visibility into company financial performance.
Vital information had to be retrieved from multiple sources, leading to frustrating delays in financial and management reporting.
High levels of manual processing were required to maintain spreadsheets for forecasting and inventory management, which was costly and prone to error.
An inefficient paper-based inventory management system meant perishable produce was regularly wasted.
Hours were also lost every week locating pallets on the warehouse floor.
Non-financial staff had very limited access to vital business data needed to be more accountable in their roles.
fresh_produce  ERP  challenges  information  IT  perishables  OPMA  spreadsheets  inefficiencies 
june 2014 by jerryking
Ontario’s ‘none of the above’ election - The Globe and Mail
JEFFREY SIMPSON
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, May. 24 2014

Start with economic growth after inflation. From 1982 to 2013, it averaged 2.6 per cent. From 2014 to 2035, it will be 2.1 per cent. Roughly speaking, therefore, growth will be about 20 per cent slower.

The labour force will grow more slowly largely because of an aging population, a change being felt throughout Canada. Labour productivity will be flat at best, and quite likely lower than from 1985 to 2000. In the meantime, global competition will intensify.

Manufacturing has been declining as a share of the economy in North America and Western Europe. Ontario’s decline was halted temporarily back when the Canadian dollar plunged to nearly 60 cents, but those days are long gone.

The province’s cost competitiveness – this is one of the two or three central challenges – has been poor. Unit labour costs have gone up by a little over 5 per cent per year over the last 13 years, compared with just over 2 per cent in the United States.

When a province’s unit labour costs rise more than twice as fast as the country where it does 78 per cent of its trade, the results are obvious: plant shutdowns, unemployment and not enough new capacity added. Automobiles are the classic case: plant openings in Mexico and the U.S., but none recently in Ontario.

Business investment in machinery and equipment has lagged the Canadian average and is far below the United States. Research and development, a pathway to innovation, also lags. It’s better than the very poor Canadian average, but far below the U.S. Take away the healthy financial sector and the Toronto’s overheated housing market, and what do you have?

In Toronto and Ottawa, where prosperity is sustained, it’s easy to forget the swaths of the province in the southwest, north and east, where very little new economic activity has been taking place. The old industrial cities – Hamilton, Windsor, St. Catharines, Thunder Bay, Sudbury, Sault Ste. Marie – and smaller cities, such as Leamington, are nearly all suffering in one form or another.

For most of the past quarter-century, Ontario provincial governments have run deficits. Slowly, the debt has risen. Such is the situation that Ontario now receives yearly small payments from the country’s equalization scheme. (And such is the absurdity of the scheme that Ontario taxpayers remain net contributors to Ottawa, which then turns around and gives a small portion of the revenues back in equalization.)

The Ontario government has reached far, but failed to execute: clean energy, gas plants, e-health, Ornge air ambulance, nuclear cost overruns. No wonder trust in government is low. For almost a decade, the Liberal government let health-care spending rip – 7-per-cent yearly increases without commensurate improvements in the system. (Spending increases are now down to 2.5 per cent a year.)

Very, very powerful – and very, very conservative – public-sector unions and associations in schools, universities, health care, policing, firefighting and municipal government make change very, very difficult.
Ontario  elections  turnout  Jeffrey_Simpson  challenges  long-term  slow_growth  low_growth  Queen’s_Park 
may 2014 by jerryking
Fareed Zakaria: China’s cyberespionage presents a 21st-century challenge -
May 22, 2014 | The Washington Post | By Fareed Zakaria.
...Vladimir Putin might be a 19th-century statesman, using old-fashioned muscle to get his way, but it has become clear that Chinese President Xi Jinping goes one step further, comfortably embracing both 19th- and 21st-century tactics....it’s also worth studying Xi’s speech in Shanghai, given the same day the deal was struck. The meeting was a gathering of an obscure Asian regional group, one that includes Turkey, Iran and Russia but not the United States. His message was that Asians should take care of their own security. ...

...Cyberattacks are part of a new, messy, chaotic world, fueled by globalization and the information revolution. In a wired, networked world, it is much harder to shut down activity that blurs the lines between governments and private citizens, national and international realms, theft and warfare. And it certainly will not be possible to do so using traditional mechanisms of national security. Notice that Washington is using a legal mechanism (which will be ineffective and largely symbolic) for what is really a national security issue.

The Sino-Russian gas deal reminds us that traditional geopolitics is alive and well. Washington knows how to work its way in that world with its own alliances and initiatives. But cyberespionage represents a new frontier, and no one really has the ideas, tools or strategies to properly address this challenge.
Fareed_Zakaria  challenges  cyber_security  cyber_warfare  espionage  Vladimir_Putin  Russia  China  geopolitics  security_&_intelligence  natural_gas  21st._century  industrial_espionage  petro-politics  realpolitik  Asia  Xi_Jinping  statesmen  cyberattacks  cyberespionage 
may 2014 by jerryking
Insurance companies see threat in technology - The Globe and Mail
JACQUELINE NELSON
Insurance companies see threat in technology Add to ...
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, May. 21 2014,

Other industry leaders share his worries. Half the global insurance CEOs polled in a PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) study earlier this year said new market entrants threatened growth prospects, more so than in most other industries.

“The industry, being conservative by nature, has a tough time catching up with consumers’ expectations, which are changing rapidly,” said Charles Brindamour, CEO of Canada’s largest property and casualty insurer, Intact Financial Corp. His main concern is at the distribution level. Insurers are increasingly using social media and websites to target potential customers.

Life insurers such as Manulife Financial Corp. are monitoring the changing ways customers seek insurance.
disruption  insurance  mobile_applications  Google  Facebook  Intact_Financial  challenges 
may 2014 by jerryking
The Power of 'Thick' Data - WSJ.com
By
Christian Madsbjerg and
Mikkel B. Rasmussen
March 21, 2014

companies that rely too much on the numbers, graphs and factoids of Big Data risk insulating themselves from the rich, qualitative reality of their customers' everyday lives. They can lose the ability to imagine and intuit how the world—and their own businesses—might be evolving. By outsourcing our thinking to Big Data, our ability to make sense of the world by careful observation begins to wither, just as you miss the feel and texture of a new city by navigating it only with the help of a GPS.

Successful companies and executives work to understand the emotional, even visceral context in which people encounter their product or service, and they are able to adapt when circumstances change. They are able to use what we like to call Thick Data.
thick_data  massive_data_sets  Lego  ethnography  visceral  storytelling  social_data  observations  Samsung  consumer_research  imagination  skepticism  challenges  problems  sense-making  emotions  contextual 
march 2014 by jerryking
Monetizing open data
September 21, 2012| Strata| by Jenn Webb

One of the big questions on everyone’s mind at this year’s Open Knowledge Festival in Helsinki, according to a report by David Meyer at ZDNet, is: Where’s the money in open data?

Ville Peltola, IBM’s innovation chief in Finland, told Meyer the situation is becoming frustrating, that he doesn’t understand why it’s so hard to properly open up data, or even just some of it. “You could have bronze, silver and gold APIs, where more data costs more,” Peltola said to Meyer. “It’s like a drug dealer. Maybe you have to solve this chicken-and-egg problem by giving samples of raw data.”

Meyer points out the real issue inherent in what Peltola is saying: “that large amounts of data are very valuable, and the companies that create them tend not to know how to realise the greatest value from them.” Peltola had an interesting idea to address this: “What if you have an internal start-up in your company tasked only with monetising your data?”

Chris Taggart, co-founder of OpenCorporates, made a more competitive argument for opening up your company’s data: it “exposes your competitors’ internal contradictions” and might inspire disruption, he told Meyer — “Most big, fat secure companies don’t have the confidence to disrupt themselves,” he said.
open_data  monetization  massive_data_sets  problems  challenges  intrapreneurship  chicken-and-egg  commercialization  APIs  disruption  complacency  contradictions 
december 2013 by jerryking
NHL deal gives CBC a chance to reboot - The Globe and Mail
Konrad Yakabuski

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Nov. 28 2013
Konrad_Yakabuski  CBC  NHL  hockey  challenges 
november 2013 by jerryking
WHOLESALE The real squeezed middle?
From dealing with ongoing margin pressure in a low growth environment, to dealing with higher customer expectations,
and mounting concerns about the black market, the challenges facing wholesalers are considerable. However, the picture is not all gloom. Opportunities still exist for operators able to supply goods in line with changing industry trends, while maintaining a low cost base. Increasingly this will be through supply chain integration and enhanced service levels. But, ultimately winners will be wholesalers that can effectively reinvent themselves by developing new
hooks into their customers.

Demand is highly influenced by end user trends. However, wholesalers only have limited ability to respond quickly.

The ability to source and alter stock in line with changing trends is vital, especially in terms of broadening of the
product range.

Wholesale is generally a high volume low margin industry with operating margins of only 1-2%.

Margins are constantly being squeezed. Bargaining power in many consumer goods markets has been weakened by
powerful manufacturers and dominant retailers.
responding to end-user trends
margin pressure

Most wholesalers now offer a range of new added value services. White label provision and web integration
increasingly common

Service level agreements increasingly tight

Symbol groups have become more popular across the grocery sector, with increased investment in own-label
development. In other sectors branding has never been more important.

The introduction of tightly-managed production techniques has resulted in greater sophistication in distribution
chains

Wholesalers are now expected to have systems in place to run goods direct from production plant to end-users

Disruption in overseas supply chains caused by ‘growing pains’ in emerging markets is becoming increasingly
common.
enhanCed serviCe levels supplY Chain integration

The black and grey markets, and fraud in general is on the increase. Alcohol duty fraud is a particular concern

Sourcing from correct brand owners is becoming more difficult. Fines for the possession of fraudulent stock are
becoming more severe.
fruits  vegetables  wholesalers  challenges  problems  margins  supply_chains  fresh_produce  OPMA  slow_growth  black_markets  low_growth  customer_expectations 
october 2013 by jerryking
30,000 orders for a gadget not yet built - The Globe and Mail
WALLACE IMMEN

The Globe and Mail (includes correction)

Published Wednesday, Jun. 19 2013
Wallace_Immen  start_ups  Kickstarter  wireless  videogames  challenges  connected_devices  wearables 
june 2013 by jerryking
Militant Threats Test Pentagon’s Role in Africa
February 11, 2013 |NYTimes.com | By ERIC SCHMITT

Created five years ago to focus on training the armed forces of dozens of African nations and strengthening social, political and economic programs, the Pentagon’s Africa Command now finds itself on a more urgent mission: confronting a new generation of Islamist militants who are testing the United States’ resolve to fight terrorism without being drawn into a major conflict....challenges include countering Al Qaeda’s fighters in Mali, Islamic extremists in Libya, drug traffickers in West Africa and armed rebels in the Democratic Republic of Congo....With the war in Afghanistan winding down, senior Pentagon officials are scrambling to address the growing threat in North and West Africa by repositioning spy satellites and shifting surveillance aircraft from other theaters, all at a time when shrinking military budgets are forcing the Obama administration to make difficult choices on where to accept more risk.
Africa  Pentagon  Africom  U.S._military  threats  challenges  security_&_intelligence  soft_power  Niger 
february 2013 by jerryking
Challenges for the Palm Oil Industry
December 2, 1996 | Business Times | Dr. Ahmad Ibrahim
palm_oil  challenges  Malaysia  plantations  Africa 
december 2012 by jerryking
As Netflix’s plot thickens, CEO strives to hone an edge
Sep. 10 2012 |The Globe and Mail | OMAR EL AKKAD - TECHNOLOGY REPORTER.

While such expansion helps to quickly build Netflix's customer base, it tends to hammer the bottom line. The company's business model relies on paying for content licenses up front, and then slowly making its money back through customer subscription fees. However, that means Netflix is currently losing money in many of its overseas markets – about $100-million a quarter from its United Kingdom and Latin America operations. Even in Canada, where Netflix constitutes the biggest single use of consumer Internet bandwidth, Netflix is only now starting to break even.
Netflix  Reed_Hastings  licensing  licensing_rights  subscriptions  streaming  web_video  challenges  opportunities  piracy  Omar_el_Akkad  competitive_landscape  digital_media  slight_edge 
september 2012 by jerryking
Managing: What entrepreneurs should watch out for
July 16, 1996 | The Globe and Mail |

fourth pitfall is the most difficult, Mr. Drucker says. “It's when the business is a success and the entrepreneur begins to put himself before the business. Now he asks himself, ‘What do I want to do? What's my role?’ "Those are the wrong questions. If you start out with them, you invariably end up killing yourself and the business. You should be asking, ‘What does the business need at this stage?’ The next question is: ‘Do I have those qualities?’
Peter_Drucker  entrepreneur  challenges  selfishness  pitfalls  cash  self-analysis  self-assessment  life_cycle 
july 2012 by jerryking
Yahoo Quarterly Results Show Challenge Mayer Faces - NYTimes.com
By NICOLE PERLROTH and TANZINA VEGA
Published: July 17, 2012

The first problem she faces is Yahoo’s identity crisis.

Previous chief executives — and there have been four of them in the last five years, plus two interim chiefs — have had a difficult time trying to define what Yahoo actually does. Most people cannot explain the company in a single simple sentence. “The age-old question with Yahoo has been: Is it technology first or is it media or content first?” said David Cohen, the chief media officer at Universal McCann.

Most recently, under Ross Levinsohn, who has been the acting chief since May, Yahoo seemed focused on content. It announced a number of prominent deals with ABC News, including a new weekly Web video show starring Katie Couric called “Katie’s Take.” During a presentation made to a room full of advertisers in April in Manhattan, Mr. Levinsohn highlighted Yahoo’s own coverage of sports, finance, the presidential campaign and the coming Summer Olympics.

With 700 million users, Yahoo still draws one of the largest audiences on the Web. More people use Yahoo’s e-mail service than any other service. Yahoo Sports, Yahoo Finance and Flickr, the photo site, are the most popular destinations in their categories.

But over the last few years advertising technology has grown more sophisticated and advertisers themselves have come under financial pressures, prompting many of them to buy ads more cheaply and more quickly through ad networks and auction-based sales. Yahoo’s advertisers are now experimenting with new platforms, most notably Facebook.
Yahoo!  Marissa_Mayer  challenges  digital_media 
july 2012 by jerryking
Degree Of Challenge
May 1, 2003 | American Demographics |Byline: SANDRA YIN

Despite modest individual earnings, college students as a whole represent a multibillion dollar market. The allure for marketers is the opportunity to lock in relationships with the future's more affluent consumers while they are still in school, when they are open to experimenting with products and sharing their opinions with their peers. The first step is to understand college students' attitudes and purchasing behavior. Today, among the most cost-effective media for reaching students on campus is the old college newspaper. At least 72% of college students report having read one of the past five issues. In addition to traditional media, guerrilla marketing, or viral marketing, has proven effective in spurring word of mouth. College students are trendsetters and early adopters who may be a first step to reaching broader market segments. Though marketers may encounter challenges as they build relationships with these young adults before they begin their financial ascent, the trouble may well be worth it.
Colleges_&_Universities  students  challenges  mass_media  guerrilla_marketing  millennials  buying_power  purchase_decisions  locked_in 
july 2012 by jerryking
Investing in Africa Can Be a Challenge -- But Good Deals Are on the Horizon - Knowledge@Wharton
March 09, 2005 in Knowledge@Wharton

Private-equity investors haven't fared much better than money managers who buy shares in public companies, according to Runa Alam, chief executive of Zephyr Management Africa, the South Africa-based subsidiary of a New York investment company. Like Oyeleke, she stressed that African companies have few venues for raising public money: "You have Johannesburg and London." Unlike Oyeleke, she argued that investors have plenty of deals to choose from. Her firm looked at more than 50 last year alone. But she pointed out that these deals tend to be concentrated in a few countries -- Nigeria, Egypt and South Africa -- and a few sectors, such as telecom, financial institutions and resource extraction.
Africa  challenges  economic_development  investing  investors  Kenya  Nigeria  resource_extraction  private_equity  funding  Egypt  South_Africa  telecom  financial_institutions 
june 2012 by jerryking
In Africa Town, everything to gain
May. 15 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Tristan Coloma
China  Africa  Guangzhou  immigration  challenges 
june 2012 by jerryking
Supermarket Challenges and Opportunities for Producers and Shippers: US Experience1
February Quarter 2005 | Farm Policy Journal Vol. 2 No. 1 |Roberta Cook
Extension Marketing Economist, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

The United States fresh fruit and vegetable market place has undergone consolidation in recent years, the
result being fewer, larger buyers who cater for large retailers. A large proportion of fresh produce is now
sold directly by shippers to retailers, bypassing intermediaries and wholesale markets. Transactions in
this consolidated market place involve more complex sales arrangements which can include off-invoice
fees and also quality, packaging and food safety requirements. More buyers in the food retail industry
are moving to seasonal and annual contracts which vary considerably for any given commodity. The
foodservice industry is also increasingly purchasing directly from shippers based in production regions.
Consolidation of food retail grocery stores has induced consolidation of shippers as firms attempt to match
the scale of the few, larger buyers. Shippers are now more market orientated and seek growers willing to
make changes necessary to be part of a more tightly controlled, yet geographically dispersed supply chain.
Contracts between shippers and producers are typically not fix-priced contracts, and focus on meeting
year-round consumer demand. Shippers reduce seasonal supply variation using imported products which
has implications for early and late season producers who may permanently face lower average prices.
Ultimately producers benefit by marketing through a shipper who can accurately reflect both shortand
longer-term market signals and can also assemble larger supplies of consistent quality products.
grocery  supermarkets  shippers  fresh_produce  OPMA  farming  agriculture  fruits  vegetables  consolidation  challenges  opportunities  Roberta_Cook 
june 2012 by jerryking
The Trouble with Big Data
May 5, 2012 | | What's The Big Data?| GilPress

“With too little data, you won’t be able to make any conclusions that you trust. With loads of data you will find relationships that aren’t real… On net, having a degree in math, economics, AI, etc., isn’t enough. Tool expertise isn’t enough. You need experience in solving real world problems, because there are a lot of important limitations to the statistics that you learned in school. Big data isn’t about bits, it’s about talent.”.....The “talent” of “understanding the problem and the data applicable to it” is what makes a good scientist: The required skepticism, the development of hypotheses (models), and the un-ending quest to refute them, following the scientific method that has brought us remarkable progress over the course of the last three hundred and fifty years.
in_the_real_world  massive_data_sets  blogs  skepticism  challenges  problems  problem_solving  expertise  statistics  talent  spurious  data_quality  data_scientists  haystacks  correlations  limitations 
june 2012 by jerryking
Agriculture, Issue 3, Evidence - October 27, 2011
Proceedings of the Standing Senate Committee on
Agriculture and Forestry
Issue 3 - Evidence - Meeting of October 27, 2011
OTTAWA, Thursday, October 27, 2011

In terms of developing new markets domestically and internationally, the lack of sound market information for the fresh fruit and vegetable sector is a current gap and potential opportunity for the government to support business planning, trade negotiations and the sustainability of the Canadian fresh fruit and vegetable industry within our global marketplace.

I must note that the current Infohort system is underfunded and under resourced. Industry and government are currently working in the dark and at a competitive disadvantage when it comes to market information on a domestic level. Accurate market information is essential to support our needs for market and economic analyses to build business and cultivate opportunities.
data  parliamentary_system  agribusiness  agriculture  farming  fruits  fresh_produce  OPMA  vegetables  challenges  information_gaps 
may 2012 by jerryking
Supermarket Challenges and Opportunities for Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Producers and Shippers: Lessons from the US Experience
May 24, 2004 | Paper presented at the Conference on Supermarkets and Agricultural Development in China – Opportunities and Challenges| By
Dr. Roberta L. Cook, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics
University of California, Davis found by Googling "challenges vegetable shippers"
fruits  vegetables  agribusiness  supermarkets  challenges  agriculture  farming  shippers  OPMA  grocery  Roberta_Cook  fresh_produce 
may 2012 by jerryking
Challenges of the Food Industry
Toni Holenstein

This presentation contains information on the following subjects: challenges within the food industry, worldwide food supply, food preservation and transportation, safety and health issues, obesity and diabetes trends, U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Pyramid, and various diet hypes. Please view the PDF overheads for additional information.

For more information, contact Toni Holenstein, Bühler AG, Uzwil, Switzerland 9240; 41-71-955-34-38; fax 41-71-955-27-27; anton.holenstein@buhlergroup.com.
challenges  food  industries  OPMA 
february 2012 by jerryking
Agriculture Focus
Agriculture Focus
December 16, 2011 | By KNews | Filed Under Editorial.

The initiative identifies several critical elements that must be confronted if agriculture is to deliver its potential to our economy. “These key elements are: agriculture is a business; agriculture is holistic, spanning the entire agri-product chain and with organic links to other productive sectors; the increasing importance of value-added food products and non-food products must be recognised; emphasis on national activities with sub-regional and regional activities included when they add value to national initiatives”.
Most importantly, ten constraints to agricultural development were identified. These were: limited financing and inadequate levels of new investments; outdated and inefficient Agricultural Health and Food Safety (AHFS) systems; inadequate research and development; a fragmented and disorganised private sector; weak land and water distribution and management systems; deficient and uncoordinated risk management measures; inadequate transportation systems, particularly for perishables; weak and non-Integrated information and intelligence systems; inadequate marketing arrangement and lack of skilled and quality human resources.
agriculture  Guyana  editorials  development  perishables  fragmentation  disorganization  challenges  farming  constraints  agribusiness  fresh_produce 
december 2011 by jerryking
The Founders Dilemma
February 2008 | HBR | Noam Wasserman.

Most entrepreneurs want to make pots of money and run the show. But Wasserman reveals that it’s tough to do both. If you don’t figure out which matters most to you, you could end up being neither rich
nor in control. Consider: To make a lot of money from a
new venture, you need financial resources to capitalize on the opportunities before you. That means attracting investors—
which requires relinquishing control as you give away equity and as investors alter your board’s membership. To remain in charge
of your business, you have to keep more equity. But that means fewer financial resources to fuel your venture. So, you must choose between money and power. Begin by articulating your primary motivation for starting a business. Then understand the trade-offs associated with
that goal. As your venture unfolds, you’ll make choices that support—rather than jeopardize—your dreams.
HBR  entrepreneur  start_ups  tradeoffs  founders  challenges  managerial_preferences  investors  boards_&_directors_&_governance  equity 
november 2011 by jerryking
Imperatives for Change: Canada in 2010
Tue, May 21, 2002 | Canadian Club | by Anne Golden
President and CEO, The Conference Board of Canada
Royal York Hotel Imperial Room
Canada  CEOs  speeches  threats  challenges  cities  innovation  agendas  crossborder  productivity  North_America  change  future  brain_drain 
october 2011 by jerryking
Apple Faces Challenges for New iPhone - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 3, 2011 | WSJ | By GEOFFREY A. FOWLER.
With more than 128 million iPhones sold since 2007, the device's ubiquity has created a marketing and design challenge for Apple Inc.: how to wow consumers in a maturing smartphone market where many alternatives now look and feel like Apple's gadget.
iPhone  Apple  challenges 
october 2011 by jerryking
Stop Looking for Ideas, Look for Problems to Grow Your Business - India Chief Mentor - WSJ
April 19, 2010, | WSJ | By Gautam Gandhi. Stop looking for
good ideas. That’s right, you read this correctly. Please don’t speak of good ideas ever again. Instead tell me about good problems. They'll most likely bring a business opportunity, Where are the problems?

If you look around there are problems everywhere. Question things you
take for granted and think to yourself: Is there a better way? When you
have your next business meeting, whether it is with a client or
customer, ask them what their biggest problems are. You will be
surprised by what people tell you. Hopefully, you will start to notice
patterns and will soon identify a problem to solve. Better still, if it
is a problem that affects you directly.

When you think of the problem that you are going to solve, ensure that:

You are tackling it for a sizable market
People are willing to pay for your solution
You assess your rivals

The last one is important. Never think: “I don’t have any competition.”
growth  problem_solving  pattern_recognition  idea_generation  problems  challenges  worthiness  messiness  uncharted_problems  large_markets  competition  questions  ideas  assumptions  criteria  India  pain_points  discernment  curiosity  dissatisfaction  opportunities  inquisitiveness  Michael_McDerment  worthwhile_problems 
july 2011 by jerryking
To Boost the Economy, Help the Self-Employed -
June 7, 2011 BusinessWeek By Richard Greenwald
Despite their importance to our economic health, we impede nearly
one-third of our workforce by making so-called freelancers, contractors,
and consultants play by outdated rules.

Despite their increasing importance to the economy, the growth of these
freelancers' businesses is stymied by our tax and labor
codes....Freelancers Shoulder All Risks

Today, the fast-growing freelance workforce is shouldering costs and
risks that were formerly borne by companies. The self-employed can't get
unemployment insurance or file for workman's compensation. They aren't
covered by most federal or state employee labor laws, leaving them
little recourse but to spend precious time and money in small claims
court when they aren't paid.

Worse, the self-employed are taxed as if they're medium-sized employers,
but they can't deduct health-insurance premiums and other expenses that
big companies can deduct.
freelancing  challenges  economy  self-employment  gig_economy  policymaking 
july 2011 by jerryking
The dark side of mentoring -
July 1, 2011 |FT.com|| by Mike Southon. Mentoring should never
be regarded as a revenue opportunity--it should always be provided for
free. A mentoring relationship should be a 2-way process, with the
person giving the advice learning as much, if not more than the person
seeking it. The greatest learning pt. for mentors is always about
themselves....Learn one's strengths and weaknesses. Maturity &
self-awareness are essential prerequisites for giving measured advice to
others....Most mentors have little or no formal training and are
therefore unprepared when the mentees do not listen to their sage advice
– or let them down in other ways. It's important for mentors to adopt
an air of professional detachment at all times and not try to intervene
unnecessarily. Never allow the relationship or the problems of the
mentee to adversely affecting the personal life of the mentor....Study
the techniques of counselling in case they find themselves with a mentee
who is disturbed & manipulative
mentoring  challenges  strengths  weaknesses  maturity  self-awareness  advice  unprepared  dark_side 
july 2011 by jerryking
The Need for Small Business Research : Sage Research Methods Online
Researching the Small Enterprise

James Curran & Robert A. Blackburn

Pub. date: 2001
small_business  research  challenges  Freshbooks 
may 2011 by jerryking
The Big Problems with Small Business Research
22 Mar 2000 | Business Week | Business Week Online Reporter
Jeremy Quittner spoke with Richard W. Oliver, professor of management
at Vanderbilt University's Owen Graduate School of Management, who led
the team that produced "The Future of Small Business," a study sponsored
by American Express, IBM, and National Small Business United, a
small-business advocacy group. The study, released in March 2000,
focused on how changing demographics in the U.S. will affect small
business.
small_business  research  challenges  Freshbooks 
may 2011 by jerryking
Africa Spends $50 Billion Each Year on Food Imports, Group Says
Apr 15, 2011 | Bloomberg | By Moses Mozart Dzawu. Africa
pays $50 billion each year on food imports and will need to invest $39
billion annually for the next 15 years in order to become
self-sufficient, said Akinwumi Adesina, vice president of the Alliance
for a Green Revolution in Africa. The continent faces problems with a
“lack of storage facilities, infrastructure and marketing of
agricultural produce,” he said in Accra, the Ghanaian capital, today. If
Africa doubles its agricultural output by 2015, the continent’s annual
gross domestic product would increase by 5.5 percent, Adesina said.
African governments need to develop strategies to get banks to boost
lending to the industry, he said.
Africa  food  importing  ideas  opportunities  farming  agriculture  infrastructure  problems  challenges  fresh_produce 
april 2011 by jerryking
DeForest B. Soaries Jr.: After MLK—The New Challenge for Black Pastors - WSJ.com
JANUARY 28, 2011 by DEFOREST B. SOARIES JR. After MLK—The New
Challenge for Black Pastors
Now that blacks have legal equality, it's up to churches and other civic
organizations to address their most pressing issues.
Today the quest for the right to vote has been replaced by the need to
motivate people to register and vote. The push to integrate schools has
been replaced by the need to motivate black students to strive for
academic excellence. The struggle for equal housing opportunities has
become a struggle to ensure that blacks learn how to live financially
responsible lives and recover from the foreclosure crisis. Whereas
King's goals were primarily about changing laws and influencing wider
public opinion, these current goals are primarily about individual
responsibility. Unfortunately, that distinction seems to have been
missed by the recently revived Conference of National Black Churches
African-Americans  challenges  churches  personal_responsibility  pastors 
january 2011 by jerryking
Assumption hunters, a new consulting business?
March 5, 2008 | CultureBy | Grant McCracken.

What is the most vexing problem in management today?

Next to setting our objectives, running a tight ship and meeting our numbers, I would argue that it’s watching out for the blind side hit.

By blind side hit, I mean the kind of thing that Google did to Microsoft, that Barak did to Hillary, that hip hop did to Levi-Strauss, that Snapple did to Coca-Cola.

Watching for blind side hits is difficult because it means knowing our assumptions. And this is hard because assumptions are not for knowing, they are for making.
........The trouble with assumptions is that they are by definition invisible from view. (That’s why we call them "unknown unknowns.") We hold ideas about the world without full awareness of what these ideas are or how they make us vulnerable. .......So what to do. How about, for starters, this three step "assumption hunting" process?

1) ferret out the assumptions. Hire someone to go through the operation of daily business and capture every assumption. Philosophers are quite good at this. Anthropologists are very good at it. This is after all the way they study culture, which is, by and large, a set of assumptions that helps us think and act fluidly precisely because we don’t know we are making them.

2) identify the parts of the world that could present challenges. Figure out just what the challenge is and when and how it will "come ashore."

3) Keep watch with a big board. In effect, what we are doing is "sunsetting" our assumptions with a view to discovery when they reach they end of their useful lives.
assumptions  management_consulting  information_gaps  the_big_picture  uncertainty  unknowns  anthropology  blindsided  blind_spots  challenges  anthropologists  philosophers 
december 2010 by jerryking
How to implement habits to get more productive
October 24th, 2008 | | by Klaus Wiedemann . Being productive
in the long term is always a challenge in the tough work environment of
the 21th century, no matter whether you are a freelancer or work in a
coporate setting.
Today’s financial crisis does certainly not help to make one’s life
easier, with long-term job security being a thing of the past for most
industries. Therefore, it is sometimes a good idea to take a step back
and rethink the way you work.

Steven Snell has a nice article about how to be productive at
www.FreeLanceSwitch.com. Although gear more towards freelancer, he has
some very valid points to make. Among his most important areas to focus
on are (among others)

* Goals
* Email/Communication
* Tasks
* Time Management
* Organisation
howto  productivity  21st._century  challenges  Managing_Your_Career  management_consulting  GTD  time-management  habits  freelancing 
october 2010 by jerryking
3 Big Challenges Facing Netflix
Sep 27 2010 | The Atlantic | Daniel Indiviglio
Netflix  challenges 
september 2010 by jerryking
The Ultimate Start-Up Challenge? Hyper Growth - WSJ.com
MARCH 10, 2010 | Wall street Journal | By TERI EVANS. Fast
growth is often an entrepreneur's dream, but it can come with
repercussions, including customer-service snafus and staffing chaos. If
not managed well, it can also wreck a company culture, which can put a
young company in "serious danger," according to Rob Wolcott, a professor
of entrepreneurship and innovation at the Kellogg School of Management.

"In many ways, culture is the one thing that gives you long-term
competitive advantage because it's something that is very difficult to
copy," .[perhaps see Paul Graham on doing things that don't scale] Mr. Wolcott says. "When growth becomes too hot to handle, so to speak, then everyone starts focusing on the urgent and sometimes misses the important."
growth  start_ups  challenges  size  scaling  organizational_culture  revenge_effects  competitive_advantage  uniqueness  customer_service  repercussions  staffing  chaos  high-growth  unscalability 
march 2010 by jerryking
Delivering the message: How premium hotel brands struggle to communicate their value proposition
2006 | International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality
Management. Vol. 18, Iss. 3; p. 246 | by Winfried Daun, Senior
Consultant, BBDO Consulting, Zurich, Switzerland, and Raffaela Klinger,
Freelance Consultant, Dusseldorf, Germany
ProQuest  luxury  hotels  value_propositions  Communicating_&_Connecting  branding  challenges 
march 2010 by jerryking
Paradise Lost for Wealthy Resort Novice - WSJ.com
DEC. 7, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by KRIS HUDSON. For some
ultrawealthy Americans like Mr. Sillerman, trophy hotel investments
made during the real-estate boom have turned into major burdens. Some
newly opened properties aren't generating enough cash to cover operating
expenses. Construction of others is being halted as lenders and
investors pull out. During the first nine months of the year, developers
postponed or canceled 43 luxury hotels totaling about 9,300 rooms in
the U.S. and the Caribbean, according to research firm Lodging
Econometrics. While veteran hoteliers are accustomed to booms and
busts, the newcomers are getting a sobering lesson in the risks of
owning and developing high-end lodging, which has been hit hard by the
real-estate bust. Sources: research firm Lodging Econometrics,
credit-rating company Realpoint LLC, Harrison Group - tracks the
spending and investing habits of the wealthy, Smith Travel Research,
Bjorn Hanson, assoc. prof. of lodging at NYU.
challenges  luxury  high_net_worth  travel  real_estate  hotels  hoteliers  bubbles  trophy_assets  high-end 
march 2010 by jerryking
Rocco Forte looks to the Middle East - WSJ.com
JANUARY 18, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By WILLIAM LYONS. but
he admits the recent expansion couldn't have come at a worse time
economically. "It is probably the most challenging period I have ever
known," he says. "Immediately after the collapse of Lehman Brothers the
impact was dramatic. We saw a 25% drop in sales across the group with
some hotels dropping as much as 40%."
hoteliers  luxury  hotels  travel  challenges  Middle_East 
march 2010 by jerryking
A high-tech sports revolution
Jan. 09, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | by Stephen Brunt. The
boomers and their buying power are heading toward the sunset, and the
talk in the sports business now is about how to attract and hold a
different generation, with a different, diminished attention span,
accustomed to having the whole world laid out for them, every minute of
every day, literally at their fingertips.

Getting them out of their homes and into the building or into the
ballpark, getting their eyes to linger for more than a few seconds as a
game flickers across a screen – not to mention the advertising that pays
the freight – has become the core challenge.
sports  consumption  Stephen_Brunt  revolution  arenas  future  challenges  LBMA  sports_marketing  baby_boomers  millennials  attention  advertising  buying_power  stadiums  attention_spans 
january 2010 by jerryking
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